Maps, Guides And More - Oklahoma in United States

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects on the map of Oklahoma.

Map of Oklahoma district in United States

Basic information about Oklahoma
Oklahoma /ˌoʊkləˈhoʊmə/ (Cherokee: Asgaya gigageyi / ᎠᏍᎦᏯ ᎩᎦᎨᏱ; or translated ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ (òɡàlàhoma), Pawnee: Uukuhuúwa, Cayuga: Gahnawiyoˀgeh) is a state located in the South Central United States. Oklahoma is the 20th most extensive and the 28th most populous of the 50 United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning \red people\. It is also known informally by its nickname, The Sooner State, in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on the choicest pieces of land prior to the official opening date, and the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which opened the door for white settlement in America's Indian Territory. The name was settled upon statehood, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged and Indian was dropped from the name. On November 16, 1907, Oklahoma became the 46th state to enter the union. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, or informally \Okies\, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City. A major producer of natural gas, oil, and agricultural products, Oklahoma relies on an economic base of aviation, energy, telecommunications, and biotechnology. In 2007, it had one of the fastest-growing economies in the United States, ranking among the top states in per capita income growth and gross domestic product growth. Oklahoma City and Tulsa serve as Oklahoma's primary economic anchors, with nearly two-thirds of Oklahomans living within their metropolitan statistical areas. With small mountain ranges, prairie, mesas, and eastern forests, most of Oklahoma lies in the Great Plains, Cross Timbers and the U.S. Interior Highlands—a region especially prone to severe weather. In addition to having a prevalence of English, German, Scottish, Scotch-Irish, and Native American ancestry, more than 25 Native American languages are spoken in Oklahoma, second only to California. Oklahoma is located on a confluence of three major American cultural regions and historically served as a route for cattle drives, a destination for southern settlers, and a government-sanctioned territory for Native Americans.
Cities, towns & villages in Oklahoma
NameDescriptionShow
GageGage is a town in Ellis County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 442 at the 2010 census. Located in the central part of Ellis County on State Highway 46, thirteen miles north of Arnett, the county seat, and on Highway 15, twenty-one miles southwest of Woodward, Gage developed primarily because of transportation access. The military road from Fort Supply to Fort Elliott/Mobeetie, Texas, passed near the future town, and two miles to the northwest a stage stop existed at the confluence of Little Wolf and Wolf creeks. In 1887 the Southern Kansas Railway (later part of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway) had constructed a line across northwestern Oklahoma from Kansas to the Texas Panhandle. A station called Gage, for a Chicago railroad financier, was established in July near W Show on map
AlsumaAlsuma was a rural community between Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma in Tulsa County, Oklahoma. Its post office opened in 1905, named Welcome, Oklahoma, but was renamed Alsuma in 1906. Another version states that the town was named for John Alsuma, a local merchant. According to a long-time resident, the town was renamed for three girls: Alice, Susan and Mabel. However, the informant did not know the full names of the girls or why they were selected. The community covered as much as 165 acres (67 ha) and held a population of 75 families. The post office discontinued service in 1926. It is now considered a ghost town. The name is still used locally in referring to a specific area of southeast Tulsa. Show on map
Picher (historical)Picher is a ghost town and former city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. This was a major national center of lead and zinc mining at the heart of the Tri-State Mining District. More than a century of unrestricted subsurface excavation dangerously undermined most of Picher's town buildings and left giant piles of toxic metal-contaminated mine tailings (known as chat) heaped throughout the area. The discovery of the cave-in risks, groundwater contamination, and health effects associated with the chat piles and subsurface shafts resulted in the site being included in 1980 in the Tar Creek Superfund Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The state collaborated on mitigation and remediation measures, but a 1996 study found that 34% of the children in Picher suffered from lead@en . Show on map
KiamichiKiamichi is a former community in northern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, six miles east of Tuskahoma. A United States Post Office was established at Kiamichi, Indian Territory on September 27, 1887 and operated until September 14, 1962. The community and post office took their name from the nearby Kiamichi River. Prior to Oklahoma's statehood Kiamichi was located in Wade County, Choctaw Nation. The site of Kiamichi was selected because of its proximity to the Kiamichi River, with its abundant water supply. Adjacent station stops were established to the north and south. Show on map
StanleyStanley is an unincorporated community in northern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, eight miles southwest of Clayton. A United States Post Office was established at Stanley, Indian Territory on August 20, 1906, and was named for William Eugene Stanley (1844–1910), Governor of Kansas, 1899–1903, and member of the Dawes Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, 1903-1904. He is buried in Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas. The Dawes Commission was appointed by the U.S. Government to prepare the Choctaw Nation and its sister Five Civilized Tribes for statehood. Show on map
Oklahoma CityOklahoma City is the capital and largest city of the state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County, the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 631,346 as of July 2015. As of 2015, the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,358,452, and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,459,758 (Chamber of Commerce) residents, making it Oklahoma's largest metropolitan area. Show on map
Red ForkRed Fork is a community in Southwest Tulsa. It was founded in 1883 as a railhead on the Arkansas River. It is famous for being the location of the first oil well in Tulsa County, the Sue A. Bland. On June 25, 1901, the first oil well in Tulsa County was completed by Drs. J.C.W. Bland and Fred S. Clinton in Red Fork. Dr. Bland, the first graduate physician in Tulsa, had moved to Red Fork in 1895 to set up a country practice. The well was on the homestead allotment of Dr. Bland’s wife, Sue A. Bland, a Creek citizen. The Sue Bland #1 was a thirty barrel well at a depth of 600 feet. This well brought the first nationwide publicity and oil boom to Tulsa and the Indian Territory. Show on map
TulsaTulsa /ˈtʌlsə/ is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma and 47th-most populous city in the United States. As of July 2015, the population was 403,505, an increase of 11,599 over that reported in the 2010 Census. It is the principal municipality of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area, a region with 981,005 residents in the MSA and 1,151,172 in the CSA. The city serves as the county seat of Tulsa County, the most densely populated county in Oklahoma, with urban development extending into Osage, Rogers, and Wagoner counties. Show on map
DunbarDunbar is a community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 17 miles north of Antlers, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office operated here from May 5, 1925 to January 15, 1956. In its early days it was a sawmill town in the Indian Territory. The site of Dunbar was selected because of its proximity to the Kiamichi River, with its abundant water supply. Adjacent station stops were established at Stanley, Oklahoma to the north, and Wadena, Oklahoma to the south. Dunbar, in one of the most scenic valleys in the state, is framed by Dunbar Mountain on the east and Bull Creek Mountain on the west. Show on map
IngallsIngalls is a ghost town in eastern Payne County, Oklahoma, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Stillwater. The town was settled as a result of the \"Unassigned Lands\" land run in 1889, and had a post office from January 22, 1890, until October 31, 1907. It was named for Senator John J. Ingalls of Kansas. During the 1890s the population peaked at about 150, then began to decline. Show on map
HamdenHamden is an unincorporated community in northern Choctaw County, Oklahoma. It is seven miles southeast of Antlers, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office was established at Hamden, Indian Territory on March 31, 1894 and operated until May 15, 1924. Hamden is on the boundary separating Choctaw County and Pushmataha County, and residents of the community live in both. The site of Hamden was selected because of its proximity to a local creek. Adjacent station stops were established to the north and south. Show on map
McAlesterMcAlester is a city in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 17,783 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Pittsburg County. It is currently the largest city in the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, followed by Durant. The town gets its name from J. J. McAlester, who later became Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma. McAlester was home to several noted politicians: Carl Albert Gene Stipe, George Nigh and Steven W. Taylor. Show on map
EubanksEubanks is a former community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 13 miles north of Antlers, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office was established for Eubanks, Indian Territory on February 26, 1907, and operated until April 30, 1934. It was named for William Eubanks, local lumberman. The site of Eubanks was selected because of its proximity to the Kiamichi River, with its abundant water supply. Adjacent station stops were established to the north and south. More information on Eubanks and the Kiamichi River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
NumaNuma was a farming community that was established early on in what was then \"L\" County in the Oklahoma Territory. This area was part of the Cherokee Strip Outlet which was opened for settlement on September 16, 1893. It is located in modern-day Grant County, between Medford and Deer Creek. It was located seven miles east and one-half mile south of Medford. It was located along the Gulf Railroad (later the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe) that connected the towns of Manchester, Wakita, Medford, and Deer Creek. The Numa Post Office was established on April 20, 1898. Numa had amenities such as a community hall, granary, weigh station, and a rail spur. Many members of the settler community made the run from Caldwell, Kansas and continued their relationships (economic and familial) with contacts Show on map
NuyakaNuyaka, Oklahoma is a populated place in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. It is about 7.4 kilometres (4.6 mi) SSE of Beggs, Oklahoma. The elevation is 735 feet (224 m) and the coordinates are latitude 35.653 and longitude -96.14. It was notable as the center of traditionalist opposition to the Creek national government during the late 19th Century. Nuyaka Mission was located nearby. Show on map
CorinneCorinne is an unincorporated community in southern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 19 miles east of Antlers. Using the Public Land Survey System commonly in use in Oklahoma the community is located in T22-4S-R19E. Captain Lesueur, Corinne’s father, was a noted military officer during the American Civil War, serving in the Confederate Army from Missouri. During post-war years he served as secretary of state of Missouri, later moving to Antlers. Prior to Oklahoma's statehood Corinne was located in Cedar County, Choctaw Nation. Show on map
SardisSardis was a community in northern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, six miles northwest of Clayton. A United States Post Office was established at Sardis, Indian Territory on February 20, 1905. It took its name from the nearby Sardis Indian Mission Church, which appears to have named itself after the Biblical city of Sardis. More information on Sardis and the Jack's Fork Creek valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
SlapoutSlapout is a small unincorporated community in Beaver County, Oklahoma, United States. The land upon which part of the town sits was homesteaded by Joseph L. Johnston. It sits on the northwest corner of the land Johnson had acquired with a government claim in 1904, three years before Oklahoma became a state. Today the gas station in the town is a regular stop for Tulsa and Oklahoma City skiers traveling to Colorado. The town was featured in a newspaper photo essay by Robert R. Mercer in the Tulsa Tribune in the 1970s. Show on map
FewellFewell is a community in eastern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office operated here from November 4, 1913 to October 15, 1943. It was named for Benjamin F. Fewell, its first postmaster. The Fewell family founded the community and the oldest marked grave in its cemetery—dated 1906—is that of a Fewell. Major creeks in the immediate vicinity are Wildhorse Creek and Uphill Creek. During recent years the old Fewell School, now a private residence, has been recognized as of historical and architectural significance, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
DelaDela is an unincorporated community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma six miles southeast of Antlers. It is within the jurisdiction of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. A United States Post Office operated here from May 12, 1920 to October 31, 1954. The post office and community were named for Dela M. Whitaker, local schoolteacher. More information on Dela, White Church, and the Locke family may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
StillwaterStillwater is a city in north east Oklahoma at the intersection of US-177 and State Highway 51. It is the county seat of Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. As of 2012, the city population was estimated to be 46,560, making it the tenth largest city in Oklahoma. Stillwater is the principal city of the Stillwater Micropolitan Statistical Area which had a population of 78,399 according to the 2012 census estimate. Stillwater was part of the first Oklahoma Land Run held April 22, 1889, when the Unassigned Lands were opened for settlement and became the core of the new Oklahoma Territory. The city charter was adopted on August 24 later that year. Stillwater is home to Oklahoma State University, a branch of Northern Oklahoma College, Meridian Technology Center, and the Oklahoma Department of Show on map
MillerMiller is an unincorporated community in southwestern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 10 miles northwest of Antlers and a short distance west of Moyers. A United States Post Office was established at Miller, Indian Territory on June 22, 1905 and operated until October 31, 1954. It was named for Dr. J.H. Miller, Sr. (1889-1924), Antlers rancher. Prior to Oklahoma statehood, Miller was located in Jack’s Fork County of the Choctaw Nation. Its county seat—Many Springs, located at present-day Daisy—was to the north of Miller. Show on map
Pine RidgePine Ridge is an unincorporated community in Hale Township, Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located 6 miles (10 km) south of Fort Cobb at the junction of County Road 1380 and County Street 2550. During the community's heyday in the 1940s there was a hub of activity at the main junction of the Ozark Trail and the Fort Cobb road, with a grocery store and two churches, Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church and Pine Ridge Church of Christ (which later merged into the Fort Cobb Church of Christ). Today only the ruins of the Baptist Church building remains. Show on map
LawtonThe city of Lawton is the county seat of Comanche County, in the State of Oklahoma. Located in southwestern Oklahoma, about 87 mi (140 km) southwest of Oklahoma City, it is the principal city of the Lawton, Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2010 census, Lawton's population was 96,867, making it the fifth-largest city in the state. Show on map
SpencervilleSpencerville is an unincorporated community in northern Choctaw County, Oklahoma. It is 12 miles northeast of Hugo, Oklahoma, adjacent to the Pushmataha County border. The improved Ft. Smith to Ft. Towson military road of 1839 ran north-south thru Spencerville after crossing the \"Seven Devils\" on its way southeast to Doaksville. This wagon road was heavily used by the U.S. Army from 1839–48, especially during the War with Mexico. Show on map
KellondKellond is an unincorporated community and former railroad station in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. Kellond is located approximately three miles northwest of Antlers on Oklahoma State Highway 2. The school building had two classrooms separated by a hallway, a larger playroom, two entryways, a large storage room which was later updated into two restrooms, (until then, there were two outhouses on the east side of the school) a large auditorium, and a basement which was used as a lunchroom and had a small kitchen, and various storage rooms. Show on map
CloudyCloudy, Oklahoma is an unincorporated community located in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, USA. It is 12 miles northeast of Rattan. Using the Public Land Survey System in use in Oklahoma the community is located at T16-3S-R19E. A United States Post Office was established for Cloudy on October 21, 1911. It took its name from Cloudy Creek, a tributary of Little River. Cloudy has always been more of a geographic area than a cohesive community. Prior to Oklahoma's statehood, Cloudy was located in Cedar County, Choctaw Nation. The nearest community of any size to Cloudy is Rattan. Show on map
AdelAdel is an unincorporated community in northwestern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 12 miles west of Clayton, Oklahoma. Using the Public Land Survey System commonly in use in Oklahoma its coordinates are T13-3S-R16E. Prior to Oklahoma's statehood Adel was located in Jack's Fork County, Choctaw Nation. No landmarks remain extant in Adel except for a small cemetery containing five graves. Only one grave, that of a county sheriff from the old Choctaw Nation, bears a marker and it is dated 1880. More information on Adel may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
BelzoniBelzoni is an area of Pushmataha County, Oklahoma formerly home to a thriving community. Located several miles southwest of Rattan, it continues as a place name. Belzoni was established during the waning years of the Choctaw Nation as a sovereign entity, and was settled by white settlers from mostly Southern states. The settlement rapidly grew into a successful farming hub and population center in that area. On October 20, 1905 a United States Post Office was established at Belzoni, Indian Territory – a testament to its success. Show on map
RamonaRamona is a town in Washington County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 564 at the 2000 census. The town began as Bon-Ton, but changed its name to Ramona in 1899 in honor of the Helen Hunt Jackson novel of the same name. The town is one of four communities that makes up the consolidated Caney Valley School District. Show on map
BisonBison is a rural unincorporated community located on US Highway 81 in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States, consisting of a 30-acre town plat. The community was named for nearby Buffalo Springs. Buffalo Springs was a historic stage coach stop and a watering hole on the Chisholm Trail located about a mile north of Bison. Bison is home to a Catholic community, part of St. Joseph's parish under the Archdisocese of Oklahoma City. The church was erected in 1909, followed by a two-story brick school building operated by the Sisters of the Divine Providence from 1911 to 1934 when the Adorers of the Blood of Christ took over. Show on map
KentonKenton is a census designated place (CDP) in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, United States. There is a store, \"The Merc\", bed and breakfasts, guest ranches, three church congregations, and a post office, which was established May 12, 1891. Kenton is the only Oklahoma community that observes Mountain Time, which legally begins a few miles west at the Oklahoma/New Mexico state line. To avoid confusion, \"Mountain Time\" is often added when giving the time to visitors. Posted business hours all end with \"MT\" or \"MST\" to specify Mountain Time. From Kenton, it is approximately 155 miles (249 km) south to Amarillo, Texas, 237 miles (381 km) northwest to Colorado Springs, Colorado, 306 miles (492 km) northwest to Denver, Colorado, 314 miles (505 km) southwest to Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 361 miles (5 Show on map
Carter NineCarter Nine was an unincorporated community in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States, located 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Shidler. Carter Nine had a post office, which opened on August 14, 1928. Carter Nine began as a company-owned town to house workers for an oil refinery operated by the Carter Oil Company. The company originally planned to build housing in Burbank, but decided the cost would be too high. Instead it created its own town in 1922, known as Carter Nine. The name Carter Nine was derived from a combination of the Carter Oil Company and the community's location in Section 9 of Township 26 North, Range 6 East. Show on map
OletaOleta is an unincorporated community in southeastern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 15 miles east of Antlers. According to the Public Land Survey System in use in Oklahoma it is located in S18-T4S-R19E. A United States Post Office opened here on October 10, 1935. According to historian George H. Shirk, whose seminal work Oklahoma Place Names was published in 1965, Oleta was named for the first wife of Alvin J. Morris, a businessman in the county. However, the name of Mr. Morris's first wife was not Oleta. More information on Oleta may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
BartlesvilleBartlesville is a city mostly in Washington County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 35,750 at the 2010 census, with a 2015 estimate of 36,595 according to the US Census Bureau. Bartlesville is 47 miles (76 km) north of Tulsa and 18 miles (29 km) from Oklahoma's northern border with Kansas. It is the county seat of Washington County. The Caney River runs through Bartlesville. It is one of two places in Oklahoma where a Lenape Native American tribe lives, the other being Anadarko. Show on map
PoolevillePooleville is a rural community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. It is west of the Arbuckles. During the territorial days, the community was originally known as Elk. It was located in District 21 of the old Indian Territory. The Elk post office opened January 15, 1890, and the name was changed to Pooleville on July 20, 1907. The current ZIP Code is 73401 assigned to Ardmore. The community was named for an Ardmore banker, E.S. Poole. On June 8, 1894, a sheriff's posse from Anadarko caught and killed William M. Dalton (a brother of the Daltons and member of the Doolin-Dalton Gang) near here. Show on map
ArdmoreArdmore is a business, cultural and tourism city in and the county seat of Carter County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 24,283, with an estimated population of 24,950 in 2013. The Ardmore micropolitan statistical area had an estimated population of 48,491 in 2013. Ardmore is located 90 miles (140 km) equidistant from Oklahoma City and Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, at the junction of Interstate 35 and U.S. Highway 70, and is generally considered the hub of the ten-county region of South Central Oklahoma, also known by state tourism pamphlets as \"Arbuckle Country\" and \"Lake and Trail Country\". Ardmore is situated about 9 miles (14 km) south of the Arbuckle Mountains and is located at the eastern margin of the Healdton Basin, one of the most oil-rich Show on map
NelsonNelson is an unincorporated community in northwestern Choctaw County, Oklahoma. It is six miles north of Soper, Oklahoma. Spencer Academy, a Choctaw Nation school, was moved here from Spencerville, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office was established at Nelson, Indian Territory on March 10, 1881 and operated until November 30, 1954. Until September 15, 1881, the official name of this post office was Nelsons. Nelson is named for Cole E. Nelson, prominent Choctaw Indian and National Attorney of the Choctaw Nation. Show on map
QuallsQualls is a small unincorporated community in Cherokee County, Oklahoma. It is west of Lake Tenkiller. The Qualls Post Office existed from January 20, 1909, until August 31, 1942. The first postmaster was William A. Qualls. One story is that sometime after the arrival of the Ross Party who traveled the Trail of Tears due to the Indian relocation in 1838, a cabin owned by a family named Qualls was burned to the ground by the Cherokee Lighthorse police and that event gave birth to the area name \"Qualls Burnt Cabin\". Sometime between World War I and World War II, that original name was shortened in common usage to the present \"Qualls\". Qualls Road and Burnt Cabin Road remain on the present maps of the area to memorialize that history. The name is further memorialized in Burnt Cabin Ridge Stat Show on map
NoliaNolia is a former community in eastern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, five miles east of Nashoba, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office operated here from October 26, 1912 to December 15, 1920. It was named for Nolia Johnson, wife of Ben F. Johnson (1885-1964), its first postmaster. More information on Nolia and the Little River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
WoodwardWoodward is a city in and the county seat of Woodward County, Oklahoma, United States. It is the largest city in a nine-county area. The population was 12,051 at the 2010 census. The area was historically occupied by the Kiowa, Comanche, Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes. European-American settlers established the town in 1887 after construction of the railroad to that point for shipping cattle to markets. The town was on the Great Western Cattle Trail. In the 19th century, it was one of the most important depots in the Oklahoma Territory for shipping cattle to the East. As an important cattle town, it had the rough frontier bawdiness of the time. The United States opened up much of the area to European-American settlement by the Land Run of 1893 and migrants rushed into the area. Show on map
Hall ParkHall Park is a neighborhood in Norman, Oklahoma. It was originally a town in Cleveland County, Oklahoma and part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. It began in the 1960s and is named after the founder Ike Hall. At the time of the 2000 census, the town population was 1,088 prior to becoming part of the City of Norman. Financial and infrastructure troubles plagued Hall Park throughout its history. The arsenic groundwater regulations established in January 2001 resulted in Hall Park's only independent water sources being declared in violation of federal drinking water standards. Show on map
BabbsBabbs (Babbs Switch) is a small rural community in Kiowa County, Oklahoma. It was named for Edith \"Babbs\" Babcock. Babbs was the scene of the nationally known Babbs Switch Fire on December 24, 1924, in which 36 people died in a school fire. Many of the dead were children but several families were completely wiped out. Although the Babbs school house is this community's \"claim to fame\", Babbs had as its largest feature a grain elevator that served the local farmers as a depository for small grains (wheat, barley, oats, milo) until the late 1970s when the elevator was closed due to its age and lack of repair by its owners, \"Hobart Farmer's CO-OP\". Additionally there was a gas station and a general store across Hwy 183 to the east approximately 2 city blocks from the elevator. The Babbs schoo Show on map
SnowSnow is an unincorporated community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 18 miles northeast of Antlers. A United States Post Office was established here on July 21, 1930 and was named for George Snow, local resident and merchant. Located in the Kiamichi Mountains, Snow was very isolated until construction and paving of U.S. Highway 271 during the 1950s, connecting the area to Nashoba and Clayton to the north and Antlers to the south. Snow is located along the upper reaches of Big Cedar Creek, which is almost always well watered and experiences reliable flow regardless of season. Show on map
EuchaOld Eucha and New Eucha are nearby census-designated places in Delaware County. Eucha, pronounced \"oochee\", is a small rural community located in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States, north of Lake Eucha. The Eucha Post Office was established November 20, 1900, in District 5 of the old Indian Territory. The community was named for Oochelata, a principal chief of the Cherokees. Eucha, well known for its Indian culture, often has Indian taco sales. Show on map
GuthrieGuthrie is a city and county seat in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City Metroplex. The population was 10,191 at the 2010 census, a 2.7 percent increase from the 9,925 at the 2000 census. First known as a railroad station stop, after the April 1889 land run, Guthrie immediately gained 10,000 new residents who began to develop the town. It was rapidly improved and was designated as the territorial capital, and in 1907 as the first state capital of Oklahoma. In 1910 state voters chose the larger Oklahoma City as the new capital in a special election. Show on map
CentraliaCentralia is a rural unincorporated community in Craig County, Oklahoma, United States. It is said to have been founded by J. H. Hargrove in 1898 and named for Centralia, Missouri. The town prospered between 1907 and 1915, before entering a long decline. It is now considered a ghost town. Show on map
SkullyvilleSkullyville (also spelled Scullyville) is a small unincorporated rural community in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is about one mile east of Spiro, Oklahoma and 15 miles (24 km)west of Fort Smith, Arkansas. Now essentially nothing but a cemetery remains, but it was an important community before the Civil War. Skullyville was the site of the Choctaw Agency from 1832 until 1839. It then became the capital of the Mushulatubbe District of the Choctaw Nation, a stop for the Butterfield Stage and capital of the Choctaw Nation. The town suffered serious damage during the Civil War, then was bypassed by the railroad and abandoned by businessmen who moved to the nearest railroad station. Closure of the post office in 1917 was essentially the death knell of the town. It is now consider Show on map
NewallaNewalla is an unincorporated community in rural eastern Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States. Newalla is an adaption of the Osage name for the Canadian River. The post office was opened June 22, 1904. Located just west of State Highway 270, north of Interstate 40, it is a part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. Show on map
NashobaNashoba is an unincorporated community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 11 miles southeast of Tuskahoma. A United States Post Office opened at Nashoba, Indian Territory on September 13, 1886. The community took its name from Nashoba County, Choctaw Nation. The county took its name from nashoba, the word in the Choctaw language for “wolf”, and the county was often referred to as Wolf County. More information on Nashoba and the Little River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. Show on map
Broken ArrowBroken Arrow is a city located in the northeastern part of the State of Oklahoma, primarily in Tulsa County but also with a section of the city in western Wagoner County. It is the largest suburb of Tulsa. According to the 2010 census, Broken Arrow has a population of 98,850 residents and is the fourth largest city in the state. However, a July 1, 2015, estimate reports that the population of the city is 106,563, making it the 280th largest city in the United States. The city is part of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area, which has a population of 961,561 residents. Show on map
TiptonTipton is a town in Tillman County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 847 at the 2010 census. Tipton also is home to a home for children, founded in 1928, when Sol Tipton donated a plot of land to the founders. The original Tipton Home was in Canadian, Texas. It holds the record for the warmest temperature ever recorded for Oklahoma. 120 °F (49 °C) recorded on June 27, 1994. On May 16, 2015, the town was nearly hit by a violent wedge tornado. Show on map
LongdaleLongdale is a town in Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 262 at the 2010 census. Longdale School, which closed in 1991, was home to the world famous \"Longdale Redmen\". The Redmen were widely known throughout both hemispheres for the successful sports teams fielded throughout the 20th Century. In 1991, the Longdale Redmen celebrated their tenth consecutive National Kickball Championship. The 1990-91 teams also captured championships in basketball (Greenfield Tournament, Progressive Tournament, Canton Tournament and Hitchcock Tournament), flag football (National 8th Grade Champions), cross-country, 4-Square, 500, Heads-Up 7-Up, and wiffleball. As Longdale continues to grow throughout the 21st century the city is being overflowed with many successful businesses. Longda Show on map
Del CityDel City is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The population was 21,332 at the 2010 census. Del City is located near two major interstate highways, both of which connect it to Oklahoma City. Interstate 40 bisects the town from the northwest to southeast, and Interstate 35 lies just a short distance west of the city. The city borders southeast Oklahoma City, Midwest City and Tinker Air Force Base. George Epperly founded the city, which was incorporated by a vote of its residents in 1948. Del City is named after Epperly's eldest daughter Delaphene. Since its incorporation Del City has expanded three times, first by annexing Carter Park in 1954, Midway Village in 1963 and the acquisition of an undeveloped piece of land betwe Show on map
DurantDurant is a city in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States and serves as the capital of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. The population was 15,856 at the 2010 census. Durant is the principal city of the Durant Micropolitan Statistical Area, which had a population of 42,416 in 2010. Durant ranks as the second largest city within the Choctaw Nation, following McAlester, and ahead of Poteau. Durant is also part of the Dallas-Fort Worth Combined Statistical Area, anchoring the northern edge. Show on map
SobolSobol is an unincorporated community in southeastern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, United States. A United States Post Office was established here on January 21, 1911. It was named for Harry Sobol, a merchant in nearby Fort Towson. Sobol was isolated until construction and paving of Oklahoma State Highway 3, which connects it to Rattan on the west and Broken Bow to the east. Pine Creek Lake lies a few miles to its east. Built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control along Little River and Pine Creek, the lake is also a popular fishing spot. Show on map
PrestonPreston is a small unincorporated community located in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The post office was established December 13, 1909. It was named for an Okmulgee oilman, Harry Preston. Unrecognizable from the past, Preston was once a highly prosperous community, thriving mainly from the oil boom as did many of the surrounding communities. Later on, as the oil industry quieted in Preston, it served as a station for restocking trains and running cattle trails, loading water from Frisco lake. Many remnants of the station may be found throughout parts of Preston. Additionally, many old cattle trails and roads, though overgrown, are still distinguishable as such due to the heavy use and traffic. Show on map
FinleyFinley is an unincorporated community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 10 miles northeast of Antlers. A United States Post Office was established at Finley, Indian Territory on April 30, 1903, and was named for Sidney W. Finley (1869-1914), local merchant and first postmaster. Finley successfully retains its status as a cohesive community, long after losing its school. It hosts cemetery clean-up days and community dinners in its community center. It continues to have a post office and store. Show on map
LugertLugert is an unincorporated community in Kiowa County, Oklahoma. The town of Lugert was founded in 1901 on 80 acres (320,000 m2). In the town, there was a general store that housed the Post office and sold dry goods, school supplies, groceries, harnesses, axes and much more. It was named for Frank Lugert, who had moved to the area in 1898. Lugert owned land where the town was sited and also owned the general store. At the peak of its prosperity the town had a bank, two hotels, two pool halls, two restaurants, a saloon and a lumberyard. Show on map
EdmondEdmond is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area in the central part of the state. As of the 2010 census, the population was 81,405, making it the sixth largest city in the state of Oklahoma. The city limits are located on the northern border of Oklahoma City. Two major highways connect Edmond to downtown Oklahoma City: U.S. Route 77 (the Broadway Extension), which runs through the center of Edmond, and Interstate 35, which runs along the eastern side. Public transportation is provided by Citylink Edmond bus service. Show on map
WoolarocWoolaroc is located in the Osage Hills of Northeastern Oklahoma on Oklahoma State Highway 123 about 12 mi (19 km) southwest of Bartlesville, Oklahoma and 45 mi (72 km) north of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Woolaroc was established in 1925 as the ranch retreat of oilman Frank Phillips. The ranch is a 1500 hectare (3700 acre) wildlife preserve, home to many species of native and exotic wildlife, such as buffalo, elk and longhorn cattle. Woolaroc is also a museum with a collection of western art and artifacts, American Indian material, and one of the largest collections of Colt firearms in the world. Also on display is Woolaroc, the aircraft that won the ill-fated Dole Air Race in 1927. Woolaroc features a nature trail and two living history areas inviting you to experience the natural environment of Woo Show on map
DarwinDarwin is an unincorporated community in western Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, nine miles west of Antlers. It is approximately one-half mile east of the Atoka County border. A United States Post Office opened at Darwin, Indian Territory on July 31, 1905 and operated until March 14, 1955. Founded during the waning days of the Indian Territory, Darwin was located in Jack’s Fork County, Choctaw Nation. After Oklahoma’s statehood in 1907, the area became an agricultural and farming center. After the decline of farming, ranching became the economic mainstay and predominant activity. Show on map
PinkPink is a town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The only town in the United States bearing this name, Pink lies within the boundaries of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. The 2010 census population was 2,058, a 76.7 percent increase from 1,165 at the 2000 census. Show on map
SpiroSpiro is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,164 at the 2010 census, a 2.8 percent decline from 2,227 at the 2000 census. Developed as a railroad station in an agricultural area in the late 19th century, the small town is notable for its proximity to the Spiro Mounds. This is a Mississippian culture center that was active from about 850CE to 1450CE, and controlled a large area in present-day southeastern Oklahoma and nearby states. Today the 80-acre site with several earthwork mounds is preserved as Oklahoma's only State Archeological Park and one of North America's most important archaeological sites. It is the westernmost site of the expansive Mississippian culture, which h Show on map
SweetwaterSweetwater is a town in Beckham and Roger Mills counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It was incorporated in 2003. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 87. Named for nearby Sweetwater Creek, the town is at the junction of State Highway 30 and State Highway 152. The post office (zip code 73666), was established September 27, 1894. Show on map
EthelEthel is a community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, six miles east of Antlers. A United States Post Office was established at Ethel, Indian Territory on April 22, 1901 and operated until August 15, 1933. It was named for Ethel Labors, early-day resident. The loss of Ethel’s post office was not a verdict on the community’s possible lack of prosperity, but was due to its proximity to Antlers, Oklahoma. The community continued to be active long after the loss of the post office, with a school and churches. Its school has since closed, but other aspects of organized community life have remained. Show on map
ReddenRedden was a small town located in northeastern Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States, on State Highway 43, about 13 miles northeast of Stringtown. The Postal Service established a post office on June 1, 1903, in what was then Atoka County, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. It was named for John A. Redden (1873), a local resident who was appointed the first postmaster. The Statehood Proclamation was signed November 16, 1907. The post office at Redden, Oklahoma, was closed permanently on October 31, 1954. Show on map
TahlequahTahlequah (/ˈtælᵻkwɑː/ TAL-ə-kwah; Cherokee: ᏓᎵᏆ)is a city in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States located at the foothills of the Ozark Mountains. It is part of the Green Country region of Oklahoma and was established as a capital of the 19th-century Cherokee Nation in 1839, as part of the new settlement in Indian Territory after the Cherokee Native Americans were forced west from the American Southeast on the Trail of Tears. The city's population was 15,753 at the 2010 census, an increase of 8.96 percent from 14,458 at the 2000 census. The 2014 estimated population is 16,496. Show on map
MiddlebergMiddleberg (sometimes also spelled as Middleburg) is an unincorporated community in Grady County, Oklahoma, United States, located on the old alignment of US Highway 62 between Blanchard and Chickasha. Middleberg was originally a stop on the Oklahoma Central Railroad (aka \"The OCR\") but today is a rural community. Public school students in Middleberg attend Middleberg Schools through the 8th grade, after which they attend high school in nearby Blanchard. Other community institutions include the Middleberg Baptist Church. Show on map
Sacred HeartThe community of Sacred Heart revolved around the Sacred Heart Mission. During the early 20th Century, many of its functions moved to other locations. High school and college education for boys moved to St. Gregory in Shawnee in 1915. The post office was closed in 1954. The mission site is located nine miles east of US 177 (Asher, Oklahoma) on SH 39, then one mile north on Sacred Heart Road. The community is now considered a ghost town. Show on map
MeersMeers is a small unincorporated community located on State Highway 115 in Comanche County, Oklahoma, in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains. Founded as a gold mining town in 1901, it was named for mine operator Andrew J. Meers. The only remaining structure of the original town is the Meers Store & Restaurant, which Food Network named as the best hamburger joint in Oklahoma & one of the best in the United States of America, largely due to its signature MeersBurger. The Meers Store also served as the area post office from March 12, 1902, until February, 1989. Currently, area residents have Lawton mailing addresses. Meers lies on the Meers Fault. In 1985, in order to monitor seismic activity, the Oklahoma Geological Survey installed a seismograph in the Meers Store. Show on map
EnidEnid (ē'nĭd) is a city in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,379, making it the ninth largest city in Oklahoma. It is the county seat of Garfield County. Enid was founded during the opening of the Cherokee Outlet in the Land Run of 1893, and is named after Enid, a character in Alfred, Lord Tennyson's Idylls of the King. In 1991, the Oklahoma state legislature designated Enid the \"Purple Martin Capital of Oklahoma.\" Enid holds the nickname of \"Queen Wheat City\" and \"Wheat Capital\" of Oklahoma and the United States for its immense grain storage capacity, and has the third largest grain storage capacity in the world. Show on map
AkinsAkins is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 493 at the 2010 census, an increase of 9.8 percent from 449 at the 2000 census. The post office existed from February 16, 1894, until December 31, 1943. It is said to be named for Robert Akins, a mail carrier. Sequoyah's Cabin, a national historic site, is located about two miles northeast of the town. Show on map
BoleyBoley is a town in Okfuskee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,184 at the 2010 census, a gain of 5.2 percent from 1,126 in 2000. Boley was established in 1903 as a predominantly Black pioneer town with Native American ancestry among its citizens. Show on map
Webbers FallsWebbers Falls is a town in southeastern Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 616 at the 2010 census, a decline of 14.9 percent from 724 at the 2000 census. The name comes from a 7-foot falls in the Arkansas River named in honor of Walter Webber, a Cherokee chief who established a trading post here before 1818. He was a leader among the Western Cherokee, also called \"Old Settlers.\" They had a treaty with the United States government by 1828, which helped settle some conflicts with the Osage people, who had been forced to give up land to the Cherokee. Show on map
The VillageThe Village is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The population was 8,929 at the 2010 Census. The Village is entirely surrounded by Oklahoma City, except where it abuts Nichols Hills, Oklahoma. The Village is home to the corporate headquarters of Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores, the OKC Friday community newspaper, and Casady School. The Village has a City Manager form of government. The City Manager is overseen by an elected Council. The position of Mayor rotates among the Council members. Show on map
SumnerSumner is a small rural community located in Noble County, Oklahoma, United States, ten miles east of Perry and two miles north of US highway 64. Established prior to statehood along the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, the post office opened on May 23, 1894. The town was named for Henry T. Sumner, a businessman from Perry. Per the 1905 Oklahoma Territorial Census, Sumner had sixty-four residents. The post office closed July 27, 1957. Show on map
FarrisFarris is a small unincorporated community in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. It lies east of the county seat of Atoka on Highway 3 near the county border. From 1914 to 2013, Farris had its own school district with a K-8 school, but after years of declining enrollment, controversies over the district's management, and an \"F\" rating from the Oklahoma State Department of Education in December 2012, the district voted to dissolve the school district and join the district in nearby Lane, Oklahoma in early 2013. Students above the eighth grade attend Atoka High School in Atoka some twenty miles west of Farris. The post office was established May 17, 1902. It was named for the first postmaster, John L. Farris. Show on map
RingoldRingold is an unincorporated community in western McCurtain County, Oklahoma, 12 miles northwest of Wright City, Oklahoma. It was formerly called Burwell. A United States Post Office opened at Burwell, Indian Territory on October 31, 1906. It was named for William P. Burwell, first postmaster. Its name was changed to Ringold on May 10, 1911. Its name comes from Ringold, Texas, from which a number of its early white settlers came. Show on map
BixbyBixby is a city in Tulsa and Wagoner counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is a suburb of Tulsa. The population was 13,336 at the 2000 census and 20,884 in the 2010 census, an increase of 56.6 percent. In 2010, Bixby became the 19th largest city in Oklahoma. It is nicknamed \"The Garden Spot of Oklahoma\" for its rich agrarian heritage. Though one of the fastest growing communities in Oklahoma, it remains a sod-growing center and a popular location for purchasing fresh vegetables. The per capita income of $36,257 is the highest in the Tulsa Metropolitan area and is more than 50 percent higher than the state average. In 2009, CNN Money.com placed Bixby No. 67 on its list of 100 Best Places to Live. Show on map
HugoHugo is a city and county seat of Choctaw County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located in southeastern Oklahoma about 9 miles (14 km) north of the Texas state line. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 5,310. The city was founded in 1901 and named for the French novelist Victor Hugo. The city serves as winter quarters for some circus performers. It is adjacent to one of the oldest schools west of the Mississippi: Goodland Academy, begun in 1848. Show on map
PawhuskaPawhuska is a city in and the county seat of Osage County, Oklahoma, United States, and the capital of the federally recognized Osage Nation. It is in the Tulsa metropolitan area, which includes part of Osage County. The population of the city was 3,589 at the 2010 census, a decline of 1.2 percent from 3,629 at the 2000 census. It was named after the 19th-century Osage chief, Paw-Hiu-Skah, which means \"White Hair\" in English. Show on map
BunchBunch is an unincorporated community in southwestern Adair County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named after a Cherokee vice-chief named Rabbit Bunch who lived in the area in the 1880s. Nestled in the Sallisaw Creek valley, Bunch is bisected by the Kansas City Southern Railroad, which was built in the 1890s. Bunch is in the Cookson Hills area of eastern Oklahoma which are a part of the western area of the Ozark Mountains. The Cookson Hills Wildlife Management Area is west of the town. The post office's zip code is 74931. Two and one-half miles north of town is Cave Springs Public Schools, a K-12 school which serves Bunch and the surrounding area. Show on map
AdamsonAdamson is a ghost town in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. Comprising 4 square miles, it was located between McAlester and Wilburton. The town contained 15 coal mines. Four mines were major producers. The post office was established on March 1, 1906. The town was named for Peter Adamson, a mine owner.It was a prosperous coal mining town before and during World War I, especially during 1913 to 1919. On September 4, 1914, Adamson was the site of one of the worst coal mine disasters in the United States. The town never recovered economically, and is now considered a ghost town. It has since been largely engulfed by Eufaula Lake. Show on map
FeltFelt is a small unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 93. It was named for C.F.W. Felt of the Santa Fe Railroad. Nearby is the Cedar Breaks Archeological District. The community is served by a post office (established July 16, 1926) and a school. Show on map
WardvilleWardville is a small unincorporated community in northern Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 131 14 miles northeast of Coalgate, Oklahoma. The post office was established February 6, 1902 under the name Herbert, Oklahoma. The town was named after Herbert Ward, who was the youngest son of the towns first postmaster, Henry Pleasant Ward. The name of the town was changed to Wardville on July 18, 1907. Wardville was named for the before mentioned Henry Pleasant Ward, who served in the territorial House of Representatives and Senate and was an Atoka County judge. The Wardville Post Office closed in 2007. Show on map
OliveOlive is a small unincorporated community in Creek County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established November 20, 1896, and discontinued September 30, 1938. The town was named for the daughter of the first postmaster]. In 1974 there was a tornado that wiped out the town. Today it is nothing more than a small community. There are three churches, a convenience store called \"Happy Corner,\" and a small school of 465 students Pre-K through 12. The town is also very popular for its love of high school basketball and the water well located in the center of the town.Olive was the birthplace of Leon \"Jack\" Guthrie. Show on map
EmetEmet is a small unincorporated community in Johnston County, Oklahoma. A post office operated in Emet from 1884 to 1917. The Chickasaw have dwelt in Johnston County since the 1830s, and Emet's history reflects its Chickasaw heritage. Pleasant Grove Mission School, which was established by the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1844 and served Chickasaw Nation, was located near Emet. Chickasaw actress and storyteller Te Ata Fisher was born in Emet in 1895. Show on map
ShawneeShawnee is a city in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 29,857 at the 2010 census, a 4.0 percent increase from 28,692 at the 2000 census. The city is part of the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area; it is also the county seat of Pottawatomie County and the principal city of the Shawnee Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
OverbrookOverbrook is an unincorporated community in Love County, Oklahoma, United States. Although it is unincorporated, Overbrook has a post office, with the ZIP code of 73453. Overbrook is named for Overbrook station, the first stop west of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on the former Pennsylvania Railroad's prestigious Main Line, located in the city's Overbrook section. It is one of several Oklahoma communities between Fort Worth and Oklahoma City that were named or renamed for PRR Main Line stations between Philadelphia and Paoli by the Santa Fe Railway on its Gulf Coast main line (now part of BNSF Railway). Show on map
FrederickFrederick is a city and county seat of Tillman County, Oklahoma, United States. Once titled \"The Friendly City\", its charm and receptiveness leaves visitors feeling like locals. The population was 3,940 at the 2010 census. It is an agriculture-based community that primarily produces wheat, cotton, and cattle. Frederick is home to three dairies, a 1400-acre industrial park, and Frederick Regional Airport, which includes restored WWII hangars which house the WWII Airborne Demonstration Team. Show on map
CushingCushing is a city in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 7,826 at the 2010 census, a decline of 6.5 percent from 8,371 at the 2000 census. The city was established after the Land Run of 1891 by William \"Billy Rae\" Little. It was named for Marshall Cushing, private secretary to U.S. Postmaster General John Wanamaker. An oil boom that began in 1912 led to the city's development as a refining center. Today, Cushing is a major trading hub for crude oil and a famous price settlement point for West Texas Intermediate on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Show on map
WoodfordWoodford is an unincorporated community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. The townsite plat and cemetery are located within Section 34, Township 2 South, Range 1 West of the Indian Meridian. Its elevation is 932 feet. The zipcode is 73401. Woodford has its own telephone exchange, serviced by the Chickasaw Telephone Company. Phone numbers in Woodford are in the format 580-561-XXXX. The Woodford area had its own school district in the past, but it was closed as the community dwindled in population. Students in the area today attend school in the nearby towns of Springer, Lone Grove, or Fox. Show on map
RossvilleRossville is a small rural community in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on US Highway 177. The community had a post office from October 7, 1895, until February 15, 1907. Per Oklahoma Place Names it was named for Ross Thomas, a local resident. The community consists of a store, a church, and several residential dwellings. The Rossville School was one mile south of the community and the Rossville cemetery is one mile south and a half-mile west of the community. Many of the buildings (including the store) were relocated back from the right-of-way when US 177 was constructed during the 1960s. Show on map
ForakerForaker is a town in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for Ohio Senator Joseph B. Foraker. The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is southeast of town. The official population peaked at 415 in 1910 and has declined steadily since 1930. The population was only 19 at the 2010 census, a 17.4 percent decline from 23 at the 2000 census. Foraker is now considered a ghost town. A historian quoted one long-time resident as saying: \"Stores gone, post office gone, train gone, school gone, oil gone, boys and girls gone – only thing not gone is graveyard and it git bigger.\" Show on map
KeotaKeota is a town in northeastern Haskell County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 564 at the 2010 census, a 9.1 percent increase from 517 at the 2000 census. The town was first called \"KeeOtter\", and was later changed to \"Keota\". The town's name may come from a Choctaw word meaning \"the fire gone out\", referring to an entire tribe being destroyed by disease. Another account is that Keota was derived from \"Jim Keese\", a rancher who owned the land where the townsite was located, and \"Otter,\" for Otter Creek, a tributary of the Sans Bois Creek which winds its way through town. Show on map
Shady GroveShady Grove is a town in southeastern Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States, near Lake Keystone. The population was 44 at the 2000 census. In the 2010 census, its population had dropped to 2, and a 2011 news report stated that one of those two had left since the census, leaving it the smallest town in the state. The report explained that the owner of the seven mobile home lots that made up the town had incorporated it in 1997 to avoid being absorbed into a larger municipality, but had dissolved the town in 2006 and died in 2009, and nearly all the tenants had departed. Show on map
Fort GibsonFort Gibson is a town in Muskogee County which has expanded into Cherokee County as it grew in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 4,154 at the 2010 census, an increase of 2.5 percent from 4,054 at the 2000 census. It is the location of Fort Gibson Historical Site and Fort Gibson National Cemetery and is located near the end of the Cherokees' Trail of Tears at Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Colonel Matthew Arbuckle of the United States Army established Fort Gibson in 1824. The Army abandoned the fort in 1890. Some of the original fort still stands at the historic site. Show on map
Medicine ParkMedicine Park is a town in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States, situated in the Wichita Mountains near the entrance to the 60,000-acre (240 km2) Wichita Mountain Wildlife Refuge. Medicine Park has a long history as a vintage cobblestone resort town. Medicine Park is located near the city of Lawton and Fort Sill. It is an exurb, part of the Lawton Metropolitan Statistical Area. Many of the original structures are constructed of naturally formed cobblestones—these red granite cobblestones are unique to the Wichita Mountains. The population was 382 at the 2010 census. Show on map
RufeRufe is an unincorporated community in western McCurtain County, Oklahoma, 10 miles northwest of Wright City, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office was established at Rufe, Indian Territory on February 13, 1903. It was named for Rufus Wilson, son of Mattie Wilson, first postmaster. Until the advent of Oklahoma’s statehood in 1907 Rufe was located in Cedar County, Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory. Its residents had much in common with those of other communities in the area, some of which, such as Rattan, Oklahoma are now included in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. Show on map
SpencerSpencer is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The population was 3,746 at the 2000 census. Established in 1903, the City of Spencer is a historic community located just east of the North Canadian River. Spencer is approximately ten miles from downtown Oklahoma City and borders the City of Nicoma Park to the east and the City of Midwest City to the south. Contributing to the cultural fabric of Spencer are the Spencer Chamber of Commerce, the Spencer Garden Club, and the Spencer Historical Society. Show on map
Pryor CreekPryor Creek, more commonly known as Pryor, is a city in and county seat of Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 8,659 at the 2000 census, compared to 9,539 in the 2010 census. Originally named Coo-Y-Yah, Cherokee for Huckleberry, it was renamed Pryor Creek in 1887, the name of the local railroad station (named for the creek). Due to confusion in distinguishing handwritten mailing addresses to Pryor Creek and Pond Creek, the U.S. Postal Service name for the city was shortened to Pryor, though the official name of the city remains Pryor Creek. Show on map
YewedYewed is an unincorporated community in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, United States. Yewed is 0.7 miles (1.1 km) east of Lambert. Yewed was platted in 1902 and had a station on the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway. The community applied for a Post Office under the name Dewey in honor of Admiral George Dewey. However, since another community - Dewey, Oklahoma - already had that name, the leters were reversed and the name Yewed was assigned to the community. The Post Office operated from December 24, 1898, to April 30, 1952. Show on map
EufaulaEufaula is a city in and county seat of McIntosh County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,813 at the 2010 census, an increase of 6.6 percent from 2,639 in 2000. Eufaula is in the southern part of the county, 30 miles (48 km) north of McAlester and 32 miles (51 km) south of Muskogee. The name \"Eufaula\" comes from the Eufaula tribe, part of the Muscogee Creek Confederacy. The town and county are within the jurisdiction of the federally recognized Muscogee Creek Nation, descendants of people who removed here from the American Southeast in the 1830s. Show on map
WetumkaWetumka is a city in northern Hughes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,282 at the 2010 census, a decline of 11.7 percent from 1,451 at the 2000 census. The town was named for a Creek town of Wetumpka in Alabama, which the Creeks were forced to leave during the Indian Removal. Wetumka is a Muscogee Creek word meaning \"tumbling water.\" It is the headquarters for two federally recognized tribes, the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town and the Kialegee Tribal Town. It is the home of the Sucker Day, held every year on the last Saturday in September. Show on map
HoldenvilleHoldenville is a city in and county seat of Hughes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 5,771 at the 2010 census, an increase of 22 percent from 4,732 at the 2000 census. It is home to The Pork Group, a subsidiary of Tyson Foods; the Holdenville State Fish Hatchery, one of four operated by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation; the Davis Correctional Facility, a 1,600 bed medium security prison operated by the Corrections Corporation of America; and the Creek Nation Casino, one of many operated by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Show on map
MuskogeeMuskogee (/məˈskoʊɡiː/) is a city in and the county seat of Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. Home to Bacone College, it lies approximately 48 miles southeast of Tulsa. The population of the city was 39,223 as of the 2010 census, a 2.4 percent increase from 38,310 at the 2000 census, making it the eleventh-largest city in Oklahoma. The 1951 film Jim Thorpe, All American, starring Burt Lancaster, was filmed on the campus of Bacone Indian College at Muskogee. Two feature films were recently shot in Muskogee: Salvation (2007) and Denizen (2010). Show on map
GlenpoolGlenpool is a city in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Tulsa Metropolitan Statistical Area (TMSA). As of 2010, the population was 10,808. This was an increase of 33.1% since the 2000 census, which reported total population as 8,123. Glenpool is notable because the discovery of oil in 1905, which caused an economic boom that propelled the growth of Tulsa and its surroundings. Although the Glenn Pool field, for which the city was named, still produces a small amount of oil; the city is now primarily a Commuter town for Tulsa. Show on map
RetropRetrop is a small Oklahoma, USA community located on the Washita/Beckham county line. It is located at the southern junction between State Highway 6 and SH-55. Retrop receives its name from the original community (Old Retrop, 35°08′43″N 99°20′33″W / 35.145331°N 99.342585°W) which is one mile south and one mile east in Washita County near the Retrop Cemetery. The Retrop Post Office (located at Old Retrop) existed from January 12, 1900, until February 28, 1905. The name is a reverse spelling of the surname of the first postmaster, Ira J. Porter. Show on map
WayneWayne is a town in McClain County, Oklahoma, United States. Wayne and McClain County are part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area The population was 519 according to the 2000 census and is part of the \"Heart of Oklahoma\" area. Wayne was so named by early railroad workers from Pennsylvania who adopted town names from the railways there, including Wayne, Paoli, Ardmore, and Wynnewood. Wayne is named for Mad Anthony Wayne a United States Army general and statesman. Gen. Wayne earned a reputation in the American Revolutionary War as a war hero. Show on map
OkmulgeeOkmulgee is a city in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population at the 2010 census was 12,321 a loss of 5.4 percent since the 2000 census figure of 13,022. It has been the capital of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation since the United States Civil War. The name is from the Creek word oki mulgee which means \"boiling waters\" in English. Other translations put it as \"babbling brook\" or 'Effluvium'. The site was chosen because of the nearby rivers and springs. Okmulgee is 38 miles south of Tulsa and 13 miles north of Henryetta via US-75. Show on map
HarrahHarrah is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Located 25 miles (40 km) east of downtown Oklahoma City, Harrah had a population of 5,095 people as of 2012. The first settler of the area, who was Potawatomi, arrived in the 1870s, but the town was not incorporated until 1908. The town was settled by Americans, Polish immigrants and other groups and had a cotton ginning center. The city is overseen by a city council and mayor and includes a police department and fire station. Show on map
Gaar CornerGaar Corner is an Unincorporated community in the U.S. state of Oklahoma.Gaar Corner is located in western Pontotoc County on State Highway 19, east of Stratford. While Gaar Corner is not shown on the official state map, it is marked by official ODOT place-name signs along SH-19. Show on map
YubaYuba, formerly known as Karma, is an unincorporated community located 12 miles east of Achille in Bryan County, Oklahoma. Its post office was established on February 27, 1929. The school in Yuba was established in 1929, and served Kindergarten through 12th grade. The post office was renamed Yuba on October 1, 1950. Local residents wanted the name to be changed to Eagle Lake. The Yuba Independent School district consolidated with the Achille Independent School district. The Yuba Elementary school continued to operate until 2010. Show on map
HulbertHulbert is a town in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States, named after Ben H. Hulbert, a prominent Cherokee man. The population was 590 at the 2010 census, an increase of 8.7 percent from 543 at the 2000 census. Our Lady of the Annunciation of Clear Creek Monastery is a Benedictine monastery located in Hulbert. The Clear Creek Monastery, recently elevated to the status of an abbey, is a foundation abbey of France's Notre Dame de Fontgombault, which is itself a foundation abbey of Saint Pierre de Solesmes, also in France. Show on map
West TulsaWest Tulsa is a local name given to an area situated in the west section of the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma which includes various communities to the west and south of the Arkansas River. As development between Sand Springs and Tulsa continued in the late 19th through the early 20th centuries, the name West Tulsa was used to refer to this area west of Tulsa and north of the Arkansas River, but many people in Tulsa and those knowing of the history of Tulsa do not include this area near Sand Springs when referring to West Tulsa. Show on map
WashungaWashunga is a small community in Kay County, Oklahoma, USA. Washunga was named for the last chief of the Kaw Indians. His name was usually spelled Washungah. The post office was established November 15, 1902 and discontinued November 25, 1906. The town was established at the former Kaw Agency. The Kaw Indian Agency is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The name means \"bird\" in the Kaw language. In the early 1970s the residents of the town were relocated to the present site for the creation of Kaw Lake. Show on map
IndependenceIndependence is a ghost town in Custer County, Oklahoma, United States. It was one of two communities established on the Cheyenne and Arapaho reservations before those reservations were opened to settlement in 1892. Independence had a post office from October 5, 1892, to July 15, 1922. At its peak, the community was served by two newspapers, the Independence Herald and Independence Courier. Ultimately, Independence failed after being bypassed by nearby railroads, and the townsite is now agricultural fields. Show on map
DaisyDaisy is a small unincorporated community in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 43. Located in the northeastern part of the county, Daisy was once a thriving community with a general store, school and other institutions. The post office was opened April 5, 1906. It is said to have been named for Daisy Beck, a local girl. The most famous person from Daisy is Clarence Carnes, who at 18 was the youngest inmate ever sent to Alcatraz. He is buried on the Indian land not far from Daisy. Show on map
ChecotahChecotah is a town in McIntosh County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for Samuel Checote, the first chief of the Creek Nation elected after the Civil War. The population was 3,481 at the 2000 census. According to Census 2010, the population has decreased to 3,335; a 4.19% loss. Checotah is home to numerous antique malls, a Civil War battle site and a downtown historic district. Checotah claims to be the steer wrestling capital of the world. Early boosters called Checotah, \"The Gem of the Prairie. Show on map
JayJay is a city and county seat of Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,448 at the 2010 census, compared to 2,482 at the 2000 census, a decrease of 1.4 percent. Almost 40% of its residents are Native American, thus Jay is home to numerous Cherokee tribal offices and a health clinic for the Delaware District of the Cherokee Nation. The city is celebrated as the Huckleberry Capital of the World and has been host to the annual Huckleberry Festival each July 4 weekend for since 1967. Show on map
Mule BarnMule Barn is a town in Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States. Its population was zero on both the 1990 and 2000 censuses. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.0 square miles (0 km2), all land. The town is located at 36.21737 N, 96.31142 W. Oklahoma law provides for the dissolution of towns under certain circumstances, including the lack of recent elections. However, the Census Bureau reported no changes to the municipal status of Mule Barn between 2000 and 2006. Show on map
GarberGarber is a city in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 845 at the 2000 census. The city is named after Martin Garber, father of Milton C. Garber, former U.S. Congressman, Enid Mayor, newspaper editor, and Judge. The Garber family participated in the Land Run of 1893, claiming the land that is now Garber, Oklahoma. In October 1899, the Garber Town Company, owned by brothers Milton C. and Burton A. Garber, platted the town. Burton Garber was part-owner of the Garber Oil Company. Show on map
Spring CreekSpring Creek is an unincorporated community in Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 4 miles (6 km) south of Cogar. It has a cemetery, church, schoolhouse, and general store still standing. The cemetery and church are still used. The remaining general store (there were once two at the same time) is now a house. The schoolhouse is block and was built around the turn of the 20th century. The surrounding area is very sandy and features much red rock. Portions of the movie Rain Man were filmed here. Show on map
AlbertAlbert, Oklahoma is an unincorporated place in Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located southwest of Binger on State Highway 146. The post office was established September 1, 1910. The community is said to have been named for the townsite owner, Albert Baker. The town is locally known as Oney with only the post office referred to as Albert. Oney was named after the early settler Richard Oney. The post office in Albert is slated for possible closure by the US Postal Service. Show on map
TishomingoTishomingo is the largest city and the county seat of Johnston County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,034 at the 2010 census, a decline of 4.1 percent from 3,162 at the 2000 census. It was the first capital of the Chickasaw Nation, from 1856 until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. It is home of country music star Blake Shelton. The city is home to Murray State College, a community college with an annual enrollment of 1,600 students. Tishomingo is part of the Texoma Region. Show on map
ClaritaClarita is a small unincorporated community in Coal County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established January 19, 1910. Clarita's school district, Olney Public School District, is one of the smallest public school districts in the state of Oklahoma. For the most recent data available, for a combined district, K-12, Olney finished between Boley (51) and Sweetwater (60), with 58 students. Olney School is now closed although the reunion is still held at the lunch room. Show on map
Midwest CityMidwest City is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 54,371, making it the eighth largest city in the state. The city was developed in response to talk of an air field being located nearby and named for the Tinker Air Force Base's original designation as the Midwest Air Depot. The city suffered damage during two tornadoes, the first in May 1999 and the second on May 8, 2003. Show on map
White OakWhite Oak is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Craig County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 66 about one mile (1.6 km) west of that road's eastern terminus with U.S. Route 60. The community had a post office from October 14, 1898 until October 31, 1957. As of the 2010 census, the White Oak CDP had a population of 263. White Oak is the location of the Shawnee Tribe's annual Spring and Fall Bread Dances and Green Corn ceremonies. Show on map
ArkomaArkoma is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,989 at the 2010 census, a decline from 2,180 at the 2000 census. The name of the town is a portmanteau of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Throughout its history, Arkoma has served as a \"bedroom community\" because many residents commuted to work in Fort Smith. Show on map
MuldrowMuldrow is a town in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 3,466 at the 2010 census, an increase of 11.7 percent from 3,104 at the 2000 census. The town was named in honor of Henry Lowndes Muldrow, a Mississippi Congressman and personal friend of one of the town's founding fathers. H.L. Muldrow used his influence with the railroad to have a depot located at the townsite. Show on map
EldonEldon is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 368 at the 2010 census, a loss of 62.3 percent from 991 at the 2000 census, due largely to shrinkage of the CDP boundaries. It lies east of Tahlequah at the junction of U.S. Highway 62 and State Highway 51. The Eldon Post Office existed from March 20, 1911, until May 30, 1936. The community is said to have been named for Eldon, Illinois. Show on map
AdaAda is a city in and the county seat of Pontotoc County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 16,810 at the 2010 census, an increase of 7.1 percent from 15,691 at the 2000 census. The city was named for Ada Reed, the daughter of an early settler, and was incorporated in 1901. Ada is home to East Central University, and is the headquarters of the Chickasaw Nation. Ada is an Oklahoma Main Street City, an Oklahoma Certified City, and a Tree City USA member. Show on map
BurneyvilleBurneyville is a small unincorporated community located in Love County, Oklahoma. The post office was established May 5, 1879. It was named for David C. Burney, father of Benjamin Crooks Burney. Benjamin Crooks Burney was Governor of the Chickasaw Nation from 1878 through 1880. Burneyville is located on State Highway 96 and on the north bank of the Red River. As of 2007, the 73430 Zip Code for the Burneyville, Oklahoma post office served a population of 1,029. Show on map
PorumPorum is a town in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for John Porum Davis, a rancher, Civil War veteran, and Cherokee Nation councilman from the Canadian District in Indian Territory. The community was first known as Porum Gap, which united with another village named Starvilla in 1905. The product of this union became the present town of Porum. The population was 727 at the 2010 census, an 0.3 percent increase from 725 at the 2000 census. Show on map
PurcellPurcell is a city in McClain County, Oklahoma, United States, and the county seat. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 5,884. Founded in 1887, Purcell was a railroad town named after Edward B. Purcell, who was an official with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Purcell is often called the \"Quarterhorse Capital of the World\" and its official motto is \"Heart of Oklahoma\"; the city has registered trademarks on both titles. Show on map
YukonYukon is a city in Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 22,709 at the 2010 census. Founded in the 1890s, the town was named in reference to a gold rush in Yukon Territory, Canada, at the time. Historically, Yukon served as an urban center for area farmers and the site of a large milling operation. It is now considered primarily a bedroom community for people who work in Oklahoma City. Show on map
KenwoodKenwood is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware and Mayes counties, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 1,224. Kenwood is 20 miles (32 km) by road southwest of Jay, the Delaware County seat. It is 11 miles (18 km) east of Salina. Kenwood once had a post office, which opened on May 25, 1922. The community's name came from a combination of William Kennedy and the National Hardwood Company. Show on map
ColbertColbert is a town in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,140 at the 2010 census, a 7 percent increase from 1,065 at the 2000 census. It was incorporated in 1939. The town was named after Benjamin \"Frank\" Franklin Colbert (1826/1828-1893), a Chickasaw. He was a great-grandson of one of five sons of Minta Hoye, Chickasaw, and her husband Scots trader James Logan Colbert, who had lived in the Southeast. It is part of the Texoma region. Show on map
CartwrightCartwright is an unincorporated rural community and census-designated place in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 609. The post office opened April 25, 1940, and it is one of the newest communities in Bryan County. The ZIP code is 74731. It is named for Congressman Wilburn Cartwright. Cartwright was established because of the construction of Denison Dam when a community of shelters for workmen was erected. Show on map
Stones CornerStones Corner is an unincorporated community in Wagoner County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located at the junction of Oklahoma State Highway 51B and Oklahoma State Highway 104, approximately 4 1/2 miles west of Porter, Oklahoma, and 7 miles south of Coweta, Oklahoma. Primarily a farming community, it once was home to a farm equipment dealer and repair shop, and Stones Corner filling station and grocery, until the latter burned down in the late 1980s. Show on map
OologahOologah is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. Renowned humorist Will Rogers was born on a ranch two miles east of Oologah, although he usually claimed Claremore as his birthplace \"because nobody but an Indian can pronounce 'Oologah.'\"There has been disagreement about the proper spelling for the town name. The official spelling is now Oologah. It was often spelled Oolagah before statehood, and this spelling appears on some old buildings. Show on map
BromideBromide is a town in Coal and Johnston counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 165 at the 2010 census, a 1.2 percent increase from 163 at the 2000 census. The area around Bromide was noted for its mineral water springs, and the bromide content of the water gave the town its name. It was also noted for limestone quarrying and the potential to produce manganese. Proposals to promote economic growth from these assets never materialized. Show on map
PortPort is a small rural community in Washita County, Oklahoma. The community had a post office from February 21, 1901, until February 29, 1940. It was named for a druggist, Mrs. F. M. Port. During the 1930s, the Port consolidated school district covered the largest area in Oklahoma, some ninety square miles. Prior to settlement, the Western Cattle Trail passed just east of the site. The community lends its name to the Oklahoma state soil, Port Silt Loam. Show on map
ValliantValliant is a town in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 754 at the 2010 census. Valliant was founded June 2, 1902, and named for Frank W. Valliant, a chief divisional engineer for the Arkansas & Choctaw Railroad being constructed in the area at that time. Valliant is famous for its annual Watermelon Festival at the City Park. The primary employer in town is International Paper, which operates a containerboard mill. Show on map
IXLIXL (or I.X.L.) is a town in Okfuskee County, Oklahoma, United States. It was incorporated in 2001 and had an estimated population of 59 in 2007. The 2010 census listed the population at 51. The source of IXL's unusual name is disputed. A 2012 article on the town's website explained that the name derived from Indian Exchange Land, a reference to the town being on Mvskoke land. Other sources claim that the letters were taken from the names of two men. Show on map
FoxFox is a small unincorporated community in Carter County in southern Oklahoma. The post office was established January 25, 1894. It is named for Frank M. Fox of the Chickasaw Nation. Its racially integrated school produced several high school championship football teams, particularly in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Robert L. Lynn, the president from 1975 to 1997 of Louisiana College in Pineville, Louisiana, graduated in 1949 from Fox High School. Show on map
MiamiMiami (/maɪˈæmə/ my-AM-ə) is a city in and county seat of Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,570, a decline of one percent from 13,704 at the 2000 census. The city is named after the Miami tribe. Miami is the capital of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma, Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma, Peoria Tribe of Indians and Shawnee Tribe. Show on map
AutwineAutwine is a ghost town in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States, formerly known as Pierceton and Virginia City. It had a post office as Pierceton from May 26, 1894 and as Autwine from March 5, 1903, until June 30, 1922. The town declined as an agricultural center after better roads in the area led to farmers taking their business to the larger business centers. Today there is nothing left of the old townsite and the area is used for agriculture. Show on map
Cedar ValleyCedar Valley is a city in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 288 at the 2010 census, nearly four times the population of 58 at the 2000 census]. It is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is primarily a bedroom community, since more than 90 percent of the employed inhabitants commute to work in other towns. The main attraction is Cedar Valley Golf Club, which is by far the largest business in town. Show on map
HelenaHelena is a town in southeastern Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, United States. Residents pronounce the town's name with a long E: \"Heh-LEE'-nuh.\" The population was 1,403 at the 2010 census. It is the site of the James Crabtree Correctional Center, run by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, with a population of 1,003 inmates in 2010. It is the site of the Timberlake Public School district, shared with the nearby towns of Goltry, Jet, and Nash. Show on map
DaleDale is a small unincorporated community located on State Highway 270 in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. It lies in the North Canadian River bottom, a few miles northwest of Shawnee. The 2010 census recorded a population of 186. Dale was platted along the Rock Island railroad line before statehood. The Dale Post Office opened October 26, 1893. The community was named for Frank Dale, a territorial judge. Dale also has a public school system. Show on map
Elmore CityElmore City is a town in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. This town is fifty-eight miles south of Oklahoma City. The population was 697 at the 2010 census. It was named after J. O. Elmore. There are two main highways running through Elmore City. One of the Highways is Oklahoma State Highway 29, running west-east. The other is Oklahoma State Highway 74, running north-south. It is about 12 miles west of Wynnewood, 25.5 miles south of Purcell, and about 23 miles west of U.S. Highway 177. Show on map
DibbleDibble is a town in McClain County, Oklahoma, United States. The population within city limits was 878 at the 2010 census. The town was named after two brothers, James and John Dibble.The community has 8,868 residents in its 73031 zipcode, according to Sperling's Best Places. Dibble is in the outer suburban area west of Purcell, OK, and southwest of Norman, OK, in the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Show on map
CleoraCleora is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 85. The population was 1,463 at the 2010 census, up from 1,113 at the 2000 census. The Cleora Post Office existed from November 28, 1900, until October 15, 1954. Cleora was established in District 2 of the old Indian Territory. It was named for Cleora Ann Lunday, sister of the postmaster, Ed Lunday. Show on map
TexannaTexanna is a census-designated place (CDP) in McIntosh County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,083 at the 2000 census. Established in District 12 of the old Indian Territory, its post office existed from June 27, 1888 until July 16, 1940. Texanna's population in the 1905 Territorial Census was 200. It is said to have been named for a settlement of Texas Cherokees. Residents of Texanna now have a Eufaula postal address. Show on map
BushyheadBushyhead is a census-designated place (CDP) in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,314 at the 2010 census, a 9.2 percent increase from the 1,203 at the 2000 census. Established on the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway between Claremore and Vinita, the community was named for Dennis W. Bushyhead, Principal Chief of the Cherokee, 1879-1887. The post office existed from April 18, 1898, until November 15, 1955. Show on map
LongLong is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 363 at the 2000 census. The post office existed from August 22, 1894, until April 15, 1937, with William J. Webb as the first postmaster. Long had 130 residents per the 1905 Territorial Census. The community was named for Cherokee leader Peter Long. Show on map
LaneLane is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established February 11, 1888. As of the 2010 census the CDP had a population of 414. Lane is located along State Highway 3 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Atoka. The famous rodeo world champion Lane Frost (1963-1989) once lived in Lane, as do his parents. Frost graduated from high school in nearby Atoka. Show on map
TiawahTiawah is a census-designated place (CDP) in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 189 at the 2010 census., a 13.9 percent gain from 166 at the 2000 census. It was built on the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, & Southern Railway line running from Coffeyville, Kansas, to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The post office existed from August 24, 1903, until December 31, 1938. It is said to be named for Tiawah Mound in Georgia. Show on map
HennepinHennepin is a small unincorporated community along State Highway 7 in extreme southern Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States, near the meeting of the Carter, Garvin, and Murray county lines. The Hennepin Post Office was opened February 16, 1885, by Henry C. Dent in the old Chickasaw Nation of Indian Territory. It was named for Father Louis Hennepin, a member of Lasalle's Louisiana Expedition. The Hennepin ZIP Code is 73444. Show on map
OkemahOkemah is the largest city in and the county seat of Okfuskee County, Oklahoma, United States. It is the birthplace of folk music legend Woody Guthrie. Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, a federally recognized Muscogee Indian tribe, is headquartered in Okemah. The population was 3,223 at the 2010 census, a 6.1 percent increase from 3,038 in 2000. In that census, about 26.6 percent of the residents identified themselves as Native American. Show on map
HarjoHarjo is a small unincorporated community in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established June 24, 1921, and discontinued August 31, 1954. The name means \"brave beyond discretion\" in the Creek (Muscogee) language. Nearby is the Rose-Fast site, a prehistoric Indian base camp dating from the Woodland Period, 0-1000 AD. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Show on map
Pauls ValleyPauls Valley is a city in and the county seat of Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 6,187 at the 2010 census, a decline of 1.1 percent from 6,256 at the 2000 census. It was settled by and named for Smith Paul, a North Carolina native who married a Chickasaw woman and became a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation before the Civil War. The town economy is largely based on agriculture and oil production. Show on map
TalihinaTalihina (pronounced \"tah-luh-HEE-nuh\") is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States, its name originating from two Choctaw words, tully and hena, meaning iron road. Iron road is reference to the railroad that the town was built around. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,114 at the 2010 census, a loss of 8.0 percent from 1,211 at the 2000 census. Show on map
PernellPernell is an unincorporated community in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. Pernell is located on Oklahoma State Highway 76 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Elmore City. Pernell had a post office with ZIP code 73076, which opened on June 28, 1922 and closed on December 27, 2003. After the post office closed, Pernell addresses were incorporated with Elmore City. The community was named after resident Thomas Pernell. Show on map
SummerfieldSummerfield, Oklahoma is an unincorporated community in Le Flore County, Oklahoma. Summerfield was the name of an early settler who operated a commissary. It is the location of the Summerfield School, built in 1937, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Summerfield has one gas station, one grocery store (previously a bar), a tire shop (shut down due to alleged drug activity), and many churches. Show on map
Fort TowsonFort Towson is a town in Choctaw County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 510 at the 2010 census, a 15.1 percent decline from 611 at the 2000 census. It was named for nearby Fort Towson, which had been established in May 1824 and named for General Nathan Towson, a hero of the War of 1812. The town of Fort Towson was established in 1902, after the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway reached eastern Choctaw County. Show on map
AvardAvard is a town in Woods County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 26 at the 2000 census and is sometimes considered a ghost town. After initial growth Avard began declining in the 1930s. Avard had a post office from June 1, 1895, until November 22, 1963. As of the 2010 census, Avard was listed as disincorporated. Show on map
MuncyMuncy (also called Muncey, Tracey or Tracy) is an unincorporated community in Texas County, Oklahoma, United States. Muncy is 18.2 miles (29.3 km) west-northwest of Guymon. The Panhandle Townsite Company founded Muncy in 1929, intending for the community to become a commercial and agricultural center for the region. The Tracey Woodframe Grain Elevator in Muncy is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
West Siloam SpringsWest Siloam Springs is a town in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 846 at the 2010 census, a 3.5 percent decrease from 877 at the 2000 census. A bedroom community for Siloam Springs, Arkansas, it is notable for its Cherokee casino, and is the closest town to Natural Falls State Park. It is also a notorious speed trap, with fines from the trap being a major source of the town's revenue. Show on map
AlphaAlpha is an unincorporated community in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, United States. Its altitude is 1165 feet (355 m). The post office was established November 7, 1893, and closed December 14, 1903. The Alpha site is 5½ miles east of Omega. The Alpha school district closed in 1947. The Alpha Schoolhouse, the last structure in Alpha, was moved to the Frontier Country Historical Society Museum in Crescent in 2005. Show on map
EnvilleEnville is a small rural community located in eastern Love County, Oklahoma. The Enville Post Office was established in the old Chickasaw Nation on June 16, 1904, and closed January 15, 1935. The name is said to have been coined from a contraction of the phrase, \"end of the road ville.\" Enville is the birthplace of noted Western actor, singer and composer, and Country Music Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Bond. Show on map
BrentBrent is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States, south of Sallisaw. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 504 at the 2000 census. The post office opened May 6, 1896 and closed May 31, 1929. It was located in District 11 of the old Indian Territory. Brent was named for the Brent Ferry on the nearby Arkansas River. Show on map
ColonyColony is a town in northeastern Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 136 at the 2010 U.S. census, a decrease of 7.5 percent from 147 in 2000. It was named for the Seger Colony, founded in 1886, which taught modern agricultural techniques to the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes that would be resettled in the vicinity. Colony is 16 miles (26 km) east and 4 miles (6.4 km) north of Cordell. Show on map
HeavenerHeavener /ˈheɪvnər/ is a city in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named for Joseph H. Heavener, who settled in the area about 1877. The population was 3,414 at the 2010 census, an increase of 6.7 percent from 3,201 at the 2000 census. Heavener is notable for the Heavener Runestone just outside the city limits. Show on map
CatesbyCatesby is an unincorporated community located in Ellis County, Oklahoma. Named for Catesby ap Roger Jones, the town was founded on July 1, 1902. The post office was opened by Ella M. Rose on February 18, 1902. The town remains a legal town site, although the post office was closed on January 1, 1970. As of the centennial in 2002, there were two residents, making it the smallest townsite in Oklahoma. Show on map
CarpenterCarpenter is an unincorporated community in Roger Mills and Custer counties in the state of Oklahoma, United States. The community is eight miles north of Elk City, Oklahoma. It was named in commemoration of Benjamin Carpenter, an early settler of western Oklahoma who moved there from Texas in 1898. It was established as a Post Office on March 19, 1901, \"named for Benjamin Carpenter, local rancher\". Show on map
TempleTemple is a town in Cotton County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 5 miles (8.0 km) south and 5 miles (8.0 km) east of Walters, the county seat. The population was 1,102 at the 2010 census, a decline of 12.6 percent from 1,146 at the 2000 census. The town is named for the celebrated trial lawyer of Texas and Oklahoma Territory, Temple Lea Houston (1860–1905), the youngest son of General Sam Houston. Show on map
El RenoEl Reno is a city in and county seat of Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 16,729. The city was begun shortly after the 1889 land rush and named for the nearby Fort Reno. It is located in the central part of the state, approximately 25 miles (40 km) west of downtown Oklahoma City, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
MenoMeno is a town in Major County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 235 at the 2010 census, a 20.5 percent increase from 195 at the 2000 census. Show on map
BalkoBalko is a small unincorporated community in Beaver County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established March 14, 1904. The population is 623. There is a truck stop in Balko. It sells untaxed diesel fuel. The Red Barn Cafe, formerly owned by the Brady family, is a small country diner. These and the post office are located at Bryan's Corner. The local school is a K-12 public school. Show on map
TexhomaTexhoma is a town in Texas County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 926 at the 2010 census. Texhoma is a divided city with the Texas–Oklahoma state border separating the town from Texhoma, Texas. The name of the town is a portmanteau of Texas and Oklahoma. Founded around the Rock Island Railroad laying tracks through the area, much of the town's local economy is from ranching and livestock. Show on map
VianVian is a town in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,466 at the 2010 census, a 17.6 percent gain from 1,362 at the 2000 census. It was named for Big Vian and Little Vian Creeks. Nearby tourist attractions include Lake Tenkiller, Lake Robert S. Kerr and Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. Show on map
ConchoConcho is a rural unincorporated community in Canadian County, Oklahoma. It is north of the Concho Indian Boarding School. The post office opened April 20, 1915. The ZIP code is 73022. The school and post office were named for Indian agent, Charles E. Shell. It is the headquarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. Show on map
MilburnMilburn is a town in Johnston County, Oklahoma, United States, along the Blue River. The population was 317 at the 2010 census, an increase of 1.6 percent from 312 at the 2000 census. The town is notable as the location of the Chickasaw White House, the former home of Chickasaw Governor Douglas H. Johnston. This home is now a museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
DodgeDodge is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 115 at the 2010 census, up from 96 at the 2000 census. The Dodge Post Office existed from November 20, 1901, until August 15, 1941. Dodge was established on Cowskin Prairie along the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway in District 6 of the old Indian Territory. Show on map
EagletownEagletown is a small unincorporated community in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 528 at the 2010 census. Located on Mountain Fork River, about 6 miles (9.7 km) from the Oklahoma-Arkansas border, it was the first permanent Choctaw settlement in the West. It was an important town from 1834 to 1906, and served as county seat for the Choctaw Nation's Eagle County. Show on map
HobartHobart is a city and the county seat of Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for Garret Hobart, the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. The population was 3,756 at the 2010 census, a decline of 6.0 percent from 3,997 at the 2000 census. It is served by Hobart Regional Airport. It also has 2 museums: the General Tommy Franks Museum and the Kiowa County Museum. Show on map
KeneficKenefic is a town in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 196 at the 2010 census, a 2 percent increase from 192 at the 2000 census. The town was named for William Kenefick, president of the Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad (MO&G), which had constructed a rail line through the region. The town name has been spelled both Kenefic and Kenefick throughout its history. Show on map
MooreMoore is a city in Cleveland County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The population was 55,081 at the 2010 census, making Moore the 7th largest city in the state of Oklahoma. Located between Oklahoma City and Norman, the city has been the site of several devastating tornadoes, with those occurring in 1999 and 2013 receiving (inter)national attention. Show on map
MadillMadill is a city and county seat of Marshall County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named in honor of George Alexander Madill, an attorney for the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway. The population at the 2010 census was 3,770, an increase of 10.8 percent from 3,410 at the 2000 census. It is best known as the site of the annual National Sand Bass Festival. It is part of the Texoma region. Show on map
SlimSlim was an unincorporated community in western McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States, six miles north of Valliant. A post office operated in Slim from January 15, 1916 to July 31, 1933. During the years following Oklahoma’s statehood, Slim's residents were economically more closely connected to communities in Pushmataha County, as the community lay near the Pushmataha County line. Show on map
LeonardLeonard is a small unincorporated community in the southeast corner of Tulsa County, Oklahoma. It is on Highway 64 at the Tulsa County/Wagoner County line. The town was named for S. C. Leonard of Detroit, Michigan. The post office was established August 22, 1908. The town serves the surrounding farming area. It is notable for the presence of the nearby Leonard Geophysical Observatory. Show on map
New WoodvilleNew Woodville is a town in Marshall County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 69 at the 2000 census. Proposals to annex the unincorporated areas of New Woodville and McBride on the shores of Lake Texoma were considered in the past. Listed erroneously by the Census Bureau as \"Woodville\" for many years, the town's name was finally corrected in Census Bureau listings in 2005. Show on map
CayugaCayuga Springs is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 140 at the 2010 census, a 33.3 percent increase from 105 at the 2000 census. It was established on the Elk River in the old Seneca Reserve in Indian Territory. The Cayuga Springs Post Office existed from June 11, 1884, until April 30, 1905. Show on map
DrumrightDrumright is a city in Creek and Payne counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It began as an oil boom town. However, the population has declined as oil production has waned in the area. The population was 2,907 at the 2010 census, almost unchanged from 2,905 at the 2000 census. Drumright and nearby Cushing were at the center of a large, productive oilfield in the 1910s and 1920s. Show on map
GibsonGibson is an unincorporated community in Wagoner County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located on Oklahoma State Highway 16 approximately 6 miles south of Wagoner, Oklahoma, and 2 1/2 miles northwest of Okay, Oklahoma. The Gibson Station was the first passenger and freight station built in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, constructed in 1872 by the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad. Show on map
ZenaZena is a census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 127. The population was 122 at the 2010 census. Established on Courthouse Prairie in District 5 of the old Indian Territory, its post office existed from April 11, 1896, until January 31, 1956. It is said to have been named for Asenith Wood, the wife of the first postmaster. Show on map
InolaInola is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the Tulsa Metropolitan Statistical Area (TMSA). The population was 1,788 at the 2010 census, a 12.5 percent increase from 1,589 at the 2000 census. Inola is a Cherokee word meaning \"Black Fox.\" The town styles itself as \"The Hay Capital of the World.\" It is now considered a bedroom community for Tulsa. Show on map
CollinsvilleCollinsville is a city in Rogers and Tulsa counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and a part of the Tulsa, Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named for Dr. A. H. Collins, an engineer and surveyor who first surveyed the land that became this community. The population was 5,606 according to the 2010 census, an increase of 37.5 percent from 4,077 at the 2000 census. Show on map
EddyEddy is an unincorporated community in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 7 miles southwest of Blackwell, Oklahoma. The community was originally called Osborne, but its name was changed to Eddy on January 3, 1901. It was named \"Eddy\" after Ed E. Peckham, who was the son of railroad developer E.L. Peckham. A post office operated in Eddy but closed on February 22, 1957. Show on map
GoreGore is a town in western Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 977 at the 2010 census, an increase of 15 percent from 850 at the 2000 census. Gore claims to be the \"trout capital of Oklahoma\", with great fishing in Lake Tenkiller, the Illinois River, and the Arkansas River. Show on map
AltusAltus is a city and county seat in Jackson County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 19,813 at the 2010 census, a loss of 7.7 percent compared to 21,454 at the 2000 census. Altus is home to Altus Air Force Base, the United States Air Force training base for C-17, and KC-135 aircrews. It is also home to Western Oklahoma State College and Southwest Technology Center. Show on map
ChelseaChelsea is a town in Rogers County, Oklahoma. The population was 1,964 at the 2010 census, a decline of 8.3 percent from 2,136 at the 2000 census. Chelsea was named after the area in London, England, by Charles Peach, a railroad official who was a native of that city. Chelsea used to be one of the largest towns in Oklahoma. Chelsea is the home of Oklahoma's first oil well. Show on map
StringtownStringtown is a town in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 410 at the 2010 census, an increase of 3.5 percent from 396 at the 2000 census. It is the second largest town in Atoka County. The town is notable for the Mack H. Alford Correctional Center, a medium-security prison operated by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, just outside Stringtown. Show on map
GuymonGuymon is a city in and the county seat of Texas County, Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 11,442, an increase of 6.5 percent from 10,472 in 2000. The 2012 census estimate grew to 11,930. Cattle feedlots, corporate pork farms, and natural gas dominate its economy, with wind energy production and transmission recently diversifying land owners farms. Show on map
Marble CityMarble City (often simply called Marble) is a town in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 263 at the 2010 census, an increase of 8.7 percent from 242 at the 2000 census, making it the seventh-largest town by population in Sequoyah County, after Gans and before Moffett. Show on map
BrittonBritton, Oklahoma is a former town in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. The GNIS classifies it as a populated place. No city limit signs, or indications of a previous town, now part of North Central Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the Britton town still appears though, particularly on phone bills as places. Britton was once a town that lay between N. Waverly Ave. & N. Walker Ave. on W. Britton Rd. Today the community is bounded by N. Waverly Ave. on the southern portion of the west side and N. Western Ave. on the northern portion of the west side, W. Britton Rd. on the western portion of the north side and W. Hefner Rd. on the eastern portion of the north side, N. Walker Ave. on the east side and W. Wilshire on the south side. Show on map
CacheCache is a city in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,796 at the 2010 census. It is an exurb included in the Lawton, Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is the location of Star House, the home of the Comanche chief Quanah Parker, the major leader of the Quahadi Comanche in the years of Indian Wars and transition to reservation life. Show on map
BaronBaron is an unincorporated community in rural Adair County, Oklahoma, United States, located along U.S. Route 59 between Westville and Stilwell. It was built on the West Branch of the Baron Fork of the Illinois River, a tributary of the Arkansas River via the Illinois River. Baron is located at 35°54′00″N 94°36′01″W / 35.90000°N 94.60028°W (35.9000843, -94.60022160) Show on map
Fort CoffeeFort Coffee is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. Originally constructed as a U. S. Army fort in 1834, it was named for U. S. General John Coffee, a veteran of the Seminole Wars. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 424 at the 2010 census, a gain of 2.9 percent from 412 at the 2000 census. Show on map
BraggsBraggs is a town in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 259 at the 2010 census, a 14.0 percent decline from 301 at the 2000 census. The town is best known as the site of Camp Gruber, a World War II military cantonment that was the home base of the 42nd Infantry Division (Rainbow Division) and the 88th Infantry Division (Blue Devil Division). Show on map
SlaughtervilleSlaughterville is a town in Cleveland County, Oklahoma, United States, and located in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 4,137. The community is made up of mostly homes on acreages so it has retained a rural type of land use. Much of the area is wooded and has a natural scenic outdoor appeal to residents and visitors. Show on map
McKeyMcKey is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 135 at the 2000 census. McKey was established on the Old Osage and Arkansas Valley Railroad near MacKey's Salt Works. The post office existed from March 13, 1891, until July 14, 1928. Show on map
StilwellStilwell is a city and county seat of Adair County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,949 at the 2010, an increase of 20.5 percent from 3,276 at the 2000 census. In 1949, the Oklahoma governor and legislature proclaimed Stilwell as the \"Strawberry Capital of the World.\" Stilwell also serves as a gateway to Lake Tenkiller and the former Adair State Park. Show on map
BentleyBentley is a small unincorporated community in Atoka County, Oklahoma. It lies east of the county seat of Atoka off Highway 3. There was once a school at Bentley, but it has closed down.The community had a post office from June 1, 1903, until August 30, 1963. On the main street of Bentley, there is a fire department, community center and a Southern Baptist Church. Show on map
AmesAmes is a town in southeastern Major County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 239 at the 2010 census. This was a 20.1 percent increase from 199 at the 2000 census. Ames is best known because it is located within the boundary of a geological structure that is called Ames crater or the Ames Astrobleme. The Ames Astrobleme Museum is located in the town. Show on map
ChockieChockie (formerly Chickiechockie), is an unincorporated community northeast of Stringtown, in Atoka County, Oklahoma. The local post office closed in 1937. The community was named for Chickie and Chockie LeFlore, daughters of Charles LeFlore, a prominent Choctaw Indian. McAlester-born singer and actress Reba McEntire lived in Chockie for a period of time. U.S. Route 69 passes through Chockie. Show on map
Warr AcresWarr Acres is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. It was established after World War II by C.B. Warr, a dynamic businessman, builder, and commercial developer. The population was 10,043 at the 2010 census. The city lies in the Putnam City School District and also Oklahoma City Public Schools. Show on map
LotseeLotsee is a town in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was two at the 2010 Census, compared to 11 in the 2000 census. The entire town is a 2,000 acres (8.1 km2) family-owned cattle and pecan ranch, the Flying G Ranch, whose owner, George Campbell, incorporated it in 1963. The population peaked at 16 in 1970, then declined to seven in 1980. Show on map
JenksJenks is a city in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States, and a suburb of Tulsa, in the northeastern part of the state. It is situated between the Arkansas River and U.S. Route 75. Jenks is one of the fastest growing cities in Oklahoma. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 9,557, but by 2010, the population was 16,924, an increase of 77.1 percent. Show on map
OrientaOrienta is a small unincorporated community located at the junction U.S. Highway 60 and U.S. Highway 412 in Major County, Oklahoma. It lies north of Fairview, east of the Glass Mountains and south of the Cimarron River. The post office was established March 12, 1901, and took its name from the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway along which it was built, Show on map
BlackwellBlackwell is a city in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States, located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 177 and State Highway 11 along Interstate 35. The population was 7,092 at the 2010 census. Blackwell was established following the September 16, 1893 Cherokee Outlet land run by A. J. Blackwell. Blackwell has an agricultural and fossil fuel based economy. Show on map
HochatownHochatown is a community in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States, the second to hold the name after the first was flooded by the damming of the Mountain Fork River to create Broken Bow Lake. The city lies within the Little Dixie region of Oklahoma, an area originally settled largely by Southerners seeking a new start following the American Civil War. Show on map
McLoudMcLoud is a town in northwestern Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City Consolidated Metropolitan Area. The population was 4,044 at the 2010 census, a 14.0 percent increase from 3,548 at the 2000 census. The town was founded in 1895 and named for John W. McLoud, attorney for the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad. Show on map
GrimesGrimes is an unincorporated community in Roger Mills County, Oklahoma, United States. Grimes is located in the southern part of the county, 11.4 miles (18.3 km) south-southwest of Cheyenne. The Grimes post office opened on March 1, 1901, and closed on November 26, 1971. The community was named for acting Oklahoma territorial governor William C. Grimes. Show on map
Wright CityWright City is a town in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States, along the Little River. The population was 848 at the 2000 census. Wright City was once home to a Weyerhaeuser plant; it closed permanently in mid March 2009 due to the slowed lumber industry. Weyerhaeuser was Wright City's economic power engine, and its closing affected 165 employees. Show on map
PeggsPeggs is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. It had a population of 813 at the 2010 census, compared to 814 at the 2000 census. A large minority of its residents are Native American, most of them members of 10 tribal groups such as the Cherokee Nation and the Muscogee Creek Nation. Show on map
SkiatookSkiatook (Skī·ǎ·tōōk or Skī·ǎ·tǒǒk versus Skī·tōōk or Skī·tǒǒk) is a city in Osage and Tulsa counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Located in the northeastern part of the state, about twenty miles north and west of Tulsa, it is a suburb of Tulsa. The population was 7,397 at the 2010 census, an increase of 37.1 percent from 5,396 at the 2000 census. Show on map
OwassoOwasso is a city in Rogers and Tulsa counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and a northern suburb of Tulsa. The population was 28,915 at the 2010 census. Originally settled in 1881 in Indian Territory, the town incorporated in 1904 just prior to Oklahoma statehood and was chartered as a city in 1972. Scenes in The Outsiders film were shot in Owasso. Show on map
HendrixHendrix is a town in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 79 at both the 2010 and the 2000 censuses. According to the Bryan County Genealogy Society, Hendrix was originally known as Kemp City. This led to it often being confused with the neighboring town that is simply named Kemp. Hendrix was largely destroyed by a 1916 tornado. Show on map
KingfisherKingfisher is a city in and the county seat of Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 4,633 at the 2010 census. It is the former home and namesake of Kingfisher College. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Kingfisher is now primarily a bedroom community for people employed in Enid and Oklahoma City. Show on map
JoyJoy is a small rural community in Murray County, Oklahoma. It was named for the nearby Joy School. Joy School, in turn, was the name selected from a 1922 student contest to choose a new name when the Carr Flats, Talley, and Wheeler schools consolidated. On May 19, 2010, an EF1 tornado struck Joy, damaging houses, outbuildings, trees and power poles. On May 9, 2016, an EF2 tornado struck Joy, damaging about 80% of the land area in Joy, damaging houses, trees, and even roads around the area. Show on map
HaywoodHaywood is a small unincorporated community in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma. The post office was established September 20, 1904. The community, located in a coal mining region, was named for William D. \"Big Bill\" Haywood a prominent socialist and labor leader of the era. The north entrance to the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant is located in Haywood. Show on map
PocolaPocola is a town in northeastern Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 4,056 at the 2010 census, a gain of 1.55 percent from 3,994 at the 2000. It is approximately 10 miles (16 km) from Fort Smith, Arkansas. Pocola is a Choctaw word meaning \"ten.\" Show on map
GrantGrant is an unincorporated community in Choctaw County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located along U.S. Route 271 south of Hugo. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 289. Established on the Frisco Railroad in the Indian Territory, the Grant Post Office opened on January 31, 1889. It was named for Ulysses S. Grant. The ZIP code is 74738. Show on map
Elk CityElk City is a city in Beckham County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 11,693 at the 2010 census, and the population was estimated at 12,717 in 2015. Elk City is located on Interstate 40 and Historic U.S. Route 66 in western Oklahoma, approximately 110 miles (180 km) west of Oklahoma City and 150 miles (240 km) east of Amarillo, Texas. Show on map
Cleo SpringsCleo Springs is a town in Major County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 326 at the 2000 census. The post office was established March 21, 1894 and discontinued May 3, 1917. The Sod House Museum, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and also an Oklahoma Historic site, is located north of town in Alfalfa County. Show on map
ChickashaChickasha /ˈtʃɪkəʃeɪ/ is a city in and the county seat of Grady County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 16,036 at the 2010 census. Chickasha is home to the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. The city is named for, and strongly connected to Native American heritage as Chickasha (Chikashsha) is the Choctaw word for Chickasaw. Show on map
Cardin (historical)Cardin is a ghost town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 150 at the 2000 census, but plummeted to 3 at the 2010 census in April 2010. The town is located within the Tar Creek Superfund site; the vast majority of its residents accepted federal buyout offers, and the town's population dropped to zero in November 2010. Show on map
Keokuk FallsKeokuk Falls is a ghost town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. The location is 4.5 miles north and 15 miles east of Shawnee. and one mile west of the Creek Nation and one mile north of the Seminole Nation across the North Canadian River. It was named after Chief Moses Keokuk (1821-1908). He is buried in Stroud, Oklahoma's Sac and Fox cemetery. Show on map
RingwoodRingwood is a town in Major County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 424 at the 2000 census, at which time it was a city; it became a town in November 2005. The population was 497 at the 2010 census, a 17.2 percent increase from the 2000 census.The town was given its name because it was ringed by woods from northwest to southeast, though the town is no longer accurate to its name. Show on map
MilfayMilfay is a small unincorporated community in Creek County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established December 14, 1911. The community was named after Charles Mills and Edward Fay, two railroad officials. In the 2003–2005 HBO fictional television series Carnivàle, Milfay is the home town of Ben Hawkins, the series' protagonist. Show on map
HominyHominy (Osage: Hą́mąðį \"night-walker\") is a city in Osage County, Oklahoma. The population was 3,565 at the 2010 census, a 38 percent increase from 2,584 in 2000. The town was the home of an all-Native American football team in the 1920s. Parts of an upcoming docudrama on the Hominy Indians were shot in the area in 2013. Show on map
MustangMustang is a growing city in the southeast corner of Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 17,395 at the 2010 census, a 32.2 percent increase from 13,156 at the 2000 census. The city is now primarily known as a bedroom community for Oklahoma City. Show on map
Dwight MissionDwight Mission is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 55 at the 2010 census, a 71.9 percent gain from 32 at the 2000 census. It is currently the home of Dwight Mission Presbyterian Camp & Retreat Center. Show on map
TecumsehTecumseh is a city in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 6,457 at the 2010 census, a 5.9 percent increase from 6,098 at the 2000 census. It was named for the noted Shawnee chief, Tecumseh, and was designated as the county seat at Oklahoma's statehood. A county-wide election moved the seat to Shawnee in 1930. Show on map
HoweHowe is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 802 at the 2010 census, a gain of 15.1 percent from 697 at the 2000 census. The town was once noted for producing coal and coke. Now its economy is mainly supported by agriculture. Show on map
LahomaLahoma is a town in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 611 at the 2010 census, a 5.9 percent gain from 577 at the 2000 census. Its name was formed from the last three syllables of Oklahoma.Until the 1960s it was a farm town. Later it became primarily a bedroom community for people who commuted to work in Enid. Show on map
AntlersAntlers is a city in, and the county seat of, Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,453 at the 2010 census, a 3.9 percent decline from 2,552 in 2000. The town was named for a kind of tree that becomes festooned with antlers shed by deer, and is taken as a sign of the location of a spring frequented by deer. Show on map
SallisawSallisaw is a city and county seat of Sequoyah County. The population was 8,880 at the 2010 Census, an 11.2 percent increase from 7,891 at the 2000 census. Sallisaw is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas–Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
SpavinawSpavinaw is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 437 at the 2010 census, a decline of 22.4 percent from 563 at the 2000 census. The town is best known as the birthplace of baseball player Mickey Mantle. It is also notable for the nearby Lake Spavinaw, the principal source of water for Tulsa, Oklahoma. Show on map
WisterWister is a town in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,002 at the 2000 census. Wister was named for Gutman G. Wister, an official of the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad (KO&G), and the father of noted writer Owen Wister. Show on map
PiedmontPiedmont is a city primarily in Canadian County, Oklahoma, though a small part of it is in Kingfisher County. It is a part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 5,720 at the 2010 census, a 56.7 percent increase from 3,650 at the 2000 census. Piedmont is a home rule city served by a council–manager government. Show on map
OnetaOneta is a small unincorporated community in Wagoner County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The post office opened July 7, 1905, and closed November 30, 1922. Oneta is located at 36°01′08″N 95°42′29″W / 36.01889°N 95.70806°W. Near Oneta is the Tulsa Tower Joint Venture Tower Oneta, one of the tallest towers in the United States. Show on map
WapanuckaWapanucka (pronounced Wop´-uh-nuck´-uh) is a town in northeast Johnston County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 438 at the 2010 census, a 1.6 percent decrease from 445 at the 2000 census. It is about 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Tishomingo. The town name refers to the Delaware Nation and means \"Eastern Land People.\" Show on map
BakerBaker is a small rural unincorporated community in northeastern Texas County, Oklahoma, United States, ¼ mile north of U.S. Route 64. Originally named Bakerburg, the post office opened June 5, 1931. The name was changed to Baker August 15, 1953. The ZIP Code is 73950. The community is said to have been named for Rueben F. Baker. Show on map
BrushyBrushy is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States, along U.S. Route 59 in the foothills of the Brushy Mountains. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 900 at the 2010 census, an increase of 14.4 percent from 787 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Nicoma ParkNicoma Park is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. The name Nicoma was made of the first three letters of Nichols, for G.A.Nichols, and the last three letters of Oklahoma. Thus was the birth of the name Nicoma Park. The population was 2,415 at the 2000 census. Show on map
SperrySperry is a town in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 807 in the 2010 U. S. census, compared to 196 at the 2000 census. It is primarily a bedroom community, since about 85 percent of the employed residents commute to work in Tulsa and other nearby towns. Sperry also has an active retirement community. Show on map
CoalgateCoalgate is a city in and the county seat of Coal County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,967 at the 2010 census, a 1.9 percent decrease from 2,005 in 2000. The town was founded in 1889 in the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory as a coal mining camp named Liddle. The name changed to Coalgate on January 23, 1890. Show on map
CaleraCalera is a town in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States, only 5 miles south of Durant and 10 miles north of the Oklahoma-Texas stateline. The population was 2,164 at the 2010 census, an increase of 24.4 percent from 1,739 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Durant Micropolitan Area. It is also part of the Texoma region. Show on map
IngersollIngersoll is a small unincorporated community in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
AftonAfton is a town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,049 as of the 2010 census, with population growth stemming from the near abandonment of nearby towns of Cardin and Picher because of ground contamination sites by local mining quarries. The town may have been named for the Scottish river Afton. Show on map
PeoriaPeoria is a town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for the Peoria tribe, a group of Native Americans who had moved into Indian Territory during the 19th Century. The population was 131 at the 2010 U. S. Census, down from 141 at the 2000 census. Peoria is part of the Joplin, Missouri metropolitan area. Show on map
WyandotteWyandotte is a town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 333 at the 2010 census, a decline of 8.26 percent from 363 at the 2000 census. The town is the tribal headquarters of the Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma, for which the town was named. Wyandotte is part of the Joplin, Missouri metropolitan area. Show on map
AtokaAtoka is a city in, and the county seat of, Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,107 at the 2010 census, an increase of 4.0 percent from 2,988 at the 2000 census. The city was settled by the Choctaw and named in 1867 by a Baptist missionary for Chief Atoka, whose name means \"ball ground\" in English. Show on map
ChandlerChandler is a city in and the county seat of Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 3,100 at the 2010 census, an increase from 2,842 at the 2000 census. Chandler is located northeast of Oklahoma City on SH-66 and I-44, and north of Shawnee on SH-18. Show on map
HomesteadHomestead is a small unincorporated community in northern Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. The town was plotted along the Rock Island railroad line before statehood. The Homestead Post Office opened January 26, 1893. Homestead had a population of 150 residents in 1905, according to the Oklahoma Territorial Census. Show on map
LenapahLenapah is a town in north central Nowata County, Oklahoma, United States, eleven miles north of Nowata and sixty two miles northeast of Tulsa. Its name is an adaptation of Lenape, the name of a Delaware Tribe of Indians tribe. The population was 293 at the 2010 census, a 1.7 percent decrease from 298 at the 2000 census. Show on map
CopelandCopeland (also Copeland Switch) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,629 at the 2010 census, a 12.5 percent increase from 1,448 at the 2000 census. Founded as a railroad community, it was named for local resident D.R. Copeland. Show on map
MocaneMocane is an unincorporated community in Beaver County, Oklahoma, United States. Its elevation is 2,631 feet (802 m). A post office once operated in Mocane, but it is no longer in existence. Mocane is the closest community to the Billy Rose Archeological Site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
Eagle CityEagle City is a small rural community located on State Highway 58 in western Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. Established on the Frisco Line before statehood, the post office was named Dillon. The Dillon Post Office opened July 26, 1902. The name was changed to Eagle City September 4, 1909. The ZIP Code is 73658. Show on map
HaskellHaskell is a town in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,007 at the 2010 census, a gain of 13.7 percent from 1,765 at the 2000 census. Haskell was established in 1904 on the Midland Valley Railroad. It was named for town site developer Charles N. Haskell, who would become the first governor of the state of Oklahoma in 1907. Show on map
DewarDewar is a town in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 818 at the 2010 census, a decline of 3.4 percent from 919 at the 2000 census. Founded in 1909 by workers for the Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway (MO&G), it was named for William Peter Dewar, a railroad official. It incorporated in 1909. Show on map
ClaremoreClaremore is a city and the county seat of Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 18,581 at the 2010 census, a 17.1 percent increase from 15,873 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area and home to Rogers State University. It is best known as the home of entertainer Will Rogers. Show on map
SummitSummit is a town in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. It was originally called South Muskogee when it was platted in 1910, and is one of thirteen all-black towns still surviving at the beginning of the 21st Century. The population was 139 at the 2010 census, a 38.5 percent decline from 226 at the 2000 census. Show on map
BroxtonBroxton is an unincorporated community in Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. Broxton had an independent school district until the 1990s, but it was consolidated with the Fort Cobb school district, becoming Fort Cobb-Broxton Public Schools The community of Pine Ridge was also served by the Broxton school district. Show on map
MiloMilo is a rural community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. It is on State Highway 53 south of the Arbuckles. The post office opened October 28, 1899. It was later closed. The current ZIP Code is 73401 assigned to Ardmore. Milo is said to have been named the initials of the four daughters of resident, J.W. Johnson. Show on map
BluejacketBluejacket is a town in eastern Craig County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 339 at the 2010 census, an increase of 23.7 percent from 274 at the 2000 census. Bluejacket was named for its first postmaster, the Rev. Charles Bluejacket, one-time chief of the Shawnee and grandson of noted leader Blue Jacket. Show on map
RoseRose is a small unincorporated rural community in southeastern Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States, on Scenic U.S. Highway 412. The post office was established March 13, 1891, with David Ragsdale as the postmaster. The ZIP Code is 74364. The community was said to have been named for Rowe's Prairie, which is nearby. Show on map
LangstonLangston is a town in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,724 at the 2010 census, an increase of 3.2 percent from 1,670 at the 2000 census. Langston is home to Langston University, the only historically black college in Oklahoma. Show on map
Douthat (historical)Douthat is a ghost town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. Douthat is 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Picher. Douthat once had a post office, which opened on March 17, 1917. The community was named after Zahn A. Douthat, the owner of the townsite. Douthat is now abandoned and part of the Tar Creek Superfund site. Show on map
BattiestBattiest /bəˈtiːst/ is a small unincorporated community in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established November 1, 1926. It was named for Choctaw jurist Byington Battiest. The population today is approximately 250 people. Battiest is served by the Battiest Independent School District. Show on map
CaddoCaddo is a town in Bryan County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 997 at the 2010 census, a 5.6 percent gain from 944 at the 2000 census. The name is derived from part a native term for \"real chief.\" According to Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the town was named for the nearby Caddo Hills. Show on map
Red RockRed Rock (Otoe: Íno Súje pronounced [ĩꜜno suꜜdʒɛ], meaning \"Rock Red\") is a town in northern Noble County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 283 at the 2010 census, a decline from 293 at the 2000 census. The headquarters of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians is located in Red Rock. Show on map
NidaNida is an unincorporated community in Johnston County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 22. A post office operated in Nida from 1895 to 1915. The first postmaster was R.F. French. The town was named after his wife, Nida French. It is the nearest community to Fort Washita, a National Historic Landmark. Show on map
CalumetCalumet is a town in Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 507 at the 2010 census, a 5.23 percent decrease since 2000. Calumet is a variant term for Ceremonial pipe. Incorporated in 1942, the town's land was settled in the Land Run of 1892. Show on map
States, regions, administrative units in Oklahoma
NameDescriptionShow
Township of NormanNorman /ˈnɔːrmən/ is a city in the U.S. state of Oklahoma 20 miles (30 km) south of downtown Oklahoma City in its metropolitan area. The population was 110,925 at the 2010 census. Norman's estimated population of 118,040 in 2014 makes it the third-largest city in Oklahoma, and the city serves as the county seat of Cleveland County. In 2008 CNN's Money Magazine ranked Norman as the sixth best small city within the United States in which to live. Show on map
OklahomaOklahoma /ˌoʊkləˈhoʊmə/ (Cherokee: Asgaya gigageyi / ᎠᏍᎦᏯ ᎩᎦᎨᏱ; or transliterated from English as ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ (òɡàlàhoma), Pawnee: Uukuhuúwa, Cayuga: Gahnawiyoˀgeh) is a state located in the South Central United States. Oklahoma is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the 50 United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning \"red people\". It is also known informally by its nickname, The Sooner State, in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on the choicest pieces of land before the official opening date, and the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which opened the door for white settlement in America's Indian Territory. The name was settled upon statehood, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged and Indian@en . Show on map
Comanche CountyComanche County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 124,098, making it the fourth-most populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Lawton. The county was created in 1901 as part of Oklahoma Territory. It was named for the Comanche tribe. Comanche County is included in the Lawton, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Garfield CountyGarfield County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 60,580. Enid is the county seat and largest city within Garfield County. The county is named after President James A. Garfield. Garfield County comprises the Enid, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Prior to the Land Run of 1893, Garfield County was named O County and was part of the Cherokee Outlet, occupied by the Cherokee people following the Treaty of New Echota and the Cherokee trail of tears. Historically, the area was a hunting ground for the Wichita, Osage, and Kiowa tribes. Show on map
Woodward CountyWoodward County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,081. Its county seat is Woodward. Woodward County comprises the Woodward, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Greer CountyGreer County is a county located along the southwest border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,239. Its county seat is Mangum. From 1860 to 1896, the state of Texas claimed an area known as Greer County, Texas, which included present-day Greer County along with neighboring areas. In 1896 it was designated as a county in Oklahoma Territory under a ruling by the US Supreme Court. Show on map
Tulsa CountyTulsa County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 603,403, making it the second-most populous county in Oklahoma, behind only Oklahoma County. Its county seat and largest city is Tulsa, the second-largest city in the state. Founded at statehood, in 1907, it was named after the previously established city of Tulsa. Before statehood, the area was part of both the Creek Nation and the Cooweescoowee District of Cherokee Nation in Indian Territory. Tulsa County is included in the Tulsa, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Noble CountyNoble County is located in the north central part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,561. Its county seat is Perry. It was part of the Cherokee Outlet in Indian Territory until Oklahoma Territory was created in 1890, and the present county land was designated as County P. After the U. S. government opened the area to non-Indian settlement in 1893, it was renamed Noble County for John Willock Noble, then the Secretary of the Interior. Show on map
Pushmataha CountyPushmataha County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,572. Its county seat is Antlers. The county was created at statehood from part of the former territory of the Choctaw Nation, which had its capital at the town of Tuskahoma. Planned by the Five Civilized Tribes as part of a state of Sequoyah, the new Oklahoma state also named the county for Pushmataha, an important Choctaw chief in the American Southeast. He had tried to ensure that his people would not have to ceded their lands, but died in Washington, DC during a diplomatic trip in 1824. The Choctaw suffered Indian Removal to Indian Territory. Show on map
Seminole CountySeminole County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,482. Its county seat is Wewoka. Before Oklahoma's admission as a state, the county was the entire small portion of Indian Territory allocated to the Seminole people, who were removed from Florida in the 1820s. Show on map
Texas CountyTexas County is a county located in the panhandle of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Its county seat is Guymon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,640. It is the second-largest county in the state, based on land area, and is named for Texas, the state that adjoins the county to its south. Texas County comprises the Guymon, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. The county economy is largely based on farming and cattle production. It is one of the top producing counties in the U.S. for wheat, cattle and hogs. It also lies within the noted Hugoton-Panhandle natural gas field. Show on map
Bryan CountyBryan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma.As of the 2010 census, the population was 42,416. Its county seat is Durant. It is the only county in the United States named for Populist politician William Jennings Bryan. Bryan County comprises the Durant, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Dallas-Fort Worth and the Texoma region, TX-OK Combined Statistical Area. It is home to the headquarters of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma located in Durant. Show on map
Beckham CountyBeckham County is a county located on the western border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,119. Its county seat is Sayre. Founded upon statehood in 1907, Beckham County was named for J. C. W. Beckham, who was Governor of Kentucky and the first popularly elected member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. Beckham County comprises the Elk City, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Rogers CountyRogers County is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 86,905. Its county seat is Claremore, making it the sixth largest county in Oklahoma based on population. The county was originally created in 1907 from the western Saline District of the Cherokee Nation and named the Cooweescoowee District. However, the residents protested and the name was changed to Rogers County, after Clem Vann Rogers, a mixed-blood Cherokee rancher and father of Will Rogers. Show on map
Township of Saddle MountainSaddle Mountain is an unincorporated community in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 115. The Saddle Mountain Post Office existed from January 2, 1902, until May 31, 1955. It was named for the Saddle Mountain Indian School. Saddle Mountain, a foothill of the Wichita Mountains lies about a mile to the southeast in Comanche County. Monroe Tsatoke, a Kiowa artist, was born here in 1904, when it was still part of Oklahoma Territory. This land was allotted to the Spotted Horse family at the beginning of the 20th century.Is said to be worth between 16-20 million dollars. Show on map
Jackson CountyJackson County is a county located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 26,446. Its county seat is Altus. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the county was named for two historical figures: President Andrew Jackson and Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. One source states only that the county was named for the former President, while an earlier source states it was only named for General Stonewall Jackson. Jackson County comprises the Altus, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Kay CountyKay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,562. Its county seat is Newkirk, and the largest city is Ponca City. Kay County comprises the Ponca City, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. It is in north central Oklahoma on the Kansas state line. Before statehood, Kay County was formed from the “Cherokee Strip” or “Cherokee Outlet” and originally designated as county “K.” Its name means simply that. Kay County is the only county to keep its same name as the Oklahoma area moved from a territory to a state. Show on map
Oklahoma CountyOklahoma County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 718,633, making it the most populous county in Oklahoma. The county seat is Oklahoma City, the state capital. Oklahoma County is at the heart of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. Oklahoma County is one of seven counties in the United States to share the same name as the state it is located in (the other six counties are Arkansas County, Hawaii County, Idaho County, Iowa County, New York County, and Utah County). Show on map
Cimarron CountyCimarron County is the westernmost county in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,475, making it the least-populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Boise City. Located in the Oklahoma Panhandle, Cimarron County contains the only community in the state (Kenton) that observes the Mountain Time Zone. Black Rock Mesa, the highest point in the state, is in the northwest corner of the county. Throughout most of its history it has had both the smallest population and the lowest population density of any county in Oklahoma. Show on map
Delaware CountyDelaware County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,487. Its county seat is Jay. The county was named for the Delaware Indians who had established a village in the area prior to the arrival of the Cherokees in Indian Territory in the 1830s. Delaware County was created in 1907. Prior to becoming Delaware County, a large portion of the area was known as the Delaware District of the Cherokee Nation. Today, Delaware County continues to be recognized by the Cherokee Nation as the Delaware District. Show on map
Major CountyMajor County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,527. Its county seat is Fairview. The county was created in 1907. Located in northwestern Oklahoma, Major County is bounded by Woods and Alfalfa counties in the north, Garfield County on the east, Kingfisher, Blaine and Dewey on the south, and Woodward on the west, Major County has 957.87 square miles of land and water. It is drained by the North Canadian and Cimarron rivers and the Eagle Chief, Griever, and Sand creeks. Show on map
Pontotoc CountyPontotoc County is in the south central part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,492. Its county seat is Ada. The county was created at statehood from part of the Chickasaw Nation in Indian Territory. It was named for a historic Chickasaw tribal area in Mississippi. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Pontotoc is usually translated \"cattail prairie\" or \"land of hanging grapes.\" Pontotoc County comprises the Ada, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. The Chickasaw Nation's headquarters are in Ada. Show on map
Ottawa CountyOttawa County is a county located in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 31,848. Its county seat is Miami. The county was named for the Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma. It is also the location of the federally recognized Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, which is based in Quapaw. Ottawa County comprises the Miami, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Joplin-Miami, MO-OK Combined Statistical Area. The county borders both Kansas and Missouri. Show on map
Blaine CountyBlaine County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,785. Its county seat is Watonga. Blaine County is the birthplace of voice actor Clarence Nash, the voice of Disney's Donald Duck. Part of the Cheyenne-Arapaho land opening in 1892, the county had gained rail lines by the early 1900s and highways by the 1930s. The county was named for James G. Blaine, an American politician who was the Republican presidential candidate in 1884 and Secretary of State under President Benjamin Harrison. Show on map
Washington CountyWashington County is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 50,976. Its county seat is Bartlesville. Named for President George Washington, it is the smallest county in Oklahoma in total area, adjacent to the largest county in Oklahoma, Osage County. Washington County comprises the Bartlesville, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Tulsa-Muskogee-Bartlesville, OK Combined Statistical Area. It is located along the border with Kansas. Show on map
Payne CountyPayne County is a county in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 77,350. Its county seat is Stillwater. The county was created in 1890 as part of Oklahoma Territory and is named for Capt. David L. Payne, a leader of the \"Boomers\". Payne County comprises the Stillwater, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. The county lies northeast of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area though many consider it an extension of the Oklahoma City metro area due to commuter patterns and other indicators. Show on map
Township of Park HillPark Hill is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in southwestern Cherokee County, Oklahoma in the United States. The population was 3,909 at the 2010 census. It lies near Tahlequah, east of the junction of U.S. Route 62 and State Highway 82. Founded in 1838, Park Hill became the home of many important Cherokee leaders, including John Ross after their removal from the southeastern U.S. It has been called \"the center of Cherokee culture.\" Show on map
Caddo CountyCaddo County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,600. Its county seat is Anadarko. Created in 1901 as part of Oklahoma Territory, the county is named for the Caddo tribe who were settled here on a reservation in the 1870s. Caddo County is immediately west of the seven-county Greater Oklahoma City metro area, and although is not officially in the metro area, it has many economic ties in this region. Show on map
Cotton CountyCotton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,193. Its county seat is Walters. When Oklahoma achieved statehood in 1907, the area which is now Cotton County fell within the boundaries of Comanche County. It was split off in 1912, becoming the last county created in Oklahoma; it was named for the county's primary crop. Cotton County is included in the Lawton, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Muskogee CountyMuskogee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 70,990. The county seat is Muskogee. The county and city were named for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. The official spelling of the name was changed to Muskogee by the post office in 1900. Muskogee County is part of the Muskogee, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Tulsa-Muskogee-Bartlesville Combined Statistical Area. Show on map
Township of SeilingSeiling is a city in Dewey County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 860 at the 2010 census. The town was named in 1899 for Louis Seiling, a local store owner who had acquired a homestead in the Cheyenne-Arapaho land run of April 1892. The Hobson Town and Improvement Company established a town called Hobson, but the name was changed to Seiling in January 1899. It incorporated in 1909. Seiling is now the largest city in Dewey County. Show on map
Marshall CountyMarshall County is a county located on the south central border of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,840. Its county seat is Madill. The county was created at statehood in 1907 from the former Pickens County of the Chickasaw Nation. It was named to honor the maiden name of the mother of George Henshaw, a member of the 1906 Oklahoma Constitutional Convention. The county and it's cities are part of the Texoma region. Show on map
Le Flore CountyLe Flore County is a county located along the eastern border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 50,384. Its county seat is Poteau. The name honors a Choctaw family named LeFlore. Le Flore County is part of the Fort Smith, AR-OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma is the federal district court with jurisdiction in Le Flore County. Show on map
Tillman CountyTillman County is a county located in the southwestern part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,992. The county seat is Frederick. Show on map
McCurtain CountyMcCurtain County is located in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,151. Its county seat is Idabel. It was formed at statehood from part of the earlier Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory. The name honors an influential Choctaw family that lived in the area. Green McCurtain was the last chief when the Choctaw Nation was dissolved before Oklahoma became a state in 1907. Show on map
Pittsburg CountyPittsburg County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,837. Its county seat is McAlester. The county was formed from part of the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory in 1907. County leaders believed that its coal production compared favorably with Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the time of statehood. Pittsburg County comprises the McAlester, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Alfalfa CountyAlfalfa County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,642. The county seat is Cherokee. Alfalfa County was formed at statehood in 1907 from Woods County. The county is named after William H. \"Alfalfa Bill\" Murray, the president of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention and ninth governor of Oklahoma, who was instrumental in carving out the county from the original much larger Woods county. Show on map
McIntosh CountyMcIntosh County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,252. Its county seat is Eufaula. The county is named for an influential Muscogee Creek family, whose members led the migration of the Lower Towns to Indian Territory and served as leaders for generations. It is one of the counties within the jurisdiction of the federally recognized Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Show on map
Township of CrutchoCrutcho is a small unincorporated community in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, on the outskirts of Oklahoma City. It is located near the intersection of US Highway 62 (Northeast 23rd Street) and Air Depot Boulevard. It took its name from Crutcho Creek which flows through the community. The creek, in turn, took its name from the Crutch-O Ranch which operated in the area prior to opening of Old Oklahoma for settlement. Show on map
Stephens CountyStephens County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,048. Its county seat is Duncan. The county was created at statehood, partly from the Chickasaw Nation in Indian Territory and partly from Comanche County in Oklahoma Territory. It was named for Texas politician John Hall Stephens. Stephens County comprises the Duncan, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Latimer CountyLatimer County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Its county seat is Wilburton. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,154. The county was created at statehood in 1907 and named for James L. Latimer, a delegate from Wilburton to the 1906 state Constitutional Convention. Prior to statehood, it had been for several decades part of Gaines County, Choctaw Nation. Show on map
Garvin CountyGarvin County is in south-central Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,576. Its county seat is Pauls Valley. In 1906, delegates to Constitution Convention formed Garvin County from part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory The county was named for Samuel J. Garvin, a local Chickasaw rancher, merchant and banker. Its economy is largely based on farming, ranching and oil production. Show on map
Okmulgee CountyOkmulgee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,069. The county seat is Okmulgee. Formerly part of the Creek Nation, the county was created at statehood in 1907. The name Okmulgee is derived from the Hitichita (Lower Creek) word okimulgi, meaning \"boiling waters\". Okmulgee County is included in the Tulsa, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Love CountyLove County is a county located on the southern border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,423. Its county seat is Marietta. The county was created at statehood in 1907 and named for Overton Love, a prominent Chickasaw farmer, entrepreneur and politician. Love County is a part of the Texoma region. Show on map
City of New CordellNew Cordell is a city in Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. The town lies along U.S. Route 183. The population was 2,915 at the 2010 census. Cordell was previously located a few miles from the current spot, but was moved c. 1900, thus the name New Cordell. It was named for a U.S. Postal Service employee in Washington D. C., Wayne W. Cordell. The town is now commonly called Cordell. Show on map
Grant CountyGrant County is a county located on the northern border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,527. Its county seat is Medford. Originally designated as part of the Cherokee Outlet, it was named County L in Oklahoma Territory at the time of its opening to non-Indian settlement. A county election renamed it for U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. Show on map
Township of TalogaTaloga is a town in Dewey County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 299 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dewey County. The town lies along U.S. Route 183, near the southern bank of the Canadian River. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the name is of Indian origin and means either \"beautiful valley\" or \"rocking water\". Show on map
Murray CountyMurray County is a county located in the southern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,488. This is a 6.9 percent increase from 12,623 at the 2000 census. The county seat is Sulphur. The county was named for William H. Murray, a member and president of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention and later a Governor of Oklahoma. Show on map
Harper CountyHarper County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,685, making it the fifth-least populous county in Oklahoma. The county seat is Buffalo. It was created in 1907 from the northwestern part of Woodward County, and named for Oscar Green Harper, who was clerk of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention. Show on map
Sequoyah CountySequoyah County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 42,391. The county seat is Sallisaw. Sequoyah County was created in 1907 when Oklahoma became a state. It was named after Sequoyah, who created the Cherokee syllabary. Sequoyah County is part of the Fort Smith, AR-OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Cherokee CountyCherokee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,987. Its county seat is Tahlequah, which is also the capital of the Cherokee Nation. Cherokee County comprises the Tahlequah, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Tulsa-Muskogee-Bartlesville, OK Combined Statistical Area. Show on map
Cleveland CountyCleveland County is a county in the central part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 255,755 at the 2010 census, making it the third-most populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Norman. The county was named after U.S. President Grover Cleveland. Cleveland County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Choctaw CountyChoctaw County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,205. Its county seat is Hugo. The county was created in 1907, at the time of Oklahoma statehood. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the name is derived from Chahta, the mythical founder of the Choctaw people. Show on map
Carter CountyCarter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 47,557. Its county seat is Ardmore. The county was named for Captain Ben W. Carter, a Cherokee who lived among the Chickasaw. Carter County is part of the Ardmore, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. It is also a part of the Texoma region. Show on map
Logan CountyLogan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,848. Its county seat is Guthrie. Logan County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Guthrie served as the capital of Oklahoma Territory from 1890 until 1907 and of the state of Oklahoma from 1907 until 1910. Show on map
Kingfisher CountyKingfisher County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,034. Its county seat is Kingfisher. The county was formed in 1890 and named Kingfisher by a vote of residents. The land was given to the Creek Nation by the federal government, but was taken back after the American Civil War. Show on map
Adair CountyAdair County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,286. Its county seat is Stilwell. Adair County was named after the Adair family of the Cherokee tribe. One source says that the county was specifically named for Watt Adair, one of the first Cherokees to settle in the area. Show on map
Osage CountyOsage County is the largest County in the state of Oklahoma by area. Created at 1907 with Oklahoma's statehood the county was named for and is home to the Osage tribe and is contiguous with the Osage Nation Reservation. Show on map
Canadian CountyCanadian County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 115,541, making it the fifth-most populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is El Reno. The county is named for the Canadian River. Canadian County is also part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Harmon CountyHarmon County is a county located in the southwest corner of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,922, making it the second-least populous county in Oklahoma, behind only Cimarron County. It has lost population in every census since the first in 1910, except 1930. The county seat is Hollis. Show on map
Township of PerkinsPerkins is a city in southern Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,831 at the 2010 census, an increase of 24.6 percent from 2,272 at the 2000 census. The name is derived from Walden Perkins, a congressman who helped establish the local post office. The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma is headquartered here. Show on map
Lincoln CountyLincoln County is a county located in eastern Central Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 34,273. Its county seat is Chandler. Lincoln County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of Oklahoma was located in Lincoln County, near the town of Sparks. Show on map
Roger Mills CountyRoger Mills County is a county located in the western part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,647, making it the third-least populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Cheyenne. The county was created in 1891. Roger Mills county is located above the petroleum-rich Panhandle-Hugoton Field, making it one of the leading sources of oil, natural gas and helium. The county also overlies part of the Ogallala Aquifer. Show on map
Johnston CountyJohnston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,957. Its county seat is Tishomingo. It was established at statehood on November 16, 1907 and named for Douglas H. Johnston, a governor of the Chickasaw Nation. Johnston County is part of the Texoma Region. Show on map
Mayes CountyMayes County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,259. Its county seat is Pryor Creek, Oklahoma. Named for Samuel Houston Mayes, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1895 to 1899, it was originally created at the Sequoyah Convention in August 1905. Show on map
Township of VerdigrisVerdigris is an incorporated town in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States, in the Tulsa metropolitan area. It straddles former U.S. Highway 66 (now State Highway 66) between Catoosa and Claremore. Verdigris had a population of 3,993 at the 2010 census, an increase of 92.9 percent from 2,070 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Ellis CountyEllis County is a county located on the western border of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,151, making it the fifth-least populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Arnett. The county was named for Albert H. Ellis, vice president of the 1906 Constitutional Convention. Show on map
Grady CountyGrady County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,431. Its county seat is Chickasha. It was named for Henry W. Grady, an editor of the Atlanta Constitution and southern orator. Grady County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
McClain CountyMcClain County is a county located in south central Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 34,506. Its county seat is Purcell. The county was named for Charles M. McClain, an Oklahoma constitutional convention attendee. McClain County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Pottawatomie CountyPottawatomie County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 69,442. Its county seat is Shawnee. Pottawatomie County is part of the Shawnee, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Oklahoma City–Shawnee, OK Combined Statistical Area. Show on map
Beaver CountyBeaver County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,636. The county seat is Beaver. The name was given because of the presence of many beaver dams on the Beaver River, which runs through the area. It is located in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Show on map
Township of LovelandLoveland is a town in Tillman County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 13 at the 2010 census. Loveland once had a post office that has since closed. The post office was popular around Valentine's Day, when people often drove many miles to have their valentines postmarked \"Loveland\". Show on map
Craig CountyCraig County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,029. Its county seat is Vinita. The county was organized in 1907, shortly before statehood, and named for Granville Craig, a prominent Cherokee farmer who lived in the Bluejacket area. Show on map
Okfuskee CountyOkfuskee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,191. Its county seat is Okemah. The county is named for a former Muscogee town in present Cleburne County, Alabama, that in turn was named for the Okfuskee, a Muscogee tribe. Show on map
Dewey CountyDewey County is a county in the western part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,810. Its county seat is Taloga. The county was created in 1891 as \"County D\". In an 1898 election, county voters chose the name Dewey, honoring Admiral George Dewey. Show on map
Custer CountyCuster County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,469. Its county seat is Arapaho. The county was named in honor of General George Armstrong Custer. Custer County comprises the Weatherford, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Hughes CountyHughes County is a county located in south central U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,003. Its county seat is Holdenville. The county was named for W. C. Hughes, an Oklahoma City lawyer who was a member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention. Show on map
Nowata CountyNowata County is a county located in northeastern Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,536. Its county seat is Nowata. The county name is derived from a Delaware word \"no-we-ata,\" meaning \"come here\" or \"welcome.\" It is located on the Kansas border. Show on map
Township of Saint LouisSt. Louis is a town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 158 at the 2010 census, a 23.3 percent decline from 206 at the 2000 census. Karen Sue Goodnight is the current leader of St. Louis, Oklahoma and her cousin Zelda is the treasurer. Show on map
Kiowa CountyKiowa County is a county located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,446. Its county seat is Hobart. The county was created in 1901 as part of Oklahoma Territory. It was named for the Kiowa people. Show on map
Haskell CountyHaskell County is a county located in the southeast quadrant of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,769. Its county seat is Stigler. The county is named in honor of Charles N. Haskell, who was the first governor of Oklahoma. Show on map
Pawnee CountyPawnee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,577. Its county seat is Pawnee. The county is named after the Pawnee Tribe. Pawnee County is included in the Tulsa, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Township of ArapahoArapaho is a town in and county seat of Custer County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 796 at the 2010 census, a 6.4 percent increase from 748 at the 2000 census. The town lies long U.S. Route 183. It is named for the Arapaho Indian tribe. Show on map
Atoka CountyAtoka County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,007. Its county seat is Atoka. The county was formed before statehood from Choctaw Lands, and its name honors a Choctaw Chief named Atoka. Show on map
Township of North EnidNorth Enid is a town in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 860 at the 2010 census. The town is served by the Chisholm school district. North Enid was the original railroad town site in the Enid-Pond Creek Railroad War. Show on map
Woods CountyWoods County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,878. Its county seat is Alva. The county is named after Samuel Newitt Wood, a renowned Kansas populist. Show on map
Washita CountyWashita County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,629. Its county seat is New Cordell. The county seat was formerly located in Cloud Chief. The county was created in 1891. Show on map
Jefferson CountyJefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,472. Its county seat is Waurika. The county was created at statehood and named in honor of President Thomas Jefferson. Show on map
Wagoner CountyWagoner County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 73,085. Its county seat is Wagoner. Wagoner County is included in the Tulsa, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Creek CountyCreek County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 69,967. Its county seat is Sapulpa. Creek County is part of the Tulsa, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Township of MangumMangum is a city in and county seat of Greer County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,010 at the 2010 census. It was named for A. S. Mangum, who owned the land on which the town was founded. Show on map
Township of MoundsMounds is a town in Creek County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located just south of Tulsa; the town's population was 1,168 at the 2010 census, an increase of 1.3 percent from 1,153 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Township of ChouteauChouteau /ʃoʊˈtoʊ/ is the second-largest town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,097 at the 2010 census, an increase of 8.6 percent from 1,931 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Township of NarcissaNarcissa is a census-designated place (CDP) in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 100 at the 2000 census. Narcissa is part of the Joplin, Missouri metropolitan area. Show on map
Township of MazieMazie is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 91 at the 2010 census, almost unchanged from 88 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Township of WaynokaWaynoka is a city in Woods County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 927 at the 2010 census. Little Sahara State Park is 4 miles (6.4 km) south of the city. Show on map
Township of Mountain ViewMountain View is a town in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 795 at the 2010 census, a decline of 9.7 percent from 880 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Township of Mountain ParkMountain Park is a town in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 409 at the 2010 census, a 4.9 percent increase from 390 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Township of GrandviewGrandview is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 394 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Township of FairviewFairview is a city in Major County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,579 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Major County. Show on map
Township of BessieBessie is a town in Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 181 at the 2010 census, a 4.7 percent decline from 190 in 2000. Show on map
Coal CountyCoal County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,925. Its county seat is Coalgate. Show on map
Township of HydroHydro is a town in Caddo and Blaine counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 969. Show on map
Township of MurphyMurphy is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 231 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Town of East DukeEast Duke is a town in Jackson County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 424 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Township of BeardenBearden is a town in Okfuskee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 133 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Township of CantonCanton is a town in Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 625 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Township of PhillipsPhillips is a town in Coal County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 135 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Township of WillowWillow is a town in Greer County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 149 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Different buildings in Oklahoma
NameDescriptionShow
Riverfield Country Day SchoolRiverfield Country Day School (RCDS) is a private school based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. Riverfield Country Day School was founded in 1984 by a group of parents and teachers working with Marty and Tom Clark. This group’s motivation was to provide an enhanced opportunity for educational growth and personal development for their children, with an emphasis on the whole child. The 120-acre campus also features a football field, four tennis courts, and numerous hiking trails. Show on map
Harding Charter Preparatory High SchoolHarding Charter Preparatory High School is a public charter school based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma that was founded in 2003. It is part of the Oklahoma City Public Schools system, offering a free public college-preparatory education. The school's mission is to “provide each student with an academically challenging, educational experience through an Advanced Placement curriculum, which will prepare graduates for success at a four-year university.” HCP was ranked as #119 on Washington Post's list of most-challenging public high schools in the US in 2014 and #1 in the state. Show on map
John Marshall High SchoolJohn Marshall High School is a public high school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The original location of John Marshall High School opened in 1950 at 9017 N University Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The school is named in honor of the 4th Chief Justice of the United States (1755–1835), John Marshall. John Marshall was the longest working Chief Justice in Supreme Court history. Marshall ruled the Court for thirty years and was an important part of making the American legal system. His most important addition was judicial review; the power to stop laws that violate the Constitution. Marshall has been called the one that made the judicial branch special and powerful. Marshall also balanced the power between the federal and state government. He made sure the federal law was more powerful than sta Show on map
University of Oklahoma Norman CampusThe University of Oklahoma (OU) is a coeducational public research university located in Norman, Oklahoma. Founded in 1890, it had existed in Oklahoma Territory near Indian Territory for 17 years before the two became the state of Oklahoma. In Fall 2015 the university had 30,824 students enrolled, most located at its main campus in Norman. Employing nearly 3,000 faculty members, the school offers 152 baccalaureate programs, 160 master's programs, 75 doctorate programs, and 20 majors at the first professional level. David Lyle Boren, a former U.S. Senator and Oklahoma Governor, has served as the university's president since 1994. Show on map
Lakeside Golf CourseLakeside Memorial Golf Course is a golf course located in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Lakeside was opened in 1945 by architect and Oklahoma State University Golf Coach, Labron Harris. It served as the home course for the 10-time national champion Oklahoma State University Men’s Golf Team for almost 50 years until the opening of Karsten Creek Golf Club in 1994. Lakeside is currently owned and operated by the City of Stillwater. Show on map
Meridian Technology CenterMeridian Technology Center had its beginning as Indian Meridian Area Vocational-Technical School in July 1973. In August 1975, classes began with 13 daytime programs and staff of approximately 30. In 1994, the school was renamed Meridian Technology Center. In addition to serving high school students and adults through full-time Career Training Majors, short-term Professional and Personal Interest courses served 1,635 students in the first year. The facility, located on 70 acres in Stillwater, Oklahoma, began with 92,000 square feet and now encompasses more than 200,000 square feet. Show on map
Oklahoma Centennial High SchoolOklahoma Centennial Middle/High School is a grade 7–12 public education school in the Oklahoma City Public Schools district. OCHS was born the year of Oklahoma's centennial celebration. In 2008, the school occupied its permanent building located at 1301 NE 101st Street in Oklahoma City. Show on map
Tulsa International AirportTulsa International Airport (IATA: TUL, ICAO: KTUL, FAA LID: TUL) is a civil-military airport five miles (8 km) northeast of downtown Tulsa, in Tulsa County, Oklahoma. It was named Tulsa Municipal Airport when the city acquired it in 1929. It got its present name in 1963. The 138th Fighter Wing of the Air National Guard is based at the co-located Tulsa Air National Guard Base. The airport is the global maintenance headquarters for American Airlines. The Tulsa Air and Space Museum is on the northwest side of the airport. Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport serves as a reliever airport. Show on map
Ford CenterChesapeake Energy Arena, originally known as the Ford Center from 2002 to 2010 and Oklahoma City Arena until 2011, is an arena located in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. It opened in 2002 and since 2008 has served as the home venue of the Oklahoma City Thunder of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Previously, Chesapeake Energy Arena was home to the Oklahoma City Blazers of the Central Hockey League (CHL) from 2002 until the team folded in July 2009, and the Oklahoma City Yard Dawgz of AF2 from 2004 to 2009 when the team moved to the Cox Convention Center. In addition to its use as a sports venue, Chesapeake Energy Arena hosts concerts, family and social events, conventions, ice shows, and civic events. The arena is owned by the city and operated by the SMG property Show on map
BOK Event CenterThe BOK Center, or Bank of Oklahoma Center, is a 19,199-seat multi-purpose arena and a primary indoor sports and event venue in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. Designed to accommodate arena football, hockey, basketball, concerts, and similar events, the facility was built at a cost of $178 million in public funds and $18 million in privately funded upgrades. Ground was broken on August 31, 2005 and a ribbon-cutting ceremony involving Tulsa musicians Garth Brooks and Hanson took place on August 30, 2008. The arena's schedule of concerts and other events began on August 31 with a community choir hosted by Sam Harris. Show on map
Bishop Kelley High SchoolBishop Kelley High School is an American Lasallian Catholic high school with over 905 students, grades 9 to 12, located at 41st and Hudson Avenue, in the center of the Tulsa metropolitan area (in the Midtown area), on a campus spanning just over 47 acres (150,000 m²). The school is a function of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tulsa and operates in the Lasallian tradition of the Brothers of the Christian Schools (Christian Brothers or the French Christian Brothers). Show on map
Wiley Post AirportWiley Post Airport (IATA: PWA, ICAO: KPWA, FAA LID: PWA) is a city-owned public-use airport located seven nautical miles (13 km) northwest of the central business district of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was named after Wiley Post, the first pilot to fly solo around the world, and holds the distinction of being named after a person who died in an airplane crash (as does the city's other major airport, Will Rogers World Airport - both men died in the same crash in 1935). Another airport, Wiley Post–Will Rogers Memorial Airport in Barrow, AK near the site of said crash, bears the same names. Show on map
Penn Square MallPenn Square Mall is a two-story, 1,063,000-square-foot (98,800 m2) upscale regional shopping mall with a 10-screen AMC Theatre in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. It is located at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and NW Expressway, near I-44. Show on map
Classen School of Advanced StudiesClassen School of Advanced Studies (often referred to as Classen SAS, CSAS, or simply Classen, not to be confused with Northwest Classen High School) is a public magnet school serving students in grades 6-12 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma City Public Schools program participates in the IB Diploma Programme and offers fine arts courses as well, offering art, drama, and music classes to any qualifying student. Show on map
Oklahoma City Community CollegeOklahoma City Community College, also referred to as OCCC or O-Triple-C, and formerly known as OKCCC or O-K-Triple-C, is a coeducational community college located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The community college was founded in 1972. It currently enrolls 19,700 students. The faculty consists of 134 full-time professors, and 400 adjunct professors.The Oklahoma City Community College is a post-secondary school. Students take classes for a variety of reasons: working towards an associate degree, certificate, transfer course work to a university, or to obtain technical skills. Show on map
Star Spencer High SchoolStar Spencer High School is located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. In 1901 a group of people from Spencer County, Indiana relocated in Oklahoma. They built an elevator and mill, a grocery store and later a hardware store. They named their new town Spencer for their old home and eventually called their school Spencer as well. Star School (in a nearby area) was named by Henry Dodd in honor of a school in Kansas where he had lived previously. Two schools merged to become Star Spencer in 1958. The official mascot for the school is the Bobcats. Star Spencer is part of the Oklahoma City Public Schools. Show on map
Holy Family CathedralThe Cathedral of the Holy Family is a cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. It is the mother church of the Diocese of Tulsa and is the seat of the bishop. It is located at 810 South Boulder Avenue in the city of Tulsa in the state of Oklahoma. The parish chose architect J.P. Curtin of the Tulsa firm Curtin, Winkler, and Macdonald to design the church. Curtin whas chosen over architect William P. Ginther of Akron, Ohio, who built many Roman Catholic churches throughout the midwest. Ginther designed an alternate plan for the church trustees who had concerns about Curtin's design. All that remains of Ginther's work is a set of blueprints. Show on map
Will Rogers World AirportWill Rogers World Airport (IATA: OKC, ICAO: KOKC, FAA LID: OKC), aka Will Rogers Airport or simply Will Rogers, is a United States passenger airport in Oklahoma City located about 6 miles (8 km) Southwest of downtown. It is a civil-military airport on 8,081 acres of land (3,270 ha) and is the primary commercial airport of the state. Although the official IATA airport codes for Will Rogers World Airport are OKC and KOKC, it should be noted that local officials, citizens, and media organizations commonly refer to it as \"WRWA\" or \"Will Rogers\". Show on map
Southern Oklahoma Technology CenterSouthern Oklahoma Technology Center (SOTC) is a public career and technology education center located in Ardmore, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. SOTC serves 13 high school's within seven counties. High school juniors and seniors attending one of the 13 in-district high schools may attend tuition free. Adults living in SOTC's school district 20 may also attend full-time classes. Financial aid and scholarships are available for adult students. SOTC has Adult and Career Development (ACD) classes on nights and weekends. Short-Term courses can be for employment, special interest or pleasure and they require a small fee. These ACD classes are offered in outlying communities, Murray County Extension Center, West Branch at Healdton High S Show on map
Quail Springs MallQuail Springs Mall is a super regional shopping mall and trade area located in far northern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It contains three major department store anchors, a 24-screen AMC Theatre, and a total of 130 tenants comprising a total of approximately 1,115,000 square feet of gross leasable area. The mall is the focal point of a large area of recent residential and commercial development, and is located very close to one of Oklahoma City's most notoriously congested and difficult intersections which includes West Memorial Road, North Pennsylvania Avenue and The Kilpatrick Turnpike. Show on map
KVOO-FM (Tulsa)KVOO-FM (98.5 MHz) is a commercial FM radio station in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The station is owned by the E. W. Scripps Company and it airs a country music radio format. The station picked up the heritage call sign and country format in 1988. It shared the call letters with an AM sister station that had long been known for country music in Tulsa, until the AM outlet changed to a news/talk format as KFAQ in 2002. KVOO's studios are located in Midtown Tulsa and the transmitter is in the Osage Reservation north of Sand Springs, Oklahoma. Show on map
Spartan College of Aeronautics and TechnologySpartan College of Aeronautics and Technology (nicknamed Spartan and initially named Spartan School of Aeronautics) is a for-profit aviation institute in Tulsa, Oklahoma that offers training in aviation, aviation electronics, flight, nondestructive testing, quality control and aircraft maintenance. Originally established to provide pilot and technicians for Spartan Aircraft Company, it outlived its parent company and continues to train pilots and mechanics into the 21st Century. According to the school web site, it has trained over 90,000 aircraft technicians and pilots. The main campus is adjacent to Tulsa International Airport, with another campus primarily used for flight training at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport.In May, 2014 Spartan acquired the Crimson Technical College located in I Show on map
Kegelman Air Force Auxiliary FieldKegelman Air Force Auxiliary Field (IATA: CKA, ICAO: KCKA, FAA LID: CKA) is located near the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, across the Great Salt Plains Lake, 20 km (12 mi) east of Cherokee, Oklahoma in the United States. The field has one runway, a fire station, personnel offices and a NEXRAD tower, which is used for weather forecasting for both the military and civilian entities. It is located on 1,066 acres (4.31 km2). The installation was first known as the Great Salt Plains Auxiliary Field, but was renamed Kegelman in 1949. Show on map
Enid Woodring Regional AirportEnid Woodring Regional Airport (IATA: WDG, ICAO: KWDG, FAA LID: WDG) is a city owned, public use airport located four nautical miles (5 mi, 7 km) southeast of the central business district of Enid, a city in Garfield County, Oklahoma, United States. It is also referred to as Woodring Airport and was formerly known as Enid Woodring Municipal Airport. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. It is mostly used for military training flights based at Vance Air Force Base. Show on map
KXOJ-FM (Sapulpa)KXOJ-FM is a contemporary Christian radio station licensed to Glenpool, Oklahoma, serving the Tulsa area at 94.1 FM. The station is owned by Stephens Media, through licensee SMG-Tulsa, LLC. Its studios are located at the CityPlex Towers and its transmitter is in Chandler Park in West Tulsa. On July 1, 2013, KTSO changed their format to adult contemporary, branded as \"94.1 The Breeze\". Show on map
Community Care CollegeCommunity Care College is a nonprofit private career college in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. The college is the main campus of two branches, Clary Sage College and Oklahoma Technical College. Founded by Teresa Knox in 1995 under the name \"Dental Directions: The School of Dental Assisting,\" the college eventually expanded its curriculum to other include career oriented programs. The colleges are licensed by the Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools and accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS.) Show on map
Oklahoma City UniversityOklahoma City University, often referred to as OCU or OKCU, is a coeducational, urban, private university historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church. It is located in the uptown district of Oklahoma City, in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Show on map
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences CenterThe University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is the health sciences branch of the University of Oklahoma. Located in Oklahoma City, it serves as the primary place of instruction for many of Oklahoma's health professions. It is one of only four health centers in the United States with seven professional colleges. Show on map
Westmoore High SchoolWestmoore High School is an American four-year public high school located in south Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The school was founded in 1988 and serves the ninth through the twelfth grades as part of the Moore Public School District. Westmoore was the second high school in the district after Moore High School. Southmoore High School, which opened in the 2008-2009 academic year, is the third. The school became a four-year high school as of the 2008-2009 academic year. Show on map
Bacone CollegeBacone College is a private four-year liberal arts college in Muskogee, Oklahoma, United States. Founded in 1880 as the Indian University by Almon C. Bacone, Bacone College is the oldest continuously operated institution of higher education in Oklahoma. The college has strong historic ties to various tribal nations, including the Cherokee Nation and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, and also to the American Baptist Churches USA. Show on map
Clary Sage College Show on map
Integris Bass Baptist Health CenterINTEGRIS Bass Baptist Health Center is the oldest hospital in Enid, Oklahoma, and consists of three main facilities. Its main facility has been located at 600 S. Monroe Street since 1914. In 1996, the hospital acquired Enid Regional Hospital (401 S. Third Street), creating its Long Term Acute Care Hospital, and in 1997, acquired its Meadowlake facility (2216 S. Van Buren Street), INTEGRIS Bass Behavioral Health. Show on map
Tinker Air Force BaseTinker Air Force Base (IATA: TIK, ICAO: KTIK, FAA LID: TIK) is a major United States Air Force base, with tenant U.S. Navy and other Department of Defense missions, located geographically in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The base, originally known as Midwest Air Depot, is named in honor of Oklahoma native Major General Clarence L. Tinker, the first Native American Major General. Show on map
Czech HallYukon, Oklahoma's original Czech Hall was built in 1899 by early Czech settlers who were members of Sokol Karel Havliček Lodge and Western Fraternal Life Association Lodge Jan Žižka No. 67. That building was replaced by the current structure in 1925. The building is a national and state historic site, having been listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. It is located at 205 N. Czech Hall Road, at the intersection of N. Czech Hall Rd. and Silver Maple Drive in Yukon. Show on map
Hatbox Field AirportHatbox Field (IATA: HAX, ICAO: KHAX, FAA LID: HAX) is a closed airfield located within city limits, two nautical miles (3.7 km) west of central Muskogee, a city in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. It was opened sometime in the early 1920s and was closed in 2000. It is the location of the Love-Hatbox Sports Complex, a large recreation center and waterpark. The former airfield site includes 10 lighted baseball fields‚ eight lighted softball diamonds‚ two full-size football fields and a 30 acre‚ 19-field soccer area called the Georgia Pacific Soccer Complex. Show on map
University of Central OklahomaThe University of Central Oklahoma, often referred to as UCO, is a coeducational public university located in Edmond, Oklahoma. The university is the third largest in Oklahoma, with more than 17,000 students and approximately 434 full-time and 400 adjunct faculty. Founded in 1890, the University of Central Oklahoma was one of the first institutions of higher learning to be established in what would become the state of Oklahoma, making it one of the oldest universities in the southwest region of the United States of America.It is home to the American branch of the British Academy of Contemporary Music in downtown Oklahoma City, directed by noted indie music agent and manager Scott Booker. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the University of Central Oklahoma as the 2009-201 Show on map
Oral Roberts UniversityOral Roberts University (ORU), based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the United States, is an interdenominational, Christian, comprehensive liberal arts university with an enrollment of about 3,661 students. Founded in 1963, the university is named after its late founder, evangelist Oral Roberts, and accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA). Show on map
Putnam City North High SchoolPutnam City North High School (PCN, PC North) is a public high school situated in Northwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States It is accredited by the North Central Association of Secondary Schools and is one of three high schools in the Putnam City School District. Offering education in grades nine through twelve, North is among the highest scoring public schools in Oklahoma, ranging from End of Instruction tests to college admission exams. Show on map
Eufaula DamEufaula Dam is a dam across the Canadian River in Oklahoma. Completed in 1964, it impounds Eufaula Lake, one of the world’s largest man-made lakes, covering 102,500 acres (41,500 hectares). The dam serves to provide flood control, water supply, navigation and hydroelectric power generation. It supports a 90 MW power station. The dam was approved by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1946 and construction began in 1956. In February 1964, the river was closed and in July that year, the first generator was operational. By September, the other three generators were operational. Show on map
East Central UniversityEast Central University (shortened to ECU or East Central) is a public, co-educational teaching university located in Ada, in the south central region of the U.S. State of Oklahoma. East Central one of the six universities that are part of Oklahoma's Regional University System. Beyond its flagship campus is Ada, the university has courses available in McAlester, Shawnee, Ardmore, and Durant, as well as online courses. Nearly 4,500 students are enrolled in the school's undergraduate and graduate programs. Founded as East Central State Normal School in 1909, its present name was adopted in 1985. Some of its more famous alumni include former NFL player Mark Gastineau, past governors Robert S. Kerr and George Nigh, former U.S. Representative Lyle Boren, Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Tom Colbe Show on map
KAUT-TV (Oklahoma City)KAUT-TV, virtual channel 43 (UHF digital channel 40), is an independent television station located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by the Tribune Broadcasting subsidiary of the Tribune Media Company, as part of a duopoly with NBC affiliate KFOR-TV (channel 4). The two stations share studio and transmitter facilities located on East Britton Road (U.S. 77) in the McCourry Heights section of northeast Oklahoma City. Show on map
Oklahoma State CapitolThe Oklahoma State Capitol is the house of government of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It is the building that houses the Oklahoma Legislature and executive branch offices. It is located along Lincoln Boulevard in Oklahoma City. The present structure includes a dome completed in 2002. The building is a National Historic Landmark. The state capitol complex is the only state capitol grounds in the United States with active oil rigs. Show on map
James Crabtree Correctional CenterJames Crabtree Correctional Center is an Oklahoma Department of Corrections state prison for men located in Helena, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, with a capacity of 800 medium-security inmates and 200 minimum-security inmates. The grounds were first established in 1904 before Oklahoma statehood, serving as the Cornell Agriculture College, an orphanage, and the Helena State School for Boys. The property was reassigned to the Department of Corrections on May 24, 1982. Show on map
University of TulsaThe University of Tulsa (TU) is a private university located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. The university is historically affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. The university offers programs in law, English, computer science, natural sciences, psychology, and engineering. Its faculty includes the Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko, psychologist Robert Hogan, and political scientist Robert Donaldson. The campus's design is predominantly English Gothic. Show on map
Lawton Municipal AirportLawton–Fort Sill Regional Airport (IATA: LAW, ICAO: KLAW, FAA LID: LAW) is a city owned airport two miles south of Lawton, in Comanche County, Oklahoma. It is used for military aviation from nearby Fort Sill and Sheppard Air Force Base and is served by American Eagle. Allegiant Air runs occasional charters to various destinations in the western United States. The 2013 Federal sequester will result in the closure of the airport's control tower and will require pilots to rely on air traffic controllers from other area airports. Show on map
Fort SillFort Sill, Oklahoma is a United States Army post north of Lawton, Oklahoma, about 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. Today, Fort Sill remains the only active Army installation of all the forts on the Southern Plains built during the Indian Wars. It is designated as a National Historic Landmark and serves as home of the United States Army Field Artillery School as well as the Marine Corps' site for Field Artillery MOS school, United States Army Air Defense Artillery School, the 31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade, and the 75th Fires Brigade. Fort Sill is also one of the four locations for Army Basic Combat Training. It has played a significant role in every major American conflict since 1869. Show on map
Allen Williamson BridgeAllen Williamson Bridge is the name of a memorial bridge in Payne County, Oklahoma, named after a former State Representative who served in the Oklahoma State House of Representatives from 1966 - 1974. This politician should not be confused with a similarly named Oklahoma State Senator. The bridge carries Oklahoma State Highway 108 over the Cimarron River just north of the town of Ripley and 2.5 miles (4.0 km) north of Oklahoma State Highway 33. It is accompanied by a monument on one end of the structure and a memorial plaque placed by the Cimarron Valley Historical Society. The bridge was dedicated on December 31, 1974. The location is marked by steep rust-colored hills overlooking the Cimarron River, populated by a medium coverage of trees and other foliage. The bridge is of moderate siz Show on map
Barry Switzer CenterThe Barry Switzer Center, on the University of Oklahoma campus in Norman, Oklahoma, houses football offices, the football locker room, equipment room, the Siegfried Strength and Conditioning Complex, the Freede Sports Medicine Facility and the Touchdown Club Legends Lobby. The Center is located at the south end of the Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. The Barry Switzer Center, dedicated on April 24, 1999, was named after OU’s all-time winningest head football coach. During Summer 2015 the Switzer Center was demolished as part of the expansion of Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. In Barry Switzer’s 16 seasons as the Oklahoma Sooners head football coach, the team won three national championships, 12 Big Eight Conference championships and eight bowl games in 13 appearances. Show on map
KGTO-AM (Tulsa)KGTO (1050 AM, \"Heart & Soul 99.1 & 1050\") is a radio station licensed to serve Tulsa, Oklahoma. The station is owned by Perry Publishing and Broadcasting and licensed to KJMM, Inc. It airs an Urban Adult Contemporary music format. Its studios are located in the Copper Oaks complex in South Tulsa. The station has been assigned these call letters by the Federal Communications Commission since February 1, 1982, having chosen them to signify \"Greater Tulsa's Oldies\", a format change. Previous formats included country music and religious broadcasting. Show on map
Oklahoma Baptist UniversityOklahoma Baptist University (OBU) is a co-educational Christian liberal arts university located in Shawnee, Oklahoma, and owned by the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma. Established in 1910, OBU is ranked among the top five baccalaureate colleges in the western region in the 2013 U.S. News & World Report “America’s Best Colleges” ratings and has been Oklahoma’s highest rated regional college in the U.S. News rankings for 18 consecutive years. According to The Princeton Review, OBU is a 2013 “Best in the West” institution and one of \"America's Best Value Colleges.\" OBU was named among Oklahoma's top-ranked university in the Forbes.com 2013 listing of \"America's Best Colleges\" and was the state's top college in the Forbes.com list of \"America's Best College Buys.\" Show on map
Boone Pickens StadiumBoone Pickens Stadium (previously known as Lewis Field) has been home to the Oklahoma State University Cowboys football team in rudimentary form since 1913, and as a complete stadium since 1920. The facility is the oldest football stadium in the Big 12 Conference but was left largely neglected and enjoyed only modest renovations throughout its near-century of existence. Officially the capacity is 60,218. Show on map
Tulsa School of Arts and SciencesThe Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences, also known as \"TSAS\", is a public charter school serving grades 9-12 located in Tulsa, Oklahoma with a middle school addition of 7-8 grade in 2016. The TSAS mission is to provide a liberal arts, college preparatory curriculum through innovative teaching methods focused on developing the individual. Enrollment is approximately 275 students, and as a public charter school, accepts only students who reside within Tulsa Public Schools boundaries, when there are more applicants than can be accepted, a random lottery open to the public determines new pupils. TSAS was selected as a 2015 Blue Ribbon School. Show on map
Richard Lloyd Jones Jr AirportRichard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (IATA: RVS, ICAO: KRVS, FAA LID: RVS) is a city owned, public use airport located five nautical miles (6 mi, 9 km) south of the central business district of Tulsa, a city in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility and reliever airport for Tulsa International Airport. Show on map
Altus Air Force BaseAltus Air Force Base (AAFB) (IATA: LTS, ICAO: KLTS, FAA LID: LTS) is a United States Air Force base located approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) east-northeast of Altus, Oklahoma. The host unit at Altus AFB is the 97th Air Mobility Wing (97 AMW), assigned to the Nineteenth Air Force (19 AF) of the Air Education and Training Command (AETC). The wing's mission is to provide C-17 Globemaster III and KC-135 Stratotanker formal initial and advanced specialty training programs for up to 3000 flight crew and aircraft maintenance students annually. Show on map
Will Rogers High SchoolWill Rogers High School, located at 3909 E. 5th Place in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was built by Tulsa Public Schools in 1939 using WPA workers and designed by Joseph R. Koberling, Jr. and Leon B. Senter. It was named for the humorist Will Rogers, who died in 1935, along with Wiley Post in a plane crash. Significant additions were made to the original structure in 1949 and 1964. The alterations were in keeping with the original design and did not detract from the school's architectural or historical significance. It has been called \"... one of the best examples of Art Deco high school architecture...in the United States. Show on map
KOKI-TV (Tulsa)KOKI-TV, virtual channel 23 (UHF digital channel 22), is a Fox-affiliated television station located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The station is owned by the Cox Media Group subsidiary of Cox Enterprises, as part of a duopoly with MyNetworkTV-affiliate KMYT-TV (channel 41). The two stations share studio facilities located on South Memorial Drive in southeastern Tulsa; KOKI maintains transmitter facilities located on South 273rd East Avenue in southeastern Tulsa County (near Broken Arrow). On cable, the station is available on Cox Communications channel 5 and AT&T U-verse channel 23. There is a high definition feed available on Cox Communications digital channel 1005 and AT&T U-verse channel 1023. Show on map
Norman High SchoolNorman High School is a four-year public high school in Norman, Oklahoma with a steady enrollment of 1,945 students. It is accredited by North Central Association, the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association. The school year consists of two 15-week semesters with a 6 class flexible schedule, consisting of 52 minute periods. Norman High School is part of the Norman Independent School District No. 29 of Cleveland County, Oklahoma, more commonly known as Norman Public Schools (NPS). Norman High was ranked as one of the top 1,400 high schools in the United States in 2009. Show on map
Metro Technology CentersMetro Technology Centers is a public career and technology education center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Metro Tech provides 30 full-time programs to high school students and adults, over 500 short-term and online courses and customized training for business and industry employees. Others services include career and business counseling, assessment, financial aid, employment services, academic centers, ESL, child care, disability services and bus transportation. Special programs include high school dropout recovery, transition from government assistance to the workplace and GED preparation. Show on map
University of Science and Arts of OklahomaThe University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, or USAO, is a public liberal arts college located in Chickasha, Oklahoma. It is the only public college in Oklahoma with a strictly liberal arts-focused curriculum and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. USAO is an undergraduate-only institution and grants Bachelor's Degrees in a variety of subject areas. The school was founded in 1908 as a school for women and from 1912 to 1965 was known as Oklahoma College for Women. It became coeducational in 1965 and today educates approximately 1,000 students. In 2001, the entire Oklahoma College for Women campus was listed as a National Historic District. Show on map
Clarence E Page Municipal AirportClarence E. Page Municipal Airport (ICAO: KRCE, FAA LID: RCE, formerly F29) is a city-owned public-use airport located in Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 15 nautical miles (28 km) west of the central business district of Oklahoma City, but still within its city limits. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Fort Gibson DamThe Fort Gibson Dam is a gravity dam on the Grand (Neosho) River in Oklahoma, 5.4 mi (9 km) north of Fort Gibson. The purpose of the dam is flood control and hydroelectric power production. It was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1941 and construction began the next year. During World War II construction was suspended and it recommenced in May 1946. In June 1949, the river was closed and the entire project was complete in September 1953 with the operation of the last of the power plant's four generators. The dam and power rights originally belonged to the Grand River Dam Authority but were seized by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1946. Show on map
Harding Fine Arts AcademyHarding Fine Arts Academy (HFAA) is a college preparatory high school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It is part of the Oklahoma City Public School District. HFAA serves students from grade 9 to 12. It is a public, charter high school; there is no tuition. As a charter school, admission is open to all students with interest in the fine arts. HFAA uses auditions and testing for placement, but not as a requirement for acceptance. Show on map
Will Rogers DownsCherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs is a gaming facility and horse racing track located in Claremore, Oklahoma Rogers County, near Tulsa, Oklahoma (east of Claremore, Oklahoma and just east of Justice). The track is owned and operated by the Cherokee Nation. Quarter Horse races are held September through November. Thoroughbred horse racing takes place from March through May. The track also features Appaloosa and Paint races. Show on map
KTOK-AM (Oklahoma City)KTOK (1000 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a news talk information format. Licensed to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, the station serves the Oklahoma City area. Owned by iHeartMedia, Inc. and licensed as Clear Channel Broadcasting Licenses, the station features programming from ABC Radio, Premiere Radio Networks and Westwood One. The station is also simulcast on KXXY's HD radio secondary channel. The station began as KFXR in 1927, and was owned by the Exchange Avenue Baptist Church. Its transmitter is located in Moore, Oklahoma, and studios are located at the 50 Penn Place building on the northwest side of Oklahoma City. Show on map
KJRH-TV (Tulsa)KJRH-TV, virtual channel 2 (VHF digital channel 8), is an NBC-affiliated television station located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The station is owned by the E. W. Scripps Company. KJRH maintains studio facilities located on South Peoria Avenue in the Brookside district of midtown Tulsa, and its transmitter is located near South 273rd Avenue East and the Muskogee Turnpike (near Broken Arrow) in southeastern Tulsa County. Show on map
Howe High SchoolHowe High School is a secondary school located in the rural town of Howe, Oklahoma. The school educates students in 9th–12th grades. The mascot of Howe High School is the lion. As of 2012, the school principal is Don McGee. In 2004, their girls basketball team won the Class A state championship. In 2007, the girls basketball team won state runner-up. In 2008, the girls basketball team won the Class A State Championship. Tammy Parks, Carrie Alexander and Scott Parks serve as the Instructional Technology Facilitators for Howe Public Schools. Show on map
KWEN-FM (Tulsa)KWEN is a country music radio station in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Broadcasting on 95.5 FM, the station is owned by Cox Media Group. The station was the sister station of the original KKNG in Oklahoma City, on 92.5 FM, as both were owned by Swanson Broadcasting. The stations were branded as the \"King and Queen of Oklahoma\", as the KWEN callsign was meant to suggest \"Queen\". The stations were split when New City Communications sold KKNG to the owners of KOMA AM 1520. KWEN broadcasts in the HD digital format. Morning Drive: Matt Bradley & Natalie Cash \"Cash & Bradley\" Middays: Mark Evans Show on map
Monroney Middle SchoolThe Mid-Del School District is a school district based in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. It serves all of Midwest City and Del City, as well as a portion of Oklahoma City. It includes Tinker Elementary School, which is located on Tinker Air Force Base. As of 2007, the school district served more than 14,500 K-12 students. Show on map
Claremore Regional AirportClaremore Regional Airport (ICAO: KGCM, FAA LID: GCM) is a city owned, public use airport located seven nautical miles (8 mi, 13 km) east of the central business district of Claremore, a city in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Oklahoma Christian UniversityOklahoma Christian University (OC) is a private comprehensive coeducational Christian liberal arts university founded in 1950 by members of the Churches of Christ. Oklahoma Christian University is located on a 240-acre (0.97 km2) campus in Oklahoma City, in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Enrollment for the fall 2014 semester was a record 2,479 students. OC is ranked among the best \"Regional Universities\" in the 16-state West region by U.S. News and World Report and is listed by the Princeton Review as one of the best \"Best Western Colleges.\" The University reported a 45% acceptance rate for fall 2012 applicants. Show on map
Mooreland Municipal AirportMooreland Municipal Airport (ICAO: KMDF, FAA LID: MDF) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) north of the central business district of Mooreland, a city in Woodward County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Newcastle High SchoolNewcastle High School is a public school located in Newcastle, Oklahoma. Newcastle is a rapidly growing suburban community. Through bond issues, Newcastle has constructed a performing arts center, high school basketball arena, and a football stadium. At one point Newcastle High School was known as the Crickets until it was changed to the Racers. Their school colors also included red until it was officially decided that it would be white and blue with black as an unofficial color. The high school enrolls 498 students in grades 9-12. There is a 96% graduation rate and a student teacher ratio of 17.12:1. Show on map
Summit View CemeterySummit View Cemetery (established 1890) is a historic cemetery located in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Operated by the city of Guthrie (the territorial capitol) since 1915, the cemetery is the final resting place for many prominent Oklahoma pioneers, including at least two territorial governors (Cassius McDonald Barnes and Robert Martin) and Frank Dale, the Chief Justice of the Territorial Supreme Court. Show on map
KGYN-AM (Guymon)KGYN (1210 AM) is a radio station licensed to Guymon, Oklahoma, USA. The station serves the southwestern Kansas area, and carries a country music format. The station is currently owned by Steckline Communications. KGYN broadcasts 10,000 watts on a protected signal and can be heard in 7 states during daytime power and most of the western half of the United States during night time power. As of Monday, February 22, 2010 at 9A.M., KGYN flipped from the Dial Global \"Mainstream Country\" format to the network's \"Classic Country\" format. Show on map
William R. Pogue Municipal AirportWilliam R. Pogue Municipal Airport (ICAO: KOWP, FAA LID: OWP), also known as Pogue Airport, is a public use airport in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Sand Springs and located three nautical miles (6 km) northwest of its central business district. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned OWP by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Boggy DepotBoggy Depot is a ghost town and Oklahoma State Park that was formerly a significant city in the Indian Territory. It grew as a vibrant and thriving town in present day Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States and became a major trading center on the Texas Road and the Butterfield Overland Mail route between Missouri and San Francisco. After the American Civil War when the MKT Railroad came through, it bypassed Boggy Depot and the town began a steady decline. It was soon replaced by Atoka as the chief city in the area. By the early 20th century, all that remained of the community was a sort of ghost town. Show on map
Alva Regional AirportAlva Regional Airport (ICAO: KAVK, FAA LID: AVK) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) south of the central business district of Alva, a city in Woods County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AVK by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA (which assigned AVK to Arvaikheer Airport in Arvaikheer, Mongolia). Show on map
Clinton-Sherman AirportFor the military use of the facility before 1969 see Clinton-Sherman Air Force Base The Clinton-Sherman Industrial Airpark, also known as the Oklahoma Air & Space Port is a spaceport near Burns Flat, Oklahoma, in the western part of the state. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted a license to the site in June 2006 to the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority (OSIDA) to \"oversee the takeoff and landing of suborbital, reusable launch vehicles\". The license expires in five years and requires regular safety inspections by the FAA. Individual operators must also secure a separate license in order to make space flights from the facility. Show on map
Vance Air Force BaseVance Air Force Base (IATA: END, ICAO: KEND, FAA LID: END) is a United States Air Force base located in southern Enid, Oklahoma, about 65 mi (105 km) north northwest of Oklahoma City. The base is named after local World War II hero and Medal of Honor recipient, Lt Col Leon Robert Vance Jr. The host unit at Vance is the 71st Flying Training Wing (71 FTW), which is a part of Air Education and Training Command (AETC). The commander of the 71 FTW is Colonel Clark J. Quinn. The vice-commander is Colonel Fred Cunningham and the command chief is Chief Master Sergeant Jeffrey Wilson. Show on map
KEMX-FM (Locust Grove)KEMX (94.5 FM) is a radio station licensed to Pryor, Oklahoma, USA broadcasting a classic country music format. The station is currently owned by Jose Esteban Torres and Jose Moguel, through licensee Key Plus Broadcasting, LLC. Show on map
KDOR-TV (Bartlesville)KDOR-TV, virtual and UHF digital channel 17, is a TBN owned-and-operated television station serving Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States that is licensed to Bartlesville. The station is owned by the Trinity Broadcasting Network. KDOR maintains studio facilities located on North Yellowwood Avenue (east of the Mingo Valley Expressway) in Broken Arrow, and its transmitter is located in rural northwestern Rogers County (southwest of Talala). Show on map
All Souls Unitarian ChurchAll Souls Unitarian Church is a Unitarian Universalist (\"UU\") church in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is one of the largest UU congregations in the world. All Souls Unitarian Church was founded in 1921 by two leading Tulsans from families with Unitarian roots: Richard Lloyd Jones, the publisher of the Tulsa Tribune daily newspaper, whose father, Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones, had served as Secretary of the Western Unitarian Conference and founded All Souls Church in Chicago; and William Rea (W. R.) Holway, an engineer who was instrumental in the development of Tulsa's water resources. Show on map
Francis Tuttle Technology CenterFrancis Tuttle Technology Center is a public career and technology education center affiliated with the state of Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education. Francis Tuttle has a dual focus, serving both the business community as well as high school and adult students. Francis Tuttle consists of three campuses, Rockwell, Reno and Portland, located in North West Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Additionally, Francis Tuttle maintains two additional locations, the Melrose Site and Business Innovation Center, located in North West Oklahoma City and Edmond, respectively. Show on map
Camp GruberCamp Gruber is an Oklahoma Army National Guard (OKARNG) training facility used for Training of OKARNG soldiers. It covers a total of 87 square miles (230 km2). The base is named after Brigadier General Edmund L. Gruber, a noted artillery officer and the composer of the Army's official song, \"The Army Goes Rolling Along\". Camp Gruber is located near Braggs, Oklahoma in the Cookson Hills, about 14 miles (23 km) southeast of Muskogee, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Wildlife Department and the OKARNG have in place an agreement that allows limited hunting by civilians on the base. Show on map
Muskogee High SchoolMuskogee High School (MHS) is a four-year public high school in Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA. MHS has a steady enrollment of 1,700 students. It is accredited by the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association. The school year consists of two 18-week semesters with a 7 class flexible schedule, consisting of 55 minute periods. Muskogee High School is part of the Muskogee Independent School District No. 20 of Muskogee County, Oklahoma, more commonly known as Muskogee Public Schools (MPS). MHS telephone number: 918-684-3750. Show on map
McAlester Army Ammunition PlantMcAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) is a weapons manufacturing facility in McAlester, Oklahoma. Its mission is to produce and renovate conventional ammunition and ammunition related components. The plant stores war reserve and training ammunition. McAlester performs manufacturing, industrial engineering, and production product assurance. The plant also receives, demilitarizes, and disposes of conventional ammunition components. The plant is government-owned and government-operated. It is located in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, southwest of the city of McAlester. Show on map
Hooker Municipal AirportHooker Municipal Airport (IATA: O45) is a city-owned public-use airport located zero miles west of the central business district of Hooker, a city in Texas County, Oklahoma, United States. Hooker Municipal Airport covers an area of 60 acres which contains one runway designated 17/35 with a 3,312 x 60 ft (1,009 x 18 m) asphalt surface. For the 12-month period ending September 23, 2010, the airport had 1,000 aircraft operations, an average of 83 per month: 100% general aviation. At that time there were 10 aircraft based at this airport: 10 single-engine. Show on map
Thomas P Stafford AirportThomas P. Stafford Airport (ICAO: KOJA, FAA LID: OJA, formerly F91) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Weatherford, a city in Custer County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned OJA by the FAA but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Stigler Regional AirportStigler Regional Airport (ICAO: KGZL, FAA LID: GZL, formerly F84) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) northeast of the central business district of Stigler, a city in Haskell County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned GZL by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
KOCB-TV (Oklahoma City)KOCB, virtual channel 34 (UHF digital channel 33), is a CW-affiliated television station located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by the Sinclair Broadcast Group, as part of a duopoly with Fox affiliate KOKH-TV (channel 25). The two stations share studio and transmitter facilities located on East Wilshire Boulevard on the city's northeast side (situated to the adjacent east of the respective studio facilities of CBS affiliate KWTV-DT (channel 9) and the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority PBS member network). Show on map
KOKH-TV (Oklahoma City)KOKH-TV, virtual channel 25 (UHF digital channel 24), is a Fox-affiliated television station located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by the Sinclair Broadcast Group, as part of a duopoly with CW affiliate KOCB (channel 34). The two stations share studio and transmitter facilities located on East Wilshire Boulevard on the city's northeast side (situated to the adjacent east of the respective studio facilities of CBS affiliate KWTV-DT (channel 9) and the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority PBS member network). Show on map
Blackwell-Tonkawa Municipal AirportBlackwell–Tonkawa Municipal Airport (IATA: BWL, ICAO: KBKN, FAA LID: BKN, formerly 4O3) is a public use airport located in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States. The airport is five nautical miles (9 km) southwest of the central business district of Blackwell, Oklahoma and is owned by the cities of Blackwell and Tonkawa. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned BKN by the FAA and BWL by the IATA (which assigned BKN to Balkanabat Airport in Balkanabat, Turkmenistan). Show on map
Tahlequah Municipal AirportTahlequah Municipal Airport (ICAO: KTQH, FAA LID: TQH) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northwest of the central business district of Tahlequah, a city in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned TQH by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Pauls Valley Municipal AirportPauls Valley Municipal Airport (ICAO: KPVJ, FAA LID: PVJ) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) south of the central business district of Pauls Valley, a city in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned PVJ by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Ada Municipal AirportAda Municipal Airport (IATA: ADT, ICAO: KADH, FAA LID: ADH) is a public airport located two miles (3 km) north of the central business district of Ada, a city in Pontotoc County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Ada, which is located in southeast Oklahoma, 88 miles (142 km) southeast of Oklahoma City. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Ada Municipal Airport is assigned ADH by the FAA and ADT by the IATA (which assigned ADH to Aldan Airport in Aldan, Russia). Show on map
Chandler Municipal AirportChandler Regional Airport (ICAO: KCQB, FAA LID: CQB) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) northeast of the central business district of Chandler, a city in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned CQB by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Coweta High SchoolCoweta High School is a public school located in Coweta, Oklahoma and is accredited by the Oklahoma State Board of Education and the North Central Association of Secondary Schools. This school services grades ten through twelve with approximately 700 students in attendance. With the core subjects Coweta High School also has elective classes that range from Art to Video Production. Students attending Coweta High school also have the opportunity to go to vocational training through Indian Capital Technology Center in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Show on map
Sallisaw Municipal AirportSallisaw Municipal Airport (ICAO: KJSV, FAA LID: JSV) is a city owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southwest of the central business district of Sallisaw, a city in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned JSV by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
KWHB-TV (Tulsa)KWHB, virtual channel 47 (UHF digital channel 48), is a LeSEA owned-and-operated television station located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by the LeSEA Broadcasting Corporation. KWHB maintains studio facilities located on South Memorial Drive (just east of the Chimney Hills addition) in southeastern Tulsa, and its transmitter is located near South 273rd Avenue East and the Muskogee Turnpike (near Broken Arrow) in southeastern Tulsa County. On cable, the station is available on Cox Communications channel 7. Show on map
Putnam City West High SchoolPutnam City West High School is a public 9–12 grade school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It is part of the Putnam City Public Schools District. The school serves portions of suburban Oklahoma City as well as Bethany and Warr Acres. The school's sports teams are known as the Patriots and they are notable for having been state champions in football in 1981 and runners up in 1976 and 1977. In 2014, the school's basketball program was runner up for the Oklahoma 6A basketball title, losing to Tulsa Union High School in the final. In 2016, Putnam City West's boys' basketball team beat Norman North for the 6A state title. Show on map
Grove Municipal AirportGrove Municipal Airport (ICAO: KGMJ, FAA LID: GMJ) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Grove, a city in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned GMJ by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Watonga Regional AirportWatonga Regional Airport (ICAO: KJWG, FAA LID: JWG) is a city owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northwest of the central business district of Watonga, a city in Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned JWG by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Atoka Municipal AirportAtoka Municipal Airport (ICAO: KAQR, FAA LID: AQR) is a city owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northwest of the central business district of Atoka, a city in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AQR by the FAA, but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Stan Stamper Municipal AirportStan Stamper Municipal Airport (IATA: HUJ, ICAO: KHHW, FAA LID: HHW) is a city-owned, public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of the central business district of Hugo, a city in Choctaw County, Oklahoma, United States. According to the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, it is classified as a general aviation airport. Although many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned HHW by the FAA and HUJ by the IATA. Show on map
First Presbyterian ChurchThe First Presbyterian Church of Tulsa was organized in 1885. It originally met in the store owned by James M. Hall and Harry C. Hall. The first permanent minister, Reverend Charles William Kerr and his wife arrived in Tulsa in 1900. Kerr remained at this church for over 40 years. Under his leadership, the church became the second largest in its denomination (the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America). This church is part of the Eastern Oklahoma Presbytery of the United Presbyterian Church in the USA (UPCUSA). Show on map
Colcord HotelColcord Hotel is a luxury boutique hotel located in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The building was finished in 1909 and has been considered Oklahoma City's first skyscraper, although less than 50m high. It is 145 feet (44 m) tall and has 14 floors. Originally an office tower developed by Charles Colcord, the building was renovated by Coury Properties and reopened as a luxury hotel in 2006. Colcord Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Show on map
Gallagher-Iba ArenaGallagher-Iba Arena, also once known as \"The Rowdiest Arena in the Country\" and \"The Madison Square Garden of the Plains”, is the basketball and wrestling venue at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States. Originally completed in 1938 and named the 4-H Club and Student Activities Building, it was soon renamed Gallagher Hall to honor wrestling coach Ed Gallagher. After renovations in 1987, the name became Gallagher-Iba Arena, as a tribute to longtime basketball coach and innovator Henry Iba. Show on map
Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (historical)The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States federal government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in Downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The building was the target of the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995, which killed 168 people, 19 of whom were children under the age of six. Half of the building collapsed seconds after the truck bomb detonated. The remains of the building were imploded a month after the attack, and the Oklahoma City National Memorial was built on the site. Show on map
David Jay Perry AirportDavid Jay Perry Airport is a town-owned public-use airport in Goldsby, a town in McClain County, Oklahoma, United States. The airport is located near the interchange of I-35 and State Highway 74. The airport was originally built by the US Navy in 1943 as an octagonal-shaped Outlying Landing Field serving Naval Air Station Norman, OK, six miles to the north. After the war, ownership of the field was transferred to the city of Goldsby, undergoing several improvements and expansions over the following decades. Show on map
KFXI-FM (Marlow)KFXI (92.1 FM broadcasting) is a 100,000 watt radio station with a 600-foot tower, allowing it to reach further than other stations in the Chickasha, Duncan and Lawton markets. KFXI Foxy92 radio broadcasts a Country music format and is known as \"The Real Country Giant\". Licensed to Marlow, Oklahoma, USA, with offices in Chickasha, Lawton, Duncan and Marlow, the station serves the Lawton, Duncan and Chickasha areas. The station is currently owned by DFWU, Inc. and features programming from Fox News Radio. Show on map
LookoutLookout is an unincorporated community located in Woods County, Oklahoma. The Lookout Post Office was opened October 16, 1901. The 1905 Oklahoma Territorial Census gives the population of Lookout as ten. The community is spread out and sparsely populated. The church, cemetery, and community hall are no closer than a mile from one another. Lookout was named for the commanding view across the Cimarron Valley. In 1878 Dull Knife's Cheyenne's caught and killed two cowboys near here (see Dull Knife's Raid). Show on map
Integris Southwest Medical CenterIntegris Southwest Medical Center is a comprehensive hospital located in southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Integris Cancer Institute of Oklahoma, the Integris Southwest Breast Health and Imaging Center, Integris Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation, the Integris Neuromuscular Center, the Integris M.J. and S. Elizabeth Schwartz Sleep Disorders Center and the Integris James R. Daniel Stroke Center are Integris Health Centers of Excellence on the Integris Southwest hospital campus in Oklahoma City. Show on map
Enid High SchoolEnid High School (EHS) is a public tertiary school in Enid, Oklahoma, USA, operated by the Enid Public Schools school district. With a student body of about 1,800 in grades 9-12, Enid High School has a matriculation rate of about 65 percent. Some graduates continue their education at University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, or other establishments in Oklahoma. In recent years some have gone to West Point, Princeton University, Trinity University (Texas) and Yale University. Show on map
Grand Lake Regional AirportGrand Lake Regional Airport (IATA: NRI, FAA LID: 3O9) is a privately owned, public use airport in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located on Monkey Island, a peninsula on the northern shore of Grand Lake o' the Cherokees. The airport is nine nautical miles (10 mi, 17 km) southeast of Afton, a city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. This airport was included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2007–2011, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Guthrie–Edmond Regional AirportGuthrie–Edmond Regional Airport (IATA: GOK, ICAO: KGOK, FAA LID: GOK) is a public use airport in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located two nautical miles (4 km) south of Guthrie and 7 miles (11 km) north of Edmond. The airport has been operated by both cities since 2005. It was formerly known as Guthrie Municipal Airport. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Del City High SchoolDel City High School is the only public high school located in Del City, Oklahoma and one of three high schools in the Mid-Del School District. The high school first opened in 1953. According to GreatSchools.org, the high school rates above Midwest City High School and is rated below Carl Albert High School which are the other two high Schools in the district. The school serves approximately 1,254 students. About a third of graduating students attend a four-year college. Show on map
KQTZ-FM (Hobart)KQTZ (105.9 FM) is an American radio station licensed to serve the community of Hobart, Oklahoma. The station is currently owned and operated by Monarch Broadcasting, Inc. KQTZ, along with KWHW (1450 AM) and KRKZ (now KWHW-FM, 93.5 FM), were acquired from Altus Radio, Inc., by Monarch Broadcasting in 2003. KQTZ broadcasts a hot adult contemporary music format to the greater Lawton, Oklahoma, area. The station features programming from Citadel Media and Dial Global. Show on map
Integris Baptist Medical CenterIntegris Health (stylized INTEGRIS Health) is an American 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization which manages health care facilities in the state of Oklahoma. Through affiliates, Integris Health Inc. operates 16 hospitals and has health providers in 49 Oklahoma towns and cities. The Integris facilities are hospitals, rehabilitation centers, physician clinics, mental health facilities, independent living centers, and home health agencies, located throughout Oklahoma. Show on map
Shawnee Regional AirportShawnee Regional Airport (IATA: SNL, ICAO: KSNL, FAA LID: SNL) is a city owned airport two miles northwest of Shawnee, in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. It was formerly Shawnee Municipal Airport. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 called it a general aviation facility. In 2011 the airport opened a new terminal building. The 4,000 sq ft (370 m2) building has a conference room and observation deck. The previous terminal was built in 1953. Show on map
Norman Regional Hospital HeliportUniversity of Oklahoma Westheimer Airport (IATA: OUN, ICAO: KOUN, FAA LID: OUN) (Max Westheimer Airport) is a public use airport in Norman, in Cleveland County, Oklahoma. It is owned by the University of Oklahoma. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a reliever airport. The Cleveland County Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol meets on Tuesday evenings in a hangar provided by the City of Norman, east of the terminal. Show on map
Christian Heritage AcademyChristian Heritage Academy (CHA) is a private Christian school located in Del City, Oklahoma, United States. Established in 1972, CHA instructs its students in an American Christian philosophy of education through the Principle Approach methodology. Enrollment includes students from grades Pre-Kindergarten through twelve. The students are residents of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. There is also a \"Christian Heritage Academy\" located in Northfield, Illinois. Show on map
Lawton High School Show on map
KXII-TV (Ardmore)KXII, VHF digital channel 12, is a CBS-affiliated television station located in Sherman, Texas, United States which also serves Ada and Ardmore, Oklahoma, and Denison, Texas. The station is owned by Gray Television. KXII maintains studios located on Texoma Parkway (SH 91) in Sherman, and its transmitter is located southwest of Madill, Oklahoma. The station's signal is relayed on low-power translator station KXIP-LD (channel 12) in Paris, Texas. Show on map
KSWO-TV (Lawton)KSWO-TV, virtual channel 7 (VHF digital channel 11), is an ABC-affiliated television station located in Lawton, Oklahoma, United States and also serves Wichita Falls, Texas. Owned by Raycom Media, KSWO also operates CBS affiliate KAUZ-TV (channel 6) through a shared services agreement with American Spirit Media. The station's studios are located on 60th Street in Southeast Lawton, and its transmitter is located near Grandfield, Oklahoma. Show on map
KFOR-TV (Oklahoma City)KFOR-TV, virtual channel 4 (UHF digital channel 27), is an NBC-affiliated television station located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by the Tribune Broadcasting subsidiary of Tribune Media, as part of a duopoly with independent station KAUT-TV (channel 43). The two stations share studio and transmitter facilities located on Britton Road (U.S. 77) in the McCourry Heights section of northeast Oklahoma City. Show on map
Shawnee MallThe Shawnee Mall is a regional shopping mall and trade area located in Shawnee, Oklahoma. It contains four department store anchors, and a total of 57 tenants comprising a total of approximately 455,420 square feet of gross leasable area. Herring Marathon and JCPenney built the mall. It opened in March 1989, with JCPenney, Sears, Walmart, and Dillard's as the anchor stores. The closure of the Sears store was announced in January 2014. Show on map
Seminole Municipal AirportSeminole Municipal Airport (ICAO: KSRE, FAA LID: SRE) is a city owned airport three miles north of Seminole, in Seminole County, Oklahoma. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 called it a general aviation facility. Most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, but this airport is SRE to the FAA and has no IATA code (Sucre Airport in Sucre, Bolivia has IATA code SRE). Show on map
McLoud High SchoolMcLoud High School is a public secondary school located in Pottawatomie County in the town of McLoud, Oklahoma. It instructs grades 9-12. It is a part of the McLoud Public School District, which also includes McLoud Elementary School and McLoud Junior High. McLoud High School currently has 557 students enrolled, giving it a student to teacher ratio of 14:1. Its mascot is the Redskins and its school colors are red, black, and white. Show on map
KTBO-TV (Oklahoma City)KTBO-TV, virtual channel 14 (UHF digital channel 15), is a TBN owned-and-operated television station located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. The station is owned by Trinity Broadcasting Network, Inc. KTBO maintains studio facilities and offices located on Northeast 108th Street and East Hefner Road, and its transmitter is located near the John Kilpatrick Turnpike/Interstate 44, both on Oklahoma City's northeast side. Show on map
Mustang High SchoolMustang High School is a public school located in Mustang, Oklahoma, United States. It is a part of Mustang Public Schools. It services approximately 3,000 students, and is growing, due to new construction that began in 2009. The school contains a large band room, an auditorium, and three gymnasiums. It is among the few public high schools in Oklahoma to receive a distinguished Great Schools Rating of ten out of ten. Show on map
Moore High SchoolMoore High School is a four-year comprehensive high school located in Moore, Oklahoma, a suburb south of Oklahoma City. The school offers several Advanced Placement courses including AP Government, AP Studio Art, AP Literature and AP Psychology. The path of the 2013 Moore tornado barely missed the school, and students were kept inside the school gym as the tornado approached around 15 minutes before school was dismissed. Show on map
Woody ChapelWoody Chapel, Oklahoma is an unincorporated community located in McClain County, Oklahoma. Woody Chapel is located at the junction of State Highway 24 and State Highway 39 It is near Dibble and Purcell. Its residents are listed in the local Purcell phone book. It suffered wind damage from a tornado in 1979. A large garage was demolished and a barn roof destroyed, two cows escaped and a few chickens flew the coop. Show on map
Putnam City High SchoolPutnam City High School (commonly, PC, Putnam City Original, and PCO) is a secondary school located in Warr Acres, Oklahoma. It is one of three high schools in the Putnam City School District and serves more than 1,900 students. It is accredited by the North Central Association of Secondary Schools. The current school site was founded in 1958 and includes the primary stadium for the Putnam City School District. Show on map
KALV-AM (Alva)KALV may refer to: \n* KALV (AM), a radio station (1430 AM) licensed to serve Alva, Oklahoma, United States \n* KALV-FM, a radio station (101.5 FM) licensed to serve Phoenix, Arizona, United States __DISAMBIG__ Show on map
Teramiranda AirportTeramiranda Airport (FAA LID: 79F) was a privately owned, public use airport in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located on Monkey Island, a peninsula on the northern shore of Grand Lake o' the Cherokees. The airport is seven nautical miles (13 km) southeast of the central business district of Afton, a city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. As of October 19, 2009, the airport was permanently closed. Show on map
McAlester Regional AirportMcAlester Regional Airport (IATA: MLC, ICAO: KMLC, FAA LID: MLC) is in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, three miles (5 km) southwest of McAlester, which owns it. The airport has no scheduled airline flights. Ground services are provided by Brenair Aviation Services. The airport was fairly new in 1952 when Braniff and Central DC-3s stopped there; Braniff left in 1952-53 and Central/Frontier pulled out in 1978. Show on map
Oklahoma City Air Force Station (historical)Oklahoma City Air Force Station (ADC ID: P-52, NORAD-ID: Z-52) is a closed Cold War United States Air Force air defense and communications-electronics headquarters and radar station. It was located 10 miles (16 km) east-southeast of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, just to the southeast of Tinker Air Force Base. It ceased to be a separate Air Force installation on 1 October 1983, when it merged with Tinker. Show on map
Silo High SchoolSilo High School is a high school in Durant, Oklahoma. It serves 9th through 12th grade. The athletic teams are known as the Rebels. The school colors are red and blue. As of 2006, there are currently 100 students enrolled. The Rebel baseball team currently has 4 Fall State Championships 2006, 2007, 2010, and 2014. Also having 6 Spring State Championships from 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2015. Show on map
Heavener High SchoolHeavener High School is a public high school located in Heavener, Oklahoma. The school educates approximately 350 students grades 9-12. Activities include marching band, choir, baseball, football, track and field, basketball, soccer, and cheerleading. Oklahoma history and government and physical education are taught in the high school in addition to more nationally typical coures, as mandated by state law. Show on map
Southwestern Christian UniversitySouthwestern Christian University was founded in 1946 as Southwestern Bible College in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and was the first Pentecostal educational institution in the state. While it was established as a Bible college for the training of Christian church leaders within the International Pentecostal Holiness Church, the denomination planned to quickly expand the school into a junior college. Show on map
El Reno Regional AirportEl Reno Regional Airport (ICAO: KRQO, FAA LID: RQO) is in Canadian County, Oklahoma, five miles southwest of El Reno, which owns it. The FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013 categorized it as a general aviation facility. Many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, but this facility is RQO to the FAA and has no IATA code. Show on map
Buffalo Municipal AirportBuffalo Municipal Airport (ICAO: KBFK, FAA LID: BFK) is a city-owned, public-use airport located two miles (3 km) north of the central business district of Buffalo, a city in Harper County, Oklahoma, United States. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned BFK by the FAA but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Stroud Municipal AirportStroud Municipal Airport (IATA: SUD, ICAO: KSUD, FAA LID: SUD) is a public use airport in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Stroud and located three nautical miles (6 km) north of its central business district. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Altus Municipal AirportAltus/Quartz Mountain Regional Airport (IATA: AXS, ICAO: KAXS, FAA LID: AXS) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) north of the central business district of Altus, a city in Jackson County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Chickasha Municipal AirportChickasha Municipal Airport (IATA: CHK, ICAO: KCHK, FAA LID: CHK) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) northwest of the central business district of Chickasha, a city in Grady County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Ponca City Regional AirportPonca City Regional Airport (IATA: PNC, ICAO: KPNC, FAA LID: PNC) is a city-owned airport two miles northwest of Ponca City, in Kay County, Oklahoma. Enrique's is a well known Mexican restaurant in the terminal. Scheduled passenger flights on Great Lakes Airlines to Denver and Dodge City ended in August, 2006. The service was subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Langston UniversityLangston University, abbreviated as LU, is a public university in Langston, Oklahoma, United States. It is the only historically black college in the state. Though located in a rural setting just 10 miles (16 km) east of Guthrie, Langston also serves an urban mission with University Centers in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City. The University is a member-school of Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Show on map
Stilwell/Cherokee Nation Airport (historical)Stilwell/Cherokee Nation Airport (FAA LID: O11) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southwest of the central business district of Stilwell, in Adair County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the Cherokee Nation. This airport was included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2007–2011, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Southmoore High SchoolSouthmoore High School is an American four-year public high school located in the southern part of Moore, Oklahoma. Southmoore High School opened in the 2008-2009 academic year. The school is headed by one head principal, and 4 class principals. The current head principal is Danny Reed. Southmoore High is a 6A division High School. It is part of the Moore Public Schools district. Show on map
Henry Post Army AirfieldHenry Post Army Airfield (IATA: FSI, ICAO: KFSI, FAA LID: FSI) is a military use airport located at Fort Sill in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. This military airport is owned by United States Army. Established as Post Field in 1917, it was one of thirty-two Air Service training camps established after the United States entry into World War I in April 1917. Show on map
Cleveland Municipal AirportCleveland Municipal Airport (FAA LID: 95F) is a public use airport in Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Cleveland and located two nautical miles (4 km) south of its central business district. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Cushing Municipal AirportCushing Municipal Airport (IATA: CUH, ICAO: KCUH, FAA LID: CUH) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) south of the central business district of Cushing, a city in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Robert S Kerr AirportRobert S. Kerr Airport (IATA: RKR, ICAO: KRKR, FAA LID: RKR) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) south of the central business district of Poteau, a city in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Nathan Hale High SchoolNathan Hale High School is a high school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Opened in 1959, it is part of the Tulsa Public Schools, and is a public school for students from grades 9 through 12. In 2009, the school established a restaurant, lodging, and health management magnet school program, which in 2010 began operating a restaurant open to the public once a week for lunch. Show on map
Memorial High SchoolMemorial High School is one of eleven high schools in Tulsa Public Schools. The school also encompasses an engineering academy. Memorial includes fine arts offerings and offers several Advanced Placement Program courses. The school offers several foreign language classes (Spanish, Latin, and French). Memorial Stadium is also where FC Tulsa plays its games. Show on map
Idabel High SchoolIdabel High School is high school located in Idabel, Oklahoma, which is in McCurtain County in the southeastern corner of the state. It is a part of Idabel Public Schools. The school offers courses in English, mathematics, social studies and history, physical education and agriculture education. It received a B under the state's A-F grading system in 2012. Show on map
Perry Municipal AirportPerry Municipal Airport (FAA LID: F22) is a city-owned public-use airport located five nautical miles (9 km) north of the central business district of Perry, a city in Noble County, Oklahoma, United States. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Gage AirportGage Airport (IATA: GAG, ICAO: KGAG, FAA LID: GAG) is a town owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) southwest of the central business district of Gage, a town in Ellis County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
South Grand Lake Regional AirportSouth Grand Lake Regional Airport (FAA LID: 1K8) is a town owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of Ketchum, a town in Craig County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Midwest Christian CollegeMidwest Christian College was a private, Christian college established in 1946 in Oklahoma City, OK.During its first year, it enrolled thirty-three students. After peaking in the 1970s and 80s, MCC entered into a time of declining enrollment and financial trouble. It merged in 1985 with Ozark Bible College of Joplin, MO to form Ozark Christian College. Show on map
KXTD-AM (Wagoner)KXTD (1530 AM, \"Que Buena 1530 AM\") is a radio station licensed to serve Wagoner, Oklahoma. The station is owned by Jose Esteban Torres and Jose Moguel, through licensee Key Plus Broadcasting, LLC. It airs a Regional Mexican music format. The station has been assigned these call letters by the Federal Communications Commission since February 23, 1988. Show on map
Stilwell High SchoolStilwell High School is a high school (grades 9-12) in Stilwell, Oklahoma, United States. As of 2006 it had some 615 students, of whom 70% were Native American, and some 38 teachers. The 1988-1989 class was the largest graduating class with a total of 181 graduates. The class of 2009-2010 had the most Honor Students in its graduating class with 22. Show on map
Nowata Municipal AirportNowata Municipal Airport (FAA LID: H66) is a city owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Nowata, a city in Nowata County, Oklahoma, United States. It was included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2007–2011, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Medford Municipal AirportMedford Municipal Airport (FAA LID: O53) is a city owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southwest of the central business district of Medford, a city in Grant County, Oklahoma, United States. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Falconhead AirportFalconhead Airport (FAA LID: 37K) is a public use airport located two nautical miles (2.3 mi, 3.7 km) northwest of the central business district of Burneyville, in Love County, Oklahoma, United States. It is privately owned by Falconhead Airport and Aviation Services, LLC. The airport is located adjacent to the Falconhead Resort & Country Club. Show on map
Durant High SchoolDurant High School (also known as Durant High and DHS) is a public secondary school in Durant, Oklahoma, serving grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. The school is part of the Durant Independent School District. Durant's mascot is the Lion. The high school has approximately 850 students, making it one of the largest high schools in Southeastern Oklahoma. Show on map
Bartlesville Municipal AirportBartlesville Municipal Airport (IATA: BVO, ICAO: KBVO, FAA LID: BVO) is a public use airport in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Bartlesville and is one mile northwest of downtown. This airport is in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which called it a general aviation facility. Show on map
Guymon Municipal AirportGuymon Municipal Airport (IATA: GUY, ICAO: KGUY, FAA LID: GUY) is in Texas County, Oklahoma, two miles west of Guymon, which owns it. The FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009-2013 classified it as a general aviation airport. From about 1957 until 1968 Central Airlines and successor Frontier Airlines stopped here. Show on map
Sallisaw High SchoolSallisaw High School is a high school in Sallisaw, Oklahoma. The school's history dates back to the early 1900s, though the building itself was constructed more recently. Oklahoma history and government and physical education is taught in the high school in addition to more nationally typical coures, as mandated by state law. Show on map
KITX-FM (Hugo)KITX (95.5 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a Country music format. Licensed to Hugo, Oklahoma, USA, the station serves the Paris, TX area. The station is currently owned by K95.5, Inc. and features programming from Fox News, Premiere Radio Networks . Current Program Schedule: Mid-5am - CMT's After Midnight with Cody Alan5-9:15am - \"The WB Morning Circus\" with Will Payne & Barry Diamond9:15am-3pm - Chad Lindsey3-7pm - Barry Diamond7pm-Midnight - \"The Night Show\" with Allison Show on map
Union High SchoolUnion High School is the highest level of secondary education in the Union Public Schools system of Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, for students in 10th, 11th and 12th grades. The school, combined with Union 9th Grade Center, is the second-largest high school in the state of Oklahoma, behind only Broken Arrow High School. Show on map
Northern Oklahoma CollegeNorthern Oklahoma College (NOC) is a community college located in Tonkawa, Oklahoma, with additional campuses located in Enid, Oklahoma and Stillwater, Oklahoma. Student enrollment is approximately 2,700. NOC bought the former Phillips University in Enid, Oklahoma in 1999, and has turned it into the NOC Enid campus. Show on map
Mack Alford Correctional CenterMack H. Alford Correctional Center (MACC, originally the Stringtown Correctional Center) is an Oklahoma Department of Corrections prison in unincorporated Atoka County, Oklahoma, near Stringtown. The medium security prison, which opened in 1973, is named after Mack H. Alford, who once served as the prison's warden. Show on map
Broken Arrow High School Show on map
Western Technology CenterWestern Technology Center is a public career and technology education center founded in 1970 with its main campus located in Burns Flat, Oklahoma. Branch campuses are located in Hobart, Sayre and Weatherford. Western Technology Center is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
KEOJ - FM (Caney)KEOJ (101.1 FM) is a radio station licensed to Caney, Kansas, USA broadcasting a contemporary Christian music format. The station is currently owned by KXOJ. The station has obtained a construction permit from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission for an increase to 25,000 watts effective radiated power. Show on map
Crossings Christian SchoolCrossings Christian School serves students in the greater Oklahoma City, Oklahoma area. Based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the school serves approximately 1000 students. There are four divisions within the school: Crossings Upper School, Crossings Middle School, Crossings Lower School, and Crossings Preschool. Show on map
Bishop McGuinness Catholic High SchoolBishop McGuinness Catholic High School (McGuinness) is a college-preparatory secondary school located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. It has an enrollment of 720 students in grades 9 through 12, is co-educational, and serves as part of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City in the Roman Catholic Church. Show on map
The Skirvin Hilton Oklahoma CityThe Skirvin Hotel at the corner of 1st Street and Broadway in downtown Oklahoma City is the city's oldest hotel. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Skirvin Hilton Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Show on map
KBEL-FM (Idabel)KBEL-FM (96.7 FM, \"Real Country Variety\") is a radio station broadcasting a country music format. Licensed to Idabel, Oklahoma, USA, the station is currently owned by Rod Liechti through licensee Brute Force Radio LLC and features programming from Fox, ONN, Agrinet Radio and Sooner Sports Properties. Show on map
Frederick Municipal AirportFrederick Regional Airport (IATA: FDR, ICAO: KFDR, FAA LID: FDR) is a city-owned, public-use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) southeast of the central business district of Frederick, a city in Tillman County, Oklahoma, United States. It was formerly known as Frederick Municipal Airport. Show on map
Bartlesville High SchoolBartlesville High School is a public high school located in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Built in 1939, it was originally called College High School, and until 1950 housed a junior college as well as the high school. Its Streamline Moderne building was designed by Tulsa architect John Duncan Forsyth. Show on map
KCFO-AM (Tulsa)KCFO (970 AM) is a Tulsa, Oklahoma, area Christian radio station. KCFO airs national shows such as Dave Ramsey, J. Vernon McGee, David Jeremiah, Dennis Rainey, and Albert Mohler. The station has been assigned the KCFO call letters by the Federal Communications Commission since October 21, 1984. Show on map
Chisholm Trail Technology CenterChisholm Trail Technology Center (CTTC) is a public career and technology education center located in Omega, Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system.The center is located on Highway 33, 13 miles east of Watonga and 16 miles west of Kingfisher. Show on map
Ardmore Air Force Base (historical)Ardmore Air Force Base is an inactive United States Air Force base, approximately 11 miles northeast of Ardmore, Oklahoma. It was active during World War II as a heavy bomber training airfield and during the early years of the Cold War as a troop carrier base. It was closed on 31 March 1959. Show on map
Port of MuskogeeThe Port of Muskogee is a regional port, located in Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA. It is a local hub for the transport of goods via trucks, railroad, and barges on the Arkansas River. It is one of the farthest inland, ice-free year-round, United States ports that can access the Gulf of Mexico. Show on map
Moore Norman Technology CenterMoore Norman Technology Center is a public career and technology education center with two campus locations: The Franklin Road Campus in Norman, Oklahoma, and the South Penn Campus in South Oklahoma City. MNTC is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Ardmore Municipal AirportArdmore Municipal Airport (IATA: ADM, ICAO: KADM, FAA LID: ADM) is in Carter County, Oklahoma, 12 miles northeast of the city of Ardmore, which owns it. It is near Gene Autry, Oklahoma. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 called it a general aviation airport. Show on map
Cameron UniversityCameron University is a four-year, state-funded university located in Lawton, Oklahoma, that offers more than 50 degrees through two-year, four-year, and graduate programs. The degree programs emphasize the liberal arts, science and technology, and graduate and professional studies. Show on map
Cherokee Seaplane BaseCherokee Seaplane Base (FAA LID: 4O6) is a privately owned, public use seaplane base on Grand Lake o' the Cherokees in Delaware County, Oklahoma. It is located seven nautical miles (8 mi, 13 km) southwest of the central business district of Afton, a city in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Show on map
McGehee Catfish Restaurant Airport (historical)McGehee Catfish Restaurant Airport (FAA LID: T40) is a privately owned, public-use airport located five nautical miles (6 mi, 9 km) southwest of the central business district of Marietta, a city in Love County, Oklahoma, United States. The runway is currently closed indefinitely. Show on map
Chisholm High SchoolChisholm High School (founded in 1973) is the second largest high school in Enid, Oklahoma, and is located in the northern part of the city. The school has a student body of approximately 300 students in grades 9-12 with a curriculum that includes normal and AP academic courses. Show on map
Chandler High SchoolChandler High School is a public high school serving 303 students in grades nine through 12 located in Chandler, Oklahoma. The sports team nickname is the Lions. Notable alumni include baseball player Jon Gray. The school's address is 901 South CHS Street, Chandler, OK 74834. Show on map
Grove High SchoolGrove High School is a public high school in the town of Grove, Oklahoma, United States. It is one of four schools in a school district that includes Grove Lower Elementary School, Grove Upper Elementary School and Grove Middle School. The school mascot is the \"Ridgerunner\". Show on map
Fort Sill National CemeteryFort Sill National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Elgin in Comanche County, Oklahoma. Administered by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, it encompasses 391.3 acres (158.4 ha), and as of 2014 had more than 4,000 interments. Show on map
Goodland AcademyGoodland Academy is a private school and home located 3 miles (4.8 km) southwest of Hugo in Southeastern Oklahoma. Founded in 1848 as a mission of the Presbyterian Church, it also has the distinction of being the oldest private boarding school in Oklahoma still in operation. Show on map
Northwest Technology CenterNorthwest Technology Center is a public career and technology education center with campuses located in Alva and Fairview, Oklahoma. It is part of the statewide system of career and technology education overseen by the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education. Show on map
Sundance AirparkSundance Airport (ICAO: KHSD, FAA LID: HSD) is a public use airport located in Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. The airport is 11 nautical miles (20 km) northwest of the central business district of Oklahoma City. It is privately owned by Sundance Airport FBO, Inc. Show on map
Municipal AirportMunicipal Airport (FAA LID: K49) is a public use airport in Texas County, Oklahoma, United States. The airport is owned by the City of Texhoma and is located two nautical miles (3.7 km) west of its central business district. It is also known as Texhoma Municipal Airport. Show on map
Seminole Junior - Senior High SchoolSeminole High School is a public high school located in Seminole, Oklahoma, operated by Seminole Public Schools. As of the 2006-07 school year, the school had an enrollment of 482 students and 30.6 classroom teachers (on a FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.8. Show on map
Washington Park MallWashington Park Mall is a 356,691 square foot shopping mall in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. It is the only mall located within 40 miles of Bartlesville. It is owned and managed by Rouse Properties. The mall opened in 1984. Show on map
KBLP-FM (Lindsay)KBLP (105.1 FM, \"Oklahoma Country 105\") is a radio station broadcasting a country music format. Licensed to Lindsay, Oklahoma, USA, the station is currently owned by Jason Wollenberg and Kevin Scruggs, through licensee KBLP Partners, LLC, and features programming from Citadel Media. Show on map
Okmulgee Regional AirportOkmulgee Regional Airport (IATA: OKM, ICAO: KOKM, FAA LID: OKM) is in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, three miles north of the city of Okmulgee, which owns it. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Denison DamDenison Dam, also known as Lake Texoma Dam, is a dam located on the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma that impounds Lake Texoma. The purpose of the dam is flood control, water supply, hydroelectric power production, river regulation, navigation and recreation. Show on map
Casady SchoolCasady School is an independent, coeducational, college preparatory school located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, founded in 1947 by Bishop Thomas Casady and the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma. Casady serves children in grades pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest. Show on map
KGWA-AM (Enid)KGWA (960 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a News Talk Information format. Licensed to Enid, Oklahoma, USA, the station serves the Oklahoma City area. The station is currently owned by Williams Broadcasting LLC and features programing from Fox News Radio. Show on map
Eaker FieldDurant Regional Airport–Eaker Field (IATA: DUA, ICAO: KDUA, FAA LID: DUA) is three miles (5 km) south of Durant, Oklahoma. It was established in September 1943. The airport is home to Southeastern Oklahoma State University's Aviation Sciences Institute. Show on map
Catoosa High SchoolCatoosa High School is a high school in the Catoosa Public Schools system, for students in ninth through twelfth grades. As of 2011, there are currently 609 students enrolled and 13 students for every teacher. The current principal is Darren Peaster. Show on map
McLain High SchoolMcLain Magnet High School for Science and Technnology is a high school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It was named after 20th Century US Army Lieutenant General Raymond S. McLain. McLain Magnet High School is one of eleven high schools in Tulsa Public Schools. Show on map
Wards ChapelWards Chapel is a small unincorporated community in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. There are a few people, a few houses, and a church, Ward's Chapel Baptist Church. The community is located around five miles west of Atoka. io:Atoka, Oklahoma Show on map
Hobart Regional AirportHobart Regional Airport (IATA: HBR, ICAO: KHBR, FAA LID: HBR) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southeast of the central business district of Hobart, a city in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Hobart. Show on map
Arrowhead MallArrowhead Mall is an enclosed shopping mall in Muskogee, Oklahoma. It was opened in 1987 and is owned by J. Herzog & Sons, Inc. It is the only mall located within 50 miles of Muskogee, but remains close to the neighboring Tulsa metropolitan area. Show on map
Saint Gregorys UniversitySt. Gregory's University is a private, co-educational Catholic liberal arts university. It is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It has its main campus in Shawnee, and an additional campus in Tulsa. Show on map
Miami Municipal AirportMiami Municipal Airport (IATA: MIO, ICAO: KMIO, FAA LID: MIO) is a city owned airport two miles northwest of Miami, in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 called it a general aviation facility. Show on map
Deep Fork National Wildlife RefugeThe Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge is part of the United States system of National Wildlife Refuges. It is located in Eastern Oklahoma, near the city of Okmulgee. The preserve runs along both banks of the Deep Fork River for about 20 miles. Show on map
Wilson High SchoolWilson High School is a secondary school in Wilson, Oklahoma, U.S.A. with 483 students. It serves grades 9 through 12, and includes an alternative high school program. The current building was built in 1978-79, replacing one built in 1917-18. Show on map
Seneca Indian SchoolThe Seneca Indian School was a Native American boarding school located in Wyandotte, Oklahoma. Initially founded for Seneca, Shawnee, and Wyandotte children, in later years it had many Cherokee students. The school operated from 1872 to 1980. Show on map
Clinton Municipal AirportClinton Regional Airport (IATA: CLK, ICAO: KCLK, FAA LID: CLK) is a city-owned public-use airport located three miles northeast of the central business district of Clinton, a city in Custer County and Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Jenks High SchoolJenks High School is a secondary school located within Tulsa County in Jenks, Oklahoma. It serves students from the town of Jenks and students from the south side of the city of Tulsa. The high school has over 2,800 students in grades 10–12. Show on map
Antlers Municipal AirportAntlers Municipal Airport (IATA: ATE, FAA LID: 80F) is a public airport located one mile (2 km) southwest of the central business district of Antlers, a city in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, United States. It is owned by the City of Antlers. Show on map
Tulsa Promenade Shopping CenterTulsa Promenade Mall is a 926,426-square-foot (86,067.8 m2) shopping center located in the Midtown section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is anchored by Dillard's, JCPenney and Macy's and a fourth anchor store last occupied by Mervyns until 2005. Show on map
West Woodward AirportWest Woodward Airport (IATA: WWR, ICAO: KWWR, FAA LID: WWR) is in Woodward County, Oklahoma, seven miles west of Woodward, which owns it. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 called it a general aviation airport. Show on map
East Central High SchoolEast Central High School is one of nine high schools in Tulsa Public Schools in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The school is home to 1,143 students from East Tulsa. The majority of students transition into East Central from: East Central Junior High. Show on map
Aaron CemeteryAaron is a ghost town in Jackson County, Oklahoma, United States, located 5 miles (8.0 km) northwest of Olustee. It had a post office from January 22, 1899 until January 14, 1905. The town was named after Calvin Aaron, an early settler. Show on map
Fort Gibson National CemeteryFort Gibson National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located inside of the town of Fort Gibson, in Muskogee County, Oklahoma. It encompasses 48.3 acres (19.5 ha), and through fiscal year 2008 there were 19,102 interments. Show on map
Stringtown High SchoolStringtown High School, Is a public high school in Stringtown, Oklahoma. Located in southeast Oklahoma in Atoka County, Serving the Stringtown School District. And a member of the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association OSSAA Show on map
Elk City Regional Business AirportElk City Regional Business Airport (IATA: ELK, ICAO: KELK, FAA LID: ELK) is a city-owned public-use airport located one mile northeast of the central business district of Elk CIty, a city in Beckham County, Oklahoma, United States. There is also an airport in Elk City, Idaho. The FAA LID for that one is S90. Show on map
Maryetta Elementary SchoolMarietta is a census-designated place (CDP) in Adair County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 106 at the 2010 census. The community was listed as Maryetta at the 2000 census, at which time it had a population of 138. Show on map
Ponca City High SchoolPonca City High School is a public high school that serves 1,637 students in grades 9-12, located in Ponca City, Oklahoma. The current main principal is Thad Dilbeck. Ponca City High School's mascot is \"Willie\" Wildcat (Ponca City Wildcats). Show on map
Great Plains Technology CenterGreat Plains Technology Center is a public career and technology education center that has campuses in Lawton, Oklahoma and Frederick, Oklahoma. It is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Ardmore Downtown Executive AirportArdmore Downtown Executive Airport (IATA: AHD, FAA LID: 1F0) is a city-owned public-use airport located one mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Ardmore, a city in Carter County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Tupelo High SchoolTupelo High School is a high school located in Tupelo, Oklahoma, United States. It currently has 77 students and serves grades 9 to 12. Notable alumni include Charlie Hudson, a one-time major league baseball player. Show on map
KADA-FM (Ada)KADA-FM (99.3 FM, \"Cool 99.3\") is a radio station licensed to serve Ada, Oklahoma, US. The station, established in 1980, is currently owned by the Chickasaw Nation. KADA-FM broadcasts an adult contemporary music format. Show on map
Blue Ribbon DownsBlue Ribbon Downs was an American horse racing track located in Sallisaw, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma. The facility hosted American Quarter Horse, and Thoroughbred flat racing events until it closed permanently in 2010. Show on map
Cox Convention CenterThe Cox Convention Center (originally Myriad Convention Center) is a multi-purpose complex located in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It is currently the home of the Oklahoma City Blue of the NBA Development League Show on map
Bartlesville Air Force Station (historical)Bartlesville Air Force Station (ADC ID: P-77) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 3.2 miles (5.1 km) west-northwest of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. It was closed in 1961. Show on map
Medical Center of Southeastern OklahomaThe Medical Center of Southeastern Oklahoma, also known as MCSO, is a hospital located at 1800 University Boulevard in Durant, Oklahoma. The hospital was founded in 1987, replacing the older Bryan Memorial Hospital. Show on map
Northwestern Oklahoma State UniversityNorthwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) is a university in Alva, Oklahoma, United States, with satellite campuses in Enid and Woodward. A state university, it offers both bachelor's and master's degrees. Show on map
KTLV-AM (Midwest City)KTLV (1220 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a Gospel format. Licensed to Midwest City, Oklahoma, USA, the station serves the Oklahoma City area. The station is currently owned by First Choice Broadcasting. Show on map
Owasso High SchoolOwasso High School is a secondary school located within Tulsa County in Owasso, Oklahoma. The school is well known for being involved in the Owasso Independent School District v. Falvo US supreme court case. Show on map
Sam Riggs AirparkSam Riggs Airpark (FAA LID: K11) is a privately owned public-use airport located seven nautical miles (13 km) south of the central business district of Claremore, in Rogers County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Victory Christian SchoolVictory Christian School is a private Christian school located in Tulsa, Oklahoma at 7700 South Lewis. The school is co-ed and a division of Victory Christian Center, a non-denominational church in Tulsa. Show on map
Beaver Municipal AirportBeaver Municipal Airport (FAA LID: K44) is a city-owned, public-use airport located one mile (2 km) southwest of the central business district of Beaver, a city in Beaver County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Westport AirportWestport Airport (FAA LID: 4F1) is a town owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) east of the central business district of Westport, a town in Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Stillwater Regional AirportStillwater Regional Airport (IATA: SWO, ICAO: KSWO, FAA LID: SWO) is a public use city owned airport located in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States, three miles (4.8 km) northwest of the city of Stillwater. Show on map
Norman North High SchoolNorman North High School is a public, co-educational secondary school in Norman, Oklahoma. It was established on August 21, 1997, on the grounds of what had been Longfellow Middle School since 1972. Show on map
Dickson High SchoolDickson High School is located in Dickson, Oklahoma. It houses grades 9-12. It is the home of the Comets. Its colors are blue, black, and white. It was awarded the Blue Ribbon for academic success. Show on map
Green Country Technology CenterGreen Country Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Okmulgee, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Gordon Cooper Technology CenterGordon Cooper Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Shawnee, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
High Plains Technology CenterHigh Plains Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Woodward, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Wes Watkins Technology CenterWes Watkins Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Wetumka, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Pansy Kidd Middle SchoolPoteau (/ˈpoʊtoʊ/ POH-toh) is a city in, and county seat of, Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 8,520 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
Love County AirportLove County Airport (FAA LID: 4O2) was a public-use airport located two nautical miles northwest of the central business district of Marietta, a city in Love County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
KDDQ-FM (Comanche)KDDQ (105.3 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a classic rock music format. Licensed to Comanche, Oklahoma, USA. The station is currently owned by Perry Broadcasting of Southwest Oklahoma. Show on map
Red River Technology CenterRed River Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Duncan, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Okeene Junior High SchoolOkeene Junior-Senior High school is a public school serving students in grades 7 through 12 in Okeene, Oklahoma. It has currently enrolled under 200 students(counting grade school as well) Show on map
Lone Grove High SchoolLone Grove High School is a high school located in Lone Grove, Oklahoma, a small town outside Ardmore, Oklahoma. The Longhorn is their official mascot and their colors are black and white. Show on map
Southwest Technology CenterSouthwest Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Altus, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Earl Henry AirportEarl Henry Airport (FAA LID: 6OK6) is a private-use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) west of the central business district of Blackwell, in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Haworth High SchoolHaworth High School is a public, four year high school serving Haworth, Oklahoma and surrounding communities. The school's mascot is the lion and the school colors are green and white. Show on map
Pontotoc Technology CenterPontotoc Technology Center is a public career and technology education center located in Ada, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education system. Show on map
Oklahoma Bible AcademyThe Oklahoma Bible Academy (OBA) is an interdenominational Christian private school located in Enid, Oklahoma. OBA is the oldest coeducational private school in the state of Oklahoma. Show on map
Guthrie High SchoolGuthrie High School is a public secondary school in Guthrie, Oklahoma, USA. It is located at 200 Crooks Drive in Guthrie, Oklahoma and the only high school in Guthrie Public Schools. Show on map
Monte Cassino SchoolMonte Cassino School is a Catholic elementary and middle school located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The school also included a girls' junior college until 1 and a high school until 1986. Show on map
Oklahoma School for the DeafOklahoma School for the Deaf (OSD) is a residential school for the deaf and hard of hearing students ages 2 through 18. The school teaches K-12 students in Sulphur, Oklahoma. Show on map
KAYE-FM (Tonkawa)KAYE-FM (90.7 FM) is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Tonkawa, Oklahoma, USA. The station is currently owned by Northern Oklahoma College. Show on map
KCLI-FM (Clinton)KCLI-FM (99.3 FM is a radio station broadcasting a news/talk format. Licensed to Cordell, Oklahoma, USA, the station is currently owned by Wright Broadcasting Systems. Show on map
KECO-FM (Elk City)KECO (96.5 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a Country music format. Licensed to Elk City, Oklahoma, USA. The station is currently owned by Paragon Communications. Show on map
Charles Page High SchoolCharles Page High School is a high school in Sand Springs, Oklahoma, named after the philanthropist Charles Page. It is the only public high school in Sand Springs. Show on map
Westminster SchoolWestminster School of Oklahoma City is a private school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was founded in 1963, and admits children from 3 years old through 8th Grade. Westminster School is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest (ISAS) and the State of Oklahoma. Show on map
Midwest City High SchoolMidwest City High School is one of two high schools in Midwest City, Oklahoma, United States. The school is part of the Mid-Del School District, and serves more than 1,600 students. Show on map
Claremore High SchoolClaremore High School is a public high school located in Claremore, Oklahoma. The school colors are red and white. The mascot is a red and white striped zebra. Show on map
Halliburton FieldHalliburton Field (IATA: DUC, ICAO: KDUC, FAA LID: DUC) (Duncan Municipal Airport) is in Stephens County, Oklahoma, two miles south of Duncan, which owns it. Show on map
Chickasha High SchoolChickasha High School is located in Chickasha, Oklahoma, United States. For the 2012–2013 school year, the school had an enrollment of 684 with 48 teachers. Show on map
Oklahoma Wesleyan UniversityOklahoma Wesleyan University (OKWU) is an evangelical Christian university of the Wesleyan Church located in Bartlesville, in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Show on map
Afton High SchoolAfton High School is located in the northeast corner of Oklahoma in the town of Afton. Its mascot is the eagle and it has an enrollment of 156 students. Show on map
Crossroads MallPlaza Mayor at the Crossroads (formerly Crossroads Mall) is a 1,268,000 square foot super regional shopping mall and trade area located in south Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Show on map
Redlands Community CollegeRedlands Community College (Redlands) is a community college located in El Reno, Oklahoma. Student enrollment is approximately 2,200 per semester. Show on map
Tecumseh High SchoolTecumseh High School is a high school located in Tecumseh, Oklahoma. The school nickname is the Savages, and the School's mascot is the Savage. 3A State champion in women's basketball in the year 1993. Show on map
Bethany High SchoolBethany High School (BHS) is located in Bethany, Oklahoma, United States. The first class graduated in 1931. The school mascot of BHS is the Broncho. Show on map
Eufaula High SchoolEufaula High School is a secondary school in Eufaula, Oklahoma, U.S.A. operated by Eufaula Public Schools. It serves grades 9 through 12. Show on map
Clinton High SchoolClinton High School is a 9th - 12th grade public high school in Clinton, Oklahoma. Clinton High School's mascot is the Red Tornado. Show on map
Cascia Hall Preparatory SchoolCascia Hall Preparatory School is an Augustinian Roman Catholic coeducational College-preparatory day school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Show on map
Boise City AirportBoise City Airport (FAA LID: 17K) is in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, four miles north of the City of Boise City, which owns it. Show on map
Barnsdall High SchoolBarnsdall High School is a secondary school in Barnsdall, Oklahoma. It belongs to the Barnsdall Independent School District. Show on map
Prague High SchoolPrague High School is the public high school serving Prague, Oklahoma. The official mascot of the school is The Red Devils. Show on map
Seminole State CollegeSeminole State College (formerly Seminole Junior College) is a state-supported community college in Seminole, Oklahoma. Show on map
Southern Nazarene UniversitySouthern Nazarene University (SNU) is a Christian liberal arts college located in Bethany, Oklahoma, United States. Show on map
Northwest Classen High SchoolNorthwest Classen High School is a public high school serving students in grades 9-12 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Show on map
Lakes, rivers, streams and other bodies of water in Oklahoma
NameDescriptionShow
Big Skin BayouBig Skin Bayou, also known as Skin Bayou or Big Skin Creek, is a tributary of the Arkansas River located in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma. It takes its name from the French word \"skein\" which are loose, tangled layers of yarn. A large, colorful canebrake resembling yarn; formed a near impenetrable, natural wall near the mouth of the creek before it was cleared for farming. French trappers and explorers named several of the major tributaries of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma; as it was once a part of the French Territory of Louisiana that was later the Louisiana Purchase. At one time, there were large rock bluffs near Big Skin's confluence with the Arkansas (most of these bluffs were later destroyed to provide rock fill for the W.D. Mayo Lock and Dam). The bluff on the south side (LeFLore Count Show on map
Kaw LakeKaw Lake is a reservoir completed in 1976 in the northern reaches of the U.S. state of Oklahoma, near Kaw City. It is approximately 8 miles (13 km) east of Ponca City. Kaw Dam is 9,466 feet (2,885 m) long and 121 feet (37 m) above the stream bed. The dam lies 654 miles (1,053 km) above the mouth of the Arkansas River. The top of the flood control pool is 1,044.5 feet (318.4 m), while the normal operating level is 1,010 feet. The Corps of Engineers and Camp McFadden offers camping on the west shore of Kaw Lake at Ponca Cove. Show on map
Keystone LakeKeystone Lake is a reservoir in northeastern Oklahoma on the Arkansas and Cimarron rivers. It is located upstream about 23 miles (37 km) from Tulsa. It was created in 1968 when the Keystone Dam was completed. The primary purposes are: flood control, hydroelectric power generation, wildlife management and recreation. Two Oklahoma state parks, Keystone State Park and Walnut Creek State Park, are located along the shores of the lake offering camping, hiking and biking trails, fishing, swimming and boating opportunities. Show on map
North Canadian RiverThe North Canadian River is a tributary of the Canadian River, approximately 441 miles (710 km) long, that flows through New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma in the United States. The North Canadian River rises just east of Des Moines, New Mexico in Union County, New Mexico, where it is known as Corrumpa Creek. From there it flows eastwardly through the Oklahoma Panhandle starting in Cimarron County, where it is also known for some distance as the Beaver River. It flows briefly into Sherman County in the Texas Panhandle for about 15 miles (24 km), then back to the Oklahoma Panhandle in Texas County, where it has a confluence with Coldwater Creek just above the dam at the Optima Lake project near Hardesty. Because the source of the river in this area is the Ogallala Aquifer, and because of increa Show on map
Foss ReservoirFoss Reservoir, also known as Foss Lake, lies in Custer County, Oklahoma on the Washita River, about 15 miles (24 km) west of Clinton, Oklahoma. The reservoir was constructed during 1958–1961 by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation. The project was known originally as the Washita Basin Project. The lake and dam were named for the community of Foss, Oklahoma, about 6 miles (9.7 km) south of the site. The primary purposes are to regulate flow of the river and to provide water for the cities of Bessie, Clinton, Cordell and Hobart. It is western Oklahoma's largest lake and lies entirely within Foss State Park. Show on map
Optima LakeOptima Lake was built to be a reservoir in Texas County, Oklahoma. The site is located just north of Hardesty and east of Guymon in the Oklahoma Panhandle. The earthen Optima Lake Dam (National ID # OK20510) was completed in 1978 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, with a height of 120 feet, and a length at its crest of 16,875 feet. Although designed to contain a maximum of 618,500 acre-feet of water, the lake never reached more than 5 percent of its capacity, and remains effectively empty. Rapid declines in streamflow related to large-scale pumping from the High Plains Aquifer, also known as the Ogallala Aquifer, coincided with the completion of dam construction to make this lake a dramatic example of unanticipated environmental impacts. Show on map
Fort Supply LakeFort Supply Lake is in Woodward County, Oklahoma, about 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Fort Supply and 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Woodward. Managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the lake surface covers 1,800 acres (7.3 km2). There are about 6,000 acres (24 km2) of public hunting land managed by the Corps of Engineers and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation adjacent to the lake. Show on map
Fort Cobb ReservoirFort Cobb Reservoir is a reservoir located in Caddo County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It impounds the waters of Cobb (Pond) Creek and Lake Creek. The lake covers approximately 4,000 acres (16 km²) of water and 45 mi (72 km) of shoreline. It was constructed in 1958. The towns of Carnegie, Fort Cobb, and Eakly are located nearby. Show on map
Pine Creek LakePine Creek Lake is a lake in McCurtain County and Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, USA. It is 8 miles (13 km) north of Valliant, Oklahoma. It is located east of Rattan and north of Sobol. The lake, which was built in 1969, impounds the waters of Little River, Pine Creek, and Turkey Creek with an earth dam. It is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control, water supply, fish and wildlife, and recreational purposes. The adjacent Pine Creek Wildlife Management Area extends this mission. Show on map
Hulah LakeHulah Lake is a man-made reservoir that was created by the United States Army Corps of Engineers damming the Caney River in northeastern Osage County, Oklahoma, within the Osage Indian Reservation. Hulah is an Osage word meaning \"eagle.\" The primary purpose of the lake is flood control. It has become a popular recreation area. According to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Hulah Lake project includes a public hunting area, bringing the total project area to 21,510 acres (8,700 ha). Show on map
Hugo LakeHugo Lake is manmade lake located 7 miles (11 km) east of Hugo, in Choctaw County, Oklahoma, United States. It is formed by Hugo Lake Dam on the Kiamichi River 18 miles (29 km) upstream from the Red River. The dam is visible from U.S. Route 70, which crosses its spillway just west of Sawyer. Lake Hugo features approximately 110 miles (180 km) of shoreline and covers over 13,250 acres (53.6 km2), or 20 square miles (52 km2). Its normal pool elevation is 404.5 feet (123.3 m) above sea level and its normal storage capacity is 157,600 acre feet (194,400,000 m3). At flood stage its elevation is at 437.5 feet (133.4 m) above sea level and it is capable of storing 966,700 acre feet (1.1924×109 m3) of flood waters. The lake's primary functions are to provide flood control, water storage, and recre Show on map
Waurika LakeWaurika Lake is a reservoir in southwestern Oklahoma, near Waurika. It is primarily in Jefferson County, but small parts of it are in Stephens County and Cotton County, Oklahoma. Its primary purposes are to provide flood control, irrigation, water supply, water quality, fish and wildlife, recreation, and other conservation needs of the public. The lake supplies water for the cities of Lawton, Duncan, Comanche, Temple, and Waurika. The wildlife management area comprises about 6,040 acres (24.4 km2). Show on map
Sooner LakeSooner Lake is a reservoir in Pawnee and Noble counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It was built in 1972 to serve as a reservoir of cooling water for a coal-fired power generation plant owned by Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company (OG&E). The plant is at the northwest end of the lake. The normal elevation is 927 feet (283 m). Maximum depth is 89 feet (27 m) and average depth is 28 feet (8.5 m). The lake covers 5,400 acres (22 km2) and has a water capacity of 149,000 acre feet (184,000,000 m3). The shoreline is 42 miles (68 km) long. Show on map
Lake HobartLake Hobart, also known as Rocky Lake, is a reservoir in Washita County, Oklahoma, just to the northwest of Rocky, off U.S. Route 183 and the N2200 and N2190 roads. It is 9.5 miles (15.3 km)from Hobart, Oklahoma. The reservoir was created as part of the Washita Basin Project in the 1950s, to improve water supply in the area by constructing a dam across Little Elk Creek. The Clinton-Cordell-Hobart Aqueduct carries water from the reservoir to the three communities for which it is named. It is popular with fisherman and boaters. The Grissom Cemetery lies near the northern side of the lake. Show on map
Clayton LakeClayton Lake is a small recreational lake in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. It is located 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Clayton, Oklahoma. The lake, which was built in 1935, impounds the waters of Peal Creek. It is operated as Clayton Lake State Park by the State of Oklahoma. The state park offers rental cabins, tent and RV campsites, picnic tables and shelters, comfort stations with showers, boat ramps, ADA accessible fishing dock, playground, hiking trails and swim beach. It is a popular fishing and camping spot due to its scenic location nestled among the Kiamichi Mountains, surrounded by pine tree forests. Show on map
Boomer LakeBoomer Lake is located in the city of Stillwater, Oklahoma and was completed in 1925. The lake, as an artificial reservoir created by damming Stillwater Creek, serves several purposes such as cooling the local power plant and providing entertainment and recreation. Boomer Lake has a surface area of 251 acres, watershed area of 8954 acres, shoreline length of 8.6 miles, shoreline development ratio of 4.17, and mean depth of 9.7 feet. In 2011 Boomer Lake underwent severe drying due to lack of water, with water levels dropping as much as 15 ft and the shoreline receding up to 40 ft in some areas. Show on map
Lake ElmerLake Elmer is a reservoir in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma that is owned by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The nearest town is Kingfisher, about 4 miles (6.4 km) southeast of the lake. Constructed in 1962, it was completely drained in 1978 for deepening the shoreline and constructing fishing jetties. It was reimpounded and restocked with fish, after a fish kill in 1979. It has a surface area of 60 acres (24 ha) and a shoreline of 3.4 miles (5.5 km). Its elevation is 1,119 feet (341 m). The latitude and longitude are 35.8798, -97.9878. It has an average depth of 6 feet (1.8 m) and a maximum depth of 18 feet (5.5 m). Show on map
Fourche MalineFourche Maline (pronounced foosh-ma-lean) (Bad Fork, French) is a 70.0-mile-long (112.7 km) tributary of the Poteau River in Oklahoma. The headwaters of Fourche Maline are in the Sans Bois Mountains in Latimer County. It flows southwestward through Robbers Cave State Park, then southeastward past Wilburton before turning eastward until it reaches the Poteau River in Le Flore County. Fourche Maline's confluence with the Poteau River is now submerged in Lake Wister. Show on map
Lake OverholserLake Overholser is a reservoir within the city limits of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The lake straddles the line separating Oklahoma and Canadian counties. Lake Overholser is formed by Overholser Dam on the North Canadian River in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. The lake is 2.9 miles (4.7 km) west of Bethany. Lake Overholser is named after Ed Overholser who was the 16th Mayor of the City of Oklahoma City. Show on map
Cimarron RiverThe Cimarron River extends 698 miles (1,123 km) across New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas. The headwaters flow from Johnson Mesa west of Folsom in northeastern New Mexico. Much of the river's length lies in Oklahoma, where it either borders or passes through eleven counties. There are no major cities along its route.The river enters the Oklahoma Panhandle near Kenton, crosses the southeastern corner of Colorado into Kansas, re-enters the Oklahoma Panhandle, re-enters Kansas, and finally returns to Oklahoma where it joins the Arkansas River at Keystone Reservoir west of Tulsa, Oklahoma, its only impoundment. The Cimarron drains a basin that encompasses about 18,927 square miles (49,020 km2). Show on map
Bird CreekBird Creek is a stream in northeast Oklahoma. The main creek is formed from the waters of North Bird Creek, Middle Bird Creek, and South Bird Creek, all of which rise in Osage County. The South and Middle branches of the creek converge at Bluestem Lake, while North Bird Creek joins the other two branches northwest of Pawhuska. From Pawhuska, the creek flows southeastward and eastward through the north side of the Tulsa metropolitan area, before reaching its mouth at the Verdigris River near Catoosa. Tributaries include Hominy Creek and Mingo Creek. Show on map
Lake Carl AlbertLake Carl Albert is a lake in Latimer County, Oklahoma, United States. The lake was formed as a result of the Scs-Rock Creek Site-02 dam on Rock Creek and is used for flood control, drinking water and recreation purposes. Construction was completed in 1964. Its normal surface area is 183 acres. It is owned by Town Of Talihina. Show on map
Lake ThunderbirdLake Thunderbird is a reservoir located in Norman, Oklahoma. The lake was constructed between 1962 and 1965 for the purpose of providing municipal water to the nearby communities of Del City, Midwest City and Norman. It is formed by an earthfill embankment (dam) 7,300 feet (2,200 m) long and up to 144 feet (44 m) high on the Little River. In addition to being a source for drinking water, Lake Thunderbird's secondary uses include numerous recreational activities. Show on map
Black Bear CreekBlack Bear Creek is a 116-mile-long (187 km) creek in northern Oklahoma. Black Bear Creek drains an area of 538 square miles (1,390 km2) in Garfield County, Noble County and Pawnee County, Oklahoma. It takes on a red color from the red clay of this area. The creek gets its name from the black bear. Though the area is outside of the range of the black bear, sightings have been rumored. Show on map
Atoka LakeLocated four miles North of Atoka in Southeastern Oklahoma, Lake Atoka was constructed in 1959 by the city of Oklahoma City; it supplies water to Lake Stanley Draper in Oklahoma City through a 60-inch pipeline. The lake has a surface area of 5,477 acre-feet with an average depth of 26 feet within 70 miles of shoreline and a capacity of 105,195 acre-feet. Show on map
Lake MurrayLake Murray is a 5,700-acre (23 km2) lake in south central Oklahoma, near Ardmore named for Oklahoma Governor William H. Murray. It was created by damming Anadarche and Fourche Maline Creeks. The lake is wholly within Lake Murray State Park, Oklahoma's largest state park, containing over 12,500 acres (51 km²) of relative wilderness. A state-operated lodge and resort is located on the west shore that serves many visitors to the lake, and serves as a base for numerous cabin and campground facilities near the lake. Show on map
Birch LakeBirch Lake is a lake 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south of Barnsdall, Oklahoma, Oklahoma and about 20 miles (32 km) southwest of Bartlesville.It impounds about 1,137 acres (4.60 km2) of water.It is formed from Birch Creek, which is a tributary of Bird Creek. It eventually empties into the Arkansas River.It is twenty miles (32 km) southweast of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Show on map
Sallisaw CreekSallisaw Creek is a 46.7-mile-long (75.2 km) tributary of the Arkansas River in far eastern Oklahoma. Its source is between Taylor and Doublehead mountains just south of Stilwell in Adair County. It flows in a southwestern direction through southern Adair County and central Sequoyah County before it empties into Robert S. Kerr Lake on the Arkansas River. The creek has four large tributaries. Greasy Creek meets Sallisaw Creek in southern Adair County, while Dry Creek and Brushy Creek join Sallisaw Creek near Marble City in northern Sequoyah County, and Little Sallisaw Creek flows into Robert S. Kerr Lake as it meets Sallisaw Creek. Show on map
Beaver RiverThe Beaver River is the historic name for an intermittent river in Oklahoma that drains most of the Oklahoma Panhandle. It is also known as the North Canadian River; both names are in common use. The Beaver River flows from Union County, New Mexico, entering the Oklahoma Panhandle in Cimarron County, then flowing out of state through Sherman County in the Texas Panhandle for about 15 miles (24 km), then back to the Oklahoma panhandle in Texas County, where it is impounded in Optima Lake. Downstream of the dam, it continues through the Oklahoma counties of Beaver and Harper before ending in Woodward County. Show on map
Elmer Thomas LakeElmer Thomas Lake is a lake in Comanche County in the state of Oklahoma in the United States. It is located on the boundary between the Wichita Mountain Wildlife Refuge and Fort Sill military base. The lake is named for an Oklahoma lawyer and politician, Elmer Thomas (1876-1965), who lived in Lawton and represented Oklahoma's 6th Congressional District in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1922 until 1926, then was elected as U.S. Senator, where he served until 1950. Show on map
Ozzie Cobb LakeOzzie Cobb Lake is a small recreational lake in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. It is located 6 miles (9.7 km) northeast of Rattan, Oklahoma. The lake, which was built in 1958, impounds the waters of Rock Creek. It is named for J. Ozzie Cobb (1898-1965), an area resident. It is managed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. Show on map
Broken Bow LakeBroken Bow Lake is a reservoir in southeastern Oklahoma, located on Mountain Fork River and 9 miles (14 km) northeast of the town of Broken Bow in McCurtain County. It is one of the largest lakes within the state of Oklahoma, and a popular tourist destination for locals and visitors from neighboring Texas and Arkansas. Show on map
James ForkThe James Fork is a 50.3-mile-long (81.0 km) river in the U.S. states of Arkansas and Oklahoma, forming on the north slope of Poteau Mountain in the Ouachita National Forest in Arkansas and flowing north and west into the Poteau River near Panama, Oklahoma. Via the Poteau and Arkansas rivers, the James Fork is part of the Mississippi River watershed. The settlements of Hartford, Midland, and Hackett, Arkansas are on or near the river. Portions of the Mansfield Branch of the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway and the main line of the Midland Valley Railroad were built alongside the river. Show on map
Sardis LakeSardis Lake is a reservoir in Pushmataha County and Latimer County in Oklahoma, USA, named for the now-defunct town of Sardis, Oklahoma. The dam impounding the lake is located approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Clayton. Sardis Lake is the focus of a lawsuit by the Chickasaw Nation against the Governor of Oklahoma, (Chickasaw v. Fallin) alleging that the state has ignored the tribe's rights to the water in the lake. The outcome of this case has the potential to become a major legal decision regarding not only this issue, but the rights of Native American tribes in other areas. Show on map
Tom Steed ReservoirCreated in 1975, Tom Steed Reservoir is a reservoir in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, 6 miles (9.7 km) northwest of the city of Snyder, Oklahoma. The reservoir is approximately 6400 acres (26 km²) of water created by damming West Otter Creek and diverting flows of Elk Creek through the Bretch Diversion Canal by Mountain Park Dam. Tom Steed Reservoir is the main feature of the Mountain Park Project of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. It provides municipal and industrial water to the cities of Snyder, Altus, and Frederick, as well as the Hackberry Flat Wildlife Management Area. Show on map
Glover RiverThe Glover River is a 33.2-mile-long (53.4 km) tributary of the Little River in the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Little and Red rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. The Glover River flows for its entire length in McCurtain County. It is formed by the confluence of its East Fork, 22.4 miles (36.0 km) long, and its West Fork, 21.3 miles (34.3 km) long; both forks rise near the northern boundary of McCurtain County. It joins the Little River 4.5 miles (7.2 km) southeast of Wright City. Show on map
Great Salt Plains LakeGreat Salt Plains Lake is a reservoir located within the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma in the United States named because of the salt flats in the area and for the Salt Fork Arkansas River, which is dammed to form the lake. It is notable for the variety of birds that are attracted to Ralstin Island (not open to the public) and also for the selenite crystals that can be collected along the shoreline. Recent droughts, most notably that of 2011, have had an adverse effect on the future of the lake. Show on map
Oologah LakeLake Oologah is a reservoir in northeastern Oklahoma. It is located near the towns of Oologah, Nowata, and Claremore. The lake has a surface of 29,500 acres (119 km2) of water and209 miles (336 km) of shoreline with 11 lake-side parks. The water storage capacity is rated as 552,210 acre feet (681,140,000 m3). The lake is formed along the Verdigris River, and is a source of water for the Tulsa Metropolitan Area. The purpose of the dam and lake is flood control, water supply, navigation, recreation, and fish and wildlife. Show on map
Poteau RiverThe Poteau River is a 141-mile (227 km) long river located in the U.S. states of Arkansas and Oklahoma. It is the only river in Oklahoma that flows north and is the seventh largest river in the state. It is a tributary of the Arkansas River, which itself is a tributary of the Mississippi River. Show on map
Tenkiller Ferry LakeTenkiller Ferry Lake, or more simply, \"Lake Tenkiller,\" is a reservoir in eastern Oklahoma formed by the damming of the Illinois River. The earth-fill dam was constructed between 1947 and 1952 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers for purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power generation, water supply and recreation. It went into full operation in 1953. The lake and dam were named for the Tenkiller family, prominent Cherokees who owned the land and ferry that were bought for the project. Show on map
Wild Horse LakeWild Horse Lake is a playa lake located in Texas County, Oklahoma. The lake was the location of the infamous Hay Meadow Massacre (July 1888) in which one faction in the county seat fight in Stevens County, Kansas, killed four members of the opposing faction. Since the killings took place in what was then No Man's Land, no court had jurisdiction over the crime. The lake was also the subject of Oklahoma case law in reference to water appropriations—Depuy V. Hoeme (1980 OK 26, 611 P.2d 228). Show on map
Lake of the ArbucklesThe Lake of the Arbuckles is a reservoir located in southern Oklahoma, 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Sulphur in Murray County. The lake covers 2,350 acres (950 ha) and is a principal water supply reservoir for the city of Ardmore, some 30 mi (48 km) to the southwest. It also supplies water to the cities of Sulphur, Davis, Wynnewood and a large oil refinery near Wynnewood. The lake also provides flood control, fish and wildlife habitat and recreation opportunities. Show on map
Heyburn LakeHeyburn Lake is a reservoir on Polecat Creek in Creek County, Oklahoma. It is about 15 miles (24 km) southwest of Sapulpa, Oklahoma. Tiger and Brown Creeks also drain into the lake. The nearest town is Kellyville, Oklahoma. It was named for the now-defunct community of Heyburn. Its primary objectives are to provide flood control, drinking water and recreation. It is owned by the Corps of Engineers. Heyburn State Park (Oklahoma) adjoins the lake. Show on map
Lake Jed JohnsonLake Jed Johnson, named for Jed Johnson (1888–1963), is third largest of thirteen small reservoirs in the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge, located in southwestern Oklahoma. It has a surface area of 57.5 acres (233,000 m2) and can be accessed by a boat ramp. The area is home to deer, elk, Longhorn cattle and bison, and there are many opportunities for boating, fishing, hunting, and hiking throughout the refuge. Show on map
Canadian RiverThe Canadian River is the longest tributary of the Arkansas River. It is about 906 miles (1,458 km) long, starting in Colorado and traveling through New Mexico, the Texas Panhandle, and Oklahoma. The drainage area is about 47,700 square miles (124,000 km2). The Canadian is sometimes referred to as the South Canadian River to differentiate it from the North Canadian River that flows into it. Show on map
Lake YaholaLake Yahola is a reservoir in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The reservoir was completed in 1924. Its primary purpose is to store raw water for treatment and distribution. This city-owned, 2-billion-US-gallon (7,600,000 m3), concrete-lined lake is an integral part of the Tulsa water supply, and receives water by pipeline from Lake Spavinaw. It is located in Mohawk Park, adjacent to the Mohawk Water Treatment Plant. Show on map
Blue RiverThe Blue River is a 141-mile-long (227 km) tributary of the Red River in southern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Red River, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. According to the Geographic Names Information System, the river has also been known as Blue Creek. The Board on Geographic Names settled on \"Blue River\" as the stream's official name in 1977. Show on map
Lake Stanley DraperLake Stanley Draper is a reservoir in southeast Oklahoma City, United States. It is one of three municipal reservoirs in the city. It was constructed in 1962-1963, and named for the long-time director of the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. Located between Midwest Boulevard and Post Road, near I-240, it receives water by pipeline from Atoka Lake and McGee Creek Reservoir. Show on map
Skiatook LakeSkiatook Lake is located in Osage County, Oklahoma, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of the town of Skiatook, 11 miles (18 km) east of Hominy, Oklahoma and about 18 miles (29 km) from Tulsa. The Skiatook Dam is located 14 miles upstream of the confluence of Hominy and Bird Creeks. Gentle rolling hills of Blackjack and Post Oak interspersed with Tallgrass prairie surround the lake. Show on map
Lake HefnerLake Hefner is a reservoir in northwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was built in 1947 to expand the water supply for the city of Oklahoma City. It is named after Robert A. Hefner, who served as mayor of Oklahoma City from April 11, 1939 to April 8, 1947. It also serves as a major recreational destination, as it is surrounded by 9.5 miles (15.3 km) of bicycle trails. Show on map
Lake ClaremoreClaremore Lake is a reservoir in Rogers County, Oklahoma. Constructed in 1929-1930 by damming Dog Creek for the purpose of providing water to the city of Claremore, Oklahoma and houses recreational amenities such as boat ramps, fishing docks, and picnic areas. In 2011, the lake added a 9-hole disc golf course. The lake has a capacity of 7,900 acre feet (9,700,000 m3), covers 470 acres (1.9 km2) Show on map
Lake HudsonLake Hudson, also known as Markham Ferry Reservoir, is a man-made reservoir in Mayes County, Oklahoma, about 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of Locust Grove, Oklahoma and 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Pryor, Oklahoma. It was created by the completion of the Robert S. Kerr dam on the Grand River in 1964. It is managed by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA). Show on map
Lake EllsworthLake Ellsworth is a lake in Caddo and Comanche counties in the state of Oklahoma in the United States. It is shown on the Oklahoma Department of Transportation map as being a fairly large lake south of Apache, Oklahoma. Lake Ellsworth has a stream source from East Cache Creek, 53 miles (85 km) of shoreline, and encompasses 5,600 acres (23 km2). Show on map
Chikaskia RiverThe Chikaskia River (usually pronounced chi-KAS-kee-uh but often pronounced chi-KAS-kee in southern Kansas) is a 159-mile-long (256 km) tributary of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Salt Fork and Arkansas rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Show on map
Lake LawtonkaLake Lawtonka is a lake in Comanche County in the state of Oklahoma in the United States. The lake is 2 square miles (5 square kilometers) in area. It is formed by a dam 60 feet (18 meters) high and 375 feet (114 meters) long across Medicine Bluff Creek. The lake provides the water supply for Fort Sill and Lawton to the south. Show on map
Lake EuchaIn 1952, Lake Eucha in Delaware County, Oklahoma, was created by completion of the Eucha dam on Spavinaw Creek. The nearest town is Jay, Oklahoma. This lake is owned by the City of Tulsa, Oklahoma and functions as additional storage and as a buffer for Lake Spavinaw, which is the principal municipal water source for Tulsa. Show on map
Elk RiverThe Elk River is a 35.2-mile-long (56.6 km) tributary of the Neosho River in southwestern Missouri and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. Its tributaries also drain a small portion of northwestern Arkansas. Via the Neosho and Arkansas rivers, the Elk is part of the Mississippi River watershed. Show on map
Washita RiverThe Washita River is a river in Texas and Oklahoma, United States. The river is 295 miles (475 km) long and terminates into Lake Texoma in Johnston County (also Bryan County and Marshall County - 33°55′N 96°35′W / 33.917°N 96.583°W), Oklahoma and the Red River. Show on map
Turner FallsTurner Falls, at 77 feet (23 m), is locally considered Oklahoma's tallest waterfall, although its height matches one in Natural Falls State Park. The falls are located on Honey Creek in the Arbuckle Mountains in south central Oklahoma, 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Davis. Show on map
Salt Fork Arkansas RiverThe Salt Fork of the Arkansas River is a 239-mile-long (385 km) tributary of the Arkansas River in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Arkansas River, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Show on map
Medicine Lodge RiverThe Medicine Lodge River is a 130-mile-long (210 km) tributary of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Salt Fork and Arkansas rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Show on map
Verdigris RiverThe Verdigris River /ˈvɜːrdᵻɡrɪs/ is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. It is about 310 miles (500 km) long. Via the Arkansas, it is part of the Mississippi River watershed. Show on map
Grand Lake O' the CherokeesGrand Lake o' the Cherokees is situated in Northeast Oklahoma, nestled in the foothills of the Ozark Mountain Range. It is often simply called Grand Lake. It is administered by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA). Show on map
Flint CreekFlint Creek is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 732 at the 2010 census, up from 580 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Drowning CreekDrowning Creek is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 155 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Elm Fork Red RiverThe Elm Fork Red River is a river in Oklahoma. It flows into the North Fork of the Red River near Quartz Mountain State Park, about ten miles east of Mangum, Oklahoma. Show on map
Muddy Boggy CreekMuddy Boggy River, also known as the Muddy Boggy Creek, is a 175-mile-long (282 km) river in south central Oklahoma. a major tributary of the Red River in south central Oklahoma, is formed by the confluence of Muddy Boggy Creek and Clear Boggy Creek. Both streams converge at a location known as River Mile 24 in Pontotoc County, Oklahoma. It is a major tributary of the Red River. The river is inhabited by over one hundred species of fish. Show on map
Clear Boggy CreekClear Boggy Creek, also known as the Clear Boggy River, is a 132-mile-long (212 km) creek in southeastern Oklahoma that is a tributary of Muddy Boggy Creek. Show on map
Little River Show on map
Lightning Creek Show on map
Canton Lake Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Oklahoma
NameDescriptionShow
Kiamichi MountainsThe Kiamichi Mountains are a mountain range in southeastern Oklahoma. A subrange within the larger Ouachita Mountains that extend from Oklahoma to western Arkansas, the Kiamichi Mountains sit within Le Flore, Pushmataha, and McCurtain counties near the towns of Poteau and Albion. The foothills of the Kiamichi Mountains sit within Haskell County, Northern Le Flore County, and Northern Pittsburg County. Its peaks, which line up south of the Kiamichi River, reach 2,500 feet in elevation. The range is the namesake of Kiamichi Country, the official tourism designation for southeastern Oklahoma. Show on map
Lost MountainLost Mountain is a mountain in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, located approximately 10 miles northwest of Antlers, Oklahoma. It is a part of the Kiamichi Mountains, a subrange of the Ouachita Mountains. Its summit is 791 feet above sea level. The commonly accepted definition of mountain calls for a mountain’s summit to top 1,000 feet in elevation. In that sense Lost Mountain qualifies as a hill. A fishing camp was located at the base of Lost Mountain for decades. Oklahoma State Highway 2 now passes to the west of Lost Mountain, affording an excellent view of it and the river valley. Show on map
Great Salt Plains State ParkGreat Salt Plains State Park is a 840-acre (3.4 km2) Oklahoma state park located in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma. It is located 8 miles (13 km) north of Jet, Oklahoma on SH-38 and 12 miles (19 km) east of Cherokee. Recreational opportunities at Great Salt Plains State Park include boating, camping, picnicking, swimming, hiking, mountain biking and exploring. The Great Salt Plains Lake is located at the park and covers 9,300 acres (38 km2) with 41 miles (66 km) of shoreline and is a shallow, salty lake with fishing opportunities for catfish, saugeye, sandbass and hybrid striper. The average depth is reportedly 4 feet (1.2 m) and the impoundment capacity is 31,420 acre-feet. Salinity of the water in the reservoir is one-fourth that of sea water. Personal watercraft are not recommended. The park@en . Show on map
Rodney MountainRodney Mountain is a mountain in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, located approximately five miles northwest of Antlers, Oklahoma. It is a part of the Kiamichi Mountains, a subrange of the Ouachita Mountains, and forms its southwest-most extremity. Its summit is 767 feet above sea level. It is found at GPS coordinates (latitude and longitude) 34.2984336 and -95.6410833. The Kiamichi River flows adjacent to the mountain, and Rodney Crossing, a low-water ford in the area, was for decades a locally important transportation link. Show on map
Lake Eucha State ParkLake Eucha Park is a 31-acre (13 ha) former Oklahoma state park located in Delaware County, Oklahoma. It is now owned and managed by the city of Tulsa, and the closest town is Jay, Oklahoma. The park was previously known as Lake Eucha State Park and Upper Spavinaw State Park. There have been parks, state and otherwise, around the lake since at least 1938; the oldest lease clearly applying to this park was started in 1967. Oddly enough, while the park includes the name \"Lake\" in its name, it is in fact not on the shore of Lake Eucha, and is in fact fenced off from the lake. Show on map
Honor Heights ParkHonor Heights Park (122 acres) is a botanical garden and arboretum located at North Honor Heights Drive, Muskogee, Oklahoma. It is a public park operated by the City of Muskogee. In 1909, the City of Muskogee purchased the original 40 acres (160,000 m2) of Honor Heights Park for $4,500. Agency Hill was officially named Honor Heights Park in 1919 in honor of the soldiers of World War I. Show on map
Upper Kiamichi River WildernessThe Upper Kiamichi River Wilderness is located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Created by an act of Congress in 1988, the wilderness covers an area of 9,754 acres (39.47 km2). Contained within Ouachita National Forest, the wilderness is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. About 7 miles (11.3 km) of the Ouachita National Recreation Trail pass through the wilderness allowing hikers access to the highest mountain ridges in eastern Oklahoma. Show on map
Twin Bridges State ParkTwin Bridges State Park is located on the north side of the Grand Lake o' the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma. It was named for the two (or \"twin\") bridges which carry U.S. Highway 60 over arms of the lake which connect to the Neosho River and the Spring River. Twin Bridges State Park is known for its quiet country atmosphere and excellent fishing for trophy-sized bass, catfish, bluegill, and spoonbill. A fishing center with bait, tackle, and enclosed fishing dock is located within the park. Lighted boat ramps, picnic areas, RV and tent campgrounds, snacks, lake huts, playgrounds, volleyball court, and horseshoe pits are also available. Picnic facilities include tables, individual shelters, and group picnic shelters for larger gatherings. Campsites range from semi-modern RV sites to ten Show on map
Cherokee State ParkCherokee State Park is a 43-acre (170,000 m2) Oklahoma state park located in Mayes County, Oklahoma. It is located near the city of Disney, Oklahoma. Cherokee State Park is located in northeastern Oklahoma on the west shore of Grand Lake o' the Cherokees, one of Oklahoma's largest lakes with over 59,000 acres (240 km2) and 1,300 miles (2,100 km) of shoreline. The park consists of several smaller parks that are located near the Pensacola Dam and around the lake. The area is known for great fishing and a variety of water sports. Amenities include picnic sites, a group shelter, campsites, playgrounds, comfort stations, lighted boat ramp and a 9-hole golf course. Show on map
Oklahoma City National MemorialThe Oklahoma City National Memorial is a memorial in the United States that honors the victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995. The memorial is located in downtown Oklahoma City on the former site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which was destroyed in the 1995 bombing. This building was located on NW 5th Street between N. Robinson Avenue and N. Harvey Avenue. The memorial was formally dedicated on April 19, 2000: the fifth anniversary of the bombing. The museum was dedicated and opened the following year on February 19. Show on map
Wister Lake State ParkLake Wister State Park is a 3,428-acre (13.87 km2) Oklahoma state park located in Le Flore County, Oklahoma. It is located near the city of Wister, Oklahoma. Lake Wister State Park, in southeast Oklahoma, is a gateway to the beautiful Ouachita National Forest. The park includes 7,300-acre (30 km2) Lake Wister with five camping areas. The park offers many recreational activities including hiking, camping, bicycling, picnics, fishing, hunting, boating and water skiing. Enjoy the water spray park for children and adults. A waterfowl refuge is nearby, and hunting is allowed at Wister Wildlife Management Area. Camping facilities include cabins, tent sites and RV sites with both modern and semi-modern. Other facilities include comfort stations with showers, picnic tables, group picnic shelters,@en . Show on map
Mount PinchotMount Pinchot is the highest peak in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge of Southwest Oklahoma at 2,476 feet (755 m) above sea level. It is located toward the western edge of the WMWR. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for the maintenance of the area. Mount Pinchot is located within the Wildlife Refuge's Special Use Area and is closed to the public. Special wildlife viewing tours are offered by the Refuge which take participants very near the base of the mountain. Show on map
Robbers Cave State ParkNot to be confused with Robber's Cave, a river cave in Uttarakhand state in India. Robbers Cave State Park is a state park in Latimer County, Oklahoma. It is located 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Wilburton, Oklahoma, on State Highway 2. Originally named Latimer State Park, it received its current name in 1936. It is located in the scenic, hilly woodlands of the Sans Bois Mountains of southeast Oklahoma. This park is a favorite of rappellers, equestrians, hikers and outdoor lovers. The park and adjoining wildlife management area covers more than 8,000 acres (3,200 ha) and includes three lakes. It offers visitors acres of discovery and enjoyment including trout fishing in season, boating, hunting, mountain biking, trails for hikers and horses, sandstone cliffs for climbing and rappelling, and fa Show on map
Woodward ParkWoodward Park is a 45-acre (18 ha) public park, botanical garden, and arboretum located between 21st Street and 24th Street east of South Peoria Avenue and west of South Rockford Street in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in the Midwestern United States. Initially, the park, named for Helen Woodward, the original property owner, was established in 1929, after a lengthy court suit over ownership. Show on map
Red Rock Canyon State ParkRed Rock Canyon State Park is located 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Hinton in Caddo County, Oklahoma. Before the settlement of Oklahoma, the area was used by Plains Indians as a winter campsite. The canyon was a stop on the California Road where settlers would gather fresh water and repair their wagons. Wagon wheel ruts are still visible in the park. The canyon has the only remaining site of native Caddo maple trees. Show on map
Arrowhead State ParkArrowhead State Park is a 2,200-acre (8.9 km2) Oklahoma state park located in northern Pittsburg County, Oklahoma on a peninsula of Eufaula Lake. It is located near the city of Canadian, Oklahoma. Lake Eufaula is one of the largest man-made lakes in the southwest. Arrowhead State Park features 100 tent sites and 91 total RV sites. The park also offers picnic shelters, a marina, playgrounds, trails, miniature golf course, swimming area, mountain biking, equestrian campground, stables, and 25 miles (40 km) of equestrian trails. Group camps with a kitchen and bunkhouses are available and can sleep up to 144 people. Area 51 Marina, which also offers a restaurant, is also located at the park in the Echo Ridge area. Show on map
Foss State ParkFoss State Park is a 1,749-acre (708 ha) Oklahoma state park located on Foss Lake, in southwestern Custer County, Oklahoma, near the city of Foss. Recreational activities include hiking, biking, horseback riding, fishing, boating, swimming and camping. Facilities include 110 RV campsites, 10 of which have full-hookups and 100 that are semi-modern. All sites are paved and offer 30 amp or 50 amp service plus water. Big rig sites, shaded sites and 35 tent sites are also available. Foss State Park has an equestrian camp with a multi-purpose trail for horseback riding, hiking and mountain biking. Horse rental is not available. The park also features picnic areas, group picnic shelters, grills, fire rings, comfort stations with showers, lighted boat ramps, boat storage, boat rentals, playgrounds Show on map
Winding Stair Mountain National Recreation AreaWinding Stair Mountain National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area located within the Ouachita National Forest. State Highway 1, known as the Talimena Scenic Byway in this area, bisects the recreation area. Winding Stair Mountain National Recreation Area and the nearby Upper Kiamichi River and Black Fork Mountain Wilderness areas were created by an act of Congress on October 18, 1988. The recreational area consists of 26,445 acres (107.02 km2) with many campgrounds, an 85 acres (340,000 m2) lake and many hiking trails. It lies mostly within LeFlore County, Oklahoma. Show on map
Roman Nose State ParkRoman Nose State Park is a state park located in Blaine County, 7 miles (11 km) north of Watonga, Oklahoma. The park opened in 1937 and was named after Chief Henry Roman Nose, who died in the canyon in 1917. Roman Nose State Park is one of the original seven Oklahoma state parks. Set amidst a beautiful canyon, recreation activities at this state park include an 18 hole golf course, swimming pools, hiking trails, two lakes, trout fishing in season, canoeing, paddle boats, mountain biking, horse stables and hayrides by reservation. Show on map
Great Plains State ParkGreat Plains State Park is a 487-acre (1.97 km2) Oklahoma state park located in Kiowa County, Oklahoma. It is located near the city of Mountain Park, Oklahoma. Located south of Hobart off Hwy 183, Great Plains State Park is nestled between the Wichita Mountains and the Tom Steed Reservoir. The area offers water sports, boating, boat ramps, camping, RV parking, swimming beach, playground, picnic areas, cycling, mountain biking and hiking trails. The campground spans approximately 460 acres (1.9 km2) of park land with 56 RV hookups and 30 tent sites. RV sites consist of 14 modern water, sewer, and electric sites and 42 semi-modern sites with water and electric. Located on the shores of Tom Steed Reservoir, a large lake with 31 miles (50 km) of shoreline. Show on map
Fort Cobb State ParkFort Cobb State Park is a 1,872-acre (7.58 km2) Oklahoma state park located in Caddo County, Oklahoma. It is located near the city of Fort Cobb, Oklahoma. This park offers recreational activities and facilities including camping, fishing, boating, water sports, golf, hunting, and swimming. A visitor's center is located on site, as well as a gift shop, bait and tackle shop, RV sites with water and electric hook-ups, primitive camping areas, scenic views of the lake, comfort stations, showers, picnic sites, group shelters, a playground, swimming beach, and marina. Equipment rentals are available. The park also offers an 18-hole golf course with practice range, putting green, and pro shop. The park features 299 RV sites and 300 tent campsites. Show on map
Mount WilliamsMount Williams was a large artificial hill in Norman, Oklahoma; it was built by the United States Navy as the backstop to a firing range, the hill became a minor landmark in the Norman area. It was named after the commander of the base at the time it was built. The hill was located near the Interstate 35/Robinson St. interchange. The hill was colloquially known as \"Mount Norman\", to Oklahomans outside of the greater Oklahoma City area. While many in the state referred to the hill as \"Mount Norman\", the hill was also known by locals as \"Bullet Mountain\"In 2006, the hill was demolished in order to make room for a Super Target. One of the access roads into the Target is named \"Mount Williams Drive\" to commemorate the old hill. Show on map
Bernice State ParkBernice State Park is an 88-acre (360,000 m2) Oklahoma state park located in Delaware County, Oklahoma. It is located near the city of Bernice, Oklahoma at the northwestern corner of Grand Lake o' the Cherokees. Known as the \"Crappie Capital of the World,\" the park also offers fishing for largemouth bass, white bass, channel catfish and bluegill. Visitors will find semi-modern RV sites and tent campsites, comfort stations with showers, boat ramp, courtesy boat dock for loading and unloading, picnic areas, playground, one mile (1.6 km) paved walking and jogging path that is handicap accessible, two wildlife watch towers, swimming and a Nature Center. Show on map
Mount ScottMount Scott is a prominent mountain just to the northwest of Lawton, Oklahoma rising to a height of 2,464 feet (751 m). It is located in the Wichita Mountains near Fort Sill Military Reservation and lies in the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge (WMWR). The US Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for the maintenance of the area. Visitors can reach the summit by car or bicycle via a three-mile paved road. Hiking is allowed, although there are no formal trails and the paved road is closed to pedestrians. Mount Scott is also popular for its numerous rock climbing areas. The peak was named in honor of General Winfield Scott. Show on map
Wichita Mountains Wildlife RefugeWichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, located in southwestern Oklahoma near Lawton, has protected unique wildlife habitats since 1901 and is the oldest managed wildlife facility in the United States Fish and Wildlife Service system. Measuring about 59,020 acres (238.8 km2), the refuge hosts a great diversity of species: 806 plant species, 240 species of birds, 36 fish, and 64 reptiles and amphibians are present. The refuge's location in the geologically unique Wichita Mountains and its areas of undisturbed mixed grass prairie make it an important conservation area. The Wichitas are approximately 500 million years old. Show on map
Little Sahara State Recreation AreaLittle Sahara State Park is a state park located in Oklahoma, named for its resemblance to the Sahara Desert.The vast dunes have formed over time from terrace deposits, remnants of prehistoric times when the Cimarron River flowed over the entire area. Show on map
Glass MountainsThe Glass Mountains (also known as Gloss Mountains or Gloss Hills) are not actually mountains, but a series of mesas and buttes that are part of the Blaine Escarpment that extends from the Permian red beds of northwestern Oklahoma in Major County. The Glass Mountains rise 150 feet (46 m) to 200 feet (61 m) above the surface of the plains, and the highest elevation in the formation is about 1,600 feet (490 m) above sea level. The Glass Mountains stretch west along US Highway 412 from Orienta south of the Cimarron River. The name comes from the sparkling selenite crystals on the slopes and tops of the mesas. Show on map
Alabaster Caverns State ParkAlabaster Caverns State Park is a 200-acre (0.81 km2) state park approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south of Freedom, Oklahoma, United States near Oklahoma State Highway 50. It is home to the largest natural gypsum cave in the world that is open to the public. The gypsum is mostly in the form of alabaster. There are several types of alabaster found at the site, including pink, white, and the rare black alabaster. This black alabaster can be found in only three veins in the world, one each in Oklahoma, Italy and China. Another form of gypsum can be found in the many selenite crystal formations. Show on map
Black Mesa State ParkBlack Mesa State Park is an Oklahoma state park in Cimarron County, near the western border of the Oklahoma panhandle and New Mexico. The park is located about 15 miles (24 km) away from its namesake, Black Mesa, the highest point in Oklahoma (4,973 feet (1,516 m) above sea level). The mesa was named for the layer of black lava rock that coats it. The associated nature preserve is open to hiking and contains 1,600 acres (6.5 km2) and is home to 23 rare plants and 8 rare animal species. The nearest community is Kenton, Oklahoma. The nearest town is Boise City, Oklahoma. Show on map
Salt Plains National Wildlife RefugeThe Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge is part of the United States system of National Wildlife Refuges. It is located in Alfalfa County in northern Oklahoma, north of Jet (pop. 230), along Great Salt Plains Lake, which is formed by a dam on the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River. The refuge was established March 26, 1930 by executive order of President Herbert Hoover and contains 32,080 acres (130 km2) of protected land as habitat to approximately 312 species of birds and 30 species of mammals. It was designated a National Natural Landmark in June 1983. Show on map
St. Louis to San Fancisco Railway Line (Historical)The St. Louis–San Francisco Railway (reporting mark SLSF), also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. At the end of 1970 it operated 4,547 miles (7,318 km) of road on 6,574 miles (10,580 km) miles of track, not including subsidiaries Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway or the Alabama, Tennessee and Northern Railroad; that year it reported 12,795 million ton-miles of revenue freight and no passengers. It was purchased and absorbed into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1980. Show on map
Ouachita MountainsThe Ouachita Mountains (/ˈwɒʃᵻtɔː/ WOSH-i-taw) are a mountain range in west central Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma. The range's subterranean roots may extend as far as central Texas, or beyond it to the current location of the Marathon Uplift. Along with the Ozark Mountains, the Ouachita Mountains form the U.S. Interior Highlands, one of the few major mountainous regions between the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains. The highest peak in the Ouachitas is Mount Magazine in west-central Arkansas which rises to 2,753 feet (839 m). Show on map
Osage Hills State ParkOsage Hills State Park is a 1,100-acre (4.5 km2) Oklahoma state park It is located in eastern Osage County, Oklahoma. The nearest cities are Pawhuska and Bartlesville. The park offers outdoor recreation opportunities including camping, hiking, fishing and wildlife watching. Park facilities include picnic tables and shelters, 20 semi-modern RV campsites, 16 tent sites and 8 cabins. Several of the park's structures are historic parkitecture built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s and 1940s. Show on map
Washita National Wildlife RefugeWashita National Wildlife Refuge is a National Wildlife Refuge of the United States located in Custer County, Oklahoma. Within the refuge, the slow-moving Washita River winds through prairie and cropland to merge with Foss Reservoir, providing a home and resting area for geese and other waterfowl. Gently rolling hills, ravines, and bottomlands laced with creeks shelter wildlife as common as white-tailed deer and as unusual as the Texas horned lizard, a state-listed endangered species. Show on map
Quartz MountainQuartz Mountain (also called Baldy Point) is located in Greer County in southwest Oklahoma. It is the namesake of Quartz Mountain Nature Park and its eastern flank is enclosed by the park boundaries. It is near the cities of Mangum, Oklahoma and Altus, Oklahoma. The park is open to the public year round for rock climbing, hiking, boating, camping, nature observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. The mountain overlooks scenic Lake Altus-Lugert. Show on map
Cherokee Oklahoma Tribal Statistical AreaOklahoma Tribal Statistical Area is a statistical entity identified and delineated by federally recognized American Indian tribes in Oklahoma that formerly had a reservation but do not now have a reservation in that state (an exception being the Osage Nation's retention of mineral rights on their reservation). Often, an OTSA will be that of the former Indian Reservation in Oklahoma. They are usually referred to as Tribal Jurisdictional Areas. Show on map
Arbuckle MountainsThe Arbuckle Mountains are an ancient mountain range in south-central Oklahoma in the United States. They lie in Murray, Carter, Pontotoc, and Johnston counties. The granite rocks of the Arbuckles date back to the Precambrian 'Era' some 1.4 billion years ago which were overlain by rhyolites during the Cambrian Period. The range reaches a height of 1,412 feet above sea level. According to the U.S. Geological Service (USGS): Show on map
Sequoyah National Wildlife RefugeSequoyah National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1970 to provide habitat for waterfowl and other migratory birds and to provide food and cover for resident wildlife. It contains 20,800 acres (8,400 ha) on the western edge of Robert S. Kerr Reservoir in three Oklahoma Counties: Muskogee, Haskell and Sequoyah. The refuge was named in honor of Sequoyah, a Cherokee who developed an alphabet for the Cherokee language. Show on map
Okmulgee State ParkOkmulgee State Park is an Oklahoma state park in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma in the United States. The park is 1,075 acres (435 ha) and sits at an elevation of 758 feet (231 m). The park is adjacent to Dripping Springs State Park and is located on Okmulgee Lake. Okmulgee State Park, established in 1963, is open for year-round recreation including camping, fishing, swimming and hiking. Show on map
Claremore MoundClaremore Mound, a hill in present-day Rogers County, Oklahoma, is the site of the Battle of Strawberry Moon where in 1817 a band Cherokees under Chief Spring Frog (Too-an-tuh) wiped out Chief Clermont's band of Osage Indians. The hill is located north of Sageeyah near the south bank of the Verdigris River. The mound and the nearby city were both named in honor of Chief Clermont. Show on map
Tishomingo National Wildlife RefugeThe Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge is a National Wildlife Refuge of the United States located in Oklahoma. It is in southern Johnston and northeastern Marshall Counties in the eastern part of the state, near the upper Washita arm of Lake Texoma. The refuge was established in 1946 and contains 16,464 acres (66.3 km²) of protected land managed by the Fish and Wildlife Service. Show on map
Rainy MountainRainy Mountain is a rounded hill standing northwest apart from the main Wichita Mountains in Kiowa County, Oklahoma. It was a prominent landmark for the Plains Indians on the southern plains. Rainy Mountain Creek, flowing northeastward from Rainy Mountain, was a favored winter camp for Plains Indians, especially the Kiowas, because the grass was green even in winter. The creek is the primary waterway of the Rainy Mountain Creek Watershed which was subject to severe annual flooding. In the years from 1926 to 1945 there were 52 major floods and 61 smaller floods. In 1960 the Kiowa County, Washita County and Mountain View Conservation Districts, in conjunction with the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service), implemented a project to construct 29 flood contr Show on map
Osage HillsThe Osage Hills is a hilly area in Oklahoma, commonly known as The Osage. The name refers to the broad rolling hills and rolling tallgrass prairie and Cross Timbers encompassing Osage County and surrounding areas, including portions of Mayes, Tulsa, Washington and Kay Counties. The Osage is the southern extension of the Flint Hills of Kansas. Show on map
Turkey MountainTurkey Mountain Urban Wilderness Area is a 300-acre (121 ha) area of undeveloped land that stretches from I-44 to 71st Street in Tulsa in the US state of Oklahoma. It is managed by the Tulsa River Parks Authority and open to the public. The main entrance to the wilderness area is at 67th Street and Elwood Avenue in West Tulsa. Show on map
Chimney HillChimney Hill [alt. 1,346 feet (410 m)] in Pontotoc County, Oklahoma was a landmark on the old California Road. It was identified on old maps as Natural Mound. Its prominence made it a major reference point for many surveys and in 1920 it became the site of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Mound Triangulation Station. Show on map
Keystone State ParkKeystone State Park is an Oklahoma state park near Sand Springs, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, in the United States. The park provides recreational opportunities in fishing, swimming, water skiing and boating. Cabins are available to rent. Keystone State Park is on State Highway 151 near Mannford. Show on map
Wilton MountainWilton Mountain, in Ouachita National Forest, is a summit in the Ouachita Mountains in Le Flore County, Oklahoma, approximately 2 miles (3 km) from U.S. Route 59 and approximately 6 miles (10 km) east of the Arkansas state line. Wilton Mountain is 2,543 feet (775.1 m) above mean sea level Show on map
Antelope HillsThe Antelope Hills are a series of low hills in the bend of the Canadian River in northwest Roger Mills County, Oklahoma, near the border between western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle. They were a major landmark for the Plains Indians and travelers on what is now the western plains of Oklahoma. The area was part of the Cheyenne-Arapaho reservation until the Land Run of 1892 opened it to non-Indian settlement. The hills are on the National Register of Historic Places. Show on map
Sans Bois MountainsThe Sans Bois Mountains are a small mountain range in southeastern Oklahoma and part of the larger Ouachita Mountains. It is a frontal belt of the Ouachita Mountains and is located in Haskell and Latimer counties, Oklahoma. Sans bois is a French term meaning means \"without forest\" or \"without wood\" in English. Show on map
Johns ValleyJohns Valley is a geographic feature and place name located in the Kiamichi Mountains in northwestern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. The valley] is formally classified by geologists as a “basin” due to its complete encirclement by mountains. Show on map
Hochatown State ParkHochatown State Park is an Oklahoma state park in far-southeastern Oklahoma, north of the city of Broken Bow. It is a popular destination for tourists from Oklahoma and Texas interested in camping or boating on Broken Bow Lake. Show on map
Blackjack MountainBlackjack Mountain is 17 miles (27 km) long mountain ridge trending from northeast to southwest in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. The highest peak has an elevation of 1,250 feet (380 m). The town of Rattan is south of Blackjack. Show on map
Steely HollowSteely Hollow is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Cherokee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 206 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Tenkiller State ParkTenkiller State Park is a 1,190-acre (4.8 km2) Oklahoma state park located in northwestern Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, near the city of Vian, Oklahoma. Show on map
Big MountainBig Mountain is a mountain in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. It is part of the Kiamichi Mountains, a subrange of the Ouachita Mountains. Show on map