Maps, Guides And More - Yemen

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Yemen. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Yemen

Basic information about Yemen
Yemen (/ˈjɛmən/; Arabic: اليَمَن al-Yaman), officially known as the Republic of Yemen (الجمهورية اليمنية al-Jumhūrīyah al-Yamanīyah), is an Arab country in Western Asia, occupying the southwestern to the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula. Yemen is the second largest country in the peninsula, occupying 527,970 km2 (203,850 sq mi). The coastline stretches for about 2,000 km (1,200 mi). It is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the north, the Red Sea to the west, the Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea to the south, and Oman to the east. Although Yemen's constitutionally stated capital is the city of Sana'a, the city has been under rebel control since February 2015. Because of this, Yemen's capital has been temporarily relocated to the port city of Aden, on the southern coast. Yemen's territory includes more than 200 islands; the largest of these is Socotra. Yemen was the home of the Sabaeans (biblical Sheba), a trading state that flourished for over a thousand years and probably also included parts of modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea. In 275 AD, the region came under the rule of the later Jewish influenced Himyarite Kingdom. Christianity arrived in the 4th century AD whereas Judaism and local paganism were already established. Islam spread quickly in the 7th century and Yemenite troops were crucial in the expansion of the early Islamic conquests. Administration of Yemen has long been notoriously difficult. Several dynasties emerged from the 9th to 16th century, the Rasulid being the strongest and most prosperous. The country was divided between the Ottoman and British empires in the early 20th century. The Zaydi Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen was established after World War I in North Yemen before the creation of Yemen Arab Republic in 1962. South Yemen remained a British protectorate until 1967. The two Yemeni states united to form the modern republic of Yemen in 1990. Yemen is a developing country. Under the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen was described as a kleptocracy. According to the 2009 international corruption Perception Index by Transparency International, Yemen ranked 164 out of 182 countries surveyed. In the absence of strong state institutions, elite politics in Yemen constituted a de facto form of collaborative governance, where competing tribal, regional, religious and political interests agreed to hold themselves in check through tacit acceptance of the balance it produced. The informal political settlement was held together by a power-sharing deal between three men: president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who controlled the state; major general Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, who controlled the largest share of the army; and sheikh Abdullah al-Ahmar, figurehead of the Islamist Islah party and Saudi Arabia's chosen broker of transnational patronage payments to various political players, including tribal sheikhs. The Saudi payments have been intended to facilitate the tribes autonomy from the Yemeni government and to give the Saudi government a mechanism with which to weigh in on Yemen's political decision making. Yemen has been in a state of political crisis since 2011. In January 2011, a series of street protests began against poverty, unemployment, corruption and president Saleh's plan to amend Yemen's constitution and eliminate presidential term limit, in effect making him president for life. He was also grooming his eldest son Ahmed Saleh, the commander of the Republican Guard, to succeed him. The United States considers Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) to be the \most dangerous of all the franchises of Al-Qaeda\. The U.S sought a controlled transition that would enable their counter-terrorism operations to continue, while Saudi Arabia's main concern was to maintain its influence in Yemen through some old regime figures and other tribal leaders who were part of the so-called \GCC initiative\. President Saleh stepped down, the transition quickly proceeded per the \GCC Initiative\; the powers of the presidency were transferYemen (/ˈjɛmən/; Arabic: اليَمَن al-Yaman), officially known as the Republic of Yemen (الجمهورية اليمنية al-Jumhūrīyah al-Yamanīyah), is an Arab country in Western Asia, occupying the southwestern to the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula. Yemen is the second largest country in the peninsula, occupying 527,970 km2 (203,850 sq mi). The coastline stretches for about 2,000 km (1,200 mi). It is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the north, the Red Sea to the west, the Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea to the south, and Oman to the east. Although Yemen's constitutionally stated capital is the city of Sana'a, the city has been under rebel control since February 2015. Because of this, Yemen's capital has been temporarily relocated to the port city of Aden, on the southern coast. Yemen's territory includes more than 200 islands; the largest of these is Socotra. Yemen was the home of the Sabaeans (biblical Sheba), a trading state that flourished for over a thousand years and probably also included parts of modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea. In 275 AD, the region came under the rule of the later Jewish influenced Himyarite Kingdom. Christianity arrived in the 4th century AD whereas Judaism and local paganism were already established. Islam spread quickly in the 7th century and Yemenite troops were crucial in the expansion of the early Islamic conquests. Administration of Yemen has long been notoriously difficult. Several dynasties emerged from the 9th to 16th century, the Rasulid being the strongest and most prosperous. The country was divided between the Ottoman and British empires in the early 20th century. The Zaydi Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen was established after World War I in North Yemen before the creation of Yemen Arab Republic in 1962. South Yemen remained a British protectorate until 1967. The two Yemeni states united to form the modern republic of Yemen in 1990. Yemen is a developing country. Under the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen was described as a kleptocracy. According to the 2009 international corruption Perception Index by Transparency International, Yemen ranked 164 out of 182 countries surveyed. In the absence of strong state institutions, elite politics in Yemen constituted a de facto form of collaborative governance, where competing tribal, regional, religious and political interests agreed to hold themselves in check through tacit acceptance of the balance it produced. The informal political settlement was held together by a power-sharing deal between three men: president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who controlled the state; major general Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, who controlled the largest share of the army; and sheikh Abdullah al-Ahmar, figurehead of the Islamist Islah party and Saudi Arabia's chosen broker of transnational patronage payments to various political players, including tribal sheikhs. The Saudi payments have been intended to facilitate the tribes autonomy from the Yemeni government and to give the Saudi government a mechanism with which to weigh in on Yemen's political decision making. Yemen has been in a state of political crisis since 2011. In January 2011, a series of street protests began against poverty, unemployment, corruption and president Saleh's plan to amend Yemen's constitution and eliminate presidential term limit, in effect making him president for life. He was also grooming his eldest son Ahmed Saleh, the commander of the Republican Guard, to succeed him. The United States considers Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) to be the \most dangerous of all the franchises of Al-Qaeda\. The U.S sought a controlled transition that would enable their counter-terrorism operations to continue, while Saudi Arabia's main concern was to maintain its influence in Yemen through some old regime figures and other tribal leaders who were part of the so-called \GCC initiative\. President Saleh stepped down, the transition quickly proceeded per the \GCC Initiative\; the powers of the presidency were transfer
DivisionDescriptionShow
Al MahwitAl Mahwit (Arabic: المحويت‎‎ Al Maḥwīt) is one of the governorates of Yemen.Show on map
Al JawfAl Jawf (Arabic: الجوف‎‎ Al Ǧauf) is a governorate of Yemen. Its capital is Al Hazm. Since mid-2011, majority of the Governorate is under control of the militant Shi'a Islamist group known as the Houthis.Show on map
Muhafazat HadramawtHadhramaut or Hadramawt (Arabic: حضرموت‎‎ Ḥaḍramawt) is a governorate of Yemen. Lying within the large historical region of Hadhramaut, it is the country's largest governorate. The capital of Hadhramut is the city of Al Mukalla. Other cities in Hadhramaut include the historical towns of Shibam, Sena, Seiyun, Tarim, and Ash Shihr. It was badly hit by rainfall during the 2008 Yemen floods, which left thousands homeless and many buildings shattered.Show on map
DhamarDhamar (Arabic: ذمار‎‎ Ḏamār), also spelt Thamar, is a governorate of Yemen. It is located to the south and southeast of Sana'a Governorate, to the north of Ibb Governorate, to the east of Al Hudaydah Governorate and to the northwest of Al Bayda' Governorate in the central highlands of Yemen. It has a total areas of 7,586 km2 (2,929 sq mi) and an estimated population of around one and a half million.The visitor enters Dhamar governorate about 70 km south of the Sana’a airport. The center of the governorate is about 100 km (62 mi) from Sana’a, the capital of the Republic. The governorate sits among a number of other governorates: Sana’a to the north and northeast, al-Bayda’ to the east, Ibb to the south, and Raymah and al-Hudaydah to the west.Show on map
Al MahrahAl Mahrah or Mahra (Arabic: المهرة‎‎ Al Mahra) is a governorate (muhafazah) of Yemen in the southern Arabian Peninsula. Situated in the area of the former Mahra Sultanate, its capital is Al Ghaydah. In addition to Arabic, Mehri, a Modern South Arabian language, is spoken in Mahra.Show on map
Al HudaydahAl Hudaydah (Arabic: الحديدة‎‎ Al Ḥudaida) is a governorate of Yemen. Its capital is Al Hudaydah. This governorate borders the Red Sea and is part of the narrow Tihamah region. Its capital, Al Hudaydah, also serves as an important local port city.Show on map
Muhafazat al Bayda'Al Bayda (Arabic: البيضاء‎‎ Al Bayḍāʾ), also spelt Al-Baidhah or Beida, is one of the governorates (muhafazat) of Yemen. It is located near the centre of the country, around the town of Al Bayda. Its population, according to the 2004 Yemeni census, was 571,778.Show on map
AdenAden (Arabic: عدن ʻAdan‎‎) is a governorate of Yemen, including the city of Aden. At the 2004 census it had a population of 589,419. The ancient capital, the port city of Crater, was located here. Aden was under British rule in the period from 1839 to 1967. In 1967, after years of struggle, Aden and other southern governorates gained their independence. The city of Aden subsequently became the capital of South Yemen between 1967 and 1990). In 1990, both South Yemen and North Yemen combined to form the present Republic of Yemen. Aden is now the commercial capital of the Republic of Yemen.Show on map
AbyanAbyan (Arabic: أبين‎‎ ʾAbyan) is a governorate of Yemen. The Abyan region was historically part of the Fadhli Sultanate. It was a base to the Aden-Abyan Islamic Army militant group. Its capital is the city of Zinjibar. This governorate is noted for its agriculture, in particular the cultivation of date palms and animal husbandry.Show on map
Ad Dali'Dhale (Arabic: الضالع‎‎ Aḍ Ḍāliʿ) province is one of the governorates of Yemen that have been created after the announcement of Yemeni unification. The population of the province accounted for (2.4%) of the total population of the Republic, and allocated administratively into (9) districts. Dali city is the centre of the province. Dali is one of the provinces distinctive with agriculture, since most of the population works in the agricultural activity. The most important agricultural crops is coffee. The province land contains some metals, the most important are talc that is used in the manufacture of paper, paint, cosmetics and pesticides. The tourist attractions in the province are vary, the most important are Damt bath, and one of the ancient cities there is Jubn city that is famous forShow on map
Omran'Amran (Arabic: عمران‎‎ 'Amrān) is one of the governorates of Yemen, which is divided into the following districts: \n* Al Ashah District \n* Al Madan District \n* Al Qaflah District \n* Amran District \n* As Sawd District \n* As Sudah District \n* Bani Suraim District \n* Dhi Bin District \n* Habur Zulaymah District \n* Harf Sufyan District \n* Huth District \n* Iyal Surayh District \n* Jabal Iyal Yazid District \n* Khamir District \n* Kharif District \n* Maswar District \n* Raydah District \n* Shaharah District \n* Suwayr District \n* Thula DistrictShow on map
HajjahHajjah (Arabic: حجة‎‎ Ḥaǧǧa) is a governorate of Yemen. Bordered by the Red Sea, it has its capital in Hajjah.Show on map
IbbIbb (Arabic: إب‎‎ ʾIbb) is a governorate of Yemen. It is located in the inland south of the country with Ta'izz Governorate to the southwest, Ad Dali' Governorate to the southeast, Dhamar Governorate to the north, and short borders with Al Bayda' Governorate to the east and Al Hudaydah Governorate to the west. It has an area of 5,344 km² and a population estimated at around 1,665,000 in 2004, making it the most densely populated governorate in Yemen outside of San'a city.Show on map
LahijLahij (Arabic: لحج‎‎ Laḥiǧ) is a governorate of Yemen.Show on map
Amanat Al AsimahSana'a (also spelled Sanaa or Sana; Arabic: صنعاء‎‎ Ṣan‘ā’ pronounced [sˤɑnʕaːʔ], Yemeni Arabic: [ˈsˤɑnʕɑ]) is the largest city in Yemen and the centre of Sana'a Governorate. The city is not part of the Governorate, but forms the separate administrative district of \Amanat Al-Asemah\. Under the Yemeni constitution, Sana'a is the capital of the country, although the seat of the internationally recognised government moved to Aden in the aftermath of the 2014–15 Yemeni coup d'état. Aden was declared as the temporary capital by President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi in March 2015.Show on map
SoqatraSocotra Archipelago (Arabic: أرخبيل سقطرى‎‎ ʾArḫabīl Suquṭrā) or Suqutra is one of the governorates of Yemen. It is composed of the archipelago of Socotra.Show on map
Ta'izzTaiz (Arabic: تعز‎‎ Taʿizz) is a governorate of Yemen. The governorate's capital is Taiz, which is the third largest city in Yemen. Other major towns include Al Sawa, Juha and the famous coffee port of Mocha. It has a total population of just over three million and an area of 10,677 km². Taiz city is the major centre of Islamic learning in Yemen and was the nation's capital between 1948 and 1962. However, it is not as old as nearby Ibb and Jibla. Today it is the most important commercial centre in Yemen owing to its proximity to the richest farmland in the nation and to the important Red Sea port of Mokha. It also has an international airport, Taiz International Airport, with numerous services within Yemen and to neighbouring countries.Show on map
ShabwahShabwah (Arabic: شبوة‎‎ Šabwa) is a governorate (province) of Yemen. Its main town is Ataq. During the Yemeni Civil War in 2015, the province became a battleground. The battle, known as the Shabwah Campaign, ended on August 15, 2015, after forces loyal to the government of Abd Rabbah Mansour Hadi defeated Houthi rebels.Show on map
SanaaSana'a (Arabic: صنعاء‎‎ Ṣanʿāʾ) is a governorate of Yemen. Its capital is Sana'a, which is also the national capital. However, the city of Sana'a is not part of the Governorate but instead forms the separate governorate of Amanat Al-Asemah. The Governorate covers an area of 13,850 km². As of 2004, the population was 918,379 inhabitants.Show on map
Sa'dahSaada (Arabic: صعدة‎‎ Ṣaʿda) is one of the governorates of Yemen. The governorate's seat and the largest city is Sa'dah.Show on map
RaymahRaymah (Arabic: ريمه‎‎ Raima) is a governorate of Yemen. It was established in January 2004.Show on map
Ma'ribMa'rib (Arabic: مأرب‎‎ Maʾrib) is a governorate of Yemen. It is located 173 kilometers to the northeast of Yemen's capital, Sana'a. The population of Ma'rib Governorate comprises 1.2% of the country's total population. The city of Ma'rib is the capital of the governorate, and was established after the discovery of oil deposits in 1984. Ma'rib's population in 2004 was 241,619.Show on map