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Places and geographical objects on the map of Chagang-do.

Map of Chagang-do district in North Korea

Basic information about Chagang-do
Chagang Province (Chagangdo) is a province in North Korea; it is bordered by China to the north, Ryanggang and South Hamgyong to the east, South Pyongan to the south, and North Pyongan to the west. Chagang was formed in 1949, after being demarcated from North Pyongan. The provincial capital is Kanggye.
Cities, towns & villages in Chagang-do
NameDescriptionShow
Chŏnch’ŏnChŏnch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in central Chagang province, North Korea. Originally part of Kanggye, it was made a separate county in 1949. The terrain is high and mountainous; the highest point is Sungjoksan, 1984 m above sea level. The Chogyuryong Mountains pass through the eastern part of the county. A significant match factory is located in the county, as is North Korea's largest fir tree. Show Chŏnch’ŏnon the map
ChasŏngChasŏng County is a county (kun) in Chagang Province, North Korea. The city is immediately south of the Chinese-North Korean border. Its approximate population to 7 km from the city center is 8,317. The average altitude is 1279 feet, or 389 meters. Nearby cities and towns include Haengjangp'yong and Umnae-dong. Show Chasŏngon the map
KanggyeKanggye is the provincial capital of Chagang, North Korea and has a population of 251,971. Because of its strategic importance, derived from its topography, it has been of military interest from the time of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Show Kanggyeon the map
Manp’oManp'o is a city of northwestern Chagang Province, North Korea. As of 2008, it had an estimated population of 116,760. It looks across the border to the city of Ji'an, Jilin province, China. Show Manp’oon the map
Hŭich’ŏnHŭich'ŏn is a city in the southern part of Chagang Province, North Korea. The population is 163,000 (1987 data). Show Hŭich’ŏnon the map
States, regions, administrative units in Chagang-do
NameDescriptionShow
Wiwŏn-gunWiwŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Chagang province, North Korea. It stands across the Yalu River from the People's Republic of China. It was originally part of North P'yŏngan province, but was annexed to Chagang in 1954. It borders Manp'o and Sijungto the north, Kanggye and Songgan to the east, Ch'onch'ŏn to the southeast, Kop'ung to the south and west, and Ch'osan to the west.Show on map
Songwŏn-gunSongwŏn County is a kun, or county, in southwestern Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Usi and Kop'ung counties to the north, Tongsin to the east, and Hŭich'ŏn to the south, as well as North P'yŏngan's Tongchang county to the west. Originally part of Chosan, it was established as a separate county in 1949, when Chagang province was created.Show on map
Tongsin-gunTongsin County is a kun, or county, in southern Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Ryongrim and Chonchon to the north, the counties of Taehung and Yongwon in South Pyongan to the south and east, and Huichon and Songwon to the west and southwest. Originally part of Huichon, it was created in 1952 as part of a general reorganization of local government.Show on map
Usi-gunUsi County is a kun, or county, in westernmost Chagang Province, North Korea. It looks across the Yalu River into the People's Republic of China. Within North Korea, it borders Chosan and Kopung to the east, Songwon to the south, and North Pyongan Province's Pyoktong county to the west. Originally part of Pyoktong, it was made a separate county in 1952 as part of a general reorganization of local government; in 1954, it was transferred from North Pyongan to Chagang.Show on map
Sijung-gunSijung County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Kanggye and Changgang to the east, Manpo to the north and west, and Wiwon to the south. Formerly part of Kanggye, Sijung became a separate county in 1952 as part of a general reorganization of local government. Sijung is served by both road and rail, with the Manpo Line stopping in the county. The Changja River reservoir is also used to ship some goods by water. Local industry is dominated by agriculture and mining.Show on map
Sŏnggan-gunSonggan County is a kun, or county, in central Chagang province, North Korea. It borders Rangrim to the east, Wiwon to the west, Kanggye to the north and Chonchon and Ryongrim to the south. It was formed in 1952 from parts of Chonchon and Changgang, as part of a general reorganization of local government. Songgan nestles among the Nangrim mountains in north central North Korea, its terrain sloping downward toward the Changja River in the west. The highest point is Maengbusan in the Rangrim range, which stands 2,214 m above sea level. 92% of the county's area is taken up by forestland.Show on map
Ch’osan-gunCh'osan County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. It borders the People's Republic of China to the north. The terrain slopes downward from the Kangnam Mountains in the south to the Yalu River in the north. The highest peak is Namhaetaesan (남해태산, 1,079 m). Some 20% of the land is arable, with animal husbandry and beekeeping playing important roles. 76.1% of the land is forested, and thus logging also contributes to the local economy. In 1999, a complex of Koguryo tombs was excavated in Chosan.Show on map
Changgang-gunChanggang County is a kun, or county, in north-central Chagang province, North Korea. Originally part of Kanggye, it was made a separate county in 1949. It borders Hwapyong and Nangrim to the east, Kanggye and Sijung to the west, Songgan to the south, and Chasong to the north. The terrain of Changgang is rugged and mountainous, with the Kangnam Mountains in the northeast and the Chogyuryong Mountains in the southwest. The highest peak is Kumpasan (금파산, 1918 m) along the northern border.Show on map
Chunggang-gunChunggang County is a kun, or county, in northern Chagang province, North Korea. It was originally part of Huchang county in Ryanggang, and for that reason older sources still identify it as being part of Huchang. The county seat was originally known as Chunggangjin (중강진), but is now known as Chunggang ŭp. Chunggang looks across the Yalu River at China, and borders Ryanggang province to the south. It has been reported that a Intermediate-range ballistic missile base was constructed in Chunggang in the early 1990s, and that its missiles are targeted at Okinawa.Show on map
Chŏnch’ŏn-gunChŏnch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in central Chagang province, North Korea. Originally part of Kanggye, it was made a separate county in 1949. The terrain is high and mountainous; the highest point is Sungjoksan, 1984 m above sea level. The Chogyuryong Mountains pass through the eastern part of the county. A significant match factory is located in the county, as is North Korea's largest fir tree.Show on map
Chasŏng-gunChasŏng County is a county (kun) in Chagang Province, North Korea. The city is immediately south of the Chinese-North Korean border. Its approximate population to 7 km from the city center is 8,317. The average altitude is 1279 feet, or 389 meters. Nearby cities and towns include Haengjangp'yong and Umnae-dong.Show on map
Chagang-doChagang Province (Chagangdo) is a province in North Korea; it is bordered by China to the north, Ryanggang and South Hamgyong to the east, South Pyongan to the south, and North Pyongan to the west. Chagang was formed in 1949, after being demarcated from North Pyongan. The provincial capital is Kanggye.Show on map
Kanggye-siKanggye is the provincial capital of Chagang, North Korea and has a population of 251,971. Because of its strategic importance, derived from its topography, it has been of military interest from the time of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).Show on map
Hwap’yŏng-gunHwapyong County is a kun, or county, in Chagang Province, North Korea. It was incorporated as a new county as part of a general reorganization of local government in December 1952. Previously it had been part of Chasong and Huchang.Show on map
Manp’o-siManp'o is a city of northwestern Chagang Province, North Korea. As of 2008, it had an estimated population of 116,760. It looks across the border to the city of Ji'an, Jilin province, China.Show on map
Kop’ung-gunKop'ung County is a kun, or county, in Chagang province, North Korea. Prior to the division of Korea, it was part of Chosan county.Show on map
Hŭich’ŏn-siHŭich'ŏn is a city in the southern part of Chagang Province, North Korea. The population is 163,000 (1987 data).Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Chagang-do
NameDescriptionShow
Myohyang-sanMyohyang-san (\"Mysterious Fragrant Mountain\") is a mountain in North Korea. It is named after the mystic shapes and fragrances found in the area. It is a sacred site as, according to legend, it was the home of King Tangun, forefather of the Korean people.Show on map