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Places and geographical objects on the map of Oslo.

Map of Oslo district in Norway

Basic information about Oslo
Oslo (/ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh, [ˈuʂˈlu] [ˈusˈlu] [ˈuʂlu]) is the capital and the most populous city in Norway. Oslo constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040, and established as a \kaupstad\ or trading place in 1048 by King Harald III, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, the city was moved closer to Akershus Fortress during the reign of King Christian IV and renamed Christiania in his honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. Following a spelling reform, it was known as Kristiania from 1877 to 1925, at which time its original Norwegian name was restored. Oslo is the economic and governmental centre of Norway. The city is also a hub of Norwegian trade, banking, industry and shipping. It is an important centre for maritime industries and maritime trade in Europe. The city is home to many companies within the maritime sector, some of which are among the world's largest shipping companies, shipbrokers and maritime insurance brokers. Oslo is a pilot city of the Council of Europe and the European Commission intercultural cities programme. Oslo is considered a global city and ranked \Beta World City\ in studies carried out by the Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network in 2008. It was ranked number one in terms of quality of life among European large cities in the European Cities of the Future 2012 report by fDi magazine. A survey conducted by ECA International in 2011 placed Oslo as the second most expensive city in the world for living expenses after Tokyo. In 2013 Oslo tied with the Australian city of Melbourne as the fourth most expensive city in the world, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU)'s Worldwide Cost of Living study. As of January 2015, the municipality of Oslo has a population of 647,676, while the population of the city's urban area was 942,084. The metropolitan area had an estimated population of 1.71 million. The population is currently increasing at record rates, making it the fastest growing major city in Europe. This growth stems for the most part from international immigration and related high birth rates, but also from intra-national migration. The immigrant population in the city is growing somewhat faster than the Norwegian population, and in the city proper this is now more than 25% of the total. Demonym for a male child or adult, is oslogutt—literally a boy from Oslo.
Cities, towns & villages in Oslo
NameDescriptionShow
EkebergEkeberg is a neighborhood in the city of Oslo, Norway. The Norway Cup soccer tournament takes place at Ekebergsletta every summer. \"Sletta\" means \"the plain\". The painting \"The Scream\" by Edvard Munch is painted from Utsikten (\"the view\"), a part of Ekeberg. In the area are a number of old Iron Age grave mounds and Bronze Age ritual sites. This establish the area of Ekeberg as one of the oldest inhabited places around Oslo. During the Middle Ages, the farm of Ekeberg belonged to Hovedøya Abbey. The area was later taken by the crown. Show Ekebergon the map
OsloOslo (English pronunciation: /ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh, Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈuʂˈlu] (13px listen) or, rarer [ˈusˈlu] or [ˈuʂlu]) is the capital and the most populous city in Norway. Oslo constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040, and established as a \"kaupstad\" or trading place in 1048 by King Harald III, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, the city was moved closer to Akershus Fortress during the reign of King Christian IV and renamed Christiania in his honour. It was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838. Fol Show Osloon the map
HolmliaHolmlia is a neighborhood in Oslo, Norway with 35,843 residents. It is located in the southeastern part of Søndre Nordstrand, the southernmost borough in Oslo. The neighborhood is served by Holmlia Station on the Østfold Line, which has a travel time to Oslo S of about 13 minutes. The Holmlia Sportsklubb is located in Holmlia, which contains a football club currently in the Norwegian fourth division. Holmlia also boasts an extensive hiking trail network, which makes it possible to walk to most of the surrounding neighborhoods without ever crossing a single street. It also contains Oslo's only underground swimming pool, Holmlia Bad, located in the mountains near the middle school. The 25 m (82 ft) long pool is run by the city and offers saunas, a slide, and special bathing hours for childre Show Holmliaon the map
NordstrandNordstrand (pronounced [ˈnuːˈʂʈrɑn]) is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway. It borders Gamle Oslo in the north, Østensjø in the east and Søndre Nordstrand in the south. The district is located in the southern part of the city and with a population of more than 40,000 people, it was the second most populated district in Oslo in 2004. In 2004, Nordstrand was merged with two other boroughs, Lambertseter and Ekeberg-Bekkelaget, to form what is today known simply as Nordstrand. In early 2012 the population was 47,696 inhabitants. First and second generation immigrants make up 14.6% of the population, which is the lowest percentage in the entire city. Show Nordstrandon the map
GrorudGrorud is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway. The district contains the Ammerud, Grorud, Kalbakken, Rødtvet, Nordtvet and Romsås areas. To the north of the district is the forest of Lillomarka. The district is the smallest in Oslo, with less than 30 000 inhabitants. The railway station at Grorud is one of the oldest in Norway, and opened in 1854, and was a hub of the whole Grorud valley for many years until the arrival of urbanization and the subway. Some of the old farms are still present in the Grorud landscape, although apartment buildings now are a more dominant part of the scenery. Show Grorudon the map
SinsenSinsen is a mixed residential and commercial area in Grünerløkka borough of Oslo, Norway. The westernmost part of Sinsen is part of the borough Nordre Aker. The Sinsen Interchange, located on the border between the boroughs of Nordre Aker, Grünerløkka and Bjerke, was the first roundabout in Norway. It has since developed into a multi-lever intersection, with both Ring 3, National Road 4 and the Sinsen Line of the Oslo Tramway routes around. \"North of the Sinsen Interchange\" is common expression in the Norwegian district debates, where inhabitants of Oslo are accused of being ignorant of the country north of the interchange. The expression cropped up in revues during the 1960s, and is probably due to that Sinsen then was the end point for the main road leading into Oslo from the north. Show Sinsenon the map
FrognerseterenFrognerseteren is the end station of the Holmenkollen Line of the Oslo Metro, located in the Marka section of Oslo, the capital city of Norway. It the northernmost station in Oslo Metro, and is the station after Voksenkollen. The line to Frognerseteren was completed on 16 May 1916. The station has two platforms which, like other stations on the Holmenkollen Line, only accommodate two-car trains. The elevation of the station is 469 meters (1,539 ft) above sea level, the highest of all the stations in Oslo. The altitude difference between this station and the lowest in Oslo Metro (Stortinget), 478 meters (1,568 ft), is the highest altitude difference within a metro network in the world. Show Frognerseterenon the map
VinderenVinderen is a neighbourhood in the Vestre Aker borough of Oslo, Norway. It was a separate one until 1 January 2004, when it was incorporated into the newly established borough of Vestre Aker. Its amenities include Vinderen station. The prosperous avenue of Tuengen Allé in Vinderen was the childhood home of Queen Sonja of Norway at 1B; and the current embassy of China in Norway at 2B. During 2015 will the Queens childhood home be moved to Maihaugen in Lillehammer. Show Vinderenon the map
LjanLjan (Norwegian pronunciation: [jɑːn]) is a residential neighborhood in the borough Nordstrand in Oslo, Norway. It is located in the eastern rolling hillsides of the fjord Bunnefjorden. To the south Ljanselva which begins at Lutvann has its mouth, and where it runs through Liadalen at Ljan it also constitutes the border with borough Søndre Nordstrand. The number of inhabitants was about 3,500 in 2004. Ljan Church is known as one of the very few churches in Norway that was built in the 1930s in the Romanesque Revival style. The public beaches at Ljan are Hvervenbukta, Ljansbadet and Katten, and in addition there are a number of private bath houses along Mosseveien. The borders to the north and east are less obvious and drawn between the school circuits Ljan and Nordstrand. The name originat Show Ljanon the map
GrefsenGrefsen is a neighbourhood in the city of Oslo, Norway. Grefsen was a part of the municipality of Aker before the Second World War, later incorporated into Oslo. Together with Kjelsås, Grefsen then formed the borough Grefsen-Kjelsås until 1 January 2004, when they became part of the new borough of Nordre Aker. The railway line Gjøvikbanen goes through the area, but Grefsen Station is actually located closer to the neighbourhood of Disen. The Kjelsås Line also runs through the area. The local sports field Grefsen stadion is the home field of Kjelsås IL. Show Grefsenon the map
HolmenkollenHolmenkollen (pronounced is a neighborhood in the Vestre Aker borough of Oslo, Norway. In addition to being a residential area, the area has been a ski recreation area since the late 19th century, with its famous, eponymous, ski jumping hill, the Holmenkollbakken, hosting competitions since 1892. To the north, the area borders to the woodlands area Marka. The Holmenkoll Line of the Oslo Metro runs through the neighborhood, serving the stations Besserud and Holmenkollen. Show Holmenkollenon the map
KringsjåKringsjå is a rapid transit station of the Oslo Metro's Sognsvann Line. It is situated Kringsjå neighborhood of the Oslo, Norway, borough of Nordre Aker. Located 8.4 kilometers (5.2 mi) from Stortinget, the station is served by Line 5 of the metro every fifteen minutes. Travel time to Stortinget is fifteen minutes. Show Kringsjåon the map
BjølsenBjølsen is a neighbourhood in the Sagene borough in central-northern Oslo, Norway. Originally a farm in the former Aker municipality, it was incorporated into Christiania (now Oslo) in 1878. It has been sawmill and mill operation as far back as the 17th century. Later came the textile industry to Bjølsen, and also a granite quarry. Show Bjølsenon the map
RomsåsRomsås was an independent borough of the city of Oslo, Norway, until January 1, 2004, when it as a result of a merger became part of the larger Grorud borough. By 1850 Romsås was one of the biggest farms in Østre Aker and the name Romsås came from the farm. With the expansion of Oslo city after the second World War, Oslo Kommune allowed OBOS to build a new borough in 1967 and this project was started in 1969. The new borough was divided into 6 neighborhoods ( Tiurleiken, ,Svattjern Røverkollen, Orremyr, Emanuelfjell and the largest: Ravnkollen Show Romsåson the map
VikaVika is a neighborhood in the borough Frogner in Oslo, Norway. It is located between the Oslofjord, Aker Brygge, Pipervika, Slottsparken and Oslo City Hall. The area is dominated by public institutions, such as the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Oslo City Hall and the Embassy of the United States in Oslo. There are also a number of cultural institutions, such as the Nobel Peace Center and Oslo Concert Hall. It also was the location of the former Western Railway Station. The Vika Line of the Oslo Tramway runs through the area. Show Vikaon the map
FrognerFrogner is a borough and an exclusive residential and retail district in the West End of the city of Oslo, Norway. In addition to traditional Frogner, the borough incorporates Bygdøy, Uranienborg and Majorstuen. The borough is named after Frogner Manor, and the famous Frogner Park is now found on the site of the manor. In Oslo, and indeed in Norwegian popular culture, Frogner occupies a similar position as London's Knightsbridge, and has the highest real estate prices in the entire country. Show Frogneron the map
VestliVestli is a subway station on Grorud Line of the Oslo Metro. It is the last station on the line and comes after Stovner. The station is located in the Stovner borough. The station opened 21 December 1975. The station has a small depot for subway carriages beyond the platforms. The area around Vestli, the northernmost neighborhood of Stovner, is residential. Like the station at Stovner, Vestli is located beneath some shops, though not as large as the shopping centre at Stovner. Show Vestlion the map
LambertsæterLambertseter is a suburb of the city of Oslo, Norway, and is part of the borough of Nordstrand. Lambertseter was built over a short period starting from 1951, and was the very first modern suburb of Oslo. A Tram line was built to the neighborhood in 1957 and the Oslo T-bane metro system came in 1966, serving the Lambertseter station. Lambertseter was also the name of a borough of Oslo up to January 1, 2004, Lambertseter also has a multi-use sports Stadium. Show Lambertsæteron the map
TonsenhagenTonsenhagen is a neighborhood in the borough of Bjerke in northeast Oslo, Norway. Built in the 1950s, it was one of the early new suburbs within Oslo. The neighborhood is situated on a hillside overlooking Oslo, surrounded by forest and near the ski resort of Grefsenkollen. There is a local school, for which the first headmaster was Rolf Ridar, and the Norwegian children's play and book writer Ingebrigt Davik was once a teacher there. Show Tonsenhagenon the map
ÅrvollÅrvoll is a residential community located in the Bjerke district of Oslo, Norway. The community is named for the historic Årvoll Gård (farm), which still stands in the center of the community. This is also where anti-Nazi activists Viggo Hansteen and Rolf Wickstrøm were executed by the Germans on September 10, 1941. They were the first two Norwegians executed by the Nazis during the five-year occupation of Norway. Show Årvollon the map
MajorstuenMajorstuen or Majorstua is an affluent neighbourhood in the Frogner borough in the western part of Oslo, Norway. Majorstuen is known for its vibrant downtown, especially its shopping area. The area has several elegant townhouses c. 1880-1890. The area is also an important public transport junction in Oslo, where all metro lines, three tram lines and five bus lines operate. It is served by Majorstuen station. Show Majorstuenon the map
SmestadSmestad is an area in the borough Vestre Aker in Oslo, Norway. It is named after the Smestad Mansion, which was parcelled out for residences after the tram line was built in 1912. The district is located between north of Hoff and Skøyen, east of Montebello in Ullern, west of the Frogner Park and south of Heggeli. It is served by Smestad station. Show Smestadon the map
RøaRøa was a borough of the city of Oslo, Norway up to January 1, 2004, when it became part of the Vestre Aker district. Røa is also a suburb of Oslo, located approximately 7 kilometers away from downtown Oslo. It primarily consists of duplex houses and apartment blocks as well as single-family detached homes. It also has a small shopping mall. Show Røaon the map
AdamstuaAdamstuen is a neighborhood in the borough of St. Hanshaugen in Oslo, Norway. It is located south of Ullevål University Hospital. It is served by Adamstuen Station of the Oslo Tramway. In the Summer of 2009, the uber-hip Monocle magazine featured Theresagate (running through the heart of Adamstuen) as Oslo's most unusual street. Show Adamstuaon the map
SageneSagene is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway. The area became part of the city of Oslo (then Christiania) in 1859. The name Sagene itself is the plural of the Norwegian word for \"saw\", reflecting all the old industrial mechanical saws powered by the river Akerselvain this area in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Show Sageneon the map
MortensrudMortensrud is a neighborhood in the borough of Søndre Nordstrand, in Oslo, Norway. The area has two primary schools, Mortensrud and Stenbråten, and a lower secondary school, Lofsrud. The area is served by the rapid transit station Mortensrud. The area is notable for the modern award winning church, Mortensrud church. Show Mortensrudon the map
KorsvollKorsvoll is an area in the borough Nordre Aker in Oslo, Norway. The area is located between the areas Brekke and Nordberg, northwest of the old industrial area Nydalen. The area borders on the forest area Nordmarka, and is a popular residential area for families.The local sports club is Korsvoll IL. Show Korsvollon the map
HellerudHellerud was a borough of the city of Oslo, Norway up to January 1, 2004, when it became part of the new borough of Alna. It is also a traditional neighbourhood located within this area to the south of Tveita and Haugerud and north of Oppsal. It borders on the forest of Østmarka. Show Hellerudon the map
LindernLindern is an area in the borough St. Hanshaugen in Oslo, Norway. Originally farmland in the former municipality Aker, the southern part was incorporated into Christiania city in 1858 and the northern part in 1948. The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science is located at Lindern. Show Lindernon the map
Ullevål HagebyUllevål Hageby is a residential area and garden city in borough Nordre Aker of Oslo, Norway. All housing in the area is part of the housing cooperative Oslo Havebyselskap. The area borders on Ullevål University Hospital to the east, Blindern in the west, and Berg to the north. Show Ullevål Hagebyon the map
FagerborgFagerborg is a neighbourhood in the St. Hanshaugen borough in Oslo, Norway. Located at the northwestern end of the borough, it is bounded by Majorstua in Frogner in the west, by Marienlyst in the north, by Adamstuen and Bolteløkka in the east, and by Bislett in the south. Show Fagerborgon the map
KeyserløkkaKeyserløkka is a neighborhood in the borough of Grünerløkka in Oslo, Norway. It was originally farmland under Tøyen. In 1850 it was given to professor Rudolf Keyser. It was later sold to the municipality, and built up with larger buildings between 1949 and 1956. Show Keyserløkkaon the map
VoksenliaVoksenlia is a station on the Holmenkollen Line (Line 1) of the Oslo Metro. It is between Skogen and Holmenkollen. The station was opened on 16 May 1916 when the tramway was extended to Frognerseteren. The station was originally called Lia. Show Voksenliaon the map
SlemdalSlemdal is a neighborhood in the borough of Vestre Aker in Oslo, Norway. The neighborhood lies south of Vettakollen, and was built up from the 1890s. It is served by the Oslo Metro station Slemdal. The local sports team is IL Heming. Show Slemdalon the map
FurusetFuruset was a borough of the city of Oslo, Norway up to January 1, 2004, when it became part of the new borough of Alna. Furuset is also a suburb in eastern Groruddalen in Oslo, consisting of both residential blocks and houses. Show Furuseton the map
BekkelagetBekkelaget is an area in the borough Nordstrand in Oslo, Norway. Until 2004 it was, together with adjacent Ekeberg, a part of the borough Ekeberg-Bekkelaget. Bekkelaget is known nationwide for the sports club Bækkelagets SK. Show Bekkelageton the map
SimensbråtenSimensbråten is a neighborhood in the borough of Nordstrand, Oslo, Norway. A mainly residential area, the suburb is located alongside a grove dividing Simensbråten from Brattlikollen. Show Simensbråtenon the map
TåsenTåsen is a neighborhood of Oslo, Norway, approx. four 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) north of the city centre. The name origins from the norse name Tásvin. The station Tåsen serves the area. Show Tåsenon the map
KongshamnKongshavn is a neighbourhood in Kristiansand, Norway. It's located in the Oddernes borough. Kongshavn Pier is a large harbor with connections to islands outside of Randesund. Show Kongshamnon the map
TeisenTeisen is a neighborhood in the borough of Alna in Oslo, Norway. It was a residential area in the 19th century, but from the 1950s it was built up with apartment blocks. Show Teisenon the map
ManglerudManglerud is a borough in the Østensjø district of Oslo, Norway. Manglerud was built in the 1960s as a suburb to Oslo, connected by the Oslo T-bane metro system. Show Manglerudon the map
HøybråtenHøybråten is a residential area in the north-eastern part (Stovner bydel) of Norway's capital Oslo. Høybråten has its own church, schools and railway station. Show Høybråtenon the map
ØkernØkern was a farm in the former municipality of Aker, Norway, and is currently a district in the borough of Bjerke in the city of Oslo. Show Økernon the map
KampenKampen is a neighborhood in Oslo, Norway. It is located Gamle Oslo borough, between Tøyen, Hasle, Vålerenga and Galgeberg. Show Kampenon the map
BrynBryn is a residential and industrial area of Oslo, Norway. The Alna River runs through the neighborhood. Show Brynon the map
TøyenTøyen is a residential area in the central parts of Oslo, Norway, part of the borough of Gamle Oslo. Show Tøyenon the map
BlindernBlindern is the main campus of the University of Oslo, located in Nordre Aker in Oslo, Norway. Show Blindernon the map
St. HanshaugenSt. Hanshaugen (Norwegian for St. John's Hill) is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway. Show St. Hanshaugenon the map
Aker bryggeAker Brygge is a neighbourhood in Oslo, Norway, a popular area for shopping, dining, and entertainment, as well as a high-end residential area. Show Aker bryggeon the map
NydalenNydalen is a neighbourhood in the Nordre Aker borough in northern Oslo, Norway. Show Nydalenon the map
UllernUllern is district of the city of Oslo, Norway. Show Ullernon the map
States, regions, administrative units in Oslo
NameDescriptionShow
Oslo CountyOslo (English pronunciation: /ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh, Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈuʂˈlu] (13px listen) or, rarer [ˈusˈlu] or [ˈuʂlu]) is the capital and the most populous city in Norway. Oslo constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040, and established as a \"kaupstad\" or trading place in 1048 by King Harald III, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, the city was moved closer to Akershus Fortress during the reign of King Christian IV and renamed Christiania in his honour. It was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838. FolShow on map
SentrumSentrum meaning city-centre is located on the southeast side of the city near the inner Oslofjord. The district is dominated by high rises like Postgirobygget and The Plaza. Oslo's Central Station is located on the eastern side of the borough. Sentrum consists of Bjørvika which has a history as Oslo's main harbour. The area is now being rebuilt with modern high rises consisting of the Barcode and also several student apartments, schools and museums. Sentrum is not a borough with an administration. It is partially administrated by St. Hanshaugen, and in part directly by the city council. The borough St. Hanshaugen takes care of health and social services.Show on map
Østensjø DistrictØstensjø is a district of the city of Oslo, Norway. The district is in the southeastern part of Oslo. It is well known for its proximity to the forested area of Østmarka, a popular resort and hiking area for the citizens of Oslo and Lørenskog. Østensjø consists of the suburbs of Bøler, Oppsal and Manglerud, all located around Lake Østensjøvannet. The Østensjøvannet area has been a protected wildlife reserve since 1992. The club IL Manglerud Star which is known for ice hockey and football is located here.Show on map
Bjerke DistrictBjerke is a borough of the city of Oslo, Norway. The most densely populated residential areas are located along the Trondheimsveien, including the high-rise apartment blocks of Linderud. The shopping centre at Linderud is also home to the borough council's administration. The northern areas of the borough are bordered by the vast woodlands of Oslomarka. The upper secondary school Bjerke Videregående Skole is located here.Show on map
Different buildings in Oslo
NameDescriptionShow
Hotel ContinentalHotel Continental is a hotel in Oslo, Norway. It is located in Stortingsgata 24, across the street from the National Theatre. Hotel Continental and Theatercaféen opened in 1900, right after the opening of the National Theatre. The business was originally owned by Foss Brewery, but was run by different tenants who all had to give up. Caroline and Christian Boman Hansen took over the lease in 1909, and within only three years they were able to purchase the establishment. In 1932 and 1961 respectively the hotel and restaurant was expanded, and now occupies a whole block centrally located in the center of Oslo. Through four generations the same family has built and developed the hotel and the restaurants into what the establishment is today. Elisabeth C. Brochmann is the current and fourth genShow on map
University of OsloThe University of Oslo (Norwegian: Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Norwegian: Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. Until 1 January 2016 it was the largest Norwegian institution of higher education in terms of size, now surpassed only by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 58th best university in the world and the third best in the Nordic countries. In 2015, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked it the 135th best university in the world and the seventh best in the Nordics. While in its 2016, Top 200 Rankings of European universities, the Times Higher Education listed the UniveShow on map
MajorstuenMajorstuen is a subway station on the Oslo Metro and a light rail station on the Briskeby Line of the Oslo Tramway. It is located in the Majorstuen neighborhood in the Frogner borough. Majorstuen is shared by all the subway lines, and, being located just after the tunnel entrance, it is the only such station not located underground. Majorstuen was originally the end station for Holmenkollbanen, and remained so until the tunnel to Nationaltheatret Station was completed.Show on map
Prinds Christian Augusts MindePrinds Christian Augusts Minde is an old asylum, hospital and social institution in downtown Oslo, Norway. The name loosely translates to \"Prince Christian August's Memorial\". The oldest building, \"Mangelsgården\", was protected as a cultural heritage site in 1927. The protection got extended to cover the entire complex in 2009. The Aker/Christiania lunatic asylum was moved to Mangelsgården in 1829, and got expanded after the new lunatic asylum laws were passed in 1848. It closed down in 1908.Show on map
BjørndalBjørndal is a suburb of Oslo, Norway, part of the borough of Søndre Nordstrand. The population is estimated to be about 9.900 residents. Bjørndal has two primary schools, respectively named \"Bjørndal skole\" and \"Seterbråten skole\", a middle school named \"Bjørnholt Ungdomsskole\" and a high school named \"Bjørnholt videregående skole\" also called \"Per Gynt skolen\". This school is also known to arrange an entrepreneur camp each year. There are also several private and public kindergartens in the area.Bjørndal is characterized by much development and have very good sports environment. Bjørndal Idretts Forening has a lot of equipment that can be allocated free for children and young people who want to borrow. Their sports park consists of four football pitches, two tennis courts, half- pipe, andShow on map
Carl Berners plassCarl Berners plass is an underground rapid transit station located on the Grorud Line of the Oslo Metro, and a tram stop on the Sinsen Line of the Oslo Tramway. The square also has a bus stop for lines 20, 21, 31, 33 and 57. Located at Grünerløkka in Oslo, Norway, the area has a mixture of apartment buildings and small businesses. The station is the first metro station on the Grorud Line after it branches off from the shared Common Tunnel. North of the station, the Ring Line branches off from the Grorud Line. The station is served by lines 5 and 6 of the metro and Line 17 of the tramway, with eight and four hourly departures during regular hours. The tram operates every 10 minutes during regular hours.Show on map
VestbanestasjonenOslo West Station (Norwegian: Oslo Vestbanestasjon) or Oslo V, is a former railway station located in Vika in Oslo, Norway. It was the terminus of the Drammen Line between 1872 and 1980, until the Oslo Tunnel opened. The station remained in use until 1989, when all traffic was moved to the new Oslo Central Station. Until its closure it was the main station for trains on the Sørland Line, the Drammen Line and the Vestfold Line. There was no passenger rail connection to Oslo Ø, the eastern station that served the eastern lines and trains to Bergen. The only connection was the Oslo Port Line that went partially through some of the most trafficked streets in Oslo.Show on map
RødtvetRødtvet is a residential area in the district of Grorud in Oslo, located just southwest of Grorud proper. The area was urbanized from the mid 1960s, and connected to the city centre with metro line 5 from 1966. Rødtvet has the forest Lillomarka as a neighbor to the north, and the residential areas Bredtvet, Kalbakken, Flaen and Nordtvet as its closest neighbors to the south.Show on map
Valle HovinValle Hovin is both a bandy and speed skating rink in cold weather, and an outdoor stadium for concerts in warm weather, in Oslo, Norway. Located in the residential area Valle-Hovin, in amongst trees and a park, one finds Valle Hovin. It is reachable from the Lines 1, 2, 3, and 4 reaching the Helsfyr station of the Oslo T-bane metro system, and additionally via two bus lines as well as substantial parking for automobiles. It was the main arena for the Bandy World Championship 1985.Show on map
The Norwegian Meteorological InstituteThe Norwegian Meteorological Institute (Norwegian: Meteorologisk institutt), also known as MET Norway, is Norway's national institute which provides weather forecasts.Its three main offices are located in Oslo, Bergen and Tromsø. MET Norway has around 500 employees and some 650 part-time observers around the country. It also operated the last remaining weather ship in the world, MS Polarfront, stationed in the North Atlantic, until it was discontinued due to budgetary issues on 1 January 2010 and replaced with satellite and buoy data.Show on map
FrøenFrøen is a rapid transit station of the Oslo Metro's Holmenkollen Line and previously also the Sognsvann Line. It is situated Frøen neighborhood of the Oslo, Norway, borough of Vestre Aker. Located 3.2 kilometers (2.0 mi) from Stortinget, the station is served by Line 1 of the metro every fifteen minutes. Travel time to Stortinget is six minutes. Diakonhjemmet Hospital falls within the station's catchment area.Show on map
TøyenTøyen is a rapid transit station located in the Common Tunnel of Oslo Metro in Norway. Located in the borough of Gamle Oslo, it is also called due to its proximity to the art museum. It is the last station on the east side shared by all lines; the Grorud Line and Ring Line departs from the other four lines at Tøyen. The station has three platforms, on the south side is a platform for all outbound trains. Across the tracks is another for inbound trains coming from Ensjø, and on the other side of this platform is a third one for inbound trains from Carl Berners plass.Show on map
Oslo Central StationOslo Central Station (Norwegian: Oslo sentralstasjon, abbreviated Oslo S) is the main railway station in Oslo, and the largest railway station within the entire Norwegian railway system. It is the terminus of Drammen Line, Gardermoen Line, Gjøvik Line, Hoved Line and Østfold Line. It serves express, regional and local rail services by four companies. The railway station is owned and operated by Norwegian National Rail Administration and was opened in 1980.Show on map
Rockefeller Music HallRockefeller Music Hall, ordinarily referred to simply as Rockefeller, is a concert venue in downtown Oslo, Norway. The building, known as \"Torggata Bad\" (\"Market Street Bath\") earlier used to house a public bath facility. The music hall was established in 1986. Rockefeller is owned by the Rockefeller Music Hall Company, which also owns a nightclub which is located in the same building complex, John Dee, as well as another nearby music venue, Sentrum Scene. Rockefeller is known for its high volume of concert events, very often involving pop and rock music, as well as cultural events with Norwegian and international artists such as the annual black metal Inferno Festival, running since 2001. The venue consists of a main room, a large gallery, a smaller upper gallery and lounge bar.Show on map
NybruaNybrua is a bridge over the Aker River (Akerselva) in Oslo, Norway. Nybrua bridge, which was built in 1827, lies in the district of Grünerløkka. It is crossed by Storgata which continues as Trondheimsveien on the eastern side of the river. At the same time, Storgata was lengthened and the lower part of Trondheimsveien was created. Nybrua was served by an Oslo Tramway station of the same name. The station became disused in 2015.Show on map
TrefoldighetskirkenTrinity Church (in Norwegian, is a church in the Hammersborg neighborhood in central Oslo, Norway. Trinity Church is neighbor of the government buildings in It is the parish church of the parish of Trinity, belonging to the Diocese of Oslo of the Church of Norway. It is one of the largest churches in Oslo (1000 seats). The church itself is in the raw red brick, while the vaults, arches and small columns have gray scale color. The nave is octagonal with a Greek cross superimposed, with the choir in the apse, shallow transept and rectangular entrance flanked by two slender, octagonal bell towers. A central dome rises above the church. Trinity Church is one of the largest of the many octagonal churches in Norway, but one of few constructed in red briShow on map
OperaenThe Oslo Opera House (Norwegian: Operahuset) is the home of The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet, and the national opera theatre in Norway. The building is situated in the Bjørvika neighborhood of central Oslo, at the head of the Oslofjord. It is operated by Statsbygg, the government agency which manages property for the Norwegian government. The structure contains 1,100 rooms in a total area of 38,500 m2 (414,000 sq ft). The main auditorium seats 1,364 and two other performance spaces can seat 200 and 400. The main stage is 16 m (52 ft) wide and 40 m (130 ft) deep. The angled exterior surfaces of the building are covered with Italian marble and white granite and make it appear to rise from the water. It is the largest cultural building constructed in Norway since Nidarosdomen was complShow on map
AlnabruAlnabru is a neighbourhood of Oslo. It is located in the middle of the southern part of Groruddalen. The name Alnabru comes from the area around Alnaelva and the old estate Alna Gård. This has also given its name to the borough (no. bydel) of Alna where the neighbourhood of Alnabru is located. Alnabru have one of oldest Sikh Church which was opened in 1983.Show on map
SandermosenSandermosen Station (Norwegian: Sandermosen stasjon) is a formerly manned station on Gjøvikbanen located in Maridalen, Oslo, Norway. The station which formerly had its own station building is located a little under 16 km from Oslo Central Station between Kjelsås Station and Snippen Station and was opened in 1909. It was closed on June 11, 2006. Since its closure Snippen is the nearest station. The area was used as a loading zone as early as 1900, two years prior to the opening of Gjøvikbanen. Dano-Norwegian author Aksel Sandemose took his new lastname from Sandermosen in Maridalen.Show on map
TryvannstårnetTryvannstårnet is an 118-metre (387 feet) tall broadcasting tower near Oslo, located 529 metres (1,736 feet) above mean sea level on the summit of Tryvannshøyden hill overlooking lake Tryvann. Tryvannstårnet was built in 1962 and has an observation deck at a height of 60 metres (197 feet), from which, weather conditions permitting, the view extends to the border with Sweden and Gaustatoppen mountain. The observation deck was closed in 2005 because of new fire safety regulations which would have required expensive modifications which coincided with rapidly declining visitor numbers. In the 1980s and 1990s annual visitor numbers averaged 100,000, but in the last year it was open to the public, only 25,000.Show on map
BorgenBorgen is a station shared by the Røa Line (line 2) and the Kolsås Line (line 3) on the Oslo T-bane system. The station is between Majorstuen and Smestad, and 3.8 km (2.4 mi) from the central station Stortinget. The station is located on a stretch where the line runs alongside Sørkedalsveien. The large Vestre gravlund cemetery is situated to the south of the station.Show on map
PostgirobyggetPostgirobygget is a commercial building located at Biskop Gunnerus' gate 14 in Oslo, Norway. The building was designed by Norwegian architect Rolf Christian Krognes and constructed in 1975. It has 26 floors and at 111 meter in height, is the second tallest building in Norway. In 2003, the building went through a rehabilitation in which seven floors were added and the building was split in two towers.Show on map
GodliaGodlia is a station on the Østensjø Line (Line 3) on the Oslo Metro. It is the first station after the line diverges from the Furuset Line and is located between the stations of Hellerud and Skøyenåsen, 6.1 kilometers (3.8 mi) from Stortinget. The station was opened as a subway station 29 October 1967. Karl Stenersen was the station's architect. Rail service through Godlia is older, having opened as a tram line already in 1926.Show on map
Rosenhoff59°55′50.29″N / 59.9306361°N 10.7751000°E Rosenhoff is a neighbourhood of Grünerløkka, Oslo. It lies north of Carl Berners plass and Rodeløkka, south and east of the park area of Torshovdalen, and west of Sinsenbyen. The neighborhood is built on the site of the former Rosenhoff locks, is triangular, and borders Mailundveien to the northwest, Rosenhoffsgata to the south, and Trondheimsveien to the east. The tram also runs through this part of Trondheimsveien, and there is a tram stop at Rosenhoff.Show on map
MariholtetMariholtet is a tourist cabin in Østmarka, which is a forested area on the eastern side of Oslo, Norway. The cabin is located on the west side of Nord-Elvåga Lake on the border between Oslo and Lørenskog municipalities. Mariholtet was originally part of the Ellingsrud fard, but was purchased by Aker municipality in 1917. The lands around Nord-Elvåga Lake were also purchased by Aker, so that the lake could be used as a drinking water source. People lived in Mariholtet until 1955. Mariholtet has a long history as a tourist cabin; as early as 1920 it was a popular destination for outdoorspeople living in Oslo.Show on map
NRKNRK (an abbreviation of the Norwegian: Norsk rikskringkasting AS, generally expressed in English as the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) is the Norwegian government-owned radio and television public broadcasting company, and the largest media organisation in Norway. NRK broadcasts three national TV channels and three national radio channels on DVB-T, cable, satellite, IPTV, FM and DAB. It also runs several digital radio stations. All NRK radio stations can be heard on the website, NRK.no, which also offers an extensive TV service. NRK is a founding member of the European Broadcasting Union.Show on map
Skøyen stasjonSkøyen Station (Norwegian: Skøyen stasjon) is a railway station located at Skøyen in Oslo, Norway. It is situated on the Drammen Line, 4.36 kilometers (2.71 mi) from Oslo Central Station. It is served by regional trains and the Oslo Commuter Rail, operated by the Norwegian State Railways, as well as by the Airport Express Train. The station is elevated and has two island platforms and four tracks.Show on map
Clarion Hotel Royal ChristianiaHotel Royal Christiania, formerly the Hotel Viking, is a hotel in Oslo, Norway. The hotel was financed and built by Oslo Municipality to accommodate the 1952 Winter Olympics. At the time of its formal opening on December 10, 1951, it was the largest hotel in Scandinavia. The first guest was J. K. Christensen Haugesund. It was here that Arne Treholt and Gennady Titov were observed dining together on February 24, 1972. Today, the hotel has 451 rooms (508 according to another source which claims it to be the second largest hotel in Norway) and is owned by the Clarion hotel chain.Show on map
BrynsengBrynseng is a rapid transit station on the Oslo Metro system located in the Gamle Oslo borough. The station is shared by three lines, the Østensjø Line (Line 3), the Furuset Line (Line 1 and 2) and the Lambertseter Line (Line 4). The station has four platforms. The two northernmost platforms are for trains on the Østensjø- and Furuset Line. The Lambertseter Line uses the two other platforms before turning south and leaving the other two lines. At Brynseng Station is one of the train yards for the metro operator Oslo T-banedrift.Show on map
Radisson SAS Scandinavia HotelRadisson Blu Scandinavia Hotel (In Oslo, simply also known as The SAS Hotel) is a hotel located just east of the Palace Park in Oslo, near Holbergs plass. The hotel was constructed in 1975 as the SAS Scandinavia Hotel, and is with its 67 metres (220 ft) Oslo's third tallest building. The hotel has 488 rooms and suites on 22 floors, and offers a variety of interior designs. There are direct views of the Oslo Fjord or Holmenkollen from the hotel, which makes it a good competitor to the Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel, Oslo.Show on map
Oslo SpektrumOslo Spektrum is an indoor multi-purpose arena in east central Oslo, Norway. It opened in December 1990. It is currently owned and operated by Norges Varemesse. Oslo Spektrum is primarily known for hosting major events such as the Nobel Peace Prize Concert, Eurovision Song Contest, and concerts by artists of national and international fame, such as Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Diana Ross, Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, Lady Gaga, Muse, Rammstein, a-ha, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Snoop Dogg and Chris Brown.Show on map
AnkerbruaAnkerbrua is a bridge located in the district of Grünerløkka, in the eastern end of Oslo, Norway. Ankerbrua was built over the Aker River (Akerselva). The former wooden bridge was constructed in 1874. It was replaced by the current granite structure in 1926. The bridge has four sculptures, one in each corner, designed by Norwegian sculptor and artist, Dyre Vaa. Cast from bronze in 1937, each figure represents a different Norwegian folk hero from Norwegian Folktales. The motifs are \n* Kvitebjørn Kong Valemon \n* Peer Gynt \n* Kari Trestakk \n* Veslefrikk med felaShow on map
LjabruLjabru is a light rail station on the Oslo Tramway. Located at Ljabru in Nordstrand, it is the current terminus of the Ekeberg Line. It was opened on 17 September 1941 as an extension of that line from Sæter. Until 1967, the stretch between Sæter and Ljabru was the only single track rail in Oslo. A bridge that is located between Ljabru and Sæter was still single track until it was expanded in 2014. This was the last part of the tramway network to be upgraded to double track.Show on map
SinsenSinsen is a rapid transit station on the Ring Line of the Oslo Metro. It is located at Sinsen in the Sagene borough of Oslo, Norway. Next to the station is the tram station Sinsenkrysset, that has been part of the Sinsen Line of the Oslo Tramway since 1939. The station opened on 20 August 2006, as part of the first section of the Ring Line. The station is served by line 6 of the metro, as well as several local bus services. Sinsen is a mixed residential and commercial area.Show on map
HaugerudHaugerud is a neighborhood in the borough of Alna in Oslo, Norway. Its origin was a farm of the same name. It first had a private owner in 1670. Some of the land was parceled out in the early 1900s, and the rest of the land was bought by the municipality in 1947, and built up with apartment blocks in the late 1960s. Since 1970 it is served by the station Haugerud on the Oslo Metro. The local church opened in 1975, and the neighborhood also has a shopping mall.Show on map
ØrakerØraker is a light rail station on the Oslo Tramway. Located at Øraker in Ullern, it was opened in 1924, the Lilleaker Line was extended to Jar. In February 2009, the part of the line west of Lilleaker station was closed due to upgrades on the Kolsås Line. The curtailing of the line eliminated Øraker station for the time being, disappointing the area residents. On 1 December 2010 the Station was reopened after extensive work being done to the next station Jar.Show on map
Vår Frelsers gravlundVår Frelsers gravlund (\"our saviour's cemetery\") is a cemetery in Oslo, Norway, located north of Hammersborg in Gamle Aker district. It was created in 1808 as a result of the great famine and cholera epidemic of the Napoleonic Wars. Its grounds were extended in 1911. The cemetery has been full since 1952. The cemetery includes five sections, including Æreslunden, Norway's main honorary burial ground, and the western, southern, eastern and northern sections.Show on map
BjørnslettaBjørnsletta is a station on the Kolsås Line of the Oslo Metro. It serves the residential area of Øraker in Oslo, Norway and is served by Line 3. The station opened on 17 August 2010 and replaced two former stations: Bjørnsletta (located at a different location) and Lysakerelven. Both these stations were closed in 2006 while the Kolsås Line was being upgraded from a light rail to a rapid transit. Bjørnsletta is 8.2 kilometres (5.1 mi) from Stortinget.Show on map
BredtvetBredtvet is a neighborhood in the borough of Bjerke in Oslo, Norway. The area is located on a ridge between the neighborhoods of Veitvet to the west and Kalbakken to the east. Its origin was as a farm of the same name. It is not mentioned in writings from the Middle Ages, but was at one time Crown land.Its first private owner is registered in 1662, and from 1817 to 1824 it was owned by Hans Nielsen Hauge.Show on map
GrorudGrorud is a rapid transit station on the Oslo Metro. Located between Ammerud and Romsås on Grorud Line, it serves the Grorud borough. The station is located on the south side of a tunnel entrance. Above the station is a small cluster of shops and a small bus terminal. The station was the end station of the original section of the Grorud Line, which opened 16 October 1966, and remained the end station until it was extended to Rommen on 3 March 1974.Show on map
SognsvannSognsvann is a rapid transit station of the Oslo Metro's Sognsvann Line. It is situated Kringsjå neighborhood of the Oslo, Norway, borough of Nordre Aker. Located 8.7 kilometers (5.4 mi) from Stortinget, the station is served by Line 5 of the metro every fifteen minutes. Travel time to Stortinget is sixteen minutes.Show on map
Tveita (station)Tveita is a subway station on the Furuset Line of the Oslo Metro between Hellerud and Haugerud, located in the Alna borough of Oslo, Norway. The station is the first one on Furusetbanen that is not shared with another line. It was opened as part of the original line in 1970. Tveita is located underneath the shopping centre Tveita senter. The neighborhood of Tveita is a dense residential area with several large apartment buildings.Show on map
MaridalMaridalen is a valley situated just north of Oslo, Norway, just above the suburb of Kjelsås. Most of the valley is made up of a lake known as Maridalsvannet, that serves as the primary source of drinking water for 90% of Oslo's population. The valley is a popular recreational area with many hiking trails and cycle tracks for summer usage, and groomed cross country trails in winter. Both the lake and valley are protected.Show on map
HøyenhallHøyenhall is a rapid transit station on the Lambertseter Line of the Oslo Metro. Served by Line 4, it is the first station on the Lambertseter Line not shared with any other line. It is located between Brynseng and Manglerud, 5.2 kilometres (3.2 mi) away from Stortinget. The station was opened as a tram station in 1957, and as a metro station on 22 May 1966. The architects were Thorvald and Henning Astrup.Show on map
The Royal PalaceThe Royal Palace (Norwegian: Slottet or formally Norwegian: Det kongelige slott) in Oslo was built in the first half of the 19th century as the Norwegian residence of the French-born King Charles III of Norway, who reigned as king of Norway and Sweden. The palace is the official residence of the present Norwegian monarch. The crown prince resides at Skaugum in Asker west of Oslo. The palace has 173 rooms.Show on map
Fagerborg kirkeFagerborg Church (Fagerborg kirke) is located south of Stensparken at Fagerborg in Oslo, Norway .Show on map
HasleHasle is a station on the Oslo Metro system located in the Gamle Oslo borough between Carl Berners plass and Økern. It is the first outdoor station on Grorud Line after the downtown tunnel. After completion of the Ring Line in 2006, Hasle is the first station on the Grorud Line not shared with another line. There is some residential housing in the vicinity, as well as some industry.Show on map
RådhusplassenRådhusplassen (\"The City Hall Square\") is a square located between Oslo City Hall and the Oslofjord in Vika, Oslo, Norway. Previously used as a road and part of European route E18, it has since 1994 served as a recreational area. North of the square stands the city hall, to the south the fjord, to the east Akershus Fortress and to the east the former Western Railway Station.Show on map
Villa Bestum / Nedre Bestum gårdBestum is a neighbourhood in Ullern in Oslo, Norway. Before the residential area arose, Bestum was mainly an agricultural area. The name origins from the middle ages. Bestum was served by a station named \"Bestun\" and the tram stop Bestum, but both are now closed. The residential houses in the area are drawn in Swiss chalet style.Show on map
ManglerudManglerud is a rapid transit station on the Lambertseter Line of the Oslo Metro. It is served mainly by line 4 and by line 1 trains on weekdays between 06:00 and 19:00. It is located between Høyenhall and Ryen, 6.2 kilometres (3.9 mi) from Stortinget. The station was opened as a tram station in 1957, and as a subway station on 22 May 1966. The architect was Edgar Smith Berentsen.Show on map
HauketoHauketo is a neighborhood in the borough of Søndre Nordstrand in Oslo, Norway. It is mainly a residential area with detached housing as well as larger blocks. It is served by the Østfold Line station Hauketo. It is located south of Ljabru, east of Sloreåsen, west of Mortensrud and north of Holmlia and Prinsdal.Show on map
Nordre gravlundNordre Gravlund is a cemetery in Oslo, between Ullevål University Hospital and Sagene. It has an area of 16 hectares. There is a memorial over 20 members of Norwegian Communist Party that were killed during the Second World War. Poet Rudolf Nilsen and historian Halvdan Koht are buried at Nordre Gravlund.Show on map
ÅmotbruaÅmotbrua is a suspension bridge located in Grünerløkka, Oslo, Norway, at 59°55′33.604″N / 59.92600111°N 10.752751000°E. It is a pedestrian bridge over the Aker River on Grünerløkka in Oslo.The bridge was built in 1851 - 1852. It is today only used as a walking bridge.Show on map
SkøyenSkøyen is a neighborhood of Oslo, Norway. It is located in the western part of the city, in the borough of Ullern. The name \"Skøyen\" comes from Old Norse Skǫðin, of unknown etymology. Skøyen is connected to downtown Oslo through The Skøyen Line (tram) and Skøyen Station (train).Show on map
The Government QuarterRegjeringskvartalet (the Government quarter) is a collection of buildings in the centre of Norwegian capital city Oslo housing several of the offices of the Government of Norway. The complex is around 300 m northeast of the Parliament Building.Show on map
Oslo BussterminalOslo Bus Terminal (Norwegian: Oslo bussterminal) is the main bus station serving Oslo, Norway. Owned by Vaterland AS it is located beside Oslo Central Station and serves local buses to Akershus as well as domestic and international coaches.Show on map
Fagerborg videregående skoleFagerborg Upper Secondary School (Norwegian: Fagerborg videregående skole) is an upper secondary school near Majorstuen in Oslo, Norway. In addition to a university preparatory track, it has a track specializing in dancing and ballet.Show on map
SkarpsnoSkarpsno is a light rail station on the Oslo Tramway. Located at Skarpsno, it was opened by Kristiania Elektriske Sporvei on 2 March 1894 as a part of the first stretch of what would become the Skøyen Line. It is served by line 13.Show on map
Abildsø skoleAbildsø skole is a Barne- og ungdomsskole in Oslo with 580 students in 2008. The school lies in Abildsø in Østensjøvannet, Østensjø. The school was founded in 1859 by Mina Vetlesen and celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2009.Show on map
BogstadBogstad Manor (Bogstad gård) is a historic Manor House and former estate located in the borough of Vestre Aker in Oslo, Norway. It is situated in the northwestern part of Oslo.Show on map
KastelletKastellet is a light rail station on the Oslo Tramway. Located at Kastellet in Nordstrand, the station is situated between Sørli and Bråten. It was opened on 11 June 1917.Show on map
Schous PlassSchous plass (lit. \"Schou's Square\") is a square placed in the south of the borough Grünerløkka in Oslo, Norway.Show on map
Kjelsås st.Kjelsås is one of the northern suburbs of Oslo situated in Nordre Aker, the northern borough of Oslo, Norway.Show on map
FurulundFurulund is a light rail station on the Oslo Tramway. It is located north of Vækerø in Ullern borough.Show on map
UranienborgUranienborg is a neighborhood in the borough of Frogner in Oslo, Norway.Show on map
Lakes, rivers, streams and other bodies of water in Oslo
NameDescriptionShow
FrognerkilenFrognerkilen is a bay in the inner Oslofjord of Norway, east of the Bygdøy peninsula. Its name stems from the neighbourhood Frogner, a name which was taken from a farm. It was formerly known, with Bestumkilen, under the name of Ladegaardsfjordene. This stems from older times, when Bygdøy was an island, named Ladegaardsøen. Bygdøy later became a peninsula due to post-glacial rebound, separating Bestumkilen from Frognerkilen. Propositions to reconnect Bestumkilen and Frognerkilen through a canal were made in 1928 and 1937, but not carried out. It was an important shipping port for timber in the 17th and 18th centuries, but today a large part of the bay is used as a harbour for leisure boats.Show on map
AkerselvaAkerselva or Akerselven (English: Aker River) is a river which flows through Oslo. It starts at Maridalsvannet in Oslomarka, and follows the urban areas Nordre Aker, Sagene, Grünerløkka, Oslo centre and Grønland, whereby it finally ends at Paulsenkaien and Oset in Bjørvika. The river is considered to be a part of the Nordmarkvassdraget, and has the watercourse number 006.Z. The entire river is about 8.2 kilometres (5.1 mi) long, and has a difference in elevation between source and mouth of approximately 149 metres (489 ft). Earlier, the river gave power to numerous industry companies in Oslo.Show on map
SognsvannSognsvann (or Sognsvannet) is a 3.3 km circumference lake just north of Oslo, Norway. Lying just within the greenbelt around Oslo, the lake is a popular recreational area, used as a camping, picnicking and bathing destination for the residents of Oslo during the summer, as well as a cross-country skiing, skating and ice fishing destination in the winter. The trail around it is used for walking or jogging all year. Every year in August, swimming and running take part in Sognsvann as part of the Oslo Triathlon. Cycling around the lake is prohibited due to large number of people covering this road on foot. Disabled access is good to and around the lake.Show on map
BestumkilenBestumkilen is a bay in Lysakerfjorden in the inner Oslofjord of Norway. Located west of the Bygdøy peninsula and east of Vækerø, it is bordered by the islet Killingen in the southwest and the mouth of the river Hoffselva at Sjølyst in the northeast. It was formerly known, together with Frognerkilen, under the name Ladegaardsfjordene. This stems from older times, when Bygdøy was an island, named Ladegaardsøen. Bygdøy later became a peninsula due to post-glacial rebound, separating Bestumkilen from Frognerkilen. Propositions to reconnect Bestumkilen and Frognerkilen through a canal were made in 1928 and 1937, but not carried out.Show on map
TryvannTryvann is a small lake in Nordmarka, the forest area just north of Oslo city, near the Holmenkollen ski jump. By the water lies a cabin called Tryvannstua, in which there is a café open regularly during both summer and winter. On a hill above the lake looms the television tower Tryvannstårnet (\"The Tryvann tower\"), visible from most of Oslo. Tryvann is the entry and beginning of Nordmarka. It is used all year around. The key purposes of this area in the winter are skiing and cross-country skiing, whereas in the summer it is more commonly used for walks in the forest and biking. When referring to Tryvann, it is mostly referred to as the Tryvann vinterpark.Show on map
LutvannetLutvann is a lake in the recreational area Østmarka in Oslo, Norway. It covers an area of 0.39 km², at 205 m elevation. Located just outside the capital city, it is a popular site for recreation, including swimming and fishing during summer, with brook trout in the lake. In the winter there are ski trails along and on the lake. The lake is also used by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for baptism. In 2001 activists from the Youth of the Progress Party were charged for cutting down a tree in the preserved area in order to protest the fact that building in the area is prohibited.Show on map
BjørvikaBjørvika is a neighborhood in the Sentrum borough of Oslo, Norway. The area is an inlet in the inner Oslofjord, situated between Gamlebyen and Akershus Fortress. It serves as an outlet for the river Akerselva. Since the 2000s, it has been undergoing urban redevelopment, being transformed from a container port. When completed, the Bjørvika neighborhood will be a new cultural and urban center in Oslo. The multi-purpose medium-rises of the Barcode Project is nearing its completion to the north; to the east the residential area of Sørenga is under construction. The National Opera is located at Bjørvika, and both the Oslo Public Library and the Munch/Stenersen museum is currently under construction here, the latter replacing the existing Munch Museum in 2020.Show on map
MaridalsvannetMaridalsvannet (English: Lake Maridal) is a lake in Maridalen, Oslo, Norway. It is the largest lake in the municipitality of Oslo, and serves as the main drinking water supply for the city. The lake drains via the river Akerselva to the Oslofjord. The primary inflows are Skjærsjøelva and Dausjøelva. The Hammeren Hydroelectric Power Station exploits the fall from Skjærsjøen to Maridalsvannet.Show on map
ØstensjøvatnetØstensjøvannet is a lake in Oslo, capital of Norway. It is well known for the wide variety of birds and other wildlife that can be found there. It is surrounded by the Østensjø borough. It is currently a wildlife preserve, though urban development posed a serious threat to the lake and its environs during the 1980s and early 1990s.Show on map
BjørnsjøenBjørnsjøen is a lake in Nordmarka in Oslo, Norway. The cabin Kikutstua, owned by the Association for the Promotion of Skiing, is located at the northeastern shore of the lake. Asbjørnsen's story \"En Nat i Nordmarken\" is set at Bjørnsjøen. Bjørnsjøen drains through the river Bjørnsjøelva to the lake Skjærsjøen.Show on map
ØvresætertjernØvresetertjern is a lake in Oslo, Norway. It is located 477 metres (1,565 ft) over sea level between the top of the hill Tryvannshøyden and Frognerseteren. From 1916 to 1938, the station Tryvandshøiden was located north of the lake, but it was never served by regular passenger trains. \n* Øvresetertjern (2014) \n*Show on map
AlnsjøenAlnsjøen (also called Alunsjøen) is a lake in Lillomarka in Oslo, Norway. The lake drains through the river Alnaelva to the Oslofjord. The surrounding area was utilized for copper mining during the 18th century. The lake is used as a water reservoir for the city of Oslo. \n* Alnsjøen in winter \n* The dam of AlnsjøenShow on map
LjanselvaLjanselva is a river in Oslo, Norway. It flows from Lutvann and Nøklevann and mouth into Bunnefjorden at Fiskevollbukta. Several saw mills were located along Ljanselva. The lower part of the river is a protected cultural site.Show on map
LysakerfjordenLysakerfjorden (English: Lysaker Fjord) is an arm of the Oslofjord in Norway. It starts at the mouth of the Lysaker River, and is bordered by the peninsulas Snarøya to the west and Bygdøy to the east.Show on map
HakkloaHakkloa is a regulated lake in Nordmarka in Oslo, Norway. Hakkloa drains through the river Hakkloelva to the lake Bjørnsjøen, and further to Skjærsjøen and Maridalsvannet.Show on map
SandungenSandungen is the name of two lakes in Nordmarka in Oslo, Norway. Store Sandungen has an area of 2.9 km², and the nearby Vesle Sandungen covers 1.4 km².Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Oslo
NameDescriptionShow
Frogner ParkFrogner Park (Norwegian: Frognerparken) is a public park located in the borough of Frogner in Oslo, Norway, and is historically part of Frogner Manor. The manor house is located in the south of the park, and houses the Oslo City Museum. Both the park, the entire borough of Frogner as well as Frognerseteren derive their names from Frogner Manor.Show on map
Vigeland Sculpture ParkFrogner Park (Norwegian: Frognerparken) is a public park located in the borough of Frogner in Oslo, Norway, and is historically part of Frogner Manor. The manor house is located in the south of the park, and houses the Oslo City Museum. Both the park, the entire borough of Frogner as well as Frognerseteren derive their names from Frogner Manor.Show on map
Karl Johans gateKarl Johans gate is the main street of the city of Oslo, Norway. The street was named in honor of King Charles III John, who was also King of Sweden as Charles XIV John. Karl Johans gate is a composite of several older streets that used to be separate thoroughfares. The eastern section was part of Christian IV's original city near the ramparts surrounding the city. When the ramparts were removed to make way for Oslo Cathedral, three separate sections eventually became Østre Gade. \n* Eidsvolls plass \n* Spikersuppa \n* Karl Johans gate in Spring (Norwegian Constitution Day, 17th of May) \n* \n*Show on map
MiddelalderparkenThe Medieval Park (Norwegian: Middelalderparken) in the borough of Gamle Oslo in Oslo, Norway. The park was built in 2000 in Sørenga in The medieval town of Oslo in The Old Town, Oslo (Gamlebyen). That is about ten minutes walk from the Oslo Central Station. The park is located within the so-called Medieval Park area, which also included the Memorial Park and Ladegården on the north side of Bispegata. In this area, development is not allowed due to ruins and plenty of cultural remains in the underground.Show on map
BygdøyBygdøy, or Bygdø, is a peninsula on the western side of Oslo, Norway. Administratively, Bygdøy belongs to the borough of Frogner.Show on map
SørkedalenSørkedalen is a valley located in the northwestern part of Oslo municipality, northwest of Oslo's western suburbs, in Norway. The valley stretches from the suburb of Røa to Skansebakken. The valley is frequently used as an entry point to Nordmarka, the large wilderness recreational area to the north of Oslo.Show on map
VettakollenVettakollen is a hill and neighbourhood in the borough of Vestre Aker in Oslo, Norway. The hill lies west of Sognsvann and southeast of Voksenåsen and Holmenkollen, and measures 419 metres above mean sea level. The estimated population in the Vettakollen area is 7 600 people. The built-up residential area south of the hill is served by the Oslo Metro station Vettakollen, Gulleråsen, Gråkammen and Skådalen.Show on map
OrmøyaOrmøya (previously called Ormsund) is an inhabited island in the inner part of Oslofjord, in the municipality of Oslo. It is located north of the island Malmøya and west of the mainland at Bekkelaget / Nordstrand. A bridge over the strait Ormsundet connects the island to the mainland. The island covers an area of 0.18 square kilometres (0.069 sq mi) Ormøy Church, designed by architect Bernhard Steckmest, was built in the 1890s.Show on map
LindøyaLindøya is a small island located in the Oslofjord, just south of central Oslo. Administratively it belongs to the borough of Gamle Oslo. In 1920, Lindøya was the Oslo base for the pioneer Norwegian airline, Det Norske Luftfartrederi, and its seaplanes. The operation only lasted until the autumn of 1920. When regular seaplane routes were again established in 1927, the operation was moved to neighboring Gressholmen. 800pxShow on map
BleikøyaBleikøya is an island in the inner part of Oslofjord, in the municipitality of Oslo. It is located between Hovedøya and Sjursøya. From the late 19th century a sanatorium for children suffering from scrofula was located on the island. In 2008 the Bleikøya Nature Reserve was established on the northeastern part of Bleikøya, including the islet Bleikøykalven.Show on map
MalmøyaMalmøya is an island 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) outside Oslo, the capital of Norway. The island is mostly known for its large quantities of fossils from the Cambro-Silurian period and its rare flowers. Parts of Malmøya are included in the Malmøya og Malmøykalven Nature Reserve, along with the neighbour island Malmøykalven.Show on map
HovedøyaHovedøya or Hovedøen is one of several small islands off the coast of Oslo, Norway in the Oslofjord. The island is quite small, no more than 800 metres across in any direction, the total area is 0,4 square kilometre. It is well known for its lush and green nature, with a wide variety of trees, bushes and flowersShow on map
GressholmenGressholmen is an islet located in the Oslofjord, just south of central Oslo. Administratively it belongs to the borough of Gamle Oslo. Gressholmen airport was for the years 1927 through 1939 the location of the main airport for Oslo, until the construction of Fornebu airport. The airport was only for seaplanes. The ramp with rail tracks and the hangar are reused for boat storage and maintenance. There is railway point with the big track gauge. The island is easily accessible from Oslo with the local ferries. The access point is on the North side. A big part of the island is a nature reserve.Show on map
UlvøyaUlvøya is an inhabited island in the inner part of Oslofjord, in the municipality of Oslo. It is located east of the island Malmøya and west of the mainland at Nordstrand. A bridge over the strait Ulvøysundet connects the island to the mainland. The island covers an area of 0.3 square kilometres (0.12 sq mi)Show on map
VippetangenVippetangen is the southern point of the peninsula Akersneset in central Oslo, Norway, located southeast of Akershus Fortress. It is surrounded by the Oslo Fjord and has served as an important section of the port in Oslo. The area is undergoing urban renewal and will become part of the Fjord City.Show on map
NakkholmenNakholmen (also spelled Nakkholmen) is an uninhabited island in the inner part of Oslofjord, in the municipitality of Oslo. It is located west of Lindøya and southeast of Bygdøy. The island has many weekend cottages.Show on map
BirkelundenBirkelunden (lit. 'The Birch Grove') is a park placed centrally in the Grünerløkka borough of Oslo, Norway. It is formed as a rectangle, more or less like a city block.Show on map
Olaf Ryes PlassOlaf Ryes plass (lit. \"Olaf Rye's Square\") is a square and park placed centrally in the Grünerløkka borough of Oslo, Norway. It is more or less quadratic in shape.Show on map
SlottsparkenThe Palace Park (Norwegian: Slottsparken) is a public park in the center of Oslo, Norway, surrounding the Royal Palace. It is 22 hectares (54 acres).Show on map
SofienbergparkenShow on map
VoksenåsenVoksenåsen is a hill and neighborhood in Vestre Aker borough in Oslo, Norway.Show on map
SkinnskattbergetSkinnskattberget is a mountain of Oppland, in southern Norway.Show on map
HadelandshøgdaHadelandshøgda is a mountain of Oppland, in southern Norway.Show on map