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Places and geographical objects on the map of Hamgyong-bukto.

Map of Hamgyong-bukto district in North Korea

Basic information about Hamgyong-bukto
North Hamgyong Province (Hamgyŏngbukdo) is the northernmost province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former Hamgyong Province.
Cities, towns & villages in Hamgyong-bukto
NameDescriptionShow
HoeryŏngHoeryŏng is a city in North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea. It is located opposite Jilin Province, China, with the Tumen River in between. Sanhe (三合鎮), in Longjing City, is the closest Chinese town across the river. Hoeryŏng is claimed to be the birthplace of Kim Il Sung's first wife and Kim Jong Il's mother, Kim Jong Suk. It was known as \"Kainei\" during Japanese rule. The Hoeryŏng concentration camp (Kwalliso No. 22) is located 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the city. Show Hoeryŏngon the map
Namyang-nodongjaguNamyang Workers' District is a town in Onsong, North Hamgyong, North Korea. It lies on the Tumen River and opposite to the city of Tumen that stands in the Chinese bank of the river. The town's latitude is 42°57′6″N 129°51′33″E / 42.95167°N 129.85917°E. The estimated population within a 5 km radius of the town is 65,956. The phone prefix used by the town is +850. The town's altitude is 131 ft, or 39 meters. Show Namyang-nodongjaguon the map
OnsŏngOnsŏng County is a county (kun) in North Hamgyong Province, North Korea, located near the border with China. The administrative center is the town (ŭp) of Onsong. Onsong is the alleged site of the former Onsong concentration camp, now closed. Show Onsŏngon the map
ChongjinChŏngjin (Chosŏn'gŭl: 청진시; MR: Ch'ŏngjin-si [tɕʰʌŋdʑin ɕʰi]) is the capital of North Korea's North Hamgyong Province and the country's third largest city. It is sometimes called the City of Iron. Show Chongjinon the map
KiljuKilju, sometimes romanized as Kilchu, is a county in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. The county seat is Kilju Town. Show Kiljuon the map
Saebyŏl Show Saebyŏlon the map
States, regions, administrative units in Hamgyong-bukto
NameDescriptionShow
Hwasŏng-gunMyŏnggan County, formerly known as Hwasŏng County, is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. Unlike many Korean districts that date from the Joseon Dynasty, Hwasong was created after liberation. Yŏngan was established in 1952, separated from Myŏngch'ŏn. In 1967 Yŏngan was renamed to Myŏnggan, in 1981 to Hwasŏng, and in 2004 to Myŏnggan. The chief streams of the county are the Ŏrangch'ŏn (Chosŏn'gŭl: 어랑천, Hancha: 漁郎川) and Myŏngganch'ŏn (Chosŏn'gŭl: 명간천, Hancha: 明澗川). More than 80% of the county is taken up by forestland.Show on map
Saebyŏl-gunKyŏngwŏn County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea, located at 42°48′41″N 130°11′58″E / 42.81139°N 130.19944°E, formerly known as Saebyŏl. It is bordered by the People's Republic of China to the north and east, Kyonghung to the southeast, Hoeryong to the southwest, and Onsong to the west. Aside from agriculture, livestock raising and sericulture are widespread. The chief local crops are rice, corn, and soybeans. Bituminous coal is also mined.Show on map
Ŭndŏk-kunKyŏnghŭng County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. Formerly known as Ŭndŏk County (Chosŏn'gŭl: 은덕군; hancha: 恩德郡), from 1977 to 2010. The county borders the People's Republic of China to the northeast. With the exception of the southwest, it is dominated by low hills, with occasional plains. The highest point is Songjinsan (1,146 m (3,760 ft)). The dominant river is the Tumen, which separates the county from China. The level ground along the Tumen is developed, but approximately 80% of the county is forested. Undok lies on the Hambuk Line and Hoeam Line railroads.Show on map
Hwadae-gunHwadae County is a county in southern North Hamgyong province, North Korea, with an area of about 460 km² and a population of approximately 70,000. It adjoins the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea) on the east and south. By land, it adjoins Kimchaek and Kilchu to the west, and Myŏngch'ŏn to the north. The county was formed from parts of Kilchu and Myŏngch'ŏn in the 1950s, as part of a general reorganization of local government. Administratively, Hwadae is divided into one ŭp and 20 ri.Show on map
Musan-gunMusan County is a county in central North Hamgyong province, North Korea. It borders the People's Republic of China to the north, across the Tumen River. It is divided into one ŭp, six labor districts, and fifteen ri. The county seat is the town of Musan, Musan ŭp. Luguo and Dehua are the closest Chinese city across the river. The Musan area has long been known for iron ore mines, lumber, and potatoes. The Musan Mine, a major excavator of iron ore, is located here. Several railroads cross the county, including the Musan Line and Paengmu Line.Show on map
Hoeryŏng-siHoeryŏng is a city in North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea. It is located opposite Jilin Province, China, with the Tumen River in between. Sanhe (三合鎮), in Longjing City, is the closest Chinese town across the river. Hoeryŏng is claimed to be the birthplace of Kim Il Sung's first wife and Kim Jong Il's mother, Kim Jong Suk. It was known as \"Kainei\" during Japanese rule. The Hoeryŏng concentration camp (Kwalliso No. 22) is located 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the city.Show on map
Kimch’aek-siKimch'aek, formerly Sŏngjin (Chosŏn'gŭl: 성진, Hancha: 城津), is a city in North Hamgyong Province, North Korea. It was an open port in 1899. It has a population of 196,000. The city received its current name in 1951 during the Korean War, in honor of the Korean People's Army (KPA) general, Kim Chaek. It was known as \"Shirotsu\" during Japanese rule between 1910 and 1945.Show on map
Onsŏng-gunOnsŏng County is a county (kun) in North Hamgyong Province, North Korea, located near the border with China. The administrative center is the town (ŭp) of Onsong. Onsong is the alleged site of the former Onsong concentration camp, now closed.Show on map
Ŏrang-gunŎrang County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It is situated on the coast of the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea). Originally part of Kyŏngsŏng county, Ŏrang was created in 1952 following the division of Korea.Show on map
Myŏngch’ŏn-gunMyŏngch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. An intermediate-range ballistic missile missile base is located here. In addition, the county is home to numerous hot springs.Show on map
Yŏnsa-gunYŏnsa County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea, being split off from Musan county in the 1952 reorganization of local government.Show on map
Ch’ŏngjin-siChŏngjin (Chosŏn'gŭl: 청진시; MR: Ch'ŏngjin-si [tɕʰʌŋdʑin ɕʰi]) is the capital of North Korea's North Hamgyong Province and the country's third largest city. It is sometimes called the City of Iron.Show on map
HambukNorth Hamgyong Province (Hamgyŏngbukdo) is the northernmost province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former Hamgyong Province.Show on map
Kyŏngsŏng-gunKyŏngsŏng County is a kun, or county, on the central coast of North Hamgyong, North Korea. The administrative center is located in Kyŏngsŏng-ŭp.Show on map
Puryŏng-gunPuryŏng County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea.Show on map
Different buildings in Hamgyong-bukto
NameDescriptionShow
Chongjin AirportChongjin Airport (IATA: RGO, ICAO: ZKHM), known within North Korea as Orang Airport, is a small airport located approximately 40 kilometres from Chongjin, North Hamgyong in North Korea. Built by the Imperial Japanese Army, designated as K-33 (Hoemun Airfield) by the USAF during the Korean War, Chongjin Airport is now controlled by the Korean People's Army. Hoemun Airfield was renamed when the original Chongin Airfield K-34 was abandoned after the Korean War. The airport is normally used by the military, though a small number of commercial passenger flights also operate there.Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Hamgyong-bukto
NameDescriptionShow
Ch’ilbo-sanChilbosan (Ch’ilbo-san, Korean: 칠보산 ) is a mountain in North Hamgyong province (Hamgyŏng-bukto ), North Korea. The name translates as seven treasures, stemming from the legend that Chilbo-san has seven treasures buried in it. Chilbo-san is particularly noted for its views when covered in snow. The mountain is commonly divided into Inner Chilbo, Outer Chilbo, and Sea Chilbo. Amongst the main attractions apart from the views is the Kaesim Temple, dating from the 9th century.Show on map