Maps, Guides And More - Venezuela

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Venezuela. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Venezuela

Basic information about Venezuela
Venezuela (/ˌvɛnəˈzweɪlə/ VEN-ə-ZWAYL-ə; [beneˈswela]), officially the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (Spanish: República Bolivariana de Venezuela), is a federal republic located on the northern coast of South America. It is bordered by Colombia on the west, Brazil on the south, Guyana on the east, and the islands of Trinidad and Tobago to the north-east. Venezuela's territory covers around 916,445 km2 (353,841 sq mi) with an estimated population around 33,221,865. Venezuela is considered a state with extremely high biodiversity (currently ranks 7th in the world's list of nations with the most number of species), with habitats ranging from the Andes Mountains in the west to the Amazon Basin rain-forest in the south, via extensive llanos plains and Caribbean coast in the center and the Orinoco River Delta in the east. The territory currently known as Venezuela was colonized by Spain in 1522 amid resistance from indigenous peoples. In 1811, it became one of the first Spanish-American colonies to declare independence, which was not securely established until 1821, when Venezuela was a department of the federal republic of Gran Colombia. It gained full independence as a separate country in 1830. During the 19th century, Venezuela suffered political turmoil and autocracy, remaining dominated by regional caudillos (military strongmen) until the mid-20th century. Since 1958, the country has had a series of democratic governments. Economic shocks in the 1980s and 1990s led to several political crises, including the deadly Caracazo riots of 1989, two attempted coups in 1992, and the impeachment of President Carlos Andrés Pérez for embezzlement of public funds in 1993. A collapse in confidence in the existing parties saw the 1998 election of former coup-involved career officer Hugo Chávez and the launch of the Bolivarian Revolution, beginning with a 1999 Constituent Assembly to write a new Constitution of Venezuela. This new constitution officially changed the name of the country to República Bolivariana de Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela). Venezuela is a federal presidential republic consisting of 23 states, the Capital District (covering Caracas), and federal dependencies (covering Venezuela's offshore islands). Venezuela also claims all Guyanese territory west of the Essequibo River, a 159,500-square-kilometre (61,583 sq mi) tract dubbed Guayana Esequiba or the Zona en Reclamación (the \zone being reclaimed\). Venezuela is among the most urbanized countries in Latin America; the vast majority of Venezuelans live in the cities of the north, especially in the capital (Caracas) which is also the largest city in Venezuela. Since the discovery of oil in the early 20th century, Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves and has been one of the world's leading exporters of oil. Previously an underdeveloped exporter of agricultural commodities such as coffee and cocoa, oil quickly came to dominate exports and government revenues. The 1980s oil glut led to an external debt crisis and a long-running economic crisis, in which inflation peaked at 100% in 1996 and poverty rates rose to 66% in 1995 as (by 1998) per capita GDP fell to the same level as 1963, down a third from its 1978 peak. The recovery of oil prices in the early 2000s gave Venezuela oil funds not seen since the 1980s. The Venezuelan government then initiated populist/revisionist policies that initially boosted the Venezuelan economy and increased social spending, significantly reducing economic inequality and poverty. Such populist policies were questioned since their initiation and the over dependence on oil funds led to overspending on social programs while strict government polices, which were initially supposed to prevent capital flight, created difficulties for Venezuela's import-reliant businesses. Venezuela under Hugo Chávez suffered \one of the worst cases of Dutch Disease in the world\ due to the Bolivarian government's large dependence on oil sales. PovVenezuela (/ˌvɛnəˈzweɪlə/ VEN-ə-ZWAYL-ə; [beneˈswela]), officially the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (Spanish: República Bolivariana de Venezuela), is a federal republic located on the northern coast of South America. It is bordered by Colombia on the west, Brazil on the south, Guyana on the east, and the islands of Trinidad and Tobago to the north-east. Venezuela's territory covers around 916,445 km2 (353,841 sq mi) with an estimated population around 33,221,865. Venezuela is considered a state with extremely high biodiversity (currently ranks 7th in the world's list of nations with the most number of species), with habitats ranging from the Andes Mountains in the west to the Amazon Basin rain-forest in the south, via extensive llanos plains and Caribbean coast in the center and the Orinoco River Delta in the east. The territory currently known as Venezuela was colonized by Spain in 1522 amid resistance from indigenous peoples. In 1811, it became one of the first Spanish-American colonies to declare independence, which was not securely established until 1821, when Venezuela was a department of the federal republic of Gran Colombia. It gained full independence as a separate country in 1830. During the 19th century, Venezuela suffered political turmoil and autocracy, remaining dominated by regional caudillos (military strongmen) until the mid-20th century. Since 1958, the country has had a series of democratic governments. Economic shocks in the 1980s and 1990s led to several political crises, including the deadly Caracazo riots of 1989, two attempted coups in 1992, and the impeachment of President Carlos Andrés Pérez for embezzlement of public funds in 1993. A collapse in confidence in the existing parties saw the 1998 election of former coup-involved career officer Hugo Chávez and the launch of the Bolivarian Revolution, beginning with a 1999 Constituent Assembly to write a new Constitution of Venezuela. This new constitution officially changed the name of the country to República Bolivariana de Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela). Venezuela is a federal presidential republic consisting of 23 states, the Capital District (covering Caracas), and federal dependencies (covering Venezuela's offshore islands). Venezuela also claims all Guyanese territory west of the Essequibo River, a 159,500-square-kilometre (61,583 sq mi) tract dubbed Guayana Esequiba or the Zona en Reclamación (the \zone being reclaimed\). Venezuela is among the most urbanized countries in Latin America; the vast majority of Venezuelans live in the cities of the north, especially in the capital (Caracas) which is also the largest city in Venezuela. Since the discovery of oil in the early 20th century, Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves and has been one of the world's leading exporters of oil. Previously an underdeveloped exporter of agricultural commodities such as coffee and cocoa, oil quickly came to dominate exports and government revenues. The 1980s oil glut led to an external debt crisis and a long-running economic crisis, in which inflation peaked at 100% in 1996 and poverty rates rose to 66% in 1995 as (by 1998) per capita GDP fell to the same level as 1963, down a third from its 1978 peak. The recovery of oil prices in the early 2000s gave Venezuela oil funds not seen since the 1980s. The Venezuelan government then initiated populist/revisionist policies that initially boosted the Venezuelan economy and increased social spending, significantly reducing economic inequality and poverty. Such populist policies were questioned since their initiation and the over dependence on oil funds led to overspending on social programs while strict government polices, which were initially supposed to prevent capital flight, created difficulties for Venezuela's import-reliant businesses. Venezuela under Hugo Chávez suffered \one of the worst cases of Dutch Disease in the world\ due to the Bolivarian government's large dependence on oil sales. Pov
DivisionDescriptionShow
ZuliaZulia State (Spanish: Estado Zulia, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈsulja]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is Maracaibo. As of the 2011 census, it has a population of 3,704,404, the largest population among Venezuela's states. It is also one of the few states (if not the only one) in Venezuela in which voseo is widely used. Zulia State is in northwestern Venezuela, around Maracaibo Lake, the largest body of water of its kind in Latin America. Its basin covers one of the largest oil and gas reserves in the Western Hemisphere.Show on map
YaracuyYaracuy State (Spanish: Estado Yaracuy, IPA: [esˈtaðo ʝaɾaˈkui]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. It is bordered by Falcón in the north, in the west by Lara, in the south by Portuguesa and Cojedes and in the east by Cojedes and Carabobo. Its geography is mountainous: the Andes range ends there, and the Coastal Range begins. It is split by two mountainous systems, the Sierra de Aroa on the North and the Sierra de Nirgua. In between lies the agricultural land drained by the Yaracuy River. Most cities and towns are in this valley, including its capital San Felipe.Show on map
TrujilloTrujillo State (Spanish: Estado Trujillo, IPA: [esˈtaðo tɾuˈxiʎo]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. Its capital is Trujillo but the largest city is Valera. The state is divided into 20 municipalities and 93 parishes. Trujillo State covers a total surface area of 7,198 km² and, has a 2011 census population of 686,367.Show on map
TachiraTáchira State (Spanish: Estado Táchira, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈtatʃiɾa]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is San Cristóbal. Táchira State covers a total surface area of 10,812 square kilometres (4,175 sq mi) and, as of the 2011 census, had a population of 1,168,908.At the end of the 19th century, Táchira state was the place where oil was discovered in Venezuela. It was exploited for many years. Currently, its main economic revenues come from the production of coffee and pineapple. The cattle and agricultural activities play an important role in Táchira's economy. There is also a strong industrial sector which focuses on the processing of potato, sugar, milk, and cheese and the production of textiles.Show on map
SucreSucre State (Spanish: Estado Sucre, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈsukɾe]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is Cumaná. Sucre State covers a total surface area of 11,800 km² and, as of the 2011 census, had a population of 896,921. The most important river in the state is the Manzanares River.Show on map
PortuguesaShow on map
Nueva EspartaNew Sparta State, in Spanish Estado Nueva Esparta (IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈnweβa esˈparta]), is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. It comprises Margarita Island, Coche, and the largely uninhabited Cubagua. The state is the smallest one in area, and is located off the northeast Caribbean coast of Venezuela. It is the only insular state of Venezuela (not including the Federal Dependencies, a federal territory but not a state). The main island of Margarita has an area of 934 km². Its capital city is La Asunción, and the main urban center is Porlamar.Show on map
MonagasMonagas State (Spanish: Estado Monagas, IPA: [esˈtaðo moˈnaɣas]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. Monagas State covers a total surface area of 28,900 km² and, as of the 2011 census, had a population of 905,443. Monagas State is surrounded by Sucre State in the north, Anzoátegui State in the west and south, Bolívar State in the south, Delta Amacuro State in the south and east and the Paria Gulf in the northeast. The capital of the state is Maturín.Show on map
MirandaMiranda State (Spanish: Estado Miranda, IPA: [esˈtaðo miˈɾanda]) is one of the 23 states (estados) of Venezuela and the second most populous after Zulia State. As of the 2011 census, it had a population of 2,675,165 residents. It also has the greatest Human Development Index in Venezuela, according to the Venezuelan National Institute of Statistics. Miranda is an important center for political, economic, cultural and commercial activities. The state relies on a government of 21 municipal mayor-ships and one governor. Miranda State covers a total surface area of 7,955 km².Show on map
MeridaThe Bolivarian State of Mérida (Spanish: Estado Bolivariano de Mérida), commonly known simply as Mérida State (Spanish: Estado de Mérida, IPA: [esˈtaðo ðe ˈmeɾiða]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is Mérida, in the Libertador Municipality. Located in the Western Andean Region, Mérida State covers a total surface area of 11,300 square kilometres (4,363 sq mi), making it the fifteenth-largest in Venezuela. In 2011, had a census population of 828,592, the fourteenth most populous.Show on map
LaraLara State (Spanish: Estado Lara, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈlaɾa]) is one of the 23 states (estados) into which Venezuela is divided. The state capital is Barquisimeto. Lara State covers a total surface area of 19,800 km2 (7,600 sq mi) and, in 2011, had a census population of 1,774,867.Show on map
GuaricoGuárico State (Spanish: Estado Guárico, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈɣwaɾiko]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is San Juan de Los Morros. Guárico State covers a total surface area of 64 986 km² and, in 2011, had a census population of 747,739. It is named for the Guárico River.(See also: Administrative divisions of Venezuela)\nShow on map
Dependencias FederalesThe Federal Dependencies of Venezuela (Spanish Dependencias Federales de Venezuela) encompass most of Venezuela's off shore islands in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Venezuela, excluding those islands which form the State of Nueva Esparta. These islands, with a total area of 342 square kilometres, are sparsely populated - according to the preliminary results of the 2011 Census only 2,155 people live there permanently, with another hundred from Margarita Island who live there seasonally to engage in fishing. Local government is under the authority of the mayor of Caracas.Show on map
CapitalThe Capital District (Spanish: Distrito Capital) of Venezuela is a federal district corresponding to the capital Caracas. It has an area of 433 km2 and there is only one administrative division (municipio), Libertador, which contains about half of Caracas. It is the seat of the federal government and the head of the public powers. The population in 2004 was 2,073,768. The District borders on the states of Vargas and Miranda.Show on map
FalconFalcón State (Spanish: Estado Falcón, IPA: [esˈtaðo falˈkon]) is one of the 23 states (estados) that constitute Venezuela. The state capital is Coro.Show on map
Delta AmacuroDelta Amacuro State (Spanish: Estado Delta Amacuro, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈðelta amaˈkuɾo]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela, and is the location of the Orinoco Delta. The Paria Gulf and the Atlantic Ocean are found to the north, Bolívar State is found to the south, the Atlantic Ocean and Guyana are found to the east, and Monagas State is found to the west. The state capital city is Tucupita. Delta Amacuro State covers a total surface area of 40,200 km² and, in 2007, had a census population of 167,676.Show on map
CojedesCojedes State (Spanish: Estado Cojedes, IPA: [esˈtaðo koˈxeðes]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. The state capital is San Carlos. Cojedes State covers a total surface area of 14,800 km² and, in 2011, had a census population of 323,165.Show on map
CaraboboCarabobo State (Spanish: Estado Carabobo, IPA: [esˈtaðo kaɾaˈβoβo]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela, located in the north of the country, about two hours by car from Caracas. The capital city of this state is Valencia, which is also the country's main industrial center. The state's area is 4,369 km² and as of the 2011 census, had a population of 2,245,744. Carabobo State was the site of the Battle of Carabobo on 24 June 1821. This was a decisive win in the war of independence from Spain, and was led by Simón Bolívar.Show on map
BolivarBolívar (Spanish: Estado Bolívar, IPA: [esˈtaðo βoˈliβar]), is one of the 23 states (estados) into which Venezuela is divided. The state capital city is Ciudad Bolívar. Bolívar State covers a total surface area of 240,500 km² and as of the 2011 census, had a population of 1,410,964.Show on map
BarinasBarinas State (Spanish: Estado Barinas, IPA: [esˈtaðo βaˈɾinas]) is one of the 23 states (estados) into which Venezuela is divided. The state capital is Barinas. Former President Hugo Chávez was born in this state. His brother Adán Chávez is the governor. Barinas State covers a total surface area of 35,200 km² and, in 2011, had an estimated population of 816,264.Show on map
AraguaAragua State (Spanish: Estado Aragua, IPA: [esˈtaðo aˈɾaɣwa]) is located in the north-central region of Venezuela. It has plains and jungles and Caribbean beaches. The most popular are Cata and Choroni. It has Venezuela's first national park which is called Henri Pittier. The capital is Maracay, other important cities include Turmero and El Limón. Aragua State covers a total surface area of 7,014 km² and, based on the 2011 census information, the estimated population of Aragua State in 2012 is 1,630,308 inhabitants.Show on map
ApureApure State (Spanish: Estado Apure, IPA: [esˈtaðo aˈpuɾe]) is one of the 23 states (estados) into which Venezuela is divided. Its territory formed part of the provinces of Mérida, Maracaibo, and Barinas, in accordance with successive territorial ordinations pronounced by the colonial authorities. In 1824 the Department of Apure was created, under jurisdiction of Barinas, which laid the foundations for the current entity. In 1856 it separated from Barinas and for the first time Apure appeared as an independent province, which in 1864 acquired the status of state. In 1881, however, a new territorial division combined Apure and Guayana to form a single state named Bolívar. In 1899 it reestablished its autonomy and finally, by means of the Constitution of 1909, gained its current borders.Show on map
AnzoateguiAnzoátegui State (Spanish: Estado Anzoátegui, IPA: [esˈtaðo ansoˈateɣi]) is one of the 23 component states of Venezuela, located in the northeastern region of the country. Anzoátegui is well known for its beaches that attract many visitors. Its coast consists of a single beach approximately 100 km long. Its capital is the city of Barcelona, and significant cities include Puerto la Cruz and El Tigre.Show on map
AmazonasAmazonas State (Spanish: Estado Amazonas, IPA: [esˈtaðo amaˈsonas]) is one of the 23 states (estados) into which Venezuela is divided. It covers nearly a fifth of the area of Venezuela, but has less than 1% of Venezuela's total population. The state capital is Puerto Ayacucho. The capital until the early 1900s was San Fernando de Atabapo. Although named after the Amazon River, most of the state is drained by the Orinoco River. Amazonas State covers a total surface area of 176,899 km² and, in 2007, had a population of 142,200. Its density is of 0.8 inhabitants per km².Show on map
VargasVargas State (Spanish: Estado Vargas, IPA: [esˈtaðo ˈβarɣas]) is one of the 23 states of Venezuela. Named after Venezuela's first non-military president, José María Vargas, Vargas comprises a coastal region in the north of Venezuela, bordering Aragua to the west, Miranda to the east, the Caribbean Sea to the north and the Capital District to the south. It is home to both the country's largest seaport and airport. The state capital is La Guaira. The Litoral Varguense conurbation it's the principal urban agglomeration in the state, which is part of the Greater Caracas Area.Show on map