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Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as \Washington\, \the District\, or simply \D.C.\, is the capital of the United States. The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any U.S. state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the pre-existing settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria. Named in honor of George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. In 1846, Congress returned the land originally ceded by Virginia; in 1871, it created a single municipal government for the remaining portion of the District. Washington had an estimated population of 672,228 as of July 2015. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to more than one million during the workweek. The Washington metropolitan area, of which the District is a part, has a population of over 6 million, the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area in the country. The centers of all three branches of the federal government of the United States are in the District, including the Congress, President, and Supreme Court. Washington is home to many national monuments and museums, which are primarily situated on or around the National Mall. The city hosts 176 foreign embassies as well as the headquarters of many international organizations, trade unions, non-profit organizations, lobbying groups, and professional associations. A locally elected mayor and a 13‑member council have governed the District since 1973. However, the Congress maintains supreme authority over the city and may overturn local laws. D.C. residents elect a non-voting, at-large congressional delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives, but the District has no representation in the U.S. Senate. The District receives three electoral votes in presidential elections as permitted by the Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1961.
Cities, towns & villages in Washington, D.C.
NameDescriptionShow
Lanier HeightsLanier Heights is a small urban neighborhood located in the northwest section of Washington, D.C., and is one of the early subdivisions which were created within the District of Columbia, but which lay outside of the original, officially-planned City of Washington. Situated two miles north of the White House, Lanier Heights is within the larger and newer neighborhood of Adams Morgan, and is usually considered to be a part of that more prominent locale. The area of Lanier Heights, about 45 acres (18.2 hectares) in size, is bounded by 16th Street on the east, Adams Mill Road and the National Zoo on the west; Columbia Road to the south, and Harvard Street on the north. Developed mostly between 1900 and 1940, Lanier Heights consists primarily of row houses, plus a number of low- and medium-ris Show on map
KenilworthKenilworth is a residential neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., located on the eastern bank of the Anacostia River and just inside the D.C.-Maryland border. A large public housing complex, Kenilworth Courts, dominates the area. The neighborhood is famous for the Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens, a national park whose centerpiece is a series of ponds carved out of Anacostia River marshland. Visitors come especially during June and July to see the beautiful blooming water lilies and lotus flowers. Kenilworth Park, which includes the Kenilworth-Parkside Recreation Center, also carries the neighborhood name, though most of the park's area is actually located adjacent to the modern neighborhoods of Parkside and Eastland Gardens. Show on map
Woodley ParkWoodley Park is a neighborhood in Northwest, Washington, DC. It is bounded on the north by Woodley Road and Klingle Road, on the east by the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park, on the south by Calvert Street, on the southwest by Cleveland Avenue, and on the west by 34th Street. Adjoining neighborhoods are Cleveland Park to the north, Mount Pleasant and Adams Morgan to the east, Kalorama to the south, Woodland-Normanstone Terrace to the southwest, and Massachusetts Heights to the west. Show on map
HillcrestHillcrest is a neighborhood in the southeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., United States. Hillcrest is located on the District-Maryland line in Ward 7, east of the Anacostia River. The National Capital Planning Commission defines Hillcrest as bounded by Branch Avenue SE, Gainesville Street SE, 32nd Street SE, and Alabama Avenue SE. It is bordered on the west by Hillcrest Park, which contains the Winston Education Center, Hillcrest Park Public Tennis Center, Hillcrest Recreation Center, and Washington Seniors Wellness Center. Originally, a separate and much more exclusive neighborhood, Summit Park (bounded by Suitland Road SE, Alabama Avenue SE, and Branch Avenue SE), existed to the east of Hillcrest. But by the late 1960s, it was generally considered to have been absorbed by Hillcrest. The Show on map
Washington, D.C.Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as \"Washington\", \"the District\", or simply \"D.C.\", is the capital of the United States. The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. Show on map
Friendship HeightsFriendship Heights is a residential neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C. and southern Montgomery County, Maryland. Though its borders are not clearly defined, Friendship Heights consists roughly of the neighborhoods and commercial areas around Wisconsin Avenue north of Fessenden Street NW and Tenleytown to Somerset Terrace and Willard Avenue in Maryland, and from River Road in the west to Reno Road and 41st Street in the east. Within Maryland west of Wisconsin Avenue is the so-called \"Village of Friendship Heights,\" technically a special taxation district. Show on map
American University ParkAmerican University Park is a neighborhood of Washington, D.C., named for the American University. AU Park, as it is often abbreviated, is situated against the Maryland border in the Northwest quadrant, bounded by Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Western Avenues. Tenleytown and Friendship Heights lie to the east, Embassy Park to the southeast, and Spring Valley—the actual home of the university's main campus—to the southwest. Politically, it is part of Ward 3 and Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3E. Show on map
Truxton CircleTruxton Circle is a neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C., bordered by New Jersey Avenue to the west, Florida Avenue to the north, New York Avenue to the South, and North Capitol Street to the East. Politically, it is partially in Ward 5. It is bordered on the north by Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park, to the east by Eckington, to the west by Shaw and Mt. Vernon Square Historic District and the south by the NOMA developmental zone. Named for a traffic circle that was demolished in 1947, the neighborhood is reclaiming its identity after decades of being presumed nameless. Show on map
McLean GardensMcLean Gardens is a residential neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C., bounded by Rodman Street NW to the north, Idaho Avenue to the south, Wisconsin Avenue to the east, and 39th Street NW to the west. Prominent residents include D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson. The historically upscale neighborhood is home to many diplomats and political figures. Show on map
CrestwoodCrestwood, which forms part of the residential area known as the Gold Coast on upper 16th Street NW, is an entirely residential neighborhood located in Northwest Washington, D.C. and bordered on three sides by Rock Creek Park. It is known for its affluent, educated and majority black population. Heading north from the White House on 16th Street, Crestwood is among the first neighborhoods that features single-family homes and lawns. Show on map
DeanwoodDeanwood is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., bounded by Eastern Avenue to the northeast, Kenilworth Avenue to the northwest, and Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue to the south. One of Northeast's oldest neighborhoods, Deanwood's relatively low-density, small wood-frame and brick homes, and dense tree cover give it a small-town character that is unique in the District of Columbia. Much of its housing stock dates from the early 20th century. Several well-known African-American architects, including W. Sidney Pittman and Howard D. Woodson, and many skilled local craftsmen designed and built many of its homes. The neighborhood was once home to Nannie Helen Burroughs, an early civil rights leader and the founder of the National Training School for Women and Girls, an independent boardi Show on map
GeorgetownGeorgetown is a historic neighborhood, commercial, and entertainment district located in northwest Washington, D.C., situated along the Potomac River. Founded in 1751 in the Province of Maryland, the port of Georgetown predated the establishment of the federal district and the City of Washington by 40 years. Georgetown remained a separate municipality until 1871, when the United States Congress created a new consolidated government for the whole District of Columbia. A separate act passed in 1895 specifically repealed Georgetown's remaining local ordinances and renamed Georgetown's streets to conform with those in the City of Washington. Show on map
Park ViewPark View is a neighborhood in central Washington, D.C., immediately north of Howard University. The name of the neighborhood comes from its views east over the campus of the Old Soldiers' Home. At the time Park View was developed, and well into the 1960s, the Home's grounds were open to the public as a park. Those grounds were a designed urban landscape, including pedestrian paths and ponds, modeled along the principles of New York City's Central Park. Indeed, when the Home's campus was developed into a public park in the later 1880s, it often was compared to Central Park. Show on map
Shepherd ParkShepherd Park is a neighborhood in the northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. In the years following World War II, restrictive covenants which had prevented Jews and African Americans from purchasing homes in the neighborhood were no longer enforced, and the neighborhood became largely Jewish and African American. Over the past 40 years, the Jewish population of the neighborhood has declined (though it is now increasing again), but the neighborhood has continued to support a thriving upper and middle class African American community. The Shepherd Park Citizens Association and Neighbors Inc. led efforts to stem white flight from the neighborhood in the 1960s and 1970s, and it has remained a continuously integrated neighborhood, with very active and inclusive civic groups. Show on map
Dupont ParkDupont Park is a residential neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Fort Dupont Park to the north, Pennsylvania Avenue SE to the south, Branch Avenue to the west, and Fort Davis Park to the east. The neighborhood civic association uses Fairlawn Avenue and the Anacostia Freeway as the western boundary of the neighborhood. Dupont Park is nestled into the parkland of Fort Davis and Fort Dupont Parks, the grounds of two Civil War-era forts that were constructed for the defense of Washington. The year-round Fort Dupont ice- skating rink is also located in this area. Show on map
North Cleveland ParkNorth Cleveland Park is a neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Albemarle Street NW to the north, Rodman and Quebec Streets NW to the south, Wisconsin and Nebraska Avenues NW to the west, and Connecticut Avenue to the east. It is served by the Van Ness–UDC station on the Washington Metro's Red Line, and is therefore — like the adjacent Forest Hills neighborhood — frequently referred to as Van Ness. Show on map
West EndThe West End is a neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., bounded by K Street to the south, Rock Creek Park to the west and north, and New Hampshire Avenue and 21st Street to the east. The West End is so named because it was the westernmost part of the original L'Enfant Plan for the city of Washington, before the annexation of Georgetown. It is home to the embassies of Qatar and Spain as well as the Delegation of the European Union to the United States. The George Washington University and George Washington University Hospital are on the edge of the West End, at Washington Circle. Show on map
Ivy CityIvy City is a small neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. About half the neighborhood is industrial or formerly industrial, dominated by warehouses. The Ivy City Yard, a railroad coach yard and maintenance facility for the passenger railroad Amtrak, is situated northwest across New York Avenue NE. Ivy City was laid out as a suburban development for African Americans in 1873. Development was slow. From 1879 to 1901, the neighborhood hosted the Ivy City Racetrack, a major horse racing facility in the District of Columbia. Construction on the rail yard began in 1907 and was complete within a year, although much of the facilities there were demolished in 1953 and 1954 as railroads switched from coal-fired locomotives to diesel-fueled or electric engines. The Alexand Show on map
River TerraceRiver Terrace is an urban cul-de-sac neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., on the eastern bank of the Anacostia River. River Terrace is Washington, DC's only planned unit development that has an unimpeded connection to and relationship with the Anacostia River. The 2010 U.S. Census reported that River Terrace has a total of 1,962 residents who live in 998 households. In addition to single-family row houses and semi-detached houses, the neighborhood has about 75 rental apartments in 7 low-rise multi-family buildings. Show on map
Manor ParkManor Park is a neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C.. The National Capital Planning Commission 1967 \"District Communities\" map indicates this neighborhood is roughly bounded by Fifth Street NW on the west, North Capitol Street and Blair Road on the east, Aspen Street to the north, and Missouri Avenue NW to the south. In 1940, the Manor Park Citizens Association deemed the boundaries to be Eighth Street, Whittier Street, North Capitol Street, and Concord Street (now Missouri Avenue). Show on map
HawthorneHawthorne is a neighborhood of 308 single family homes in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C.. \"According to neighborhood lore,\" the subdivision was named for the hawthorn trees once abundant in the area. The neighborhood borders Montgomery County, Maryland, and is bounded by Pinehurst Tributary to the south, Western Avenue to the northwest, and Rock Creek Park to the east. Hawthorne students are zoned to Lafayette Elementary School, Alice Deal Middle School, and Woodrow Wilson High School. Show on map
GreenwayGreenway is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. The neighborhood is bounded by East Capitol Street to the north, Pennsylvania Avenue SE to the south, Interstate 295 to the west, and Minnesota Avenue to the east. As of the start of the 21st century, residents of Greenway are largely poor, and the neighborhood is characterized by multi-family homes and public housing projects. Show on map
Potomac HeightsPotomac Heights is a neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C., overlooking the Potomac River from MacArthur Boulevard westward. Potomac Heights is the part of the Palisades bounded to the north by Loughboro Road and to the south by Chain Bridge and Arizona Avenue NW. It is part of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3D in Ward 3, the far northwest corner of the Northwest Quadrant just north of Georgetown. Sights in the area include Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historic Park, Andrew S. Edwards Island, and Chain Bridge. Show on map
Naylor GardensNaylor Gardens is a small neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Alabama Avenue SE, 30th Street SE, Erie Street SE, 32nd Street SE, Gainesville Street SE, 31st Street SE, and Naylor Road SE. The neighborhood is located in the area south and east of the Anacostia River. Show on map
Penn BranchPenn Branch is a neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., east of the Anacostia River. It is bounded by Pennsylvania Avenue SE to the south; Pope Branch Park and Pope Creek to the north; Branch Avenue to the west; and Fort Davis Park to the east. ‘Penn Branch’, takes its name from its location at the intersection of two major thoroughfares, Pennsylvania and Branch Avenues. Show on map
The PalisadesThe Palisades, or simply Palisades, is a neighborhood in Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River, running roughly from the edge of the Georgetown University campus (at Foxhall Road) to the D.C.-Maryland boundary (near Dalecarlia Treatment Plant). MacArthur Boulevard (once called Conduit Road) is the main thoroughfare that passes through the Palisades. Show on map
BrooklandBrookland is a neighborhood in the Northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., historically centered along 12th Street NE. Brookland is bounded by 9th Street NE to the west, Rhode Island Avenue NE to the south, and South Dakota Avenue to the east. Michigan Avenue is the northern boundary between 9th and 14th Streets; The President Lincoln and Soldiers' Home National Monument is also located near Brookland. (It is technically in Park View.) The Lincoln cottage was the once rural place where President Abraham Lincoln spent the summers of 1862 to 1864, to escape the heat and political pressures of Washington. Brookland has been nicknamed \"Little Rome\" by some for the many Catholic institutions clustered around The Catholic University of America (CUA) which lives atop what was Fort Slemmer, constr Show on map
Fort DavisFort Davis is a residential neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C., on the border between the District of Columbia and Maryland. It is bounded by Southern Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue SE, and Alabama Avenue SE/Bowen Road SE. Fort Davis Park abuts the western corner of the neighborhood. This park was the site of an American Civil War fort that gives the neighborhood its name. Fort Dupont Park is adjacent to the neighborhood's northern border on Alabama Avenue SE between Massachusetts Avenue SE and Burns Street SE. Show on map
Adams MorganAdams Morgan is a culturally diverse neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C., centered at the intersection of 18th Street and Columbia Road. Adams Morgan is considered to be the center of Washington's Hispanic immigrant community, and is a major night life area with many bars and restaurants, particularly along 18th Street (the primary commercial district) and Columbia Road. Much of the neighborhood is composed of 19th- and early 20th-century row houses and apartment buildings. Show on map
Capitol ViewCapitol View is a neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is bounded by East Capitol Street to the north, Central Avenue SE to the southwest and south, and Southern Avenue SE to the southeast. Overwhelmingly poor and African American, the neighborhood was one of the most violent and drug-ridden in the 1980s and 1990s. The Capitol View neighborhood has seen several large, poorly maintained public housing projects demolished within the past decade. The government of the District of Columbia partnered with private real estate developers to construct the Capitol Gateway mixed-use development between 2000 and 2010. A second phase in the project, will include a large new Wal-mart store and other retail businesses, construction will begin in 2015. Show on map
Randle HighlandsRandle Highlands is a neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., east of the Anacostia River. Show on map
Cleveland ParkCleveland Park is a residential neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C.It is located at 38°56′11″N 77°3′58″W / 38.93639°N 77.06611°W and bounded approximately by Rock Creek Park to the east, Wisconsin and Idaho Avenues to the west, Klingle and Woodley Roads to the south, and Rodman and Tilden Streets to the north. Its main commercial corridor lies along Connecticut Avenue, NW, where the eponymous Cleveland Park station of the Washington Metro's Red Line can be found; another commercial corridor lies along Wisconsin Avenue. The neighborhood is known for its many late 19th century homes and the historic Art Deco Uptown Theater. It is also home to the William L. Slayton House and the Park and Shop, built in 1930 and one of the earliest strip malls. Show on map
GatewayGateway is the name of a small industrial and residential neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by New York Avenue NE to the south and southeast, Bladensburg Road to the west, and South Dakota Avenue to the northeast. Gateway is across New York Avenue from the U.S. National Arboretum. Gateway is home to the printing press facility for the Washington Times newspaper. Show on map
Shipley TerraceShipley Terrace, formerly known as Randle Heights, is a large residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., bordering Prince George's County, Maryland. The neighborhood, named after a former public housing complex in the neighborhood, which was largely occupied by low-income housing — primarily walkup and garden unit apartments. This neighborhood now has a mix of townhome communities, large single family home communities, as well as some low-income housing. It is a model neighborhood for the Hope VI revitalization Grant Program. Show on map
Wesley HeightsWesley Heights is a small neighborhood of Washington, DC situated south of Tenleytown. It is bordered by New Mexico Avenue (on the East), Nebraska Avenue (on the North), Battery-Kemble Park (on the West) and Glover Parkway (on the South). Foxhall Road is the main roadway passing through Wesley Heights. Wesley Heights is in Northwest, in Ward 3 and Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3D. Show on map
Garfield HeightsGarfield Heights is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., bordering Prince George's County, Maryland. Garfield Heights contains both apartment units and single-family detached houses. Garfield Heights has gone through a wave of physical renovation and an increase in property values since 2006, along with an influx of wealthier residents. Rental apartment buildings throughout the quiet neighborhood have been converted to luxury style condominiums. Recently, Garfield Heights has emerged as one of Southeast's up-and-coming neighborhoods. Show on map
Foggy BottomFoggy Bottom is one of the oldest late 18th and 19th-century neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. Foggy Bottom is west of downtown Washington, in the Northwest quadrant, bounded roughly by 17th Street to the east, Rock Creek Parkway to the west, Constitution Avenue to the south, and Pennsylvania Avenue to the north. Much of Foggy Bottom is occupied by the main campus of George Washington University (GWU). Foggy Bottom is thought to have received its name due to its riverside location, which made it susceptible to concentrations of fog and industrial smoke, an atmospheric quirk. Show on map
Barnaby WoodsBarnaby Woods is a neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., wedged between Rock Creek Park and Montgomery County, Maryland. It is bounded on the north by Aberfoyle Place, on the west by Western Avenue, on the south by Tennyson Street, and on the east by Oregon Avenue. Barnaby Woods is entirely residential, with no commercial zoning whatsoever, and the housing consists primarily of 1930s colonial homes on large parcels of land although on Unicorn Lane NW there are only townhouses. Show on map
SoutheastSoutheast (SE or S.E.) is the southeastern quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, and is located south of East Capitol Street and east of South Capitol Street. It includes the Capitol Hill and Anacostia neighborhoods, the Navy Yard, the Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB), the U.S. Marine Barracks, the Anacostia River waterfront, Eastern Market, the remains of several Civil War-era forts, historic St. Elizabeths Hospital, RFK Stadium, Nationals Park, and the Congressional Cemetery. It is also contains a landmark known as \"The Big Chair,\" located on Martin Luther King Avenue. The quadrant is bisected by the Anacostia River, with the portion that is west of the river sometimes referred to as \"Near Southeast\". Show on map
EckingtonEckington is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., located south of the Prospect Hill and Glenwood Cemeteries. Eckington is less than one mile (1.6 km) southeast of Howard University and exactly one mile north of the United States Capitol. Eckington is also the home of the District of Columbia office of Sirius XM Radio. The boundaries of Eckington are Rhode Island Avenue to the north, Florida Avenue to the south, North Capitol Street to the west, and Washington Metro's Brentwood Yard to the east. Show on map
University HeightsUniversity Heights is a neighborhood adjacent to The Catholic University of America in Northeast Washington, D.C.. It is located east of the University and west of the Franciscan Monastery, bounded by the tracks for the Red Line of the Washington Metro to the west; 14th Street NE to the east; Taylor Street to the north; and Otis Street to the south. University Heights is often thought of as a section of the Brookland neighborhood, largely because Brookland Elementary School is inside University Heights, but is actually a separate neighborhood north of Brookland proper. Show on map
BellevueBellevue is a residential neighborhood in far Southwest in Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is bounded by South Capitol Street, a block of Atlantic Street SE, and 1st Street SE and SW to the north and east; Joliet Street SW and Oxon Run Parkway to the south; Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE, Shepherd Parkway, 2nd Street SW, and Xenia Street SW to the west. Bellevue was created from some of the earliest land patents in Maryland, and draws its name from a 1795 mansion built in the area. Subdivisions began in the 1870s, but extensive residential building did not occur until the early 1940s. Bellevue is adjacent to a number of federal and city agency buildings. Show on map
Michigan ParkMichigan Park is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C.. It is bordered by Gallatin Street NE to the north, 6th Street NE to the west, Taylor Street NE and Michigan Avenue to the south, and South Dakota Avenue to the east. Michigan Park is home to Providence Hospital. Show on map
Mount Vernon SquareMount Vernon Square is a Washington Metro station in Washington, D.C., on the Green and Yellow Lines. During rush hours, this is the northern terminus for Yellow Line service to Huntington, and trains reverse direction using a pocket track just north of the station. Metro has been running off-peak and weekend Yellow Line trains north to Fort Totten since 2006, and three rush hour only Yellow Line trains per hour between Greenbelt and Franconia-Springfield as part of the Rush Plus service pattern, which began on June 18, 2012. Mount Vernon Square is the least-used station within the Metro system's core section, seeing only 3,813 entries each weekday. Show on map
Massachusetts Avenue HeightsMassachusetts Heights is a small neighborhood in Northwest Washington, DC, dominated by the grounds of the Washington National Cathedral. The neighborhood is bounded to the north by Woodley Road, to the southwest by Massachusetts Avenue, to the east by 34th Street NW, and to the west by Wisconsin Avenue. Show on map
ChinatownChinatown in Washington, D.C.(Chinese: 華府華埠; pinyin: huá fǔ huà bù), is a small, historic borough east of downtown consisting of about 20 ethnic Chinese and other Asian restaurants and small businesses along H and I Streets between 5th and 8th Streets, Northwest. It is known for its annual Chinese New Year festival and parade and the Friendship Arch, a Chinese gate built over H Street at 7th Street. Other nearby prominent landmarks include the Verizon Center, a sports and entertainment arena, and the Old Patent Office Building, which houses two of the Smithsonian Museums. The neighborhood is served by the Gallery Place-Chinatown station of the Washington Metro. Show on map
Brightwood ParkBrightwood Park is a small neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C. in the United States. The neighborhood is bounded by Georgia Avenue NW to the west, Missouri Avenue NW to the northeast and Emerson Street NW to the south. It is located in Ward 4, which is represented in the Council of the District of Columbia by Brandon Todd. Show on map
FoxhallFoxhall is an affluent neighborhood in Washington, D.C., bordered by Reservoir Road on the north side and Foxhall Road on the west and south sides. Glover-Archbold Park makes up the eastern border.The first homes were constructed along Reservoir Road and Greenwich Park Way in the mid-1920s. By the end of December, 1927, some 150 homes had been erected, and the community given the name of Foxhall Village. Show on map
Kingman ParkKingman Park is a residential neighborhood in the Northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital city of the United States. Kingman Park's boundaries are 15th Street NE to the west; C Street SE to the south; Benning Road to the north; and Anacostia Park to the east. The neighborhood is composed primarily of two-story brick rowhouses (most of which were built when the neighborhood was founded in 1928). Kingman Park is named after Brigadier General Dan Christie Kingman, the former head of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (for whom nearby Kingman Island and Kingman Lake are also named). Show on map
North Michigan ParkNorth Michigan Park is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C.. It is bordered by Gallatin Street NE to the north, South Dakota Avenue to the west, Michigan Avenue to the south, and Eastern Avenue to the east. Show on map
Buena VistaBuena Vista is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. Buena Vista is located in Ward 8. The neighborhood is dominated by detached single-family housing and multi-family apartment complexes. Buena Vista is in a hilly region. Roads in the area follow the topography, with most streets narrow and winding. Buena Vista's high elevation means that the neighborhood has expansive views of downtown Washington, including the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument. One of the largest condominium complexes in the neighborhood is Washington View. Show on map
Congress HeightsCongress Heights is a residential neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. The irregularly shaped neighborhood is bounded by the St. Elizabeths Hospital campus, Lebaum Street SE, 4th Street SE, and Newcomb Street SE on the northeast; Shepard Parkway and South Capitol Street on the west; Atlantic Street SE and 1st Street SE (as far as Chesapeake Street SE) on the south; Oxon Run Parkway on the southeast; and Wheeler Street SE and Alabama Avenue SE on the east. Commercial development is heavy along Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue and Malcolm X Avenue. Show on map
Good HopeGood Hope is a residential neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C, near Anacostia. The neighborhood is generally middle class and is dominated by single-family detached and semi-detached homes. The year-round Fort Dupont Ice Arena skating rink and the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum are nearby. Good Hope is bounded by Fort Stanton Park to the north, Alabama Avenue SE to the south, Naylor Road SE to the west, and Branch Avenue SE to the east. The proposed Skyland Shopping Center redevelopment project is within the boundaries of the neighborhood. Show on map
BloomingdaleBloomingdale is a neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., less than two miles (3 km) north of the United States Capitol building. It is a primarily residential neighborhood, with a small commercial center near the intersection of Rhode Island Avenue and First Street, NW featuring bars, restaurants, and food markets. Most of Bloomingdale's houses are Victorian-style rowhouses built around 1900 as single-family homes. Today, these houses remain primarily single-family residences, with some recently converted to two-unit condominiums. Show on map
PetworthPetworth is a residential neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C.. It is bounded to the east by the Soldiers’ Home and Rock Creek Church Yard and Cemetery, to the west by Arkansas Avenue NW, to the south by Rock Creek Church Road NW and Spring Road NW, and to the north by Emerson Street NW. Petworth is represented on the Council of the District of Columbia by the Ward 4 councilmember: since May 2015, Brandon Todd. Muriel Bowser served as Ward 4 councilmember until she became the city's mayor on Jan. 2, 2015. Show on map
Fort DupontFort Dupont is a residential neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C, east of the Anacostia River. It is bounded by East Capitol Street to the north, Fort Dupont Park to the south, Minnesota Avenue to the west, and Fort Chaplin Park to the east and northeast. Fort Dupont is adjacent to Fort Dupont Park, the grounds of a Civil War-era fort that was constructed for the defense of Washington. Fort Dupont is a distinct neighborhood from the nearby Dupont Park, although both border the park and take their name from it. Show on map
BurleithBurleith is a moderately upscale neighborhood in Washington, D.C. It is bordered by 35th Street to the East, Reservoir Road and the historic Georgetown district to the south, Whitehaven Park to the North and Glover Archbold Park to the West. The neighborhood is home to the Duke Ellington School of the Arts and the Washington International School (primary campus). It is also adjacent to the French embassy and Georgetown University. It is often referred to as \"the Village in the City.\" Show on map
Forest HillsForest Hills is a residential neighborhood in the northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., United States, bounded by Connecticut Avenue NW to the west, Rock Creek Park to the east, Chevy Chase to the north, and Tilden Street NW to the south. The neighborhood is frequently referred to as Van Ness, both because of its proximity to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC)'s Van Ness campus, and because it is served by the Van Ness–UDC station on the Washington Metro's Red Line. Show on map
WoodridgeWoodridge is a residential neighborhood located on the northeastern edge of Washington, D.C., bounded by Eastern Avenue on the east, Michigan Avenue to the north, South Dakota then 18th St. to the west, and Bladensburg Road to the south. Its central commercial strips are Rhode Island Avenue NE and Bladensburg Road NE. It is located roughly between the neighborhoods of Brookland in D.C. to the northwest, Brentwood to the west and the city of Mount Rainier, Maryland to the east. Show on map
Knox Hill DwellingsKnox Hill is a small neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is almost entirely occupied by a public housing complex of the same name. Knox Hill lies in Washington's Ward 8, long the poorest and least developed of the city's wards. Like the neighborhoods around it, Knox Hill is almost exclusively African American. Knox Hill is bounded by Hartford Street and Knox Place to the north, Alabama Avenue to the east, Jasper Street to the south, and Fort Stanton Park to the west. Show on map
LangdonLangdon, sometimes called Langdon Park, is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C.. In modern times, Langdon is generally considered a subdivision of Woodridge. Historical surveys of D.C. recognize Langdon as a neighborhood dating back to at least 1903. Langdon is bounded by Montana Ave. NE to the west/southwest, New York Ave. NE to the south, Bladensburg Rd. NE to the southeast, South Dakota Ave. NE to the northeast, and Rhode Island Ave. NE to the north/northwest. Show on map
Central NortheastCentral Northeast, also sometimes called Mahaning Heights, is a small neighborhood located in Northeast Washington, D.C with Fort Mahan Park at its center. It is bounded by Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue to the north, Benning Road to the south, the tracks of the Washington Metro and Minnesota Ave station to the west, and 44th Street NE to the east. It is home to the Friendship Collegiate Academy, a public charter high school. This neighborhood is part of Ward 7. Show on map
FairlawnFairlawn is a working class and middle class residential neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Interstate 295, Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Minnesota Avenue SE (between Pennsylvania Avenue SE and Naylor Road SE), Naylor Road SE (between Minnesota Avenue SE Good Hope Road SE), and Good Hope Road SE. Fairlawn is located at 38°52′15″N 076°58′44″W / 38.87083°N 76.97889°W (38.8709456, -76.9788641), at an elevation of 26 feet (8 metres). Show on map
Eastland GardensEastland Gardens is a small residential neighborhood, located in northeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Eastern Avenue NE to the north, the Watts Branch Tributary to the south, CSX Transportation tracks to the east and the Anacostia River to the west. Eastland Gardens is in Ward Seven of Washington, D.C. Many of its 300 homes were designed by African-American architects or constructed by African-American builders. Development began in 1927. Show on map
Colonial VillageColonial Village was an area in northwest Washington, D.C., built in 1931 with 80 residences. The homes are reproductions of colonial buildings, such as the Moore House, where Cornwall surrendered at Yorktown. The community was mostly Protestant, in contrast to the nearby 220-house North Portal Estates, which was a mostly Jewish neighborhood. After the mid-20th century, both Colonial Village and North Portal Estates became part of Shepherd Park. Show on map
AnacostiaAnacostia is a Washington Metro station in Washington, D.C. on the Green Line. The station is located in the Anacostia neighborhood of Southeast Washington, with entrances at Shannon Place and Howard Road near Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE (a major street serving the southeastern portion of the city). The station serves as a hub for Metrobus routes in Southeast, Washington, D.C. and Prince George's County, Maryland. Show on map
Glover ParkGlover Park is a neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C., about a half mile north of Georgetown and just west of the United States Naval Observatory and Number One Observatory Circle (the Vice President's mansion). Every morning and evening, Glover Park residents can hear the Naval Observatory play the sounding of colors synchronized to the nation's Master Clock. It is named after Charles Carroll Glover. Show on map
SouthwestSouthwest (SW or S.W.) is the southwestern quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, and is located south of the National Mall and west of South Capitol Street. It is the smallest quadrant of the city. Southwest is small enough that it is frequently referred to as a neighborhood in and of itself. However, it actually contains five separate neighborhoods. Show on map
Mount PleasantMount Pleasant is a neighborhood in the northwestern quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The neighborhood is bounded by Rock Creek Park to the north and west; and Harvard Street, NW, and the Adams Morgan neighborhood to the south; and Sixteenth Street, NW, and the Columbia Heights neighborhood to the east. The neighborhood is home to about 10,000 people. Show on map
Fairfax VillageFairfax Village is a small neighborhood of garden apartments and townhouses located in southeast Washington, D.C in the Hillcrest area. It is bound by Alabama Avenue SE to the northwest, Pennsylvania Avenue SE to the northeast, Suitland Road to the southwest, and Southern Avenue to the east. At one time, former mayor Marion Barry lived close to here. Also see article on Anacostia. Show on map
KentKent is a neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C. in the United States, bounded by Loughboro Road to the north, MacArthur Boulevard to the southwest, and Chain Bridge Road and Battery Kemble Park to the southeast. It is a suburban neighborhood, home to some of the most expensive homes in the city with an average home sales price in 2012 of $1.7 million ($1.75 million today). Show on map
Benning HeightsBenning Heights is a residential neighborhood located in southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by East Capitol Street to the south, Brooks Street NE to the north, 44th Street NE and Benning Road NE to the west, and Division Avenue NE to the east. It is served by the Benning Road Metro Rail station on the Blue Line and Silver Line of the Washington Metro (Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority/WMATA). Politically, Benning Heights is in Ward 7. Show on map
TwiningTwining is a neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., near the eastern bank of the Anacostia River. It is bounded by Minnesota Avenue NE to the northeast, Branch Avenue to the northwest, and Pennsylvania Avenue to the south. The Fort Dupont year-round ice skating rink, and the Smithsonian's Anacostia Neighborhood Museum are nearby. Also see article on Anacostia. It is named for Major William Johnson Twining, who served as Military Commissioner of the District of Columbia from 1878 until his death in 1882. Show on map
Washington HighlandsWashington Highlands is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. It lies within Ward 8, and is one of the poorest and most crime-ridden sections of the city. Most residents live in large public and low-income apartment complexes, although there are extensive tracts of single-family detached homes in the neighborhood. Show on map
Spring ValleySpring Valley is an affluent neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C., known for its large homes and tree-lined streets and more recently for being a military superfund site of former Camp Leach. It houses most of the main campus of American University, which gives its name to the neighborhood to Spring Valley's northeast, American University Park. Show on map
BenningBenning is a residential neighborhood located in Northeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by East Capitol Street to the south, Minnesota Avenue to the west, and Benning Road (for which the neighborhood is named) on the north and east. It is served by the Benning Road station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro. Politically, Benning is in Ward 7. Show on map
Northeast BoundaryNortheast Boundary is a small neighborhood located in northeast Washington, D.C. It is Eastern Avenue to the northeast, Southern Avenue to the southeast, Marvin Gaye Park to the southwest, 55th Street NE to the west. Northeast Boundary immediately borders Seat Pleasant, Maryland. Show on map
Cathedral HeightsCathedral Heights is a small, residential neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. It is approximately bounded by Woodley Road to the north, Fulton Street to the south, Wisconsin Avenue to the east, and Glover Archbold Park and Idaho Avenue to the west. Show on map
Marshall HeightsMarshall Heights is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by East Capitol Street, Central Avenue SE, Southern Avenue, Fitch Street SE, and Benning Road SE. Long an undeveloped rural area occupied by extensive African American shanty towns, the neighborhood received nationwide attention after a visit by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in 1934, which led to extensive infrastructure improvements and development for the first time. In the 1950s, Marshall Heights residents defeated national legislation designed to raze and redevelop the neighborhood. Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom visited the area in 1991, at a time when Marshall Heights was in the throes of a violent crack cocaine epidemic. Limited redevelopment has occurred in the neighborhood, which wa Show on map
Riggs ParkRiggs Park is a residential neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Riggs Road NE to the south and east, Eastern Avenue to the north, and Blair Road NE, Kansas Avenue NE, and North Capitol Street NE to the west. Show on map
Rock Creek GardensRock Creek Gardens is an affluent residential neighborhood in Northwest, Washington, D.C. It is bounded by West Beach Drive to the east and northeast, Parkside Drive to the south and southwest, and Rock Creek Park to the northeast. Show on map
Lincoln HeightsLincoln Heights is a residential neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue to the north, Blaine Street to the south, Division Avenue to the west, and 49th Street NE to the east. Show on map
ShawShaw is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., named after Union Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, the commander of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War. Show on map
BrightwoodBrightwood is a neighborhood located in the northwestern quadrant of Washington, D.C. Brightwood and the rest of Ward 4 are represented in the Council of the District of Columbia by Brandon Todd. Show on map
Buzzard PointBuzzard Point is an urbanized area located on the peninsula formed by the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers in the southwest quadrant of Washington, DC, USA. Show on map
Chevy ChaseChevy Chase is a neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C. It borders Chevy Chase, Maryland, a collection of similarly affluent neighborhoods. Show on map
TrinidadTrinidad is a neighborhood located in Ward 5, in the northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C. and is a largely residential area. Show on map
TenleytownTenleytown is a historic neighborhood in Northwest, Washington, D.C. Show on map
Columbia HeightsColumbia Heights is a neighborhood in central Washington, D.C. Show on map
EdgewoodEdgewood is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, D.C., USA. Edgewood is bounded by Lincoln Road and Glenwood Cemetery to the west; the tracks for the Red Line of the Washington Metro to the east; Rhode Island Avenue NE to the south; and the combination of Irving Street, Michigan Avenue, and Monroe Street to the north. Edgewood is in Ward 5. Show on map
States, regions, administrative units in Washington, D.C.
NameDescriptionShow
District of ColumbiaWashington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as \"Washington\", \"the District\", or simply \"D.C.\", is the capital of the United States. The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. Show on map
Different buildings in Washington, D.C.
NameDescriptionShow
Library of CongressThe Library of Congress is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress, but which is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., and also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center. Show on map
William H Greene StadiumWilliam H. Greene Stadium is a 7,086-seat multi-purpose stadium in Washington, D.C., in the United States, which opened in 1926. It is home to the Howard University Bison football and soccer teams. Originally called Howard Stadium, it was renamed William H. Greene Stadium in 1986 in honor of William H. Greene, M.D., a Washington, D.C., physician. Show on map
Washington Theological Union SchoolWashington Theological Union (WTU), a Roman Catholic graduate school of theology and seminary in Washington, D.C. in the United States, was founded in 1968, stopped accepting students in 2011, and suspended its operation in June 2015. Founded by religious communities of men for presbyteral (priestly) education, their vision expanded to include theological education for religious communities of women as well as deacons, lay men and women and members of other faith traditions from the United States and many foreign countries. It closed its doors because of financial difficulties, low enrollment, and declining vocations. It was housed in a building at 6896 Laurel St. NW. Show on map
Benjamin Ogle Tayloe HouseThe Benjamin Ogle Tayloe House is a Federal-style house located at 21 Madison Place NW in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The house is on the northeast corner of Madison Place NW and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, directly across the street from the White House and the Treasury Building. Built in 1828 by Benjamin Ogle Tayloe, son of Colonel John Tayloe III (who built the famous Octagon House), the house became a salon for politically powerful people in the federal government. Show on map
Robert F Kennedy Memorial StadiumRobert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, commonly known as RFK Stadium, is a multi-purpose stadium in Washington, D.C., located about two miles (3 km) due east of the U.S. Capitol building. It is the current home of D.C. United of Major League Soccer and the AT&T Nation's Football Classic, as well as the de facto national stadium of the U.S. men's national soccer team. Show on map
Melvin Gelman LibraryThe Estelle and Melvin Gelman Library, simply referred to as the Gelman Library, is the main library of The George Washington University, and is located on its Foggy Bottom campus. The Gelman Library, the Eckles Library on the Mount Vernon campus and the Virginia Science and Technology Campus Library in Ashburn comprise the trio known as the George Washington University Libraries. The Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library and the Jacob Burns Law Library also serve the university. The Gelman Library is a member of the Washington Research Library Consortium and the Association of Research Libraries. Show on map
J Edgar Hoover Federal Bureau of Investigation BuildingThe J. Edgar Hoover Building is a high-rise office building located at 935 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is the headquarters of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Planning for the building began in 1962, and a site was formally selected in January 1963. Design work, focusing on avoiding the typical blocky, monolithic structure typical of most federal architecture at the time, began in 1963 and was largely complete by 1964 (although final approval did not occur until 1967). Land clearance and excavation of the foundation began in March 1965; delays in obtaining congressional funding meant that only the three-story substructure was complete by 1970. Work on the superstructure began in May 1971. These delays meant that the cost of the project gre Show on map
Theodore Roosevelt Memorial BridgeThe Theodore Roosevelt Bridge (also known as the Teddy Roosevelt Bridge or the Roosevelt Bridge) is a bridge crossing the Potomac River which connects Washington, D.C., with the Commonwealth of Virginia. The bridge crosses over Theodore Roosevelt Island, and carries Interstate 66/U.S. Route 50. The center lane in the bridge is reversible; the middle barrier is moved with a barrier transfer machine. The bridge is named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States. Show on map
Washington MonumentThe Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the first American president. Located almost due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial, the monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world's tallest stone structure and the world's tallest obelisk, standing 554 feet 7 11⁄32 inches (169.046 m) tall according to the National Geodetic Survey (measured 2013–14) or 555 feet 5 1⁄8 inches (169.294 m) tall according to the National Park Service (measured 1884). In 1975, construction raised the ground or pavement around the base of the monument the most since 1884, reducing the remaining height to its apex. It is the tallest monumental c Show on map
Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox CathedralSaint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral was founded as a church in 1904 to serve the Greek Orthodox residents of the District of Columbia. In 1962, the church was elevated to a cathedral under the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of America in New York City and serves as his cathedral in Washington. The church is not named for Saint Sophia the martyr, but rather the Holy Wisdom of God in the tradition of Hagia Sophia of Constantinople. The building is in the Neo-Byzantine style with a central dome that reaches 80 ft (24 m) in height. Show on map
Miller HouseMiller House is a mansion on the Embassy Row section of Massachusetts Avenue in Washington, D.C.. It was designed by Paul J. Pelz, the architect of the Library of Congress, in the Northern Renaissance style, and built in 1900-01 for Commander Frederick Augustus Miller (1842–1909). Because Miller had been a U.S. Navy officer during the U.S. Civil War the house includes a number of maritime motifs, including the statue of a ship's cat on the ledge facing Massachusetts Avenue. Show on map
Georgetown UniversityGeorgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic and Jesuit institution of higher education in the United States. Located in Washington's historic Georgetown neighborhood, the university's main campus is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark. Georgetown's law school is located on Capitol Hill, and the university has auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey and Qatar. Show on map
Catholic University of AmericaThe Catholic University of America (CUA) is a private university located in Washington, D.C. in the United States. It is a pontifical university of the Catholic Church in the United States and the only institution of higher education founded by the U.S. Catholic bishops. Established in 1887 as a graduate and research center following approval by Pope Leo XIII on Easter Sunday, the university began offering undergraduate education in 1904. The university's campus lies within the Brookland neighborhood, known as \"Little Rome\", which contains 60 Catholic institutions, including Trinity Washington University and the Dominican House of Studies. Show on map
National Zoo EntranceThe National Zoological Park, commonly known as the National Zoo, is one of the oldest zoos in the United States, and as part of the Smithsonian Institution, does not charge admission. Founded in 1889, its mission is to provide leadership in animal care, science, education, sustainability, and visitor experience. The National Zoo has two campuses. The first is a 163-acre (66 ha) urban park located in northwest Washington, D.C. that is 20 minutes from the National Mall by Metro to the Woodley Park station, or downhill walk from the Cleveland Park station. The other campus is the 3,200-acre (1,300 ha) Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI; formerly known as the Conservation and Research Center) in Front Royal, Virginia. On this land there are 180 species of trees, 850 species of w Show on map
Washington National CathedralThe Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the City and Diocese of Washington, operated under the more familiar name of Washington National Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Episcopal Church located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. Of Neo-Gothic design closely modeled on English Gothic style of the late fourteenth century, it is the sixth-largest cathedral in the world, the second-largest in the United States, and the highest as well as the fourth-tallest structure in Washington, D.C. The cathedral is the seat of both the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Michael Bruce Curry, and the Bishop of the Diocese of Washington, Mariann Edgar Budde. In 2009, nearly 400,000 visitors toured the structure. Average attendance at Sunday services in 2009 was 1,667, Show on map
Environmental Protection AgencyThe United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or sometimes USEPA) is an agency of the Federal government of the United States which was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress. The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon and began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon signed an executive order. The order establishing the EPA was ratified by committee hearings in the House and Senate. The agency is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the president and approved by Congress. The current administrator is Gina McCarthy. The EPA is not a Cabinet department, but the administrator is normally given cabinet rank. Show on map
University of California Washington CenterUCDC (an acronym which stands for \"University of California-District of Columbia\") is an internship program sponsored by the University of California which places undergraduates in quarter/semester or summer internships in Washington, D.C. Residents are housed in the UC Washington Center, the Washington, D.C. campus of the University of California. The Center also houses the offices of the University of California Office of Federal Governmental Relations. Show on map
Woodrow Wilson Memorial BridgeThe Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge (also known as the Woodrow Wilson Bridge or the Wilson Bridge) is a bascule bridge that spans the Potomac River between the independent city of Alexandria, Virginia, and Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States. The bridge is one of only a handful of drawbridges in the U.S. Interstate Highway System. It contained the only portion of the Interstate system owned and operated by the federal government, but was turned over to the Virginia and Maryland departments of transportation upon project completion. Show on map
New Executive Office BuildingThe New Executive Office Building (NEOB) is a U.S. federal government office building in Washington, D.C., for the executive branch. The building is located at 725 17th Street NW, on the north side of Pennsylvania Avenue. To the south is the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB), which is next to the White House. The other sides are bounded by 17th Street NW (west), H Street NW (north), and Jackson Place and Lafayette Park (east). Within the same block are several buildings: Blair House, Trowbridge House, and Renwick Gallery in the south and the Decatur House to the north. Show on map
Nationals ParkNationals Park is a baseball park located along the Anacostia River in the Navy Yard neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It is the home ballpark for the Washington Nationals, the city's Major League Baseball franchise. When the Nationals franchise relocated to Washington, D.C., they temporarily played at RFK Stadium until Nationals Park was completed. It is the first LEED-certified green major professional sports stadium in the United States. The facility hosted the 2008 season's first game (in North America), when the Nationals hosted the Atlanta Braves on March 30, 2008 and the first game played there was a collegiate baseball game. Show on map
Thomas Law HouseThe Thomas Law House (Honeymoon House) was constructed between 1794 and 1796 near present day 6th and N Streets, Southwest in Washington, D.C. The builder was a syndicate headed by James Greenleaf, an early land speculator in the District of Columbia. Thomas Law spent many years in India, where he made a fortune in trade. Law came to Washington, D.C., in the summer of 1794. He was one of Washington's wealthiest citizens and was active, although not successful, in business enterprises. He eventually lost his fortune. Show on map
Embassy of the PhilippinesThe Embassy of the Philippines in Washington, D.C. (Filipino: Pasuguan ng Pilipinas sa Washington D.C) is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of the Philippines to the United States. It is located at 1600 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C. It predates the independence of the Philippines, and is the oldest Philippine legation overseas, though the distinction of the first Philippine embassy proper overseas, belongs to the Philippine Embassy in Tokyo. The old building, meanwhile, was converted into the embassy's Consular section in the late 2000s. Show on map
John F Kennedy Center for the Performing ArtsThe John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (on the building itself called the John F. Kennedy Memorial Center for the Performing Arts, and commonly referred to as the Kennedy Center) is a performing arts center located on the Potomac River, adjacent to the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. The Center, which opened September 8, 1971, produces and presents theater, dance, ballet, orchestral, chamber, jazz, popular, and folk music, in addition to multi-media performances for all ages. Show on map
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate ConceptionThe Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is a prominent Roman Rite Catholic basilica located in Washington, D.C., United States of America, honoring the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Immaculate Conception, the principal Patroness of the USA. The basilica does not have its own parish community, but serves the adjacent Catholic University of America which donated the land for its construction, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, and hosts numerous Masses for various organizations of the Church from across the United States. Show on map
Art Museum of the AmericasArt Museum of the Americas (AMA) is an art museum located in Washington, D.C., primarily devoted to exhibiting works of modern and contemporary art from Latin America and the Caribbean. The museum was formally established in 1976 by the Organization of American States (OAS). Artists represented in the AMA's permanent collection include Candido Portinari, Pedro Figari, Fernando de Szyszlo, Amelia Peláez and Alejandro Obregón. Show on map
Lauinger LibraryThe Joseph Mark Lauinger Library is the main library of Georgetown University and the center of the seven-library Georgetown library system that includes 2.8 million volumes. It holds 1.7 million volumes on six floors and has accommodations for individual and group study on all levels. It is generally referred to colloquially as \"Lau\" by Georgetown students. Show on map
United States Department of the Interior MuseumThe Interior Museum is a museum operated by the United States Department of the Interior and housed at the Department's headquarters at the Stewart Lee Udall Main Interior Building in Washington, D.C., on the first floor. Admission is free, but valid photo identification must be presented to enter the building. Museum hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30AM to 4:30PM (closed Federal holidays). Building tours are offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2PM; advance reservations are required. Show on map
K Street BridgeThe K Street Bridge is a complex of bridges over Rock Creek and the Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway in Washington, D.C. The lower level of the bridge carries the surface street K Street, while the upper level carries the Whitehurst Freeway (U.S. Route 29) which terminates and merges into K Street immediately east of the bridge. The central bridge is flanked by two flyover ramps that connect to the nearby terminus of Interstate 66. Show on map
Harriet Tubman Elementary SchoolTubman Elementary School is a public elementary school, named after Harriet Tubman, an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the U.S. Civil War. It is located in Washington, DC and is under the jurisdiction of the District of Columbia Public Schools. It was built in 1970, shortly after the 1968 Washington, D.C. riots which ravaged its neighborhood of Columbia Heights. Over five hundred students are currently enrolled from pre-school to fifth grade. Show on map
L'Enfant Plaza HotelThe L'Enfant Plaza Hotel is a hotel located in downtown Washington, D.C., in the United States. It was designed by architect Vlastimil Koubek, and named after Pierre Charles L'Enfant, the first surveyor and designer of the street layout of the city. It was inaugurated on May 31, 1973. The hotel is listed as a Mobile 4-star and AAA 4-Diamond Luxury Hotel. The L'Enfant Plaza Hotel closed on December 3, 2013, for what was to be a year-long overhaul and upgrade of the entire property. In January 2014, the reopening date was moved to some time in 2015. Show on map
United States Holocaust Memorial MuseumThe United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) is the United States' official memorial to the Holocaust. Adjacent to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the USHMM provides for the documentation, study, and interpretation of Holocaust history. It is dedicated to helping leaders and citizens of the world confront hatred, prevent genocide, promote human dignity, and strengthen democracy. Researchers at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have documented 42,500 ghettos and concentration camps erected by the Nazis throughout German-controlled areas of Europe from 1933 to 1945. Show on map
Congressional CemeteryThe Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River. It is the only American \"cemetery of national memory\" founded before the Civil War.Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early 19th century. Show on map
Southeastern UniversitySoutheastern University was a private, non-profit undergraduate and graduate institution of higher education located in southwestern Washington, D.C.. The university lost its accreditation from the Middle States Commission on Higher Education on August 31, 2009. The Commission reported that the college lacked rigor and was losing faculty, enrollment and financial stability. The 130-year-old school ceased offering classes after an extended summer session in 2009. It merged with Graduate School USA in March 2010. Show on map
Lincoln MemorialThe Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon; the designer of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers; and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations. Show on map
Washington HarbourWashington Harbour is a Class-A mixed-use development located at 3000 and 3050 K Street, N.W., in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The southern edge of the development borders the Potomac River on the Georgetown waterfront. Designed by Arthur Cotton Moore, the complex consists of two curved towers and three other buildings attached to them, all of which are in the Postmodern architectural style. The complex contains luxury condominia, offices, retail space, restaurants, and underground parking. Show on map
The Dupont Circle HotelThe Dupont Circle Hotel is a luxury boutique hotel overlooking Dupont Circle, in Washington, D.C. Before renovations in 2009, it was known as the Jurys Washington Hotel. Prior to that, it was known as the Dupont Plaza Hotel. Writing in The Washington Post, Nancy Trejos applauded the hotel's furnishings and convenient location, but felt that it charged too much for some of its services. In The New York Times Fred Bernstein also praised the hotel's room design. He noted that there were \"small mistakes\" made by his room service. Show on map
Skyland Shopping CenterSkyland is a neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is bounded by Good Hope Road to the northeast, Alabama Avenue to the southeast, and Fort Stanton Park to the south and west. Also see article on Anacostia. The District is in the midst of redeveloping the 18-acre (73,000 m2) Skyland Shopping Center at Alabama Avenue and Naylor Road, SE in Ward 7 into a mixed-used town center. The project will also include 420 to 470 units of housing, about 80 percent of the units will be condos and 20 percent will be apartments. Show on map
National Postal MuseumThe National Postal Museum, located opposite Union Station in Washington, D.C., United States, was established through joint agreement between the United States Postal Service and the Smithsonian Institution and opened in 1993. Show on map
Oak Hill Cemetery(For other cemeteries with this name, see Oak Hill Cemetery.) Oak Hill Cemetery is a historic 22-acre (8.9 ha) cemetery located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in the United States. It was founded in 1848 and completed in 1853, and is a prime example of a garden cemetery. A large number of famous politicians, business people, military people, diplomats, and philanthropists are buried at Oak Hill, and the cemetery has a number of Victorian-style memorials and monuments. Oak Hill has two structures which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel and the Van Ness Mausoleum. Show on map
Frederick Douglass Memorial BridgeThe Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge (also known as the South Capitol Street Bridge) is a swing bridge that carries South Capitol Street over the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1950 and named after abolitionist Frederick Douglass. In 2007, the bridge was used by 77,000 daily commuters. The bridge provides a gateway to an industrial part of the city that the District of Columbia government wants to rejuvenate, including the area around the new Nationals Park for the Washington Nationals, which opened March 30, 2008. Show on map
Bender ArenaBender Arena is a 4,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Washington, DC. The arena opened in 1988. It is home to the American University Eagles basketball, volleyball and wrestling teams. The arena, named for Washington DC philanthropists, Howard and Sondra Bender, is also the primary campus venue for concerts, commencement and speakers, seating up to 6,000. Bender Arena is the flagship facility of the American University Sports Center, which also includes a fitness center, the Reeves Aquatic Center, a mini-mall, the campus store, and a 470-car, seven-level parking garage. Show on map
Smithsonian S. Dillon Ripley CenterThe S. Dillon Ripley Center, better known simply as the Ripley Center, is one of the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution series of museums located in the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The above-ground portion is only a small pagoda, and it descends into a larger underground portion. The Ripley Center houses the International Gallery, The Smithsonian Associates, and the offices of the Smithsonian Contributing Membership. It contains a conference center, an art gallery, and meeting/class rooms as well as exhibition space. It connects underground to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, and the Freer Gallery of Art. Show on map
National Presbyterian ChurchThe National Presbyterian Church is a Christian congregation of approximately 1,500 members of all ages from the greater metropolitan Washington, D.C., area. The mission statement of the church is \"Leading People to Become Faithful Followers of Jesus Christ Together in God’s World\" The site also includes the National Presbyterian School, which provides pre-school-to-Grade 6 education. The school is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and the Association of Independent Maryland and DC Schools and is open to all children. Show on map
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture GardenThe Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is an art museum beside the National Mall, in Washington, D.C., the United States. The museum was initially endowed during the 1960s with the permanent art collection of Joseph H. Hirshhorn. It was designed by architect Gordon Bunshaft and is part of the Smithsonian Institution. It was conceived as the United States' museum of contemporary and modern art and currently focuses its collection-building and exhibition-planning mainly on the post–World War II period, with particular emphasis on art made during the last 50 years. Show on map
Holy Rood CemeteryHoly Rood Cemetery is located at 2126 Wisconsin Avenue NW at the southern end of the Glover Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It stands at one of the highest elevations in Washington, D.C. and has memorable views. Holy Rood Cemetery contains approximately 7,000 graves, including as many as 1,000 free and enslaved African Americans, and may be the best-documented slave burial ground in the District of Columbia. At the western edge of the cemetery is the grave of Joseph Nevitt, a veteran of the American Revolution. Show on map
Main Navy and Munitions Buildings (historical)The Main Navy and Munitions Buildings were constructed in 1918 along Constitution Avenue (then known as B Street) on Washington, D.C.'s National Mall (Potomac Park), to provide temporary quarters for the United States Military. Both buildings were constructed by the Navy's Bureau of Yards and Docks, with the United States Department of War occupying the Munitions Building. To make the buildings more resistant to fire, the buildings were constructed using concrete. With solid construction, the temporary buildings remained in use long after the end of World War I. Show on map
Kennedy - Warren Apartment BuildingThe Kennedy-Warren is a historic eleven-story apartment house in Washington, D.C. It is located at 3131-3133 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. between the Cleveland Park and Woodley Park neighborhoods. The Art Deco building, which was constructed from 1931, overlooks the National Zoological Park and Klingle Valley Park, which is near the Art Deco Kingle Valley Bridge. The original main building was built between 1930 and 1931 with 210 apartments. Show on map
NewseumThe Newseum is an interactive museum that promotes free expression and the five freedoms of the First Amendment, while tracing the evolution of print and electronic communication from our nation’s earliest days to the technologies of the present and the future. The modern seven-level, 250,000-square-foot (23,000 m2) museum is located at 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, in Washington, D.C. features 15 theaters and 15 galleries. The Newseum's Berlin Wall Gallery includes the largest display of sections of the Berlin Wall outside of Germany. The Today's Front Pages Gallery presents daily front pages from more than 80 international newspapers. Other galleries present topics including the First Amendment, world press freedom, news history, the September 11 attacks, and the history of the Internet, TV, Show on map
School of International ServiceThe School of International Service was created when AU's Hurst Anderson was urged by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to create a school of practitioners prepared for foreign policy beyond the U.S.–Soviet rivalry. Since 1957, SIS has prepared thousands of graduates to represent their country in the global arena by \"waging peace\" and employing the hallmarks of thoughtful diplomacy. Show on map
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority HeadquartersThe Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), commonly referred to as Metro, is a tri-jurisdictional government agency that operates transit service in the Washington Metropolitan Area. WMATA was created by the United States Congress as an interstate compact between the District of Columbia, the State of Maryland, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Show on map
National Gallery of ArtThe National Gallery of Art, and its attached Sculpture Garden, is a national art museum in Washington, D.C., located on the National Mall, between 3rd and 9th Streets, at Constitution Avenue NW. Open to the public and free of charge, the museum was privately established in 1937 for the American people by a joint resolution of the United States Congress. Andrew W. Mellon donated a substantial art collection and funds for construction. The core collection includes major works of art donated by Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, Lessing J. Rosenwald, Samuel Henry Kress, Rush Harrison Kress, Peter Arrell Brown Widener, Joseph E. Widener, and Chester Dale. The Gallery's collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts traces the development of Wester Show on map
Folger Shakespeare LibraryThe Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in the United States. It has the world's largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, and is a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500–1750). The library was established by Henry Clay Folger in association with his wife, Emily Jordan Folger. It opened in 1932, two years after his death. Show on map
Embassy of AustraliaThe Embassy of Australia in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Commonwealth of Australia to the United States. The chancery is located on Embassy Row at 1601 Massachusetts Avenue NW, at Scott Circle in Washington, D.C. Show on map
Prospect Hill CemeteryProspect Hill Cemetery, also known as the German Cemetery, is a historic German-American cemetery founded in 1858 and located at 2201 North Capitol Street in Washington, D.C. From 1886 to 1895, the Prospect Hill Cemetery board of directors battled a rival organization which illegally attempted to take title to the grounds and sell a portion of them as building lots. From 1886 to 1898, the cemetery also engaged in a struggle against the District of Columbia and the United States Congress, which wanted construct a major thoroughfare (North Capitol Street) through the center of the cemetery. This led to the passage of an Act of Congress, the declaration of a federal law to be unconstitutional, the passage of a second Act of Congress, a second major court battle, and the declaration by the cou Show on map
Toutorsky MansionThe Toutorsky Mansion is a five-story, 18-room house located at 1720 16th Street, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. As of 2012, it is the location of the embassy of the Republic of the Congo. The 12,000-square-foot (1,100 m2) mansion was completed in 1894 for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Henry Billings Brown, who paid $25,000 in 1891 to buy the land from the Riggs family and spent $40,000 on its construction. Show on map
Sidwell Friends SchoolSidwell Friends School is a highly selective Quaker school located in Bethesda, Maryland and Washington, D.C., offering pre-kindergarten through secondary school classes. Founded in 1883 by Thomas Sidwell, its motto is \"Eluceat omnibus lux\" (English: Let the light shine out from all), alluding to the Quaker concept of inner light. All Sidwell Friends students attend Quaker meeting for worship weekly, and middle school students begin every day with five minutes of silence. Show on map
Kirov Academy of BalletThe Kirov Academy of Ballet (formerly the Universal Ballet Academy) is a ballet school in Washington, D.C. Its function is to train ballet dancers through the principles and aesthetics of the Vaganova method of Classical Ballet taught at the Vaganova Choreographic Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. Show on map
Thomas Jefferson MemorialThe Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., dedicated to Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), one of the most important of the American Founding Fathers as the main drafter and writer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, governor of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia, American minister to King Louis XVI and the Kingdom of France, first U.S. Secretary of State under the first President George Washington, the second Vice President of the United States under second President John Adams, and also the third President (1801–1809), as well as being the founder of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Virginia. Show on map
Watergate ComplexThe Watergate complex is a group of five buildings next to the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in the United States. Covering a total of 10 acres (4.0 ha), the buildings include: Show on map
International Monetary Fund BuildingThe International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., of \"189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.\" Formed in 1944 at the Bretton Woods Conference primarily by the ideas of Harry White and John Keynes, it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system. It now plays a central role in the management of balance of payments difficulties and international financial crises. Countries contribute funds to a pool through a quota system from which countries experiencing balance of payments problems can Show on map
National Geographic Society BuildingThe National Geographic Society (NGS), headquartered in Washington, D.C., United States, is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history. The National Geographic Society’s logo is a yellow portrait frame – rectangular in shape – which appears on the margins surrounding the front covers of its magazines and as its television channel logo. It also operates a website that features extra content and worldwide events. Show on map
Vietnam Veterans MemorialThe Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a 2-acre (8,000 m²) national memorial in Washington, DC. It honors U.S. service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for (Missing In Action) during the War. Show on map
Old Post Office Pavilion Shopping CenterThe Old Post Office Pavilion, historically known as the Old Post Office and Clock Tower, located at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. was completed in 1899, and is a contributing property to the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site. It was used as the city's main post office until 1914. It functioned primarily as an office building afterward, and was nearly torn down during the construction of the Federal Triangle complex in the 1920s. It was nearly demolished again in the 1970s to make way for completion of the Federal Triangle. Major renovations occurred in 1976 and 1983. The 1983 renovation added a food court and retail space and the building was renamed the Old Post Office Pavilion. An addition was added to the structure in 1991. In 2013, the U.S. General Services A Show on map
National Museum of Natural HistoryThe National Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., United States. With free admission and open doors 364 days a year, it is the third most visited museum in the world, the most visited natural history museum in the world, and the most visited museum (of any type) in North America. Opened in 1910, the museum on the National Mall was one of the first Smithsonian buildings constructed exclusively to hold the national collections and research facilities. The main building has an overall area of 1,500,000 square feet (140,000 m2) with 325,000 square feet (30,200 m2) of exhibition and public space and houses over 1,000 employees. Show on map
National Air and Space MuseumThe National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, also called the NASM, is a museum in Washington, D.C.. It holds the largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft in the world. It was established in 1946 as the National Air Museum and opened its main building on the National Mall near L'Enfant Plaza in 1976. In 2014, the museum saw approximately 6.7 million visitors, making it the fifth most visited museum in the world. Show on map
Gallaudet UniversityGallaudet University /ˌɡæləˈdɛt/ is a federally-chartered private university for the education of the Deaf and hard of hearing located in Washington, D.C., on a 99 acres (0.40 km2) campus. Founded in 1864, Gallaudet University was originally a grammar school for both deaf and blind children. It was the first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard of hearing in the world and remains the only higher education institution in which all programs and services are specifically designed to accommodate deaf and hard of hearing students. Hearing students are admitted to the graduate school and a small number are also admitted as undergraduates each year. The university was named after Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, a notable figure in the advancement of deaf education, who was hard of hea Show on map
National Academy of Sciences and EngineeringThe National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is an American nonprofit, non-governmental organization. The National Academy of Sciences is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), the National Academy of Medicine, and the National Research Council. Show on map
Johns Hopkins University Paul H Nitze School of Advanced International StudiesThe Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) is a division of Johns Hopkins University based in Washington, D.C., United States, with campuses in Bologna, Italy; and Nanjing, China. It is generally considered one of the top graduate schools for international relations in the world. The institution is devoted to the study of international affairs, economics, diplomacy, and policy research and education. Show on map
Children's National Medical CenterChildren’s National Medical Center (formerly DC Children’s Hospital) is the only exclusive provider of pediatric care in the Washington, D.C. area. Located just north of the McMillan Reservoir and Howard University, it shares grounds with Washington Hospital Center, National Rehabilitation Hospital, and the DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center. It is a not-for-profit institution that holds 303 beds, 54 of which are level III C NICU bassinets. Children’s National cares for patients through more than 360,000 visits each year and is the regional referral center for pediatric emergency, trauma, cancer, cardiac, and critical care as well as neonatology, orthopaedic surgery, neurology, and neurosurgery. Children's National is ranked among the best pediatric hospitals in the United States by U.S. N Show on map
WHUR-FMWHUR-FM, 96.3 FM, is an urban adult contemporary radio station that is licensed to Washington D.C., and serving the Metro D.C. area. It is owned and operated by Howard University, making it one of the few commercial radio stations in the United States to be owned by a college or university, as well as being the only independent, locally-owned station in the Washington, D.C. area. Also, the staff of the station mentors the students of the university's school of communications. The studios are located on campus in its Lower Quad portion, and the transmitter tower is based in the Tenleytown neighborhood. It is also co-owned with its television partner, WHUT-TV, one of D.C.'s PBS affiliates. Show on map
John Ericsson National MemorialJohn Ericsson National Memorial, located near the National Mall at Ohio Drive and Independence Avenue, SW,in Washington, D.C., is dedicated to the man who revolutionized naval history with his invention of the screw propeller. The Swedish engineer John Ericsson was also the designer of the USS Monitor, the ship that ensured Union naval supremacy during the American Civil War. Show on map
Arlington Memorial BridgeThe Arlington Memorial Bridge is a Neoclassical masonry, steel, and stone arch bridge with a central bascule (or drawbridge) that crosses the Potomac River at Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. First proposed in 1886, the bridge went unbuilt for decades thanks to political quarrels over whether the bridge should be a memorial, and to whom or what. Traffic problems associated with the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in November 1921 and the desire to build a bridge in time for the bicentennial of the birth of George Washington led to its construction in 1932. Show on map
Marine BarracksMarine Barracks, Washington, D.C. is located at the corner of 8th and I Streets, Southeast in Washington, D.C. Established in 1801, it is a National Historic Landmark, the oldest post in the United States Marine Corps, the official residence of the Commandant of the Marine Corps since 1806, and main ceremonial grounds of the Corps. It is also home to the \"Commandant's Own\" Marine Drum & Bugle Corps and the \"President's Own\" U.S. Marine Band. Barracks Marines conduct ceremonial missions in and around the National Capitol Region as well as abroad. They also provide security at designated locations around Washington, D.C. as necessary, carry out the distance education and training program of the Marine Corps through the Marine Corps Institute, and Barracks officers are part of the White House Show on map
George Mason Memorial BridgeThe George Mason Memorial is a national memorial to Founding Father George Mason, the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights that inspired the United States Bill of Rights. The Memorial is located in East Potomac Park within Washington, D.C. at 900 Ohio drive, which is a part of the Tidal Basin. Authorized in 1990, with a groundbreaking in 2000 and dedication in 2002, the memorial includes a sculpture of Mason, a pool, trellis, circular hedges, and numerous inscriptions. Show on map
Smithsonian InstitutionThe Smithsonian Institution (/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOE-nee-ən), established in 1846 \"for the increase and diffusion of knowledge,\" is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States. Originally organized as the \"United States National Museum,\" that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.Termed \"the nation's attic\"for its eclectic holdings of 138 million items, the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia. Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Virginia, Texas, and Panama. A further 170 museums are Smithsonian Affiliates.The Institution's thirty million annual visitors are@en . Show on map
Embassy of BrazilThe Embassy of Brazil in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of Brazil to the United States. The Chancery of the Embassy is located at 3006 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington D.C., in the Embassy Row neighborhood. The United States was the first country to recognize Brazil's independence and the nation's first legation was thus established in Washington. It was founded January 1, 1824 when José Silvestre Rebello presented his credentials to President James Monroe. In 1905, the legation was raised to a full embassy. Show on map
Psychiatric Institute of WashingtonThe Psychiatric Institute of Washington (PIW) is an acute (104 bed) psychiatric hospital in Washington, DC. Opened in 1967, PIW is a short-term, private hospital. It offers behavioral healthcare to patients suffering from mental and addictive illnesses, including children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. Services offered by PIW include inpatient, partial and intensive outpatient hospitalization, and group treatment programs for substance abuse and addiction. Show on map
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade CenterThe Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, named after former United States President Ronald Reagan, is the first federal building in Washington, D.C. designed for both governmental and private sector purposes. Show on map
James Creek MarinaJames Creek Marina is located at the confluence of the Anacostia River, the Washington Channel, and the Potomac River. The marina is located directly east of Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. (Southwest). It is situated between the National Defense University at Fort McNair and the headquarters of the United States Coast Guard. The marina grounds are on National Park Service land. James Creek Marina is located 95 miles (by water) from the Chesapeake Bay. There are 297 wet slips that can accommodate vessels from 16 to 160+ feet. The docks are wooden floating structures with fingerpiers. Entrance to each dock is limited to James Creek Marina guests and visitors. Coded locks guard each entrance. James Creek has a winter de-icing system in place. Pumps keep the marina water in motion so that ice Show on map
Edmund Burke SchoolThe Edmund Burke School is a private college preparatory school in Washington, D.C. Located on Connecticut Avenue, NW, near the Van Ness metro station. It covers 6th through 12th grades, and it currently enrolls about 300 students. Founded in 1968 by Jean Mooskin and Dick Roth, the school practices progressive education: teachers are called by their first names and classes are small. In 2003, after years of legal negotiations with neighbors, Burke gained city approval to expand its facilities with a new building which would increase both size and capacity. New computer labs, offices, classrooms, athletic facilities, a theater, and a large parking garage were built. Show on map
Major General Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben StatueMajor General Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben is a bronze statue, by Albert Jaegers. It was dedicated on December 7, 1910. The inscription reads: (Base, southeast side:) Albert Jaegers, sculptor (Base, front in raised letters:)ERECTED.BY.THE.CONGRESSOF.THE.VNITED.STATES. TOFREDERICK.WILLIAM.AVGVSTVS.HENRY.FERDINANDBARON.VON.STEVBENIN.GRATEFVL .RECOGNITION .OF.HISSERVICESTOTHEAMERICAN.PEOPLEIN.THEIR.STRVGGLE.FOR.LIBERTYBORN.IN PRVSSIASEPTEMBER 17, 1730DIED.IN.NEW.YORK.NOVEMBER 28, 1794AFTER.SERVING.AS AIDE.DE.CAMP.TO.FREDERICKTHE.GREAT.OF PRVSSIAHE.OFFERED.HIS.SWORDTO.THE.AMERICAN.COLONIES.AND WAS APPOINTED.MAJOR.GENERAL ANDINSPECTOR GENERAL INTHE CONTINENTAL ARMYHE GAVE MILITARY.TRAIN-ING.AND.DISCIPLINE.TOTHE.CITIZEN.SOLDIERSWHO.ACHIEVED.THE.IN-DEPENDENCE.OF.THEVNITED.STATES. .M.C.M.X Show on map
United States Naval ObservatoryThe United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States, with a primary mission to produce Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) for the United States Navy and the United States Department of Defense. Located in Northwest Washington, D.C. at the Northwestern end of Embassy Row, it is one of the pre-1900 astronomical observatories located in an urban area; at the time of its construction, it was far from the light pollution thrown off by the (then-smaller) city center. The USNO operates the \"Master Clock\", which provides precise time to the GPS satellite constellation run by the United States Air Force. The USNO performs radio VLBI-based positions of quasars with numerous global collaborators, in order to produce Earth Orientation paramete Show on map
Embassy of the Republic of TurkeyThe Embassy of Turkey in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Turkey to the United States. It is located at 2525 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest in the Embassy Row neighborhood. The chancery is housed in a new building, inaugurated by Turkish President Süleyman Demirel on April 23, 1999. Designed by Shalom Baranes Associates, it reflects aspects of Turkish vernacular architecture while harmonizing with the styles of the Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood. Show on map
Parkmont SchoolParkmont School is an independent school, headed by Ron McClain, located in Washington, D.C. Parkmont was founded in 1971, as a cooperative Middle School by a parent group in McLean, Virginia. The parents were acquainted with the work of progressive educator Maria Montessori and they consulted extensively with John Bremer, founder of the Parkway School in Philadelphia and a proponent of experience-based learning. Parkmont has always emphasized educating the individual in the context of a close-knit community and the program has strong roots in both the progressive and experiential educational traditions. Show on map
American UniversityAmerican University (AU or American) is a private research university in Washington, D.C., United States, affiliated with the United Methodist Church, although the university's curriculum is secular. The university was chartered by an Act of Congress on February 24, 1893 as \"The American University,\" when the bill was approved by President Benjamin Harrison. Show on map
Hecht Company WarehouseThe Hecht Company Warehouse in Washington, D.C. is a Streamline Moderne style building. Designed by engineer Gilbert V. Steel of the New York engineering firm Abbott and Merkt, and prominently located on New York Avenue in Ivy City, it served as the central warehouse for The Hecht Company from its construction in 1937 and expansion in 1948. The building uses glass block extensively, culminating in a twelve-pointed star-shaped cupola at the corner, which is illuminated at night. Black brick interspersed with glass block spells out \"The Hecht Co\" at the fifth floor. Show on map
Ariel Rios Federal BuildingThe William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building is located in the Federal Triangle in Washington, D.C., across 12th Street from the Old Post Office. The New Post Office, as the Clinton Building was originally known, housed the headquarters of the Post Office Department until that department was replaced by the United States Postal Service in 1971. The building, which now houses the headquarters of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was first renamed the Ariel Rios Federal Building on February 5, 1985, in honor of Ariel Rios, an undercover special agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives who was killed in the line of duty on December 2, 1982. After the federal government announced that it would be renaming the building again in honor of former President Bill C Show on map
United States CapitolThe United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building or Capitol Hill, is the seat of the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. It sits atop Capitol Hill, at the eastern end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Though not at the geographic center of the Federal District, the Capitol forms the origin point for the District's street-numbering system and the District's four quadrants. Show on map
USS BarryUSS Barry (DD-933) was one of eighteen Forrest Sherman–class destroyers of the United States Navy, and was the third US destroyer to be named for Commodore John Barry. Commissioned in 1954, she spent most of her career in the Caribbean, Atlantic, and Mediterranean, but also served in the Vietnam War, for which she earned two battle stars. Another notable aspect of her service was the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Decommissioned in 1982, she became the \"Display Ship Barry (DS Barry), a museum ship at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., in 1984. Show on map
MedStar National Rehabilitation HospitalMedStar National Rehabilitation Network (MedStar NRH) is located in Washington, D.C., and specializes in treating persons with physical disabilities, including spinal cord injury, brain injury, stroke, arthritis, amputation, multiple sclerosis, post-polio syndrome, orthopedic, and other neurological conditions. National Rehabilitation Hospital was founded in 1986 by Edward A. Eckenhoff, and is a member of the MedStar Health system, the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore region’s largest non-profit healthcare organization. Show on map
East Potomac Park Golf CourseEast Potomac Park Golf Course (also known as East Potomac Golf Course) is a golf course located in East Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The course includes an 18-hole course, two 9-hole courses, and a miniature golf course. It is the busiest of the city's three golf courses (all of which are publicly owned). The original nine-hole course opened in 1921, and the miniature golf course in 1930 (making it one of the oldest miniature golf courses in the nation). Additional holes opened in stages between 1921 and 1925, leaving the course with 36 holes in all. Show on map
Washington International School - Tregaron CampusWashington International School (also known as Washington International or simply WIS; Spanish: Colegio Internacional de Washington; French: École Internationale de Washington) is a coeducational international school for day students in grades pre-Kindergarten through 12. The school is located in northwest Washington, DC. Established in 1966, WIS was the first school in the Washington area to offer the International Baccalaureate (IB) program. Show on map
Embassy of PakistanThe Embassy of Pakistan in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United States. It is located at 3517 International Court, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Cleveland Park neighborhood. The embassy also operates Consulates-General in Boston, Houston, Los Angeles, and New York City. H.E. Jalil Abbas Jilani is the current Ambassador of Pakistan to the United States. Show on map
Church of the EpiphanyThe Church of the Epiphany, built in 1844, is an historic Episcopal church located at 1317 G Street, N.W., in Washington, D.C.. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 10, 1971. Show on map
Major General John A Rawlins StatueGeneral John A. Rawlins is a statue depicting John Aaron Rawlins, a United States Army general who served during the Civil War and later as Secretary of War. The statue is a focal point of Rawlins Park, a small public park in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It was installed in 1874, but relocated several times between 1880 and 1931. The statue was sculpted by French-American artist Joseph A. Bailly, whose best known work is the statue of George Washington in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Show on map
Blair HouseThe President's Guest House, commonly known as Blair House, is a complex of four formerly separate buildings—Blair House, Lee House, Peter Parker House, and 704 Jackson Place—located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. A major interior renovation of these 19th century residences between the 1950s and 1980s resulted in their reconstitution as a single facility. Show on map
Emerson Preparatory SchoolEmerson Preparatory School (also known as Emerson) is a small private high school in Northwest Washington, D.C., founded in 1852 as the Emerson Institute. It is Washington's oldest co-ed college preparatory school. The school is located at 1324 18th Street NW, near Dupont Circle and Embassy Row. Most students ride the Metro to and from school. Emerson has occupied its present location since 1937. Show on map
US National ArboretumThe United States National Arboretum is an arboretum in Washington, D.C., operated by the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service as a division of the Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. It was established in 1927, by an act of Congress after a campaign by USDA Chief Botanist Frederick Vernon Coville. Show on map
Arena StageArena Stage is a not-for-profit regional theater based in Southwest, Washington, D.C. It was a pioneer in 1950 of the Regional Theater Movement. It is located at a theatre complex called the Mead Center for American Theater since its opening in 2010 after extensive renovation; this included construction of a third small theater in a complex with two stages: one a theatre in the round and the other a proscenium style. The Artistic Director is Molly Smith and the Executive Director is Edgar Dobie. It is the largest company in the country dedicated to American plays and playwrights. Show on map
Volta Laboratory and Bureau BuildingThe Volta Laboratory (also known as the \"Alexander Graham Bell Laboratory\", the \"Bell Carriage House\" and the \"Bell Laboratory\") and the Volta Bureau were created in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. by Alexander Graham Bell. The Volta Laboratory was founded in 1880–1881 with Charles Sumner Tainter and Bell's cousin, Chichester Bell, for the research and development of telecommunication, phonograph and other technologies. Show on map
Maloney HallMaloney Hall is the home of the Tim and Steph Busch School of Business and Economics at The Catholic University of America. It is located on the southeast corner of Catholic University’s main campus. Maloney Hall was named for Martin Maloney, a Philadelphia philanthropist and papal marquis (a layman who has received a high title of nobility from the reigning pope), who gave $120,000 for the main building and $100,000 for the auditorium. The building originally housed the Martin Maloney Chemical Laboratory, the laboratory where the chemical weapon lewisite was first invented by Julius Nieuwland and later Winford Lee Lewis, with the help of CUA and Army researchers, developed it into a now-banned chemical weapon. It served as a laboratory for Army researchers developing chemical munitions fo Show on map
Rock Creek Park Public Golf CourseRock Creek Park Golf Course (also known as Rock Creek Golf Course) is a golf course located in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The entire course lies within Rock Creek Park, a national park owned and maintained by the National Park Service division of the United States Department of the Interior. Rock Creek Park Golf Course is one of three golf courses in Washington, D.C., all of which are owned by the National Park Service. The other two are East Potomac Park Golf Course and Langston Golf Course. Show on map
WETA-TV (Washington)WETA-TV virtual channel 26 (UHF digital channel 27) is a non-commercial educational PBS member television station licensed to and broadcasting from the capital city of Washington, District of Columbia, United States. The station is owned by the Greater Washington Educational Telecommunications Association, alongside sister radio outlet and NPR member station WETA (90.9 FM). WETA-TV's studios are located in nearby Arlington, Virginia, and its transmitter is located in the Tenleytown neighborhood in the northwest quadrant of Washington. Show on map
Walter Reed Army Medical CenterThe Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) — known as Walter Reed General Hospital (WRGH) until 1951 — was the U.S. Army's flagship medical center from 1909 to 2011. Located on 113 acres (46 ha) in Washington, D.C., it served more than 150,000 active and retired personnel from all branches of the military. The center was named after Major Walter Reed (1851–1902), an army physician who led the team that confirmed that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes rather than direct contact. Show on map
Georgetown Visitation Preparatory SchoolGeorgetown Visitation Preparatory School is a private Roman Catholic college-preparatory school for girls located in the historic Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Georgetown. Founded in 1799 by the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary (also known as the Visitation Sisters), it is one of the oldest continuously-operating school for girls in the country and the city as well as the oldest Catholic school for girls in the original Thirteen Colonies. It is located within the Archdiocese of Washington. Show on map
MedStar Georgetown University HospitalMedStar Georgetown University Hospital is one of the national capital area's oldest academic teaching hospitals and is affiliated with Georgetown University School of Medicine. MedStar Georgetown is a not-for-profit, acute-care teaching and research facility located in Northwest Washington, DC. MedStar Georgetown’s clinical services represent one of the largest, most geographically diverse, and fully integrated healthcare and delivery networks in the area. MedStar Georgetown is home to the internationally known Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, as well as centers of excellence in the neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, gastroenterology, transplant and vascular surgery. It is located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington DC. Show on map
Georgetown Day School Lower Middle CampusGeorgetown Day School (GDS) is an independent coeducational PK-12 school located in Washington, D.C.. The school educates 1,075 elementary, middle, and high school students across two campuses in the city's Northwestern quadrant. Founded in 1945 as Washington's first racially integrated school, it is known for its progressive climate and dedication to social justice. Students call teachers by their first names, and the high school allows students to leave the campus during school hours. Show on map
The Lab School of WashingtonThe Lab School of Washington is a small private school in Washington, D.C. for students with learning disabilities, established in 1967 by Sally Smith. Katherine Schantz has directed the school from 2009 to the present. The Lab School of Washington is currently being renovated and has plans to establish a new high school building by the Fall of 2016, as well as an expanded Theater and Arts Wing and a renovated Middle School. Show on map
National Defense UniversityThe National Defense University (NDU) is an institution of higher education funded by the United States Department of Defense, intended to facilitate high-level training, education, and the development of national security strategy. It is chartered by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, with Major General Frederick M. Padilla, USMC, as president. It is located on the grounds of Fort Lesley McNair in Washington, D.C. Show on map
House of the TempleThe House of the Temple is a Masonic temple in Washington, D.C., United States that serves as the headquarters of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction, U.S.A. (officially, \"Home of The Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction, Washington D.C., U.S.A.\") It contains a museum devoted to Albert Pike, who rewrote a number of the Scottish Rite rituals and headed its Supreme Council from 1859 until his death in 1891, and whose remains are buried in the House of the Temple. Show on map
Latrobe GateThe Latrobe Gate (also known as Main Gate, Washington Navy Yard) is a historic gatehouse located at the Washington Navy Yard in Southeast Washington, D.C. Built in 1806 and substantially altered in 1881, the ceremonial entrance to the U.S. Navy's oldest shore establishment is an example of Greek Revival and Italianate architecture. It was designed by the second Architect of the Capitol Benjamin Henry Latrobe, whose works include St. John's Episcopal Church, the Baltimore Basilica, and the United States Capitol. The Latrobe Gate is one of the nation's oldest extant examples of Greek Revival architecture. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 14, 1973, and is a contributing property to the Washington Navy Yard's status as a National Historic Landmark. Show on map
Nannie Helen Burroughs SchoolNannie Helen Burroughs School, formerly known as National Training School for Women and Girls, is a private coeducational elementary school located in the District of Columbia. The school was originally founded in 1909 by Nannie Helen Burroughs as The National Trade and Professional School for Women and Girls, Inc. to provide vocational training for African-American females, who did not have many educational opportunities available to them. The Trades Hall building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1991. Show on map
Longworth House Office BuildingThe Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. The building is located south of the Capitol, bounded by Independence Avenue, New Jersey Avenue, C Street S.E., and South Capitol Street, in southeast Washington. It covers an area of 599,675 square feet (55,711.6 m2) and has a total of 251 congressional offices and suites, five large committee rooms, seven small committee rooms, and a large assembly room now used by the Ways and Means Committee. Show on map
National Museum of the American IndianThe National Museum of the American Indian is part of the Smithsonian Institution and is dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native Americans of the Western Hemisphere. It has three facilities: the National Museum of the American Indian on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., which opened on September 21, 2004, on Fourth Street and Independence Avenue, Southwest; the George Gustav Heye Center, a permanent museum in New York City; and the Cultural Resources Center, a research and collections facility in Suitland, Maryland. The foundations for the present collections were first assembled in the former Museum of the American Indian in New York City, which was established in 1916, and which became part of the Smithsonian in 1990. Show on map
L'Enfant PlazaL'Enfant Plaza is a complex of four commercial buildings grouped around a large plaza in the Southwest section of Washington, D.C.. Immediately below the plaza and the buildings is the \"La Promenade\" shopping mall. The plaza is located south of Independence Avenue SW between 12th and 9th Streets SW (9th Street actually runs underneath the centers of the buildings on the easternmost side of the plaza). It was built perpendicular to L'Enfant Promenade, a north-south running street and pedestrian esplanade part of which is directly above 10th Street SW. The plaza is named for Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant, the architect and planner who first designed a street layout for the capital city. It was dedicated in 1968 after completion of the north and south buildings. Show on map
Washington ColiseumThe Washington Coliseum, formerly Uline Arena, is an indoor arena in Washington, D.C. located at 1132, 1140, and 1146 3rd Street, Northeast, Washington, D.C. It was the site of the first concert by The Beatles in the United States. It is directly adjacent to the railroad tracks, just north of Union Station, and bounded by L and M Streets. Show on map
Chain BridgeThe Chain Bridge is a viaduct which crosses the Potomac River at Little Falls in Washington, D.C. It carries close to 22,000 cars a day. It connects Washington with affluent sections of Arlington and Fairfax counties in Virginia. On the Washington side, the bridge connects with Canal Road. Left turns onto the Clara Barton Parkway from the Chain Bridge are prohibited, but the reverse is permitted. On the Virginia side, the bridge connects with State Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road), which provides access to the George Washington Memorial Parkway. Show on map
East Capitol Street Car BarnEast Capitol Street is a major street that divides the northeast and southeast quadrants of Washington, D.C. It runs due east from the United States Capitol to the DC-Maryland border. The street is uninterrupted until Lincoln Park then continues eastward to Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium. East of the stadium, East Capitol crosses the Anacostia River over the Whitney Young Memorial Bridge and then goes underneath Route 295 before crossing into Prince George's County, Maryland where it becomes Maryland State Highway 214. Show on map
Corcoran Gallery of ArtThe Corcoran Gallery of Art was an art museum in Washington, D.C. Prior to its closing, it was one of the oldest privately supported cultural institutions in the United States capital. Starting in 1890, a museum school, later known as the Corcoran College of Art + Design, co-existed with the gallery. The museum's main focus was American art. In 2014, after decades of financial problems, the Corcoran entered into an agreement with the National Gallery of Art (NGA) and the George Washington University whereby almost all of the gallery's 17,000 work collection was placed under the care of the NGA, while the school and historic 17th street gallery building continued operations as a part of the George Washington University's new Corcoran School of the Arts and Design. Show on map
Embassy of New ZealandThe Embassy of New Zealand in Washington, D.C., United States (in Māori: Te Kāinga o te Māngai o Aotearoa i Washington D.C.) is located at 37 Observatory Circle, Northwest, Washington, D.C. in the Embassy Row neighborhood. The embassy also operates consulates general in Los Angeles, New York City, and honorary consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Tamuning, Honolulu, Houston, Sacramento, Salt Lake City, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle provides assistance to New Zealand citizens and issues travel visas to foreign nationals who wish to visit New Zealand. Show on map
Shrine of the Sacred Heart Catholic ChurchThe Shrine of the Sacred Heart is a Roman Catholic parish established in 1899 in the Mount Pleasant/Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington D.C.. The parish church is a large domed Byzantine structure modeled after the Cathedral in Ravenna, Italy. The current church is actually the second that the Shrine of the Sacred Heart community has called home. The original red brick structure was dedicated in 1901, and the current structure in 1922. Both buildings were influenced by the City Beautiful architectural movement which overtook Washington from 1901 to 1910. Show on map
National Christmas TreeThe National Christmas Tree is a large evergreen tree located in the northeast quadrant of The Ellipse near the White House in Washington, D.C. Each year since 1923, the tree has been decorated as a Christmas tree. The grand illumination of the Christmas lights on the tree by the President of the United States early in December is an annual event. Every president since Franklin D. Roosevelt has made formal remarks and lights the tree during the tree lighting ceremony. Since 1954, the event has marked the start of month-long festivities known as the Pageant of Peace. Smaller trees representing the U.S. states, District of Columbia, and the five territories around the National Christmas Tree are referred to as the Pathway to Peace. Show on map
Alban Towers Apartment BuildingAlban Towers is an apartment building on Massachusetts Avenue in Northwest Washington, D.C. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and is considered to be one of the best examples of Gothic Revival architecture in Washington. Show on map
Darnall HallHousing at Georgetown University consists of 13 residence halls at the main campus and a law center campus. Housing on Georgetown's main campus is divided between \"halls,\" usually more traditional dormitories, and \"villages,\" usually less traditional apartment complexes. In addition, Georgetown operates many townhouses in the Georgetown neighborhood, usually for second, third, and fourth-year students. Show on map
International Spy MuseumThe International Spy Museum is a privately owned museum dedicated to the tradecraft, history and contemporary role of espionage, featuring the largest collection of international espionage artifacts currently on public display. The museum is located within the 1875 Le Droit Building in the Penn Quarter neighborhood of Washington, D.C., across the street from the Old Patent Office Building (which houses the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery) and one block south of the Gallery Place Metro station via Red, Green and Yellow lines. In April 2015, plans for a new museum designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners were released. The Museum will move to L'Enfant Plaza, with expected re-opening in 2018. Show on map
General William Tecumseh Sherman MonumentGeneral William Tecumseh Sherman Monument is an equestrian statue of American Civil War Major General William Tecumseh Sherman located in Sherman Plaza, which is part of President's Park in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The selection of an artist in 1896 to design the monument was highly controversial. During the monument's design phase, artist Carl Rohl-Smith died, and his memorial was finished by a number of other sculptors. The Sherman statue was unveiled in 1903. It is a contributing element to the Civil War Monuments in Washington, D.C. (added in 1973) and to the President's Park South (added in 1980), both of which are protected historic sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
George Washington University HospitalThe George Washington University Hospital is located in Washington, D.C. in the United States. It is affiliated with the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The current facility opened on August 23, 2002, with 371 beds in a 400,000 sq. ft. building, housing more than $45 million of medical equipment and costing over $96 million to construct. The hospital is licensed by the District of Columbia Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs and accredited by the U.S. Joint Commission. Show on map
Embassy of ItalyThe Italian Embassy in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Italian Republic to the United States. The original Italian diplomatic mission to the United States following Italian unification was founded by Baron Saverio Fava. The current chancery is located just off Embassy Row at 3000 Whitehaven Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C. The structure is quite new, being built in 1996. In 1972, the Italians had bought a lot from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, a piece of the campus of the neighboring Center for Hellenic Studies. Show on map
Gaston HallGaston Hall is an auditorium located on the third and fourth floors of the north tower of Healy Hall on Georgetown University's main campus in Washington, D.C. Named for Georgetown's first student, William Gaston, who also helped secure the university's federal charter, Gaston Hall was completed in 1901, around twenty years after the construction of the building within which it is housed. Show on map
Embassy of SpainThe Embassy of Spain in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Kingdom of Spain to the United States It is located at 2375 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, in the West End neighborhood. Spain did not establish diplomatic relations with the United States until 1790, after the ratification of the 1783 Treaty of Paris ending hostilities between the United States and the Kingdom of Great Britain. Diplomatic relations were broken off from 1808 to 1814 over American occupation of West Florida, and again from April 1898 to April 1899 during the Spanish–American War. Show on map
National World War II MemorialThe World War II Memorial is a memorial of national significance dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument. Show on map
Federal Triangle Metro StationThe Federal Triangle is a triangular area in Washington, D.C. formed by 15th Street NW, Constitution Avenue NW, Pennsylvania Avenue NW, and E Street NW. Federal Triangle is occupied by 10 large city and federal office buildings, all of which are part of the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site. Seven of the buildings in Federal Triangle were built by the U.S. federal government in the early and mid-1930s as part of a coordinated construction plan that has been called \"one of the greatest building projects ever undertaken\" and all seven buildings are now designated as architecturally historic. The Federal Triangle Washington Metro station serves Federal Triangle and the surrounding area. Show on map
Union StationUnion Station is a major train station, transportation hub, and leisure destination in Washington, D.C. Opened in 1907, it is Amtrak's headquarters and the railroad's second-busiest station, with annual ridership of over 5 million. The station also serves MARC and VRE commuter rail services, the Washington Metro, and buses. Show on map
Mary E Switzer BuildingThe Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building is a federally owned office building located at 330 C Street SW in Washington, D.C. in the United States. The Egyptian Revival structure was originally named the Railroad Retirement Board Building. It was designed by Charles Klauder and Louis A. Simon and completed on September 15, 1940. Although intended for the Railroad Retirement Board, its first occupant was to the United States Department of War. By Act of Congress, it was renamed the Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building on October 21, 1972, becoming the first federal building to be named for a woman. Show on map
Anacostia MuseumThe Anacostia Community Museum (known colloquially as the ACM) is a community museum in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C. in the United States. It is one of twenty museums under the umbrella of the Smithsonian Institution and was the first federally funded community museum in the United States. The museum, founded in 1967, was created with the intention to bring aspects of the Smithsonian museums, located on the National Mall, to the Anacostia neighborhood, with the hope that community members from the neighborhood would visit the main Smithsonian museums. It became federally funded in 1970 and focuses on the community in and around Anacostia in its exhibitions. This museum also houses a library. Show on map
National Museum of African ArtThe National Museum of African Art is an African art museum located in Washington, D.C., United States. The museum is one of nineteen under the wing of the Smithsonian Institution. The museum, which was started in 1964, was originally located at the Frederick Douglass House in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Show on map
WUSA-TV (Washington)WUSA, channel 9, is a CBS-affiliated television station located in the American capital of Washington, D.C.. The station is owned by Tegna, Inc. (based in the suburb of McLean, Virginia) and effectively serves as the flagship television property of the company. WUSA's studios and transmitter are located at Broadcast House on Wisconsin Avenue in the Tenleytown neighborhood on the northwestern side of Washington. WUSA is the largest CBS affiliate by market size (WGCL-TV being the third-largest and KHOU being the second-largest) that is not owned and operated by the network. Show on map
Columbia Hospital for Women (historical)The Columbia Hospital for Women was a hospital located in Washington, D.C. Originally opening in 1866 as a health-care facility for wives and widows of Civil War soldiers, it moved in 1870 from Thomas Circle to its later location at 2425 L Street, NW in the West End neighborhood. The Columbia became a private, non-profit hospital when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation transferring it to a board of directors in 1953. The facility closed in 2002 and the building was converted into a condominium, The Columbia Residences. Show on map
Washington Navy YardThe Washington Navy Yard (WNY) is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy. The Yard currently serves as a ceremonial and administrative center for the U.S. Navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations, and is headquarters for the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Reactors, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Naval Historical Center, the Department of Naval History, the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General's Corps, Marine Corps Institute, the United States Navy Band, and other more classified facilities. Show on map
National Museum of Women in the ArtsThe National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), located in Washington, D.C., is \"the only major museum in the world solely dedicated\" to celebrating women’s achievements in the visual, performing, and literary arts. NMWA was incorporated in 1981 by Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay. Since opening its doors in 1987, the museum has acquired a collection of more than 4,500 paintings, sculptures, works on paper and decorative art. Highlights of the collection include works by Mary Cassatt, Frida Kahlo, and Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Le Brun. The museum occupies the old Masonic Temple, a building listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
Pope John Paul II Cultural CenterThe Saint John Paul II National Shrine is a national shrine in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Knights of Columbus. It is a place of prayer for Catholics and welcomes people of all faiths. It houses a permanent exhibit called \"A Gift of Love: the Life of Saint John Paul II\" and hosts temporary exhibits relating to the history of the Catholic Church in North America. It has a Chapel with daily services. Show on map
MedStar Washington Hospital CenterMedStar Washington Hospital Center is the largest private hospital in Washington, D.C. A member of MedStar Health, the not-for-profit Hospital Center is licensed for 926 beds. Health services in primary, secondary and tertiary care are offered to adult and neonatal patients. It also serves as a teaching hospital for Georgetown University School of Medicine. Show on map
Naval Research LaboratoryThe United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is the corporate research laboratory for the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps and conducts a wide range of basic scientific research, applied research, technological development and prototyping. A few of the laboratory's current specialties include plasma physics, space physics, materials science, and tactical electronic warfare. NRL is one of the first US Government scientific R&D laboratories, having opened in 1923 at the instigation of Thomas Edison, and is currently under the Office of Naval Research. NRL's research expenditures are approximately $1.1 billion per year. Show on map
Kreeger MuseumThe Kreeger Museum is a private museum located in Washington D.C. at the former home of David and Carmen Kreeger, and first opened in 1994. The collection features 19th- and 20th-century paintings and sculptures, with works by internationally known artists such as Boudin, Cézanne, Epstein, Kandinsky, Rainer Lagemann, Monet, Moore, Munch, Picasso, Rodin, Stella and van Gogh, together with works by local Washington artists such as Sam Gilliam and traditional west and central African art. The museum also hosts various art and music events. Show on map
Riggs LibraryRiggs Library was the main library of Georgetown University from 1891-1970, until being replaced by Lauinger Library. It was housed in the south tower of Healy Hall, on the third floor. Riggs Library is one of the few extant cast iron libraries in the nation. The library still serves its original function of storing books despite its primary use as a formal event space.The library's construction was funded by E. Francis Riggs as a memorial to his father and brother, and was supervised by architect Paul Pelz, who designed Healy Hall and the Library of Congress, although Riggs did not open until a full decade after Healy Hall opened for use. Show on map
Columbus School of LawThe Columbus School of Law, also known as CUA Law, is the law school of The Catholic University of America, in Washington, D.C. More than 500 Juris Doctor students attend CUA Law. Incoming classes are typically composed of about 150 hundred students, including day and evening programs. Around 1,900 students apply annually. CUA Law is located slightly more than two miles north of the United States Capitol and is a five-minute walk from the Brookland-CUA metro station. Show on map
Phillips CollectionThe Phillips Collection is an art museum founded by Duncan Phillips and Marjorie Acker Phillips in 1921 as the Phillips Memorial Gallery located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Phillips was the grandson of James H. Laughlin, a banker and co-founder of the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. Show on map
World BankThe World Bank is an international financial institution that provides loans to developing countries for capital programs. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA). The World Bank is a component of the World Bank Group, which is part of the United Nations system. Show on map
British School of WashingtonThe British International School of Washington (BISW), formerly known as British School of Washington (BSW), is a non-sectarian, co-educational college preparatory day school located in the Georgetown neighborhood in downtown Washington D.C.. BISW offers education for ages 3 to 18 (UK Nursery to Year 13/US Pre-K to Grade 12). The school was opened in September 1998 by Dr. Lesley Stagg. In 2013, BISW joined Nord Anglia Education, an international education provider with 42 international schools and over 34,000 students.The British International School of Washington relocated in 2008 to its current location in Georgetown. The school shares property with Georgetown University. Show on map
Bolling FieldJoint Base Anacostia–Bolling is a 905-acre (366 ha) military installation, located in Southeast Washington, D.C., established on 1 October 2010 in accordance with congressional legislation implementing the recommendations of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission. The legislation ordered the consolidation of Naval Support Facility Anacostia (NSF) and Bolling Air Force Base (BAFB), which were adjoining, but separate military installations, into a single joint base, one of twelve formed in the country as a result of the law. The only aeronautical facility at the base is a 100-by-100-foot (30 by 30 m) helipad (ICAO: KBOF). Show on map
Thomas Jefferson BuildingThe oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building was built between 1890 and 1897. It was originally known as the Library of Congress Building and is located on First Street SE, between Independence Avenue and East Capitol Street in Washington, D.C. The Beaux-Arts style building is known for its classicizing facade and elaborately decorated interior. Its design and construction has a tortuous history; the building's main architect was Paul J. Pelz, initially in partnership with John L. Smithmeyer, and succeeded by Edward Pearce Casey during the last few years of construction. Show on map
Dahlgren Chapel of the Sacred HeartThe Dahlgren Chapel of the Sacred Heart (often shortened to Dahlgren Chapel) is a Roman Catholic chapel located in Dahlgren Quadrangle on the main campus of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The chapel is located within the Archdiocese of Washington, is maintained by Georgetown University, and is administered by the Society of Jesus. It is the largest place of worship on Georgetown's campus and is the primary Catholic house of worship for students, faculty, and other community members. Masses are celebrated regularly and the chapel is a popular location for baptisms and weddings, particularly of Georgetown alumni. Show on map
Embassy of the Republic of SenegalThe Embassy of Senegal in Washington, D.C. (French: Ambassade du Sénégal aux Etats Unis) is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Senegal to the United States. The building is located at 2215 M Street Northwest in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The current ambassador of Senegal to the United States is Cheikh Niang. Show on map
Georgetown University Law CenterGeorgetown University Law Center (also known as Georgetown Law) is the law school of Georgetown University, located in Washington, D.C. Established in 1870, Georgetown Law offers J.D., LL.M., and S.J.D. degrees in law. As the second largest law school in the United States, Georgetown Law often touts the advantages of its wide range of program offerings and proximity to federal agencies and courts, including the Supreme Court. Show on map
United States Department of Commerce BuildingThe United States Department of Commerce is the Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. The mission of the department is to \"promote job creation and improved living standards for all Americans by creating an infrastructure that promotes economic growth, technological competitiveness, and sustainable development\". Among its tasks are gathering economic and demographic data for business and government decision-making, and helping to set industrial standards. This organization's main purpose is to create jobs, promote economic growth, encourage sustainable development and improve standards of living for all Americans. Show on map
National MallThe National Mall is a national park in downtown Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The National Park Service (NPS) administers the National Mall, which is part of its National Mall and Memorial Parks unit. The term National Mall commonly includes areas that are officially part of West Potomac Park and Constitution Gardens to the west, and often is taken to refer to the entire area between the Lincoln Memorial and the United States Capitol, with the Washington Monument dividing the area slightly west of its midpoint. The National Mall contains a number of museums and memorials and receives approximately 24 million visitors each year. Show on map
Benning Road Metro StationBenning Road is a major traveled street in Washington, D.C., and Prince George's County, Maryland. The street's western terminus is at the \"Starburst intersection\" in the northeast quadrant of the city at Bladensburg Road, Florida Avenue, Maryland Avenue, H Street and 15th Street. It passed over the Anacostia River via the Benning Bridge into the neighborhood of Benning. It continues southeast across East Capitol Street into the southeast quadrant, crossing Southern Avenue and the D.C.-Maryland boundary into Maryland, ending at an intersection with Marlboro Pike (a former alignment of Maryland Route 4). Show on map
Union MarketUnion Market is a gourmet food hall in Northeast Washington, D.C.. Bon Appétit called it one of the 5 best food halls in the United States. Union Market is owned by Edens, a South Carolina-based company. Show on map
Omni Shoreham HotelThe Omni Shoreham Hotel is a hotel in Northwest Washington, D.C., owned by Omni Hotels. It is located at the intersection of Connecticut Avenue and Calvert Street. It is located two blocks from another major hotel, the Marriott Wardman Park, the largest hotel in the city. Built in 1930 by local construction company owner Harry Bralove. The hotel has also been an entertainment venue, having been a regular venue for Mark Russell and the Capitol Steps. Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Show on map
Eastern High SchoolEastern High School is a public high school located in Washington, D.C. It educates about 1100 students in grades 9 through 12. Eastern was a part of the DCPS restructuring project, reopening in 2011 to incoming freshmen and growing by a grade level each year. It graduated its first class in 2015, with over 85% of graduating students attending college in the fall, while others enrolled in job readiness programs as well as the military. Show on map
Arthur M Sackler GalleryThe Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art form the Smithsonian Institution's national museums of Asian art in the United States. The Freer and Sackler galleries house the largest Asian art research library in the country. Founded in 1982, the Gallery is named after Arthur M. Sackler, who donated approximately 1,000 objects and $4 million to the building of the museum. Located on the south side of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and being physically connected to the Freer Gallery of Art, 96% of the museum is located underground underneath the Enid A. Haupt Garden. Show on map
Dupont CircleDupont Circle is a traffic circle, park, neighborhood, and historic district in Northwest Washington, D.C. The traffic circle is located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue NW, Connecticut Avenue NW, New Hampshire Avenue NW, P Street NW, and 19th Street NW. The Dupont Circle neighborhood is bounded approximately by 16th Street NW to the east, 22nd Street NW to the west, M Street NW to the south, and Florida Avenue NW to the north. The local government Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC 2B) and the Dupont Circle Historic District have slightly different boundaries. The circle is named for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont. Show on map
Main Hall - Trinity UniversityTrinity Washington University is a Roman Catholic university located in Washington, D.C. across from The Catholic University of America and the Dominican House of Studies and under the trusteeship of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. Although it has been a university since September 10, 2004, Trinity Washington University's College of Arts & Sciences undergraduate program maintains its original status as a liberal arts women's college. Men are accepted into the School of Education and the School of Professional Studies at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Show on map
Dupont Circle BuildingThe Dupont Circle Building is a landmark building on the south end of Dupont Circle in Washington DC. The entrance is on 1350 Connecticut Avenue NW. It was designed in the art deco style by architect Mihran Mesrobian, originally as an apartment building. In 1942 it was converted to offices. The American Institute of Architects's guide to the architecture of Washington DC assesses the Dupont Circle Building's bas-relief ornament as \"genius\" and judges that in respect of the interplay between ornament and geometry, \"it outdoes New York's famous Flatiron Building.\" Show on map
National City Christian ChurchNational City Christian Church, located on Thomas Circle in Washington, D.C., is the national church of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the \"Disciples of Christ\" or \"Christian Church\". The denomination grew out of the Stone-Campbell Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. The church currently hosts the Thomas Circle Singers, a chamber chorus that raises awareness and funds for charitable organizations located in Washington, D.C. Show on map
National Portrait GalleryThe National Portrait Gallery is a historic art museum located between 7th, 9th, F, and G Streets NW in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Founded in 1962 and opened to the public in 1968, it is part of the Smithsonian Institution. Its collections focus on images of famous Americans. The museum is housed in the historic Old Patent Office Building, as is the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The two museums are the eponym for the Gallery Place Washington Metro station, located at the corner of F and 7th Streets NW. Show on map
Second Division MemorialThe Second Division Memorial is located in President's Park, between 17th Street Northwest and Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC, United States. The Memorial commemorates those who died, while serving in the 2nd Infantry Division of the U. S. Army. The artist was James Earle Fraser. It was dedicated on July 18, 1936, by president Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was rededicated in 1962, by Gen. Maxwell Taylor, with two wings added for the battle honors of World War II and the Korean War. The flaming sword symbolizes the defense of Paris from the German advance. Show on map
Inter-American Development Bank Cultural CenterThe Inter-American Development Bank (IADB or IDB or BID) is the largest source of development financing for Latin America and the Caribbean. Established in 1959, the IDB supports Latin American and Caribbean economic development, social development and regional integration by lending to governments and government agencies, including State corporations. The IDB has four official languages: English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish. Its official names in the other three languages are as follows: In all three other languages the Bank uses the acronym \"BID\". Show on map
Arts and Industries BuildingThe Arts and Industries Building is the second oldest of the Smithsonian museums on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Initially named the National Museum, it was built to provide the Smithsonian with its first proper facility for public display of its growing collections.The building, designed by architects Adolf Cluss and Paul Schulze, opened in 1881, hosting an inaugural ball for President James A. Garfield. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971. After being closed for renovation, the building opened in the spring of 2016 for events and exhibitions. Show on map
New York Avenue Presbyterian ChurchThe New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., is a congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). The church was formed in 1859-60, but traces its roots to 1803 as the F Street Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and another congregation founded in 1820 on its current site, the Second Presbyterian Church. It is located at the intersection of 13th Street and New York Avenue in the city's northwest quadrant, four blocks from the White House. Due to its proximity to the White House, a number of Presidents have attended services there. Show on map
Capuchin CollegeCapuchin College is a national Catholic Roman Rite seminary located in Washington, D.C. The seminary is owned and administered by priests and brothers of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin. Built in the early 1900s, it serves as a house of Post-Novitiate training in the United States and belongs to the Capuchin Province of St. Augustine. The college is located in close proximity to the Catholic University of America, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the Dominican House of Studies, and Theological College. Show on map
Rayburn House Office BuildingThe Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB) is a congressional office building for the U.S. House of Representatives in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C., between South Capitol Street and First Street. Rayburn is named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn. It was completed in 1965 and at 2.375 million square feet (220,644 m²) is the largest congressional office building and the newest House office building (the only newer congressional office building is the Hart Senate Office Building, completed in 1982). Show on map
Healy Hall - Georgetown UniversityHealy Hall is the historic flagship building at the main campus of Georgetown University. Constructed between 1877-79, it was designed by prominent architects Paul J. Pelz and John L. Smithmeyer at the time they were working on the Library of Congress. The building was listed on DC Inventory of Historic Sites in 1964, on the National Register of Historic Places on May 25, 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark on December 23, 1987. Healy Hall was named after the then President of Georgetown University, Patrick Francis Healy. Show on map
DAR Constitution HallDAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall located in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1929 by the Daughters of the American Revolution to house its annual convention when membership delegations outgrew Memorial Continental Hall. Later, the two buildings were connected by a third structure housing the DAR Museum, administrative offices, and genealogical library. DAR Constitution Hall is still owned and operated by the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985. Show on map
Walter E. Washington Convention CenterThe Walter E. Washington Convention Center is a 2,300,000-square-foot (210,000 m2) convention center located in Washington, D.C., USA, owned and operated by the city's convention arm, Events DC. Designed by the Atlanta-based architecture firm Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates, the convention center is located in a superblock bounded by Mount Vernon Square and 7th, 9th and N streets, N.W. It is served by the Mount Vernon Square station on the Yellow and Green lines of the Washington Metro. It was completed in 2003. Show on map
Nassif Building(This article is about the Washington, D.C., office building recently renamed \"Constitution Center\". For the museum in Philadelphia, see National Constitution Center.) Constitution Center (formerly known as the David Nassif Building) is an office building located at 400 7th Street SW in Washington, D.C. It is 140 feet (43 m) high and has 10 floors. Covering an entire city block, it is the largest privately owned office building in the District of Columbia. Current tenants include the Federal Housing Finance Agency and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. As of February 2014, Constitution Center was worth $725.8 million, making it the most valuable, taxable property in the city. Show on map
Verizon CenterThe Verizon Center, formerly known as the MCI Center, is a sports and entertainment arena in Washington, D.C. Named after its sponsor, the telecommunications company Verizon Communications, the Verizon Center has been nicknamed the \"Phone Booth\" by local fans, because of its historical association with various telecommunications companies, such as MCI Inc. and Verizon. Located in the Chinatown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., the Verizon Center sits atop the Gallery Place rapid transit station of the Washington Metro. Show on map
WRC-TV (Washington)WRC-TV, channel 4, is an NBC owned-and-operated television station located in the American capital city of Washington, District of Columbia. The station is owned by the NBC Owned Television Stations subsidiary of NBCUniversal. WRC-TV's studios and transmitter are co-located on 4001 Nebraska Avenue NW in the Tenleytown neighborhood in the northwest quadrant of Washington. WRC-TV houses and originates NBC News' Washington bureau, out of which the network's long-running political events program, Meet the Press, is based. Show on map
Universalist National Memorial ChurchUniversalist National Memorial Church (UNMC) is a Unitarian Universalist church located at 1810 16th Street, Northwest in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. Theologically, the church describes itself as \"both liberal Christian and Universalist\". Originally a member of the Universalist Church of America, it became a member of the Unitarian Universalist Association in 1961 when the former merged with the American Unitarian Association to form the UUA, and in 2003, UNMC strengthened its ties to the UUA. Show on map
Fraser MansionThe Fraser Mansion is a building at 1701 20th Street NW, at the intersection of Connecticut Avenue, 20th Street, and R Street in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Since its construction in 1890, the mansion has served as a private residence, a restaurant, a boarding house, and most recently as home to the Founding Church of Scientology. The building is currently the location of Scientology's National Affairs office. The mansion was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Show on map
The Gwenfritz SculptureGwenfritz is a painted steel abstract stabile, by Alexander Calder.It is located at the National Museum of American History, at 14th Street, and Constitution Avenue, in Washington, D.C. It was dedicated on June 2, 1969. In 1983, it was relocated from the west front fountain plaza, to a corner location. It is planned to be relocated to its original location. It is named after Gwendolyn Cafritz, widow of Morris Cafritz, who had helped finance the project as head of the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation. Show on map
Calvary Baptist ChurchCalvary Baptist Church is a diverse and historic Baptist church in the Penn Quarter neighborhood in Washington, D.C. affiliated with the American Baptist Churches USA, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, the Baptist Peace Fellowship of North America, the Alliance of Baptists, the District of Columbia Baptist Convention, and the Association of Welcoming and Affirming Baptists. It severed ties with the Southern Baptist Convention in July 2012. Since 2003, Calvary's Senior Pastor has been Rev. Dr. Amy Butler. Show on map
Eastern MarketEastern Market is an island platformed Washington Metro station in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C., United States. The station was opened on July 1, 1977, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). The station currently provides service for the Blue, Orange, and Silver Lines. The station is located in Southeast Washington at Pennsylvania Avenue and 7th Street. It is named after the nearby Eastern Market, a historic Washington, D.C. public marketplace. Show on map
Embassy of CanadaThe Embassy of Canada in Washington, D.C. (French: Ambassade du Canada à Washington) is Canada's main diplomatic mission to the United States. The embassy building is located at 501 Pennsylvania Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C. between the Capitol and the White House, just north of the National Gallery of Art. In addition to its diplomatic role, the Embassy handles consular services and assists with international business development for the surrounding states of Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland. Show on map
Vietnam Women's MemorialThe Vietnam Women's Memorial is a memorial dedicated to the women of the United States who served in the Vietnam War, most of whom were nurses. It serves as a reminder of the importance of women in the conflict. It depicts three uniformed women with a wounded soldier. It is part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and is located on National Mall in Washington D.C., a short distance south of The Wall, north of the Reflecting Pool. It was designed by Glenna Goodacre and dedicated on November 11, 1993. Show on map
Cosmos ClubThe Cosmos Club is a private social club in Washington, D.C., founded by John Wesley Powell in 1878. Among its stated goals is \"The advancement of its members in science, literature, and art\". Cosmos Club members have included four U.S. Presidents, two U.S. Vice Presidents, a dozen Supreme Court justices, 32 Nobel Prize winners, 56 Pulitzer Prize winners, and 45 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Since 1952, the Club's headquarters have been in the Townsend House on Embassy Row. Show on map
Fort Lesley J McNairFort Lesley J. McNair is a United States Army post located on the tip of Greenleaf Point, the peninsula that lies at the confluence of the Potomac River and the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. To the peninsula's west is the Washington Channel, while the Anacostia River is on its south side. Originally named Washington Arsenal, the fort has been an army post for more than 200 years, third in length of service, after the United States Military Academy at West Point and the Carlisle Barracks. Show on map
William Howard Taft BridgeThe Taft Bridge, also known as the Connecticut Avenue Bridge or William Howard Taft Bridge, is a historic bridge located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. It carries Connecticut Avenue over the Rock Creek gorge, including Rock Creek and the Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway, connecting the neighborhoods of Woodley Park and Kalorama. It is situated to the southwest of the Duke Ellington Bridge. On July 3, 2003, the Taft Bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
Society of the Cincinnati Headquarters BuildingThe Society of the Cincinnati, Inc. is a patriotic-hereditary society with branches in the United States and France, founded in 1783, to preserve the ideals and fellowship of officers of the Continental Army who served in the Revolutionary War. Now in its third century, the Society promotes public interest in the American Revolution through its library and museum collections, exhibitions, programs, publications, and other activities. It is the oldest hereditary society in North America. Show on map
Renaissance Washington DC HotelRenaissance Washington DC Hotel is a high-rise building located in Washington, D.C., United States. Its construction was completed in 1986. The architect of the building was Smith-Williams Group, who proposed the architectural style of the building, which is postmodern. The building rises to 190 feet (58 m) containing 15 stories and 807 units. The building is part of the TechWorld Plaza complex. The hotel began a major renovation of its ballroom and meeting room level in 2013. Show on map
Capitol Hill Baptist ChurchCapitol Hill Baptist Church is a Baptist church located on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., six blocks from the United States Capitol. Mark Dever serves as the senior pastor of the church. It was founded in 1878 and was originally named Metropolitan Baptist Church, after the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London. CHBC is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, and has been described as the \"epicenter of the new Calvinism\". The average age of its members is 31. CHBC emphasizes the need for a regenerate church membership, and has implemented a church covenant to that end. Show on map
National Building MuseumThe National Building Museum, historically known as the Pension Building, in Washington, D.C., United States, is a museum of \"architecture, design, engineering, construction, and urban planning\". It was created by an act of Congress in 1980, and is a private non-profit institution; it is adjacent to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial and the Judiciary Square Metro station. The museum hosts various temporary exhibits in galleries around the spacious Great Hall. Show on map
P Street BridgeThe P Street Bridge or Lauzun's Legion Bridge is a 336-foot (102 m) concrete arch bridge that conveys P Street across Rock Creek and Rock Creek Park between the Georgetown and Dupont Circle neighborhoods of Northwest Washington, D.C. The first bridge at this site was constructed in 1855 and was replaced in 1935 by the current structure. The bridge reopened on July 15, 2004, after a year-long, $3.5-million reconstruction project, the first since its completion in 1935. Show on map
Holy Trinity Catholic ChurchHoly Trinity Catholic Church is a Catholic church located in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Located in the Georgetown neighborhood, it was established in 1787 and finished construction in 1794 and is the oldest Roman Catholic house of worship in both Georgetown and the larger city of Washington, D.C. The original building was vacated due to the lack of space and is now the Chapel of St. Ignatius, which is used as an auxiliary space for parish activities. Show on map
Embassy of FranceThe Embassy of France in Washington, D.C. is the primary French diplomatic mission to the United States. It is located at 4101 Reservoir Road, Northwest, Washington, D.C., just north of Georgetown University. The embassy opened in 1984. With some 400 staffers, it is France's largest foreign embassy. The embassy represents the interests of France and French citizens in the United States and conducts the majority of diplomatic work on such interests within the USA. Show on map
United States Botanic GardenThe United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden on the grounds of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., near Garfield Circle. The Botanic Garden is supervised by the Congress through the Architect of the Capitol, who is responsible for maintaining the grounds of the United States Capitol. The USBG is open every day of the year, including federal holidays. It is the oldest continually operating botanic garden in the United States. Show on map
Maine Avenue Fish MarketThe Maine Avenue Fish Market is an open air seafood market located in Southwest Washington, D.C. Also known as the Fish Wharf, or simply, the Wharf, the Maine Avenue Fish Market is one of the few surviving open air seafood markets on the east coast of the United States. A local landmark, the Maine Avenue Fish Market is the oldest continuously operating fish market in the United States, seventeen years older than New York City's Fulton Fish Market. Show on map
WJLA-TV (Washington)WJLA-TV, channel 7, is an ABC-affiliated television station serving the American capital city of Washington, D.C.. The station is owned by Hunt Valley, Maryland-based Sinclair Broadcast Group, which also operates local cable channel NewsChannel 8. The two stations share broadcast facilities located on Wilson Blvd in the Rosslyn section of Arlington, Virginia; WJLA-TV's transmitter is located in the Tenleytown neighborhood of northwest Washington. Show on map
Barney CircleBarney Circle is a small residential neighborhood located on the west bank of the Anacostia River in southeast Washington, D.C., in the United States. The neighborhood's name refers to the traffic circle which exists at Pennsylvania Avenue SE just before it crosses the John Philip Sousa Bridge over the Anacostia. The Barney Circle traffic circle is named for Commodore Joshua Barney, commander of the Chesapeake Bay Flotilla in the War of 1812. Show on map
WDCA-TV (Washington)WDCA, channel 20, is a MyNetworkTV owned-and-operated television station in the American capital city of Washington, D.C. The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations division of 21st Century Fox, and is part of a duopoly with Fox owned-and-operated station WTTG (channel 5). The two stations share studio and transmitter facilities located on Wisconsin Avenue in the Tenleytown section of Washington's northwest quadrant. Show on map
Embassy of the NetherlandsThe Embassy of the Netherlands in Washington, D.C. is the Kingdom of the Netherlands' diplomatic mission to the United States, located at 4200 Linnean Drive, N.W., Washington, D.C. The Netherlands operates Consulates-General in New York City, New York; Miami, Florida; Chicago, Illinois; and San Francisco, California. The Dutch Ambassador to the United States is Henne Schuwer. The Ambassador's residence is located at 2347 S Street, N.W. Washington, D.C.. Show on map
National Museum of Health and MedicineThe National Museum of Health and Medicine (NMHM) is a museum in Silver Spring, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. The museum was founded by U.S. Army Surgeon General William A. Hammond as the Army Medical Museum (AMM) in 1862; it became the NMHM in 1989 and relocated to its present site at the Army's Forest Glen Annex in 2011. An element of the Defense Health Agency (DHA), the NMHM is a member of the National Health Sciences Consortium. Show on map
Willard HotelThe Willard InterContinental Washington is a historic luxury Beaux-Arts hotel located at 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. Among its facilities are numerous luxurious guest rooms, several restaurants, the famed Round Robin Bar, the Peacock Alley series of luxury shops, and voluminous function rooms. It is two blocks east of the White House, and two blocks west of the Metro Center station of the Washington Metro. Show on map
Cannon House Office BuildingThe Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux-Arts style of architecture. It occupies a site south of the United States Capitol bounded by Independence Avenue, First Street, New Jersey Avenue, and C Street S.E. In 1962 the building was named for former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Joseph Gurney Cannon. Show on map
Anacostia StationAnacostia is a Washington Metro station in Washington, D.C. on the Green Line. The station is located in the Anacostia neighborhood of Southeast Washington, with entrances at Shannon Place and Howard Road near Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE (a major street serving the southeastern portion of the city). The station serves as a hub for Metrobus routes in Southeast, Washington, D.C. and Prince George's County, Maryland. Show on map
Meridian House InternationalThe Meridian House is located at 1630 Crescent Place in Washington, D.C., a mile and a half from the White House. It was designed by American architect John Russell Pope and built in 1920 for Ambassador Irwin Boyle Laughlin, who filled it with his extensive collection of French paintings and Oriental porcelain. It stayed in Laughlin family until 1960 when it was purchased by the non-profit Meridian International Center. Show on map
National Museum of American HistoryThe National Museum of American History: Kenneth E. Behring Center collects, preserves and displays the heritage of the United States in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. Among the items on display is the original Star-Spangled Banner. The museum is part of the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. Show on map
Tidewater LockThe Tidewater Lock is a dam in Washington, D.C. to the west of the mouth of Rock Creek at the Potomac River, on the east side of Georgetown. It is sometimes listed as Lock 0 on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. On historical canal documents, this is listed as \"Tide Lock A\". Canal Documents sometimes list a \"Tide Lock B\" on section \"I\" which stood at the lockhouse at 17th and Constitution Ave NW. It was completed in 1834. Show on map
Sibley Memorial HospitalSibley Memorial Hospital is a non-profit hospital located in The Palisades neighborhood of Washington D.C.. It is fully accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, and is licensed by the District of Columbia Department of Health and Human Services. The hospital specializes in surgery, orthopedics, and oncology services. It has been part of Johns Hopkins Medicine since 2010. Show on map
Whitney Young Memorial BridgeThe Whitney Young Memorial Bridge is a bridge that carries East Capitol Street across the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. in the United States. Finished in 1955, it was originally called the East Capitol Street Bridge. It was renamed for civil rights activist Whitney Young in early 1974. The bridge is 1,800 feet (550 m) long, its six lanes are 82 feet (25 m) wide, and it has 15 spans resting on 14 piers. Show on map
Cutts-Madison HouseThe Cutts-Madison House (also known as the Dolley Madison House) is an American colonial-style historic home located at 1520 H Street NW in Washington, D.C.The house is best known for being the residence of former First Lady Dolley Madison, who lived there from November 1837 until her death in July 1849. The Cutts-Madison House is a National Historic Landmark, part of the Lafayette Square Historic District. Show on map
Flather HallFlather Hall is a dormitory and one of 10 housing options for students at The Catholic University of America. Named for Mary Flather, it was constructed in 1962 and renovated in 2008. On the first floor is a priest in residence and a chapel. It has solar panels on the roof, making it part of the largest solar energy system in the Washington, D.C. metro area. Flather is used primarily to house freshmen men. Show on map
Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentThe United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a Cabinet department in the Executive branch of the United States federal government. Although its beginnings were in the House and Home Financing Agency, it was founded as a Cabinet department in 1965, as part of the \"Great Society\" program of President Lyndon Johnson, to develop and execute policies on housing and metropolises. Show on map
Woodrow Wilson HouseThe Woodrow Wilson House was the residence of the Twenty-Eighth President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson after he left office. It is at 2340 S Street NW just off Washington, D.C.'s Embassy Row. On February 3, 1924, Wilson died in an upstairs bedroom. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964. The National Trust for Historic Preservation owns the house and operates it as a museum. Show on map
Constitution GardensConstitution Gardens is a park area in Washington, D.C., United States, located within the boundaries of the National Mall. The 50-acre (200,000 m2) park is bounded on the west by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, on the east by 17th St NW, on the north by Constitution Avenue, and on the south by the Reflecting Pool. Constitution Gardens has a small pond, which contains an island open to pedestrians. Show on map
Mary Ann Shadd Cary HouseMary Ann Shadd Cary (October 9, 1823 – June 5, 1893) was an American-Canadian anti-slavery activist, journalist, publisher, teacher and lawyer. She was the first black woman publisher in North America and the first woman publisher in Canada. Shadd Cary was an abolitionist who became the first female African American newspaper editor in North America when she edited the Provincial Freeman in 1853. Show on map
Sheridan CircleSheridan Circle is a traffic circle in the Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Embassy Row. A number of embassies ring Sheridan Circle, including the former Turkish chancery and the Romanian embassy on the southern side, and the Embassy of Pakistan to the northwest. Dupont Circle is visible down Massachusetts Avenue; in the other direction, the avenue rises toward a bridge over Rock Creek Park. Show on map
Russell Senate Office BuildingThe Russell Senate Office Building is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings. Designed in the Beaux-Arts architectural style, it was built from 1903 to 1908, opened in 1909, and named for former Senator Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. of Georgia in 1972. It occupies a site north of the Capitol bounded by Constitution Avenue, First Street, Delaware Avenue, and C Street N.E. Show on map
Observatory CircleObservatory Circle is a street in Washington, D.C. It runs from Calvert Street to Massachusetts Avenue near 34th Street. Established in 1894, the street follows an incomplete loop, forming an arc rather than a circle. Number One Observatory Circle is the official residence of the Vice President of the United States. The inside of the arc formed by Observatory was blurred on Google Maps. Show on map
John Adams BuildingThe John Adams Building is one of three library buildings of the Library of Congress in the United States. The building was originally built simply as an annex to the Library's Main Building (the Thomas Jefferson Building). It opened its doors to the public on January 3, 1939. It is located on Second Street SE between Independence Avenue and East Capitol Street in Washington, DC. Show on map
Brigadier General Thaddeus Kosciuszko StatueBrigadier General Thaddeus Kosciuszko is a bronze statue by Antoni Popiel.It was dedicated by William Howard Taft, on May 11, 1910. It is located in Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C. A copy of the monument was unveiled in Warsaw, Poland in 2010. The statue is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as a part of American Revolution Statuary in Washington, D.C. Show on map
The Shops at National PlaceThe Shops at National Place is a three-level, indoor shopping mall located in downtown Washington, D.C. in the 16-story National Place Building. It is located on the block bounded by Pennsylvania Avenue, F Street, between 13th and 14th Streets NW, the former site of the Munsey Trust Building. It is located near the Metro Center station of the Washington Metro system. Show on map
Logan CircleLogan Circle is a traffic circle, neighborhood, and historic district in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The primarily residential neighborhood includes two historic districts, properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and sites designated D.C. Historic Landmarks. It is the only major circle downtown that remains entirely residential. Show on map
Andrew W Mellon AuditoriumThe Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium (originally named the Departmental Auditorium) is a 750-seat historic Neoclassical auditorium located at 1301 Constitution Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. The auditorium, which connects the two wings of the United States Environmental Protection Agency building, is owned by the U.S. government but available for use by the public. Show on map
National Visitor CenterThe National Visitor Center was an ill-fated attempt to repurpose Washington, D.C.'s Union Station as an information center for tourists visiting the United States Capitol and other Washington attractions. It opened for the Bicentennial celebrations in 1976, but it never was able to attract enough crowds to sustain its operating costs, and it closed in 1978. Show on map
James Madison Memorial BuildingThe James Madison Memorial Building is one of three buildings that make up the Library of Congress and is part of the United States Capitol Complex. The building was constructed from 1971 to 1976, and serves as the official memorial to President James Madison. It is located between First and Second Streets SE on Independence Avenue, in Washington, DC. Show on map
Dunbar High SchoolPaul Laurence Dunbar High School is a public secondary school located in Washington, D.C., United States. The school is located in the Truxton Circle neighborhood of Northwest Washington, two blocks from the intersection of New Jersey and New York Avenues. Dunbar, which serves grades 9 through 12, is a part of the District of Columbia Public Schools. Show on map
The Henley Park HotelThe Henley Park Hotel is a 96-room boutique style hotel located on 10th street and Massachusetts Avenue NW in Washington, DC. It features an upscale restaurant, Coeur De Lion, and is noted for its unique architecture. The Henley Park Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Show on map
Connecticut Connection Shopping CenterConnecticut Connection is a high-rise building located at 1101 Connecticut Avenue NW in the United States capital of Washington, D.C.. The building rises to 150 feet (46 m) and contains 12 floors. Its construction was completed in 1978. The architect of the building was Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, who created the postmodern design of the building. Show on map
United States Tax Court BuildingThe United States Tax Court Building is a courthouse located at 400 Second Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Judiciary Square neighborhood.It serves as the headquarters of the United States Tax Court. Built in 1972, the building and its landscaped plaza occupy the entire block bound by D Street, E Street, Second Street, and Third street. Show on map
Benning Bridge Show on map
Lafayette SquareLafayette Square is a seven-acre (30,000 m²) public park located within President's Park, Washington, D.C. directly north of the White House on H Street, bounded by Jackson Place on the west, Madison Place on the east, and Pennsylvania Avenue. It is named for the Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the American Revolution, and includes a prominent statue of early 19th century President and general Andrew Jackson on horseback. The square and the surrounding structures were designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1970. Show on map
Embassy of SingaporeThe Singaporean Embassy in Washington, D.C. is Singapore's main diplomatic mission to the United States. It is located at 3501 International Place Northwest, Washington, D.C. The embassy also operates Consulates-General in San Francisco, New York City, and Honorary Consulates-General in Miami and Chicago. The Ambassador is Ashok Kumar Mirpuri. Show on map
Sheridan SchoolSheridan School is an independent, progressive, K-8 school in Washington, D.C. The school enrolls about 25 students in each grade for a total of 225. The average tuition for the 2015-2016 school year is $32,475, and 20% of families receive some form of financial aid. About 25% of Sheridan staff and families are from underrepresented groups. Show on map
Ballou High SchoolFrank W. Ballou Senior High School is a public school located in Washington, D.C., United States. Ballou is a part of the District of Columbia Public Schools. The current principal is Dr. Yetunde Reeves . The marching band traveled to the 2009 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California and the 2009 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Show on map
Embassy of GreeceThe Embassy of Greece in Washington, D.C. is the Hellenic Republic's diplomatic mission to the United States. It is located at 2217 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C. in the Embassy Row neighborhood, near Sheridan Circle. The Embassy complex consists of four buildings. The current ambassador is Christos P. Panagopoulos. Show on map
Petersen HouseThe Petersen House is a 19th-century federal style row house located at 516 10th Street NW in Washington, D.C. On April 15, 1865, United States President Abraham Lincoln died there after being shot the previous evening at Ford's Theatre located across the street. The house was built in 1849 by William A. Petersen, a German tailor. Future Vice-President John C. Breckinridge, a friend of the Lincoln family, once rented this house in 1852. In 1865, it served as a boarding house. It is now a museum. Show on map
Glenwood CemeteryGlenwood Cemetery is a historic cemetery located at 2219 Lincoln Road NE in Washington, D.C. It is a private, secular cemetery owned and operated by The Glenwood Cemetery, Inc. Many famous people are buried in Glenwood Cemetery, and the cemetery is noted for its numerous elaborate Victorian and Art Nouveau funerary monuments. Show on map
Almas TempleThe Almas Temple is a building facing Franklin Square at 1315 K St NW in Washington, DC. It was designed in the Moorish Revival style. It was constructed in 1929 by Allen H. Potts, a member of the temple. Five stories tall, it was restored and relocated to its current location in 1987 to make way for a new office complex. Show on map
Lowell SchoolLowell School is an independent, co-educational Pre-Primary through 8th Grade school located in the Colonial Village neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school’s mission, which is rooted in the educational philosophy of Haim Ginott, John Dewey and Jean Piaget is to strengthen minds, ensure equity and honor individuality. Show on map
Gonzaga College High SchoolGonzaga College High School is a Jesuit high school for boys located in Washington, D.C. It is named in honor of St. Aloysius Gonzaga, an Italian saint from the 16th century. Gonzaga is the oldest boys' high school in the District of Columbia and also the oldest college in the original federal city of Washington. Show on map
Blessed Sacrament SchoolBlessed Sacrament School is a primary school teaching students from grades Kindergarten up through eighth grade, and is based in the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament parish. The school, along with the rest of the parish, recently underwent a large renovation, which created a long addition to the school. Show on map
Nineteenth Street Baptist ChurchThe Nineteenth Street Baptist Church, located on 16th Street, NW, is considered to be the first and oldest black Baptist congregation in Washington, D.C. Since its founding in 1839, the church has figured prominently within the historical and social fabric of Washington, D.C.'s African American community. Show on map
Embassy of IndiaDiplomatic relations of India in the United States are conducted through India's permanent diplomatic mission to USA. The Indian Embassy in U.S. is headed by the Indian Ambassador to the United States. It is situated in Washington, D.C.'s Embassy Row in a house which was originally built in 1901 for T. Morris Murray. India also has consulates in the cities of New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston and Chicago, and all these are associated with the Indian Embassy in U.S. Show on map
Gibbons HallGibbons Hall is a female dormitory for 138 upper-class students and one of 10 housing options for students at The Catholic University of America. Constructed in 1911 and named for the university's first chancellor, Cardinal James Gibbons, it was renovated in 2009. It is marked by a large central tower. Show on map
District of Columbia Public Library-Martin Luther King Jr Memorial LibraryThe Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library (MLKML) is the central facility of the District of Columbia Public Library (DCPL). Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed the 400,000 square foot (37,000 m²) steel, brick, and glass structure, and it is a rare example of modern architecture in Washington, D.C. Show on map
Embassy of JamaicaThe Embassy of Jamaica in Washington, D.C. is the primary diplomatic mission of Jamaica to the United States. It is located at 1520 New Hampshire Avenue, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The government of Jamaica established its first embassy in the U.S. on August 16, 1962. Show on map
Dumbarton BridgeThe Dumbarton Bridge, also known as the Q Street Bridge and the Buffalo Bridge, is a historic masonry arch bridge in Washington, D.C. Dumbarton Bridge was built between 1914 and 1915 to convey Q Street Northwest across Rock Creek Park between the city's Dupont Circle and Georgetown neighborhoods. Show on map
Mount Olivet CemeteryMount Olivet Cemetery is an historic cemetery located at 1300 Bladensburg Road, NE in Washington, D.C. It is maintained by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington. The largest Catholic burial ground in the District of Columbia, it was one of the first in the city to be racially integrated. Show on map
M Street BridgeThe M Street Bridge carries M Street across Rock Creek and the Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway. It lies between the neighborhoods of Georgetown and Foggy Bottom in Northwest Washington, D.C. The non-arched design of the bridge contrasts with that of all the other bridges rising over the parkway. Show on map
Dominican House of StudiesThe Dominican House of Studies, officially the Priory of the Immaculate Conception, is a community of the Province of St. Joseph of the Order of Preachers (Dominicans) dedicated to the theological education of the friars of the Province who are preparing for the Catholic priesthood. It houses: \n* The Priory of the Immaculate Conception. \n* The Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception (PFIC), an Ecclesiastical, and therefore Pontifical, Faculty of theology. Show on map
Hart Senate Office BuildingThe Philip A. Hart Senate Office Building is the third U.S. Senate office building, and is located on 2nd Street NE between Constitution Avenue NE and C Street NE in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Construction began in January 1975, and it was first occupied in November 1982. Rapidly rising construction costs plagued the building, creating several scandals. The structure is named for Philip Hart, who served 18 years as a senator from Michigan. Accessed via a spur of the United States Capitol Subway System, the building features a nine-story atrium dominated by massive artwork, and a large Central Hearing Facility which provides television facilities as well as extensive seating. Show on map
Maret SchoolMaret School is a coeducational, K-12 independent school in Washington, D.C.. It was founded by Marthe Maret in 1911 as a French primary school for girls and boys. Today, Maret is widely considered to be one of the best coeducational, K-12 independent schools in the Washington, D.C. area. Show on map
Military Road SchoolMilitary Road School is an historic structure located in the Brightwood neighborhood in the Northwest Quadrant of Washington, D.C. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. The building now houses the Latin American Montessori Bilingual Public Charter School. Show on map
John Burr GymnasiumBurr Gymnasium is a multi-purpose arena in Washington, D.C., which opened in 1963. It is home to the Howard University Bison basketball team. It is named after John Harold Burr Jr., chairman of the physical education department from 1923 to 1958. It has a seating capacity of 3,000. Show on map
Zero MilestoneThe Zero Milestone is a zero mile marker monument in Washington, D.C. intended as the initial milestone from which all road distances in the United States should be reckoned when it was built. At present, only roads in the Washington, D.C. area have distances measured from it. Show on map
Tivoli TheatreThe Tivoli Theatre is a landmark building in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on 14th Street and Park Road Northwest. Originally built as a movie theater, it currently (as of 2006) exhibits live stage productions as the home of the GALA Hispanic Theatre. Show on map
Embassy of IndonesiaThe Embassy of Indonesia in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Indonesia to the United States. It is located at 2020 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Embassy Row neighborhood. The Ambassador is Budi Bowoleksono. Show on map
Sherman CircleSherman Circle is an urban park and traffic circle in the Northwest Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Petworth at the intersection of Illinois Avenue, Kansas Avenue, 7th Street, and Crittenden Street NW. The circle is named in honor of Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman. Administered by the National Park Service's Rock Creek Park unit, Sherman Circle (U.S. Reservation 369) together with four surrounding triangular parks (U.S. Reservations 436, 438, 447, and 448) covers 3.44 acres and is considered by the National Park Service a \"cultural landscape.\" Show on map
Battleground National CemeteryBattleground National Cemetery is a military burial ground, located along Georgia Avenue near Fort Stevens, in Washington, D.C.'s Brightwood neighborhood. The cemetery is managed by the National Park Service, together with other components of Rock Creek Park. Show on map
Pinehurst CirclePinehurst Circle is at the intersection of Western and Utah Avenues and 33rd and Worthington Streets in Northwest Washington, D.C. The circle forms a semicircle along the border of Washington with Maryland and contains bus stops for both the E6 and M4 lines. Show on map
Columbia Heights Education CampusThe current Bell Multicultural High School building was built in 2006 to replace the old Bell Multicultural High School. In 2016, First Lady Michelle Obama visited the school to speak on higher education, telling students, \"My story can be your story.\" Show on map
National TheatreThe National Theatre is located in Washington, D.C., and is a venue for a variety of live stage productions with seating for 1,676.Despite its name, it is not a governmentally funded national theatre, but operated by a private, non-profit organization. Show on map
Duke Ellington Memorial BridgeThe Duke Ellington Bridge, named after Duke Ellington, carries Calvert Street NW over Rock Creek in Washington, D.C., United States. It connects 18th Street NW in Adams Morgan with Connecticut Avenue NW in Woodley Park, just north of the Taft Bridge. Show on map
Church of the PilgrimsThe Church of the Pilgrims is a neo-Gothic church on 22nd Street in Washington DC. It was founded in 1904 as the Second Southern Presbyterian Church and took its current name in the 1920s. It was designed by Baltimore architect Benjamin C. Flournoy. Show on map
University of The District Of ColumbiaThe University of the District of Columbia (UDC) is the only public university in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C. UDC is one of the few urban land-grant universities in the country and a member school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Show on map
McDonough GymnasiumMcDonough Gymnasium, sometimes referred to as McDonough Arena when hosting a sports or entertainment event, is a multi-purpose arena on the campus of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. It opened in 1951 and now holds 2,500 people. Show on map
Randle CircleRandle Circle is a traffic circle located at the intersection of Massachusetts, Minnesota and Branch avenues, K and 32nd streets, and Fort DuPont Drive in Southeast Washington, D.C. The entrance to Fort Dupont is located on the circle. Show on map
Korean War Veterans MemorialThe Korean War Veterans Memorial is located in Washington, D.C.'s West Potomac Park, southeast of the Lincoln Memorial and just south of the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. It commemorates those who served in the Korean War. Show on map
Embassy of South AfricaThe South African Embassy in Washington, D.C. is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of South Africa to the United States. It is located at 3051 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C. in Embassy Row neighborhood. Show on map
National Capital Parks East HeadquartersNational Capital Parks-East (NCPE) is an administrative grouping of a number of National Park Service sites generally east of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., but also nearby in Maryland. These sites include: Show on map
American Security and Trust Company BuildingThe American Security and Trust Company Building is a Neoclassical bank office in Washington, D.C., designed by the architectural firm of York and Sawyer. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Show on map
Dirksen Senate Office BuildingThe Dirksen Senate Office Building is the second office building constructed for members of the United States Senate in Washington, D.C., and was named for the late Minority Leader Everett Dirksen from Illinois in 1972. Show on map
Embassy of the State of QatarThe Embassy of Qatar in Washington, D.C. houses Qatar's diplomatic mission to the United States. The chancery is located at 2555 M Street NW on the western edge of the West End near the Georgetown neighborhood. Show on map
Garfinckel's Department StoreGarfinckel's was a prominent department store chain based in Washington, D.C. that catered to a clientele of wealthy consumers. It filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June 1990 and ceased operations that year. Show on map
Embassy of the Czech and Slovak Federal RepublicThe Slovak Embassy in Washington, D.C. is the main diplomatic mission of Slovak Republic to the United States. It is located at 3523 International Court NW in Washington, D.C.. The Ambassador is Peter Kmec. Show on map
Mazza GallerieMazza Gallerie is a retail, dining and entertainment complex in the Friendship Heights neighborhood of northwest Washington, D.C.. Opened in 1978, the center is owned by TIAA-CREF and managed by CBRE Group. Show on map
Oakcrest SchoolOakcrest School is an independent school in the Catholic tradition for girls grades 6–12 located in McLean, Virginia. It is inspired by the teachings of the Catholic Church under the auspices of Opus Dei. Show on map
Embassy of UruguayThe Embassy of Uruguay in Washington, D.C., is the diplomatic mission of Uruguay to the United States. The embassy also operates Consulates-General in Los Angeles; Miami; Washington, DC; and New York City. Show on map
Warner TheatreWarner Theatre is a theatre located at 513 13th Street, N.W. in downtown Washington, D.C. The theatre is attached to an office building called the Warner Building located on 1299 Pennsylvania Avenue. Show on map
The Field SchoolThe Field School is a preparatory school in Washington, D.C., located in the old Cafritz mansion on Foxhall Road. The school teaches 6th-12th grade, with about 380 students attending. Having the smallest average class size for any D.C. school and challenging, comprehensive curricula, Field is considered one of the best independent schools in the Washington, D.C. area. Show on map
Tower BuildingThe Tower Building is a historic high-rise building, located at 1401 K Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C., and is the seventh tallest commercial building in Washington, D.C.. Show on map
Bolling Air Force BaseBolling Air Force Base was a United States Air Force base in Washington, D.C. In 2010 it was merged with Naval Support Facility Anacostia to form Joint Base Anacostia–Bolling. Show on map
Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD)The Model Secondary School (MSSD) is a residential four-year high school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students located on the Gallaudet University campus in Washington, D.C.. Show on map
Lafayette BuildingLafayette Building, also known as Export-Import Bank Building, is a building in Washington, D.C.. Completed in 1940, it was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2005. Show on map
Shiloh Baptist ChurchShiloh Baptist Church is located at 1500 9th Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001 in the historic Shaw District.. The church was founded in Fredericksburg, VA in 1804. Show on map
Anacostia Railroad BridgeThe Anacostia Railroad Bridge is a vertical lift railroad bridge crossing the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., United States. The bridge is owned by CSX Transportation. Show on map
Twin OaksThe Twin Oaks (Chinese: 雙橡園; pinyin: Shuāng Xiàngyuán) is an 18.1 acre estate located in the Cleveland Park neighborhood in Washington, D.C., United States. Show on map
Commercial National BankCommercial National Bank is an historic structure located in Downtown Washington, D.C. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. Show on map
Lakes, rivers, streams and other bodies of water in Washington, D.C.
NameDescriptionShow
Dalecarlia ReservoirDalecarlia Reservoir is the primary storage basin for drinking water in Washington, D.C., fed by an underground aqueduct in turn fed by low dams which divert portions of the Potomac River near Great Falls and Little Falls.The reservoir is located between Spring Valley and the Palisades, two neighborhoods in Northwest Washington, and Brookmont, a neighborhood in Montgomery County, Maryland. The reservoir is maintained by the Washington Aqueduct division of the Army Corps of Engineers. Show on map
Georgetown ReservoirThe Georgetown Reservoir is a reservoir that is part of the water supply and treatment infrastructure for the District of Columbia. It is located in the Palisades neighborhood of Washington, D.C., approximately two miles downstream from the Maryland–D.C. boundary. At the outlet of the Georgetown facility is a sluice gate building that controls the flow of water into Washington City Tunnel, which leads to the McMillan Reservoir. This structure, called the Georgetown Castle Gatehouse, was built by the Army (c. 1901) in the shape of a castle. Show on map
Watts BranchWatts Branch is a tributary stream of the Anacostia River in Prince George's County, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. The headwaters of the stream originate in the Capitol Heights area of Prince George's County, and the branch flows roughly northwest for 4.9 miles (7.9 km) to the Anacostia, which drains to the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay. The watershed area of Watts Branch is about 6,000 acres (24 km2) in Prince George's County and 5,500 acres (22 km2) in Washington. Show on map
Washington ChannelThe Washington Channel is a channel that parallels the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. It is located between the Southwest Waterfront on the east side and East Potomac Park on the west side. The channel is two miles long, receives outflow from the Tidal Basin at its north end, and empties into the Anacostia River at Hains Point at its south end. The channel's depth ranges from 8.8 feet (2.7 m) to 23 feet (7.0 m). Show on map
Foundry BranchFoundry Branch is a tributary stream of the Potomac River in Washington, DC. The historic headwaters of the stream originate in the Tenleytown area in Northwest Washington, however at present the section of the stream north of Massachusetts Avenue is hydrologically separated from the lower section and runs through a large stormwater pipe under the daylighted portion. The daylight portion of the stream can be seen south of Massachusetts Avenue, in Glover-Archbold Park, and the stream continues to the Potomac, which drains to the Chesapeake Bay. Show on map
Oxon CreekOxon Creek is a cove on the Potomac River which straddles the border between Washington, D.C. and Prince George's County, Maryland just north of Interstate 495 (Capital Beltway) at Woodrow Wilson Bridge. The tributary stream is Oxon Run. Oxon Creek is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) in length and empties into the Potomac at Goose Island (a sand bar often under water) across from the city of Alexandria, Virginia. To the north is the Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant and to the south the Oxon Cove Park. The Anacostia Freeway crosses it on a bridge. To the east is Oxon Hill Manor. The unusual spelling is either historical or a reference to Oxfordshire, England. Show on map
Reflecting PoolThe Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool is the largest of the many reflecting pools in Washington, D.C., United States. It is a long and large rectangular pool located on the National Mall, directly east of the Lincoln Memorial, with the Washington Monument to the east of the reflecting pool. Part of the iconic image of Washington, the reflecting pool hosts many of the 24 million visitors a year who visit the National Mall. It is lined by walking paths and shade trees on both sides. Depending on the viewer's vantage point, it dramatically reflects the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, the Mall's trees, and/or the expansive sky. Show on map
McMillan ReservoirThe McMillan Reservoir Park is a reservoir in Washington, D.C. that supplies the majority of the city's municipal water. It was originally called the Howard University Reservoir or the Washington City Reservoir, and was completed in 1902 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The reservoir was built on the site of Smith Spring, one of the springs previously used for drinking water. Washington's earliest residents relied on natural springs but this came to be inadequate as the city's population grew. In 1850, Congress determined that the Potomac River should be the city's principal source of water. Show on map
Kingman LakeKingman Lake is a 110-acre (0.45 km2) artificial lake located in the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The lake was created in 1920 when the United States Army Corps of Engineers used material dredged from the Anacostia River to create Kingman Island. The Corps of Engineers largely blocked the flow of the Anacostia River to the west of Kingman Island, creating the lake (although some water is permitted to enter the lake to prevent it from completely evaporating and to refresh its waters). Kingman Lake is currently managed by the National Park Service. Show on map
Tidal BasinThe Tidal Basin is a partially man-made reservoir between the Potomac River and the Washington Channel in Washington, D.C. It is part of West Potomac Park and is a focal point of the National Cherry Blossom Festival held each spring. The Jefferson Memorial, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, and the George Mason Memorial are situated adjacent to the Tidal Basin. The basin covers an area of about 107 acres (43 ha) and is 10 feet (3.0 m) deep. Show on map
Pope BranchPope Branch is a tributary stream of the Anacostia River in Washington, DC. The headwaters of the stream originate near Fort Davis Drive, and the branch flows roughly northwest for about 1 mile (1.6 km) to the Anacostia, which drains to the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay. The watershed area of Pope Branch is about 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2). Show on map
Maddox BranchMaddox Branch is a tributary stream of the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., USA. The historic headwaters of the stream originate in the Tenleytown area in Northwest Washington. The stream flows from the campus of American University south about 1 mile (1.6 km) through Battery Kemble Park, under the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal to the Potomac. Show on map
Capitol Reflecting PoolThe Capitol Reflecting Pool is a reflecting pool in Washington, D.C., USA. It lies to the west of the United States Capitol and is the westernmost element of the Capitol grounds (or the easternmost element of the National Mall, according to some reckonings). The Capitol Dome and the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial are reflected in its waters. Show on map
Rock CreekRock Creek is a free-flowing tributary of the Potomac River, which empties into the Atlantic Ocean via the Chesapeake Bay. The creek is 32.6 miles (52.5 km) long, with a drainage area of about 76.5 square miles (198 km2). The last quarter-mile (400 m) of the creek is affected by tides. Show on map
Hickey RunHickey Run is a tributary stream of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C.. Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Washington, D.C.
NameDescriptionShow
White HouseThe White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The term White House is often used to refer to actions of the president and his advisers, as in \"The White House announced that...\". Show on map
Freedom PlazaFreedom Plaza, originally known as Western Plaza, is an open plaza in Northwest Washington, D.C., United States, located at the corner of 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, adjacent to Pershing Park. Designed by Robert Venturi, the plaza was constructed in 1980 and is mostly composed of stone, inlaid with a partial depiction of Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant's plan for the City of Washington. Most of the plaza is raised above street level. The western end of the plaza contains a large fountain, while the eastern end of the plaza contains an equestrian statue of Kazimierz Pułaski. The Freedom Plaza is also home to a monument honoring the Great Seal of the United States. Show on map
Farragut SquareFarragut Square is a city square in Washington, D.C.'s Ward 2. It is bordered by K Street NW on the north, I Street NW to the south, and on the east and west by segments of 17th Street NW, and it interrupts Connecticut Avenue NW. It is serviced by two stops on the Washington Metro rail system, Farragut North on the Red Line and Farragut West on the Blue, Orange, and Silver Lines. The square is a known hangout for bicycle messengers and for pigeons, sparrows, and a few starlings. Monday through Friday, several food trucks congregate on streets surrounding Farragut Square. Show on map
Robert A Taft Memorial and CarillonThe Robert A. Taft Memorial and Carillon is a carillon dedicated as a memorial to U.S. Senator Robert Alphonso Taft, son of President William Howard Taft. The memorial is located north of the Capitol, on Constitution Avenue between New Jersey Avenue and First Street, N.W. Designed by architect Douglas W. Orr, the memorial consists of a Tennessee marble tower and a 10-foot (3.0 m) bronze statue of Senator Taft sculpted by Wheeler Williams. The shaft of the tower measures 100 feet (30 m) high, 11 feet (3.4 m) deep, and 32 feet (9.8 m) wide. Above the statue is inscribed, \"This Memorial to Robert A. Taft, presented by the people to the Congress of the United States, stands as a tribute to the honesty, indomitable courage, and high principles of free government symbolized by his life.\" The bas Show on map
Franklin Delano Roosevelt MemorialThe Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington D.C. dedicated to the memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States, and to the era he represents. For the memorial's designer, landscape architect Lawrence Halprin, the memorial site represents the capstone of a distinguished career, partly because the landscape architect had fond memories of Roosevelt, and partly because of the sheer difficulty of the task. Show on map
East Potomac ParkEast Potomac Park is a park located on a man-made island in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The park lies southwest of the Jefferson Memorial and the 14th Street Bridge, and the Washington Channel lies between the park and the Potomac River. Amenities in East Potomac Park include the East Potomac Park Golf Course, a miniature golf course, a public swimming pool (the East Potomac Park Aquatic Center), tennis courts, and several athletic fields (some configured for baseball and softball, others for soccer, rugby, or American football). The park is a popular spot for fishermen, and cyclists, walkers, inline skaters, and runners heavily use the park's roads and paths. A portion of Ohio Drive SW runs along the perimeter of the park. Show on map
Theodore Roosevelt IslandTheodore Roosevelt Island is a 88.5-acre (358,000 m2) island and a national memorial located in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. The island was given to the American people by the Theodore Roosevelt Association in memory of the 26th U.S. president, Theodore Roosevelt; before that, the island had been known as My Lord's Island, Barbadoes Island, Mason's Island, Analostan Island, and Anacostine Island. Show on map
Major General John A Logan StatueMajor General John A. Logan, also known as the General John A. Logan Monument and Logan Circle Monument, is an equestrian statue in Washington, D.C. that honors politician and Civil War general John A. Logan. The monument is sited in the center of Logan Circle, a traffic circle and public park in the Logan Circle neighborhood. The statue was sculpted by artist Franklin Simmons, whose other prominent works include the Peace Monument and statues in the National Statuary Hall Collection. The architect of the statue base was Richard Morris Hunt, designer of prominent buildings including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and The Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island. Prominent attendees at the dedication ceremony in 1901 included President William McKinley, members of his cabinet, Sen Show on map
Major General George B McClellan StatueMajor General George B. McClellan is an equestrian statue in Washington, D.C. that honors politician and Civil War general George B. McClellan. The monument is sited on a prominent location in the Kalorama Triangle neighborhood due to efforts made by area residents. The statue was sculpted by American artist Frederick William MacMonnies, a graduate of the École des Beaux-Arts whose best known work is a statue of Nathan Hale in New York City. MacMonnies was chosen to design the statue following a lengthy competition organized by a statue commission, led by then Secretary of War William Howard Taft. The monument was dedicated in 1907, with prominent attendees at the ceremony including President Theodore Roosevelt, New York City mayor George B. McClellan, Jr., politicians, generals and thousa Show on map
Clark Griffith Stadium (historical)Griffith Stadium was a sports stadium that stood in Washington, D.C., from 1911 to 1965, between Georgia Avenue and 5th Street, and between W Street and Florida Avenue NW. An earlier wooden baseball park had been built on the same site in 1891. It was called Boundary Field or National Park, as its occupants were then known primarily by the nickname Nationals. This park was destroyed by a fire in March 1911 and replaced by a steel and concrete structure, also at first called National Park; it was renamed for Washington Senators owner Clark Griffith in 1920. The stadium was home to the American League Senators from 1911 through 1960, and to an expansion team of the same name for their first season in 1961. Show on map
Tenley CircleTenley Circle is a traffic circle in the Northwest Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Tenleytown. Tenley Circle lies at the intersection of Nebraska Avenue, Wisconsin Avenue, and Yuma Street. The circle gets its name from John Tennally, a tavern owner and local resident c. 1790. As is common with the passage of time, the name \"Tennally\" evolved into the name \"Tenley\" with which we are familiar today. The name change was relatively gradual and historic photos of The District's streetcar system have indicated that streetcars of the period were signed with the original spelling. Show on map
President Ulysses S Grant MemorialThe Ulysses S. Grant Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., honoring American Civil War general and U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. It sits at the base of Capitol Hill (Union Square, the Mall, 1st Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Maryland Avenue), below the west front of the United States Capitol. Its sculpture of Grant on horseback faces west, over the Capitol Reflecting Pool and toward the Lincoln Memorial, which honors Grant's wartime president, Abraham Lincoln. Grant's statue rests on a pedestal decorated with bronze reliefs of the infantry; flanking pedestals hold statues of protective lions and bronze representations of the Union cavalry and artillery. The Grant and Lincoln memorials define the eastern and western ends, respectively, of the National Mall. Show on map
Battery Kemble ParkBattery Kemble Park is a park in Northwest Washington D.C., administered by the National Park Service. Battery Kemble was a Union Army defensive site during the Civil War. The battery was located on Ridge Road (now Nebraska Avenue, NW), and included two 100-pound Parrott rifles, placed in such a way as to sweep Chain Bridge, Aqueduct Bridge, and Virginia beyond. Today, the parapet and gun positions are fairly well preserved and remain visible. The park is located south of Nebraska Avenue along Maddox Branch. Battery Kemble Park is bounded by Chain Bridge Road (to the west), MacArthur Boulevard (to the south), 49th Street (to the east), and Nebraska Avenue, NW (north). It is considered part of the Palisades neighborhood. The park is popular for running, sledding, and nature walks. Show on map
Burnham BarrierKingman Island (also known as Burnham Barrier) and Heritage Island are islands in Northeast and Southeast Washington, D.C., in the Anacostia River. Both islands are man-made, built from material dredged from the Anacostia River and completed in 1916. Kingman Island is bordered on the east by the Anacostia River, and on the west by 110-acre (45 ha) Kingman Lake. Heritage Island is surrounded by Kingman Lake. Both islands were federally owned property managed by the National Park Service until 1995. They are currently owned by the District of Columbia government, and managed by Living Classrooms National Capital Region. Kingman Island is bisected by Benning Road and the Ethel Kennedy Bridge, with the southern half of the island bisected again by East Capitol Street and the Whitney Young Memo Show on map
Admiral David G Farragut StatueAdmiral David G. Farragut is a statue in Washington, D.C. honoring David Farragut, a career military officer who served as the first admiral in the United States Navy. The monument is sited in the center of Farragut Square, a city square in downtown Washington, D.C. The statue was sculpted by female artist Vinnie Ream, whose best known works include a statue of Abraham Lincoln and several statues in the National Statuary Hall Collection. The monument was dedicated in 1881 in an extravagant ceremony attended by President James A. Garfield, members of his cabinet, and thousands of spectators. It was the first monument erected in Washington, D.C. in honor of a naval war hero. Show on map
Seward SquareSeward Square is a square and park maintained by the National Park Service located at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Carolina Avenue in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Southeast Washington, D.C. The square is bounded by 4th Street to the west and 6th Street to the east. North and south of the park are the respective westbound and eastbound lanes of Seward Square, SE. Because Pennsylvania and North Carolina Avenues intersect in the middle of the square, it divides the square into four unique smaller parks. The park is named after William Henry Seward, the United States Secretary of State under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. Seward is noted for his part in the American purchase of Alaska from the Russian Empire in 1867. The purchase was ridiculed at the ti Show on map
Ford's Theatre National Historic SiteFord's Theatre is a historic theatre in Washington, D.C., used for various stage performances beginning in the 1860s. It is also the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot, the mortally wounded president was carried across the street to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning. Show on map
Oscar S Straus Memorial FountainThe Oscar S. Straus Memorial in Washington, D.C., commemorates the accomplishments of the first Jew to serve in the cabinet of a U.S. president. Oscar Solomon Straus was Secretary of Commerce and Labor under President Theodore Roosevelt from 1906 to 1909. The memorial is a marble fountain located in the Federal Triangle on 14th Street between Pennsylvania Avenue and Constitution Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C.. It is located in front of the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. It was rededicated on October 26, 1998. Show on map
United States Navy MemorialThe United States Navy Memorial, on Pennsylvania Avenue NW between 7th Street Northwest and 9th Street Northwest in Washington, D.C., honors those who have served or are currently serving in the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and the Merchant Marine. The National Park Service, through its National Mall and Memorial Parks administrative unit, provides technical and maintenance assistance to the foundation. The memorial is adjacent to the Archives station and the National Archives building. Show on map
Brigadier General Albert Pike StatueBrigadier General Albert Pike is a public artwork in Washington, D.C. honoring Albert Pike (1809–1891), a poet, lawyer, soldier, and influential figure in the Scottish Rite of freemasonry. The memorial is sited near the corner of 3rd and D Streets NW in the Judiciary Square neighborhood. The memorial's two bronze figures were sculpted by Gaetano Trentanove, an Italian-American artist responsible for another Washington, D.C. sculptural landmark, the Daniel Webster Memorial. The dedication ceremony in 1901 was attended by thousands of Masons who marched in a celebratory parade. Show on map
Dupont Circle FountainThe Dupont Circle Fountain, formally known as the Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Dupont Memorial Fountain, is a fountain located in the center of Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C. It honors Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont, a prominent American naval officer and member of the Du Pont family. The fountain replaced a statue of Du Pont that was installed in 1884. Designed by Henry Bacon and sculpted by Daniel Chester French, the fountain was dedicated in 1921. Prominent guests at the dedication ceremony included First Lady Florence Harding, Secretary of War John W. Weeks and Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby. Show on map
Lincoln ParkLincoln Park is an urban park located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The largest Capitol Hill Park, Pierre L'Enfant included it in his original 1791 plan for the District of Columbia, intending it for public use. L'Enfant planned it to be the point from which all distances in North America would be measured, although it was not ultimately utilized for this purpose. It was known historically as Lincoln Square. Show on map
Scott CircleScott Circle is a traffic circle in the northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., at the junction of Massachusetts Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue, and 16th Street, N.W. N Street stops short of meeting the circle from either direction, and is connected to Rhode Island and Massachusetts avenues through Corregidor Street and Bataan Street. The through-lanes of 16th Street NW pass under Scott Circle in a $317,000 tunnel that began construction in February 1941 and opened on December 29, 1941. The service lanes of 16th Street intersect the circle. Show on map
General Philip H Sheridan StatueGeneral Philip Sheridan is a bronze sculpture that honors Civil War general Philip Sheridan. The monument was sculpted by Gutzon Borglum, best known for his design of Mount Rushmore. Dedicated in 1908, dignitaries in attendance at the unveiling ceremony included President Theodore Roosevelt, members of the President's cabinet, high-ranking military officers and veterans from the Civil War and Spanish–American War. The equestrian statue is located in the center of Sheridan Circle in the Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The bronze statue, surrounded by a plaza and park, is one of eighteen Civil War monuments in Washington, D.C., which were collectively listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The sculpture and surrounding park are owned and maintained by@en . Show on map
Columbia IslandColumbia Island is an island located in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., in the United States. It formed naturally as an extension of Analostan Island in the latter part of the 1800s, and over time erosion and flooding severed it from Analostan. The U.S. federal government deposited material dredged from the Potomac River on the island between 1911 and 1922, and again from 1925 to 1927. The island was also reshaped by the government at this time. It received the name \"Columbia Island\" about 1918. In 1968, the island was renamed Lady Bird Johnson Park. Located within the park are the Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove, Navy – Merchant Marine Memorial, and the Columbia Island Marina. The island, park, memorials, and marina are part of the George Washington Memorial Parkway and admini Show on map
Victims of Communism MemorialThe Victims of Communism Memorial is a memorial in Washington, D.C. located at the intersection of Massachusetts and New Jersey Avenues and G Street, NW, two blocks from Union Station and within view of the U.S. Capitol. The memorial is dedicated \"to the more than one hundred million victims of communism\". The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation says the purpose of the memorial is to ensure \"that the history of communist tyranny will be taught to future generations.\" Show on map
Judiciary SquareJudiciary Square is a neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C., the vast majority of which is occupied by various federal and municipal courthouses and office buildings. Judiciary Square is located roughly between Pennsylvania Avenue to the south, H Street to the north, 6th Street to the west, and the Interstate 395 access tunnel to the east. Judiciary Square is also home to Georgetown University Law Center, located on New Jersey Avenue NW. Show on map
James Buchanan MemorialThe James Buchanan Memorial is a bronze and granite memorial in the Southeast corner of Meridian Hill Park Northwest, Washington, D.C. It was designed by architect William Gorden Beecher, and sculpted by Maryland artist Hans Schuler. The memorial in the nation's capital complemented an earlier monument, constructed in 1907–08 and dedicated in 1911, on the site of Buchanan's birthplace in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. Show on map
West Potomac ParkWest Potomac Park is a U.S. national park in Washington, D.C., adjacent to the National Mall. It includes the parkland that extends south of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool, from the Lincoln Memorial to the grounds of the Washington Monument. The park is the site of many national landmarks, including the Korean War Veterans Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, George Mason Memorial, Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial and the surrounding land on the shore of the Tidal Basin, an artificial inlet of the Potomac River created in the 19th century that links the Potomac with the northern end of the Washington Channel. West Potomac Park is administered by the National Park Service. Show on map
African American Civil War MemorialThe African American Civil War Memorial, at the corner of Vermont Avenue, 10th St, and U Street NW in Washington, D.C., commemorates the service of 209,145 African-American soldiers and sailors who fought for the Union in the American Civil War. The sculpture, The Spirit of Freedom, is a 9-foot bronze statue by Ed Hamilton of Louisville, Kentucky, commissioned by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities in 1993 and completed in 1997. The memorial includes a walking area with curved panel short walls inscribed with the names of the men who served in the war. The complex is located at the eastern entrance to the U Street station on the Washington Metro, served by the Yellow and Green Lines. Show on map
Fort Dupont ParkFort DuPont Park is a 376-acre (1.52 km2) wooded park under the management of the National Park Service located in Washington, DC. The name of the park comes from the old Civil War earthwork fort that lies within the park. The fort was one of several designed to defend Washington from a Confederate attack during the Civil War. There are few remains of the actual fortifications. Show on map
Pershing ParkThe National World War I Memorial is a planned memorial commemorating the service rendered by members of the United States Armed Forces in World War I. The 2015 National Defense Authorization Act established the World War I Centennial Commission, which was given the authority to build the memorial in Pershing Park, located at 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., in the United States. The park, which has existed since 1981, also contains the John J. Pershing General of the Armies commemorative work. In January 2016, the design commission selected the competition winning team - Joseph Weishaar, Sabin Howard, Phoebe Lickwar, and GWWO Architects - and their winning concept \"The Weight of Sacrifice.\" Show on map
Rock Creek Park(For the song, see City Life (album).) Rock Creek Park is a large urban park that bisects the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The park was created by an Act of Congress in 1890, and today is administered by the National Park Service. In addition to the park proper, the Rock Creek administrative unit of the National Park Service administers various other federally owned properties in the District of Columbia located to the north and west of the National Mall, including Meridian Hill Park on 16th Street, N.W., the Old Stone House in Georgetown, and certain of the Fort Circle Parks, a series of batteries and forts encircling the District of Columbia for its defense during the U.S. Civil War. Show on map
President Lincoln and Soldiers' Home National MonumentPresident Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument, sometimes shortened to President Lincoln's Cottage, is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, known today as the Armed Forces Retirement Home. It is located near the Petworth and Park View neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.. President Lincoln's Cottage was formerly known as Anderson Cottage. Show on map
Meridian Hill ParkMeridian Hill Park is a structured urban park located in the Washington, D.C neighborhood of Columbia Heights; it also abuts the nearby neighborhood of Adams Morgan. The park was designed and built between 1912 and 1940. This 12 acre (49,000 m²) formally landscaped site is maintained by the National Park Service as a part of Rock Creek Park, but is not contiguous with that much larger nearby park. Meridian Hill Park is bordered by 15th, 16th, W, and Euclid Streets NW, and sits on a prominent hill 1.5 miles (2.42 km) directly north of the White House. The park has also been unofficially known as \"Malcolm X Park\" by some city residents. Show on map
Union SquareUnion Square is an 11-acre public plaza at the foot of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., USA. It encompasses the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (1924) and the 6-acre Capitol Reflecting Pool (1971) and is just west of the United States Capitol building. Views differ as to whether the Square is just east of the National Mall or is itself the eastern end. Show on map
Nuns of the Battlefield MonumentNuns of the Battlefield is a public artwork made in 1924 by Irish artist Jerome Connor, located at the intersection of Rhode Island Ave NW, M St & Connecticut Ave NW in Washington, D.C., United States. A tribute to the more than 600 nuns who nursed soldiers of both armies during the American Civil War, it is one of two monuments in the District that mark women's roles in the conflict. It is a contributing monument to the Civil War Monuments in Washington, D.C., listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1993, it was surveyed for the Smithsonian Institution's Save Outdoor Sculpture! program. Show on map
Ward CircleWard Circle is a traffic circle at the intersection of Nebraska and Massachusetts avenues in Northwest, Washington, DC. The land on three sides of Ward Circle is owned by American University, while the fourth is temporary home to the headquarters of the Department of Homeland Security. The circle contains a statue of Maj. Gen. Artemas Ward, which was donated by Harvard University. Ward Circle was constructed for the sculpture. Sculpted by Leonard Crunelle, the statue was unveiled on November 3, 1938. Maj. Gen. Ward's great-great-great-granddaughter unveiled the statue. Show on map
Georgetown Waterfront ParkThe Georgetown Waterfront Park is a national park completed in Washington, DC in the fall of 2011. Part of the Georgetown Historic District, the park stretches along the banks of the Potomac River from 31st Street, NW to the Key Bridge. The result of many years of advocacy and fundraising, the site features several notable design elements. Now complete, the park links 225 miles (362 km) of parkland along the Potomac River stretching from Cumberland, Maryland to Mount Vernon, Virginia. The park was designed to passively complement the natural curve of the river. Show on map
The EllipseThe Ellipse (officially called President's Park South) is a 52-acre (210,000 m²) park located just south of the White House fence. Properly, the Ellipse is the name of the five-furlong (1 km) circumference street within the park. The entire park is open to the public, and features various monuments. The Ellipse is also the location for a number of annual events. D.C. locals can often be heard to say they are \"on the Ellipse\", which is understood to mean that the individual is on the field that is bounded by Ellipse Road. It is part of the President's Park. Show on map
Adams MemorialThe Adams Memorial is a grave marker located in Section E of Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C., featuring a cast bronze allegorical sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The shrouded figure is seated against a granite block which forms one side of a hexagonal plot, designed by architect Stanford White. Across a small light-toned granite plaza, a comfortable stone bench invites visitors to rest and meditate. The whole is sheltered by a close screen of dense conifers, more dense and uniform in 2015 than in the photograph to the right. Show on map
Japanese LanternThe Japanese Lantern is a stone statue in West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.It is located next to the Tidal Basin, among the cherry trees first planted in 1912. It is lighted during the annual National Cherry Blossom Festival. A pair of lanterns were created in 1651, to mark the death of Tokugawa Iemitsu. The lantern was formerly located at the Tōshō-gū temple, in Ueno Park, where its twin remains. The lantern was given, by the governor of Tokyo, to the people of the United States, and was dedicated on March 30, 1954. Show on map
Oxon Run ParkwayThe Oxon Run Parkway, is a roadway and small park in the Washington Highlands neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. 126 acres (51 ha) of important wetlands and deciduous forest is located in this urban environment. Only a single road, managed by the National Park Service, traverses the area, which is meant to demonstrate how a relatively wooded and pristine environment can be preserved within a city setting. Before the establishment of the parkway, the parkland was contained within the Camp Simms military installation. Show on map
Lafayette Square Historic DistrictLafayette Square Historic District is a historic district in Washington, D.C.. It includes the 7-acre (28,000 m2) Lafayette Square park, and surrounding buildings. It is part of President's Park. NRHP 'travel itinerary' listing at the National Park Service It includes the American Peace Society house, at 734 Jackson Place. It is located \"Roughly between 15th and 17th Sts. and H St. and State and Treasury Places, exclusive of the White House and its grounds\" It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1970. Show on map
Kenilworth Park and Aquatic GardensKenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens is a National Park Service site located in the north eastern corner of Washington, D.C., and the Maryland state border. Nestled near the banks of the Anacostia River and directly west of the Baltimore Washington Parkway, Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens preserves a plethora of rare waterlilies and lotuses in the cultivated ponds near the river. The park also contains the Kenilworth Marsh, the only remaining tidal marsh in Washington, D.C. and an adjacent recreational area. Show on map
Peace MonumentThe Peace Monument, also known as the Naval Monument or Civil War Sailors Monument, stands on the grounds of the United States Capitol in Peace Circle at First Street, N.W., and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. The 44 foot (13.4 m) high white marble memorial was erected from 1877-1878 to commemorate the naval deaths at sea during the American Civil War. Today it stands as part of a three-part sculptural group including the James A. Garfield Monument and the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial. Show on map
Washington CircleWashington Circle is a traffic circle in the northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., United States. It is located on the border of the Foggy Bottom and West End neighborhoods, which is a part of the Ward 2 section in Washington. It is the intersection of 23rd Street, K Street, New Hampshire Avenue, and Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. The through lanes of K Street (which are U.S. Route 29) travel underneath the circle in a tunnel, while the service lanes intersect the circle. Show on map
Alexander Robey Shepherd StatueAlexander Robey Shepherd (January 30, 1835 – September 12, 1902), better known as Boss Shepherd, was one of the most controversial and influential civic leaders in the history of Washington, D.C., and one of the most powerful big-city political bosses of the Gilded Age. He was head of the DC Board of Public Works from 1871 to 1873 and Governor of the District of Columbia from 1873 to 1874. He is known, particularly in Washington, as \"The Father of Modern Washington.\" Show on map
Hains PointHains Point is located at the southern tip of East Potomac Park between the main branch of the Potomac River and the Washington Channel in southwest Washington, D.C. The land on which the park is located is sometimes described as a peninsula but is actually an island: the Washington Channel connects with the Tidal Basin north of the park and the Jefferson Memorial. The island is artificial: it was built up from Potomac dredging material from 1880 to 1892. Show on map
Grant CircleGrant Circle is a traffic circle located in the Petworth neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C. New Hampshire and Illinois Avenues NW, Varnum Street NW, and 5th Street NW all intersect at this circle. The park within the circle is owned and administered by the National Park Service through its Rock Creek Park unit. The circle and the buildings flanking it were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2015. Show on map
National Law Enforcement Officers MemorialThe National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C., at Judiciary Square, honors 20,267 U.S. law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty throughout history. The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund was established by former U.S. Representative Mario Biaggi (D-NY), a 23-year New York City police veteran who was wounded in the line of duty over 10 times before retiring in 1965. Show on map
Bartholdi FountainThe Bartholdi Fountain is a monumental public fountain, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, who later created the Statue of Liberty. The fountain was originally made for the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and is now located at the corner of Independence Avenue and First Street, SW, in the United States Botanic Garden, on the grounds of the United States Capitol, in Washington D.C.. Show on map
Fort Reno ParkFort Reno Park is a park in the Tenleytown neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. It is the highest point in the city, and was involved in the only Civil War battle to take place in the District of Columbia. The highest natural elevation at Fort Reno, 409 feet, is lower than the top of the Washington Monument, which rises 555 feet from nearly sea level. The Highpointers Foundation is working with the National Park Service to place a sign near the USGS marker so that the highest natural point is easier to locate. Show on map
McPherson SquareMcPherson Square is a square in downtown Washington, D.C. It is bound by K Street Northwest to the north, Vermont Avenue NW on the East, I Street NW on the south, and 15th Street NW on the West; it is one block northeast of Lafayette Park. It is served by the McPherson Square station of the Washington Metro. Show on map
First Division MonumentThe First Division Monument is located in President's Park, south of State Place Northwest, between 17th Street Northwest and West Executive Avenue Northwest in Washington, DC, United States. The Monument commemorates those who died while serving in the 1st Infantry Division of the U. S. Army. Show on map
Thomas CircleThomas Circle is a traffic circle in Northwest Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue NW, Vermont Avenue NW, 14th Street NW, and M Street NW. It is named for George Henry Thomas, a Union Army general in the American Civil War. Show on map
American Legion Freedom BellFreedom Bell, American Legion, is a public artwork located at Union Station in Washington, D.C., United States. Freedom Bell, American Legion was surveyed as part of the Smithsonian's American Art Museum's Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture database in 1985. Show on map
Cubi XI SculptureCubi XI is an abstract sculpture by David Smith. It is a part of the Cubi series of sculptures. Constructed in 1963, it was installed on April 21, 1964 at 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. near Sheridan Circle.It is in the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden. Show on map
Mount Vernon SquareMount Vernon Square is a city square and neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The square is located where the following streets would otherwise intersect: Massachusetts Avenue NW, New York Avenue NW, K Street NW, and 8th Street NW. Show on map
Christopher Columbus Memorial FountainColumbus Fountain is a public artwork by American sculptor Lorado Taft, located at Union Station in Washington, D.C., United States. A centerpiece of Columbus Circle, Columbus Fountain serves as a tribute to the explorer Christopher Columbus. Show on map
Acacia Griffins SculptureAcacia Griffins are public artworks by American sculptor Edmond Amateis, located at the Acacia Building at 51 Louisiana Avenue N.W., in Washington, D.C., United States. Show on map
Fort Bunker HillFort Bunker Hill was a brick and earthenwork fortification built as part of the defenses of Washington, D.C. during the American Civil War. Show on map
Lieutenant General George Washington StatueLieutenant General George Washington is an equestrian statue of George Washington, at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C. Show on map
District of Columbia War MemorialThe District of Columbia War Memorial commemorates the citizens of the District of Columbia who served in World War I. Show on map