Maps, Guides And More - Alaska in United States

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects on the map of Alaska.

Map of Alaska district in United States

Basic information about Alaska
Alaska (/əˈlæskə/) is a U.S. state situated in the northwest extremity of the Americas. The Canadian administrative divisions of British Columbia and Yukon border the state to the east while Russia has a maritime border with the state to the west across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, the southern parts of the Arctic Ocean. To the south and southwest is the Pacific Ocean. Alaska is the largest state in the United States by area, the 3rd least populous and the least densely populated of the 50 United States. Approximately half of Alaska's residents (the total estimated at 738,432 by the Census Bureau in 2015) live within the Anchorage metropolitan area. Alaska's economy is dominated by the fishing, natural gas, and oil industries, resources which it has in abundance. Military bases and tourism are also a significant part of the economy. The United States purchased Alaska from the Russian Empire on March 30, 1867, for 7.2 million U.S. dollars at approximately two cents per acre ($4.74/km2). The area went through several administrative changes before becoming organized as a territory on May 11, 1912. It was admitted as the 49th state of the U.S. on January 3, 1959.
Cities, towns & villages in Alaska
NameDescriptionShow
JuneauThe City and Borough of Juneau (/ˈdʒuːnoʊ/; Tlingit: Dzánti K'ihéeni [ˈtsántʰì kʼìˈhíːnì]), is the capital city of Alaska. It is a unified municipality located on the Gastineau Channel in the Alaskan panhandle, and it is the second largest city in the United States by area. Juneau has been the capital of Alaska since 1906, when the government of what was then the District of Alaska was moved from Sitka as dictated by the U.S. Congress in 1900. The municipality unified on July 1, 1970, when the city of Juneau merged with the city of Douglas and the surrounding Greater Juneau Borough to form the current municipality, which is larger by area than both Rhode Island and Delaware. Show on map
KetchikanKetchikan (/ˈkɛtʃᵻkæn/, KETCH-ih-kan) (Tlingit: Kichx̱áan) is a city in the Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska, United States, the southeasternmost city in Alaska. With a population at the 2010 census of 8,050, it is the fifth-most populous city in the state, and tenth-most populous community when census-designated places are included. The surrounding borough, encompassing suburbs both north and south of the city along the Tongass Highway (most of which are commonly regarded as a part of Ketchikan, albeit not a part of the city itself), plus small rural settlements accessible mostly by water, registered a population of 13,477 in that same census. Estimates put the 2014 population at 13,787 people. Incorporated on August 25, 1900, Ketchikan is the earliest extant incorporated city in Alaska, Show on map
GirdwoodGirdwood is a resort town within the southern extent of the Municipality of Anchorage in the state of Alaska. Located near the end of the Turnagain Arm of Cook Inlet, Girdwood lies in a valley in the southwestern Chugach Mountains, surrounded by seven glaciers feeding into a number of creeks, which either converge within the valley or empty directly into the arm. Girdwood is typically accessed by the Seward Highway, with the main line of the Alaska Railroad paralleling the highway. By road distance, most of the community lies within 35 to 40 miles (56 to 64 km) of downtown Anchorage. According to 2014 estimates, a little under 2,000 people live in the valley. Show on map
EklutnaEklutna /ɛˈkluːtnə/ is a native village within the Municipality of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Tribal Council estimates the population at 70; many tribal members live in the surrounding communities. Eklutna lies 24 miles northeast of Anchorage near the intersection of Mi. 142 of the Alaska Railroad and the Mile 26 of the Glenn Highway two miles from the mouth of the Eklutna River at the head of the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet, at 61°27′30″N 149°21′44″W / 61.45833°N 149.36222°W in the Anchorage Recording District. Show on map
NushagakNushagak was a trade center and settlement near the present-day site of Dillingham, Alaska, United States, at the northern end of Nushagak Bay in northern Bristol Bay. It was located near the confluence of the Wood and Nushagak Rivers. In 1881, after the Alaska Purchase by the United States, the United States Signal Corps built a weather station at Nushagak. The first salmon cannery in the Bristol Bay region was constructed by Arctic Packing Company in 1883 at Kanulik, just east of Nushagak Point. Several other canneries followed, two of which were at Nushagak Point. Show on map
Jack WadeJack Wade is an unincorporated community in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Its elevation is 2,428 feet (740 m), and it is located along Wade Creek at 64°9′15″N 141°27′35″W / 64.15417°N 141.45972°W (64.1541667, -141.4597222), about 46 miles (74 km) south of Eagle near the Canada–US border. Founded as a mining camp around 1900, it was named for Jack Anderson and Wade Nelson, the original locators. Jack Wade received a post office in 1901, which remained until 1948. Brief History of the Jack Wade Creek Mine: Show on map
VenetieVenetie (/ˈviːnᵻtaɪ/ VEEN-i-ty; Vįįhtąįį in Gwich’in), is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census, the population was 202. It includes the Village of Venetie, a Gwich'in tribal entity designated in the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Show on map
CurryCurry is an unincorporated community in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It was also known as Dead Horse. Its post office was founded with that name as well. The old townsite of Curry is now an uninhabited stop along the Alaska Railroad, about 22 miles north of Talkeetna. In 1922, this remote train station in the Alaska wilderness became a briefly popular luxury resort destination. Located halfway between Seward and Fairbanks and alongside the Sustina River, Curry was billed \"a wilderness palace\" when the Railroad opened the first hotel in 1923. Curry was the perfect overnight stop for rail passengers, and with the hotel and renowned fishing, became a destination spot of its own. The little town blossomed, and the resort became more popular as it expanded to include a golf Show on map
ColdfootColdfoot is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 10 at the 2010 census. Coldfoot primarily serves as a truck stop on the Dalton Highway from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay. North of Coldfoot, there are no services for 240 miles (400 km), until Deadhorse. It has a restaurant and a small number of overnight accommodations (converted pipeline construction camp quarters). Bus tours along the highway typically take two days with passengers spending the night in Coldfoot. The BLM, USFWS, and NPS jointly staff a small visitor center during the summer. The Coldfoot truck stop was founded by Iditarod champion Dick Mackey who started his operation by selling hamburgers out of a converted school bus. Truckers helped build the existing@en . Show on map
KodiakKodiak (Alutiiq: Sun'aq; Russian: Кадьяк, tr. Kadʹyak) is one of seven communities and the main city on Kodiak Island, Kodiak Island Borough, in the U.S. state of Alaska. All commercial transportation between the entire island and the outside world goes through this city either via ferryboat or airline. The population was 6,130 as of the 2010 census. 2014 estimates put the population at 6,304. Show on map
UnalaskaUnalaska (Aleut: Iluulux̂) is the largest city of the Aleutian Islands. The city is in the Aleutians West Census Area, a regional component of the Unorganized Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Unalaska is located on Unalaska Island and neighboring Amaknak Island in the Aleutian Islands off mainland Alaska. The population was 4,376 at the 2010 census, which is 79% of the entire Aleutians West Census Area. Unalaska is the second-largest city in the Unorganized Borough, behind Bethel. Show on map
SnettishamSnettisham is a locale and former populated place in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Based on the mainland coast of Stephens Passage, it is 31 miles (50 km) southeast of the city of Juneau. The area was named by George Vancouver in 1794; the bay on which Snettisham was located (Port Snettisham) was named for the town of Snettisham in England. It was established as a gold- and silver-mining camp around 1895, its operations being linked to those in the immediate Juneau area, and it remained a small harbor village until 1926. The United States Department of the Treasury designated Snettisham as one of several of Alaska's \"special\" landing places for vessels carrying \"coal, salt, railroad iron, and other like items in bulk\". The designation was meant to encourage the con Show on map
UmiatUmiat is an unincorporated community in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. It is located on the Colville River, 140 miles southwest of Deadhorse in the Arctic Circle. The town is not accessible by road or rail, only by air or river. In 1944, the Naval Oil Reserve was set up and it later became an air force base, which is now closed. It is known as one of the coldest places in the US with its inland tundra climate, a rarity for North America. Yearly low temperatures run even colder than Barrow, Alaska on average. Show on map
Port WakefieldPort Wakefield, Alaska is a ghost town on the north-east coast of Raspberry Island, Alaska, in the Kodiak Archipelago located in the Gulf of Alaska. It was established shortly after World War II by Lowell Wakefield (1909-1977) (and named in his honour), after he relocated his father, Lee Howard Wakefield's salmon cannery business, Apex Fish Company, from Anacortes, Washington, renaming it Wakefield Fisheries. Show on map
WasillaWasilla is a city in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, United States and the sixth-largest city in Alaska. It is located on the northern point of Cook Inlet in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley of the southcentral part of the state. The city's population was 7,831 at the 2010 census. Estimates in 2013 put the population at roughly 8,621. Wasilla is the largest city in the borough and a part of the Anchorage metropolitan area, which had an estimated population of 396,142 in 2013. Show on map
OphirOphir is an unincorporated area located in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was named by miners after the wealthy land of Ophir mentioned in the Old Testament. The area was the site of a gold rush in 1906. Ophir reached a peak population of 122 in 1910. Ophir is now abandoned, but serves as a checkpoint in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. An airport with a single gravel runway exists at the village, built prior to 1949. It is currently in disuse and unmaintained. Show on map
Mendenhall ValleyThe Mendenhall Valley (historically Mendenhall, colloquially The Valley) is the drainage area of the Mendenhall River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The valley contains a series of neighborhoods, comprising the largest populated place within the corporate limits of the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska's capital. The valley was formed by Mendenhall Glacier over the course of roughly three thousand years. It was named for physicist and meteorologist Thomas Corwin Mendenhall. Show on map
AnchorageAnchorage (officially called the Municipality of Anchorage) (Dena'ina Athabascan: Dgheyaytnu) is a unified home rule municipality in the U.S. state of Alaska. With an estimated 298,695 residents in 2015, it is Alaska's most populous city and contains more than 40 percent of the state's total population; among the 50 states, only New York has a higher percentage of residents who live in its most populous city. All together, the Anchorage metropolitan area, which combines Anchorage with the neighboring Matanuska-Susitna Borough, had a population of 396,142 in 2013. Show on map
NabesnaNabesna (Nabaesna’ in Ahtna) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community in northern Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States, in the northern part of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. It lies along the Nabesna Road, a gravel road that connects it to the Tok Cut-Off at Slana. Its elevation is 2,979 feet (908 m). Founded by and named for the Nabesna Mining Company, the community received a post office in 1909. Located at the base of White Mountain in the Wrangell Mountains, it lies west of the Nabesna River. According to the 2010 Census, there were five people residing at this location. Show on map
SoldotnaSoldotna is a city in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, in the U.S. State of Alaska. At the 2010 census the population was 4,163. It is the seat of the Kenai Peninsula Borough. Soldotna is located in the Southcentral portion of Alaska on the central-western portion of the Kenai Peninsula. The city limits span 7 square miles along the Kenai River, which empties into the Cook Inlet in the nearby city of Kenai. The Kenai River was selected by CNN Travel as one of the \"World's 15 Best Rivers for Travelers,\" due to its fishing and hunting opportunities. Soldotna is located on the western edge of the vast Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, a protected area spanning nearly 2 million acres and home to bears, moose, caribou, sheep, and many fish and bird species. Show on map
Prudhoe BayPrudhoe Bay /ˈpruːdoʊ/ or Sagavanirktok is a census-designated place (CDP) located in North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 2,174 people; however, at any given time several thousand transient workers support the Prudhoe Bay oil field. The airport, lodging, and general store are located at Deadhorse; the rigs and processing facilities are located on scattered gravel pads laid atop the tundra. It is only during winter that the surface is hard enough to support heavy equipment, and new construction happens at that time. Show on map
Prudhoe BayPrudhoe Bay /ˈpruːdoʊ/ or Sagavanirktok is a census-designated place (CDP) located in North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 2,174 people; however, at any given time several thousand transient workers support the Prudhoe Bay oil field. The airport, lodging, and general store are located at Deadhorse; the rigs and processing facilities are located on scattered gravel pads laid atop the tundra. It is only during winter that the surface is hard enough to support heavy equipment, and new construction happens at that time. Show on map
AmchitkaAmchitka (/æmˈtʃɪtkə/; Aleut: Amchixtax̂) is a volcanic, tectonically unstable island in the Rat Islands group of the Aleutian Islands in southwest Alaska. It is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The island is about 68 kilometers (42 mi) long, and from 3 to 6 km (1.9 to 3.7 mi) wide. The area has a maritime climate, with many storms, and mostly overcast skies. Show on map
WrangellThe City and Borough of Wrangell (Tlingit: Ḵaachx̱aana.áakʼw) is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census the population was 2,369. Incorporated as a Unified Home Rule Borough on May 30, 2008, Wrangell was previously a city in the Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area (afterwards renamed the Petersburg Census Area (the Petersburg Borough was formed from part of this census area)). Its Tlingit name is Ḵaachx̱aana.áakʼw (“Ḵaachx̱an’s Little Lake” with áa-kʼw ‘lake-diminutive’). The Tlingit people residing in the Wrangell area, who were there centuries before Europeans, call themselves the Shtaxʼhéen Ḵwáan after the nearby Stikine River. Alternately they use the autonym Shxʼát Ḵwáan, where the meaning of shxʼát is unknown. Show on map
ChatanikaChatanika is a small unincorporated community located in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States, north-northeast of the city of Fairbanks. The community runs along an approximately 20-mile (32 km) stretch of the Steese Highway, the majority of which sees the highway paralleled by the Chatanika River. The community consists of sparsely scattered residential subdivisions, several roadside businesses, a boat launch where the Steese Highway crosses the Chatanika River, relics of past gold mining operations in the area and the Poker Flat Research Range operated by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Show on map
BethelBethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city located near the west coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, approximately 400 miles (640 km) west of Anchorage. Accessible only by air and river, Bethel is the main port on the Kuskokwim River and is an administrative and transportation hub for the 56 villages in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Annual events in Bethel include a noted dogsled race, the Kuskokwim 300, Camai, a traditional Yup'ik dance festival held each spring, and the Bethel Fair held in August. Show on map
Lake LouiseLake Louise (Sasnuu’ Bene’ in Ahtna) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. Although it is an isolated settlement and is close to Glennallen, it is considered part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area like all other locations in the Mat-Su Borough. At the 2010 census the population was 46. The first recorded name of Lake Louise was Shosubenich, which means \"great flat water with many islands\". Later, Lake Louise was named Lake Adah after a girlfriend of Lieutenant Castner. Later Captain Edwin Glenn changed the name to Lake Louise in honor of his wife. The U.S. Army established a recreation facility at the lake towards the end of World War II and built the first road into the area. Lake Louise road runs about 20 miles (32 km Show on map
SkagwaySkagway /ˈskæɡweɪ/ is a first-class borough in Alaska on the Alaska Panhandle. As of the 2010 census, the population was 920. Estimates put the 2015 population at 1,057 people. The population doubles in the summer tourist season in order to deal with more than 900,000 visitors. It was formerly a city (urban Skagway located at 59°27′30″N 135°18′50″W / 59.45833°N 135.31389°W) first incorporated in 1900 that was re-incorporated as a borough on June 25, 2007. Show on map
TonsinaTonsina /tɒnˈsiːnə/ is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States At the 2010 census the population was 78. Tonsina is part of the Copper River Valley area. The centerpiece of Tonsina valley is the Tonsina River Lodge. This roadhouse alongside the Richardson Highway consists of a bar, restaurant, gas station, convenience and liquor store, laundromat and showers. There is also a camping area, RV park and motel. A main attraction of the roadhouse is the historic hotel. Show on map
Covenant LifeCovenant Life is a census-designated place (CDP) in Haines Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 102. It is a community of people with common religious beliefs, with a panel of church elders who set policy for the community's common church, K-12 school, and private 4-year university, and a loose form of self- (municipal) government. An emphasis for community living is a key value in their lifestyle, such as taking most meals together in a common meeting place. The community was established during a Christian religious movement in the 1960s and 1970s, where many such communities were established in Alaska and Canada, with emphasis on self-sufficiency and at least partial agricultural independence. The latter lends to the term often used by outsiders as \"The F Show on map
Auke BayAuke Bay is an unincorporated community located in the city and borough of Juneau, Alaska that contains Auke Bay Harbor, Auke Lake, the University of Alaska Southeast, a former branch office of NOAA, an elementary school, a church, a post office, a bar, a coffee shop, a waffle house, a thrift shop, a Thai restaurant, and one convenience store. The view of the Mendenhall Glacier behind Auke Bay and Mount McGinnis towering over Auke Lake are some of the most popular photo opportunities in Juneau. The ferry terminal of the Alaska Marine Highway system is also located further out the road in Auke Bay at about 14 mile. The flamingo house on Auke Lake is a local attraction, known for its topical or weather-related formations of pink lawn flamingos. Whale watchings targeting curious humpbacks are Show on map
YorkYork was a settlement in the U.S. state of Alaska. The mining camp was situated at the mouth of Anikovik River, at Cape York on the Seward Peninsula. It was a distributing point for the region lying to the north. In the spring of 1900, York promised to be a place of importance, but in the early fall, its population had been reduced to about 20-30. The settlement included a number of log cabins and half a dozen substantial frame buildings. During the stormy months of the fall, landing at York was difficult. It was reached overland with horses from Port Clarence. Fifteen miles to the west of York, at Cape Prince of Wales, is the village of Kengegan, which is the westernmost settlement on the North American continent. York is about 80 miles (130 km) from Nome and 45 miles (72 km) from Port Cl Show on map
YakutatThe City and Borough of Yakutat (/ˈjækətɑːt/, YACK-uh-tat) (Tlingit: Yaakwdáat) is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Incorporated as a non-unified Home Rule Borough on September 22, 1992, Yakutat was previously a city in the Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area (afterwards renamed the Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area). The name is Tlingit, Yaakwdáat (\"the place where canoes rest\") but it originally derives from an Eyak name diyaʼqudaʼt and was influenced by the Tlingit word yaakw (\"canoe, boat\"). Show on map
DeadhorseDeadhorse is an unincorporated community in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States, along the North Slope near the Arctic Ocean. The town consists mainly of facilities for the workers and companies that operate at the nearby Prudhoe Bay oil fields. Deadhorse is accessible via the Dalton Highway from Fairbanks, 495 mi (797 km) south, or Deadhorse Airport. Limited accommodations are also available for tourists. The permanent population is variously listed as being between 25 and 50 residents. Temporary residents (employed by various firms with local interests) can range as high as 3,000. Show on map
Eagle VillageEagle Village is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 67 at the 2010 census. Eagle Village is located 13 km (8.1 mi) on the Yukon River west of the border between Alaska and the Yukon Territory of Canada on the Taylor Highway, next to Eagle. Eagle Village was called Johnny's in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by some people, after its chief at the time, known as John in English. Show on map
SitkaThe City and Borough of Sitka (Tlingit: Sheetʼká), formerly New Arkhangelsk, or New Archangel under Russian rule (Russian: Ново-Архангельск or Новоaрхангельск, t Novoarkhangelsk), is a unified city-borough located on Baranof Island and the southern half of Chichagof Island in the Alexander Archipelago of the Pacific Ocean (part of the Alaska Panhandle), in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,881. In terms of land area, it is the largest city-borough in the U.S., with a land area of 2,870.3 mi2 (7,434.1 km2) and a total area (including water area) of 4,811.4 mi2 (12,460.8 km2). Urban Sitka, the part that is usually thought of as the \"city\" of Sitka, is situated on the west side of Baranof Island. Show on map
NomeNome (/ˈnoʊm/, Siqnazuaq in Iñupiaq) is a city in the Nome Census Area in the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The city is located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast on Norton Sound of the Bering Sea. According to the 2010 Census, the city population was 3,598. The 2014 population estimate was 3,788, suggesting a slight increase. Nome was incorporated on April 9, 1901, and was once the most populous city in Alaska. Nome lies within the region of the Bering Straits Native Corporation. Show on map
Lemon CreekLemon Creek is a neighborhood in Juneau, Alaska, United States. The name was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2000. It is 5 miles (8 km) northwest of downtown Juneau. It is the site of the Lemon Creek Correctional Center. The neighborhood is bisected by the namesake Lemon Creek, which provides runoff for local glaciers. The Lemon name is said to come from traveling miner John Lemon, who reportedly had a placer mine on the creek in 1879. Show on map
Port AlsworthPort Alsworth is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. It is one hundred miles southwest of Anchorage. The population was 159 at the 2010 census. Port Alsworth was founded in 1950 by Babe Alsworth, a missionary and bush pilot, and Mary Alsworth, who was the town's first postmaster. Port Alsworth is located on private land within Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and the site of the National Park's field headquarters. Show on map
West JuneauWest Juneau is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is located on Douglas Island 1.8 miles (2.9 km) northwest of Douglas. The name was first published by the United States Geological Survey in 1948 and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Despite its location on Douglas Island, the neighborhood was juridically a part of the City of Juneau, rather than the City of Douglas, prior to municipal unification in 1970. Show on map
Ward CoveWard Cove (also Wacker, Wacker City, or Wards Cove) is an unincorporated community in Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska, United States. Its elevation is 164 feet (50 m). Although it is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 99928. The settlement lies on the northern shore of Ward Cove, at the southwestern end of Revillagigedo Island, 4½ mi (7¼ km) northwest of Ketchikan, Alex. Arch. Show on map
Nelson LagoonNelson Lagoon (Unangax̂: Niilsanam Alĝuudaa) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aleutians East Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 52. Nelson Lagoon was established around 1960 and is the youngest of the Borough communities. It is the only Aleut settlement on the Bering Sea shore. The community is on the northern coast of the Alaska Peninsula and sits on a narrow sand spit that separates the lagoon from the Bering Sea. Nelson Lagoon is in the middle of a rich and productive salmon fisheries area. The community's dock, boat ramp, harbormaster's office and warehouse were completed in the late 1990s. Nelson Lagoon has excellent docking facilities as well as boat and gear storage. A state-owned 4,000-foot-long lighted gravel runway allows regularly schedule Show on map
Sand PointSand Point, also known as Qagun Tayagungin, is a city in Aleutians East Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 976. It is on northwestern Popof Island, one of the Shumagin Islands, off the Alaska Peninsula. It is the borough seat of Aleutians East Borough, and is near the entrance to the Bering Sea. Show on map
DouglasDouglas is a community on Douglas Island in southeastern Alaska, directly across the Gastineau Channel from downtown Juneau. Today, Douglas is a residential community on Douglas Island and the only traditional school left on Douglas is Gastineau Elementary, which serves all the Douglas Island elementary aged students. The Douglas Public Library is part of the Capital City Libraries, and a couple restaurants and bars exist (The Island Pub, Louie's Douglas Inn, and The Douglas Café). The town’s population dropped over the years, but recently is up to about 3000 people, or close to 10 percent of the City and Borough of Juneau’s population. Douglas gets its water and electricity from Juneau and has a mix of onsite and municipal (diverted to Juneau) wastewater treatment. Show on map
Attu StationAttu Station is a census-designated place (CDP) located on Attu Island in the Aleutians West Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 21 at the 2010 census, consisting entirely of coast guard personnel who resided and worked at Casco Cove Coast Guard Station, but left the island when the station was closed in August 2010, leaving it uninhabited. LORAN Station Attu had provided a navigational signal for mariners of the North Pacific since the 1970s. Show on map
Naukati BayNaukati Bay is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 135 at the 2000 census. Also known as Naukati or Naukati West, the community lies approximately 30 miles (48 km) north of Craig and 20 miles (32 km) southwest of Coffman Cove on Prince of Wales Island, within the Unorganized Borough. Naukati Bay Subdivision East and West are located on the east side of Tuxekan Passage in Naukati Bay. The community of Naukati Bay has developed over the past 30 years from its original logging camp status to an independent community. Primary local access is via unpaved gravel logging roads. The area was extensively clear cut over the past 30 years, and the resulting regrowth is quite dense. Vegetati Show on map
Edna BayEdna Bay is a city on Kosciusko Island in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The community was officially incorporated on October 13, 2014 and has a current population of 49. Show on map
UsibelliUsibelli is an unincorporated community in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States, 5 miles (8 km) east of Healy. Its elevation is 1,654 feet (504 m). The community is named for the Usibelli Coal Mine; located near the community, the mine is the chief economic enterprise in the area. With its large deposits and its status as the only coal mine in the state, Usibelli Coal Mine has long been prominent; it is a primary supplier for coal-fired power plants in the Fairbanks area and in southern Alaska, and it exports coal to South Korea and Chile. In recent years, the mine has stood to benefit from efforts for American energy independence; a bill in the United States Senate in 2008 was amended to encourage conversion of coal into liquid fuels for the use of the United States Air Force. Show on map
QuinhagakQuinhagak (/ˈkwɪnəhɑːk/; also spelled Kwinhagak) (Kuinerraq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city is 669. The Yupik name for the village is Kuinerraq, meaning \"new river channel.\" It has been dated to at least 1000 AD. Show on map
ThaneThane is a neighborhood in the City and Borough of Juneau in the U.S. state of Alaska. Located along Gastineau Channel, it begins one mile (1.6 km) south of downtown Juneau and consists of approximately two dozen houses spread over five miles (8 km). All the houses are located on Thane Road, which comes to a dead end about six miles (10 km) from downtown; there are no side streets. It was named for Bartlett L. Thane, Manager and Director of the Alaska-Gastineau Mining Company. Show on map
ChevakChevak (Cevʼaq , which means \"cut-through channel\" in Chevak Cup’ik) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 765. There is a tri-language system in Chevak; English, Cup’ik, and a mixture of the two languages. The people in Chevak speak a dialect of Central Yup'ik, Cup'ik (pr. Chew-pick), and identify themselves as Cup'ik people rather than Yup'ik. This unique identity has allowed them to form a single-site school district, the Kashunamiut School District, rather than joining a neighboring Yup'ik school district. The Cup'ik dialect is distinguished from Yup'ik by the change of \"y\" sounds into \"ch\" sounds, represented by the letter \"c\", and by some words that are completely different from Yup'ik words. Show on map
FairbanksFairbanks /ˈfɛərbæŋks/ is a home rule city and the borough seat of the Fairbanks North Star Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Fairbanks is the largest city in the Interior region of Alaska. 2014 estimates put the population of the city proper at 32,469, and the population of the Fairbanks North Star Borough at 99,357, making it the second most populous metropolitan area in Alaska (after Anchorage). The Metropolitan Statistical Area encompasses all of the Fairbanks North Star Borough and is the northernmost Metropolitan Statistical Area in the United States, located less than 120 miles (190 km) south of the Arctic Circle. Fairbanks is home to the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the oldest of Alaska's current universities. Show on map
Lime VillageLime Village is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. The 2010 census found a population of 29. It has also been known as Hungry Village and Hek'dichen Hdakaq' In July 2008, Lime Village gained notoriety when it was reported that their gasoline prices were more than double of the already-high national average of over $4/gallon with Lime Village selling regular unleaded gasoline at $8.55/gallon. The high prices were considered ironic considering that Alaska is one of the main suppliers of oil in the United States, but have the highest state average due to scattered villages throughout Alaska such as Lime Village making it difficult to transport oil and other goods. Show on map
NenanaNenana /nɛˈnænə/ (Toghotili in Lower Tanana language) is a Home Rule City in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the Unorganized Borough in the Interior of the U.S. state of Alaska. Nenana developed as a Lower Tanana community at the confluence where the tributary Nenana River enters the Tanana. The population was 378 at the 2010 census. Completed in 1923, the 700-foot-long (210 m) Mears Memorial Bridge was built over the Tanana River as part of the state's railroad project connecting Anchorage and Fairbanks. Show on map
SheshalikSheshalik (Sisualik in Iñupiaq, means \"one that has beluga whales\" from sisuaq \"beluga whale\") is a former Inuit village and summer camp in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located by the Chukchi Sea shore on the Sheshalik Spit, 14 mi. northwest of Kotzebue. Show on map
ChisanaChisana (also Shushanna) (Tsetsaan’ Na’ in Ahtna) is a ghost town abandoned and a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was 0. The English name Chisana derives from the Ahtna Athabascan name Tsetsaan' Na', meaning literally 'copper river' (not to be confused with the river known in English as the Copper River). Show on map
HoonahHoonah (Xunaa in Tlingit) is a largely Tlingit community on Chichagof Island, located in Alaska's panhandle in the southeast region of the state. It is 30 miles west of Juneau, across the Alaskan Inside Passage. Hoonah is the only first-class city on Chichagof Island, the 109th largest island in the world and the 5th largest island in the United States. At the 2000 census the population was 860, though summer population can swell to over 1,300 depending on fishing, boating, hiking and hunting conditions. Hoonah became the official spelling in 1901, with establishment of the Hoonah branch of the United States Post Office. Xunaa means \"protected from the North Wind\" in the Tlingit language. Show on map
KiwalikKiwalik (sometimes written Keewalik) is an unincorporated community in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located where the Kiwalik River flows into Kotzebue Sound on the Seward Peninsula, 97 km (60 mi) south of Kotzebue. Show on map
WisemanWiseman is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 14 at the 2010 census. Wiseman is a small mining community along the Middle Fork Koyukuk River in the Brooks Range. It was founded by gold miners who abandoned the Slate Creek (later Coldfoot) settlement around 1908. Robert Marshall wrote the book, Arctic Village, about his stay in this town around the year 1930. Marshall called Wiseman and the Koyukuk River area surrounding it, \"the happiest civilization of which I have knowledge.\" The community is only 3 miles (5 km) from the Dalton Highway, but the community was not connected to the road until the early 1990s. Show on map
TananaTanana /ˈtænənɑː/ (Hohudodetlaatl Denh in Koyukon) is a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2000 census the population was 308. It was formerly known as Clachotin, adopted by Canadian French. Show on map
Hobart BayHobart Bay is a census-designated place that was located in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska during the 2010 United States Census, but is now part of Petersburg Borough. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was one. Show on map
KantishnaKantishna is an unincorporated community in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States, within Denali National Park and Preserve. Founded as a gold mining camp in 1905, it endured longer than similar communities in the area, having been constructed nearest to the source of the gold. It lies in the Kantishna Hills at the junction of Eureka Creek and Moose Creek, 3 mi (5 km) northwest of Wonder Lake, and near the mouth of the Kantishna River. Although the community was once also called \"Eureka\", the Board on Geographic Names officially ruled in favor of \"Kantishna\" in 1944, the name given to the post office that was built at the site in 1905. Its elevation is 1,696 feet (517 m). Show on map
EkukEkuk (Yup'ik Iquk) is a small unincorporated community in the Dillingham Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. Until 2002 it was the site of a large fish processing operation owned by Wards Cove Packing Company. Currently, it is inhabited mainly by seasonal fishing families who set gillnet in the nearby waters of the Nushagak Bay for mid-summer runs of sockeye salmon, early season runs of king salmon and late season runs of silver salmon. Located 15 miles southeast of Dillingham, Ekuk is accessible only by sea or by air. Show on map
PetersburgPetersburg (Tlingit: Gantiyaakw Séedi \"Steamboat Channel\") is a census-designated place (CDP) in Petersburg Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 2,824 according to 2009 Census Bureau estimates. Show on map
CircleCircle (also called Circle City, Danzhit Khaiinląįį in Gwich’in) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 100. Circle is 160 mi (260 km) northeast of Fairbanks at the end of the Steese Highway. Circle was named by miners in the late 19th century who believed that the town was on the Arctic Circle, but the Arctic Circle is about 50 mi (80 km) north of Circle. Every February, Circle City hosts a checkpoint for the long-distance Yukon Quest sled dog race. Show on map
CollegeCollege is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 12,964 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
NewtokNewtok (Niugtaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a small village on the Ningliq River in western Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 354. Erosion is forcing the primarily Yupik Alaska Native village to consider relocation. The town was featured in History Channel's Tougher in Alaska, episode \"Dangerous Earth\". In 2007 the New York Times reported that erosion made Newtok an island between the widening Ningliq River and a slough to the north because Alaskan permafrost is melting due to climate change. Coastal storms and thawing permafrost have worn away the land upon which Newtok was built. Although the town’s roughly 400 residents voted in 2003 to relocate to higher ground nine miles away, progress has been slow as of 2016. According to the Times, because the village@en . Show on map
DiomedeDiomede (native name Iŋaliq, meaning \"the other one\" or \"the one over there\") is a city in the Nome Census Area of the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska, located on Little Diomede Island. Little Diomede is the smaller of the two Diomede Islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between the Alaskan mainland and the Russian Far East. Its neighboring island is the Big Diomede, Russia, behind the International Date Line, and is less than 2.4 miles (3.9 km) away. The populated area of Diomede lies on the west side of Little Diomede and is the only settlement on the island. The population was 115 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Tee HarborTee Harbor (also known as The Harbor) refers to two adjacent populated places in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska. The area had a population of 32 in 1950. It is located 3 miles (4.8 km) northwest of Fairhaven and 17 miles (27 km) northwest of the main city of Juneau. Business in the area began with a saltery in 1901 and a cannery in 1911; the cannery burnt down in 1912, according to a 1957 publication by R. N. DeArmond. Show on map
ChenegaChenega /tʃᵻˈniːɡə/ (Alutiiq: Caniqaq) is a census-designated place (CDP) on Evans Island in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. Located in Prince William Sound, the CDP consists of the Chugach Alutiiq village of Chenega Bay, which was established only after the Good Friday earthquake destroyed the original community on Chenega Island to the north. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 76, largely Alaska Natives. Chenega Bay is in the Chugach School District and has one school, Chenega Bay Community School, serving a little over 10 students from preschool through high school Show on map
AmblerAmbler (Ivisaappaat in Iñupiaq) is a city in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 258. The city is located in the large Iñupiaq language speaking region of Alaska, and the local dialect is known as the Ambler dialect (related to the Shugnak dialect). As of 1999, over 91% of the community speaks and understands the language (Kraus, 1999), with many young children actively learning the language in school. It has important relationships with the \"hub\" city of Kotzebue, Alaska and has important relationships with Maniilaq Health Association. Show on map
Chena Hot SpringsChena Hot Springs is a hot spring, resort, and unincorporated community in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States, 56.5 miles northeast of Fairbanks near the Chena River State Recreation Area. The resort makes use of the first low-temperature binary geothermal power plant built in Alaska, and is working on several alternative energy projects, including production and use of hydrogen and vegetable oil for fuel. The resort is conducting collaborative experiments in greenhouse production of vegetables with the University of Alaska Fairbanks Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. Show on map
SuntranaSuntrana is an unincorporated community in eastern Denali Borough, Alaska, United States. It lies along the George Parks Highway south of the city of Anderson, and on the northeastern edge of Denali National Park and Preserve. Its elevation is 1,463 feet (446 m). Located along the right bank of the Healy River, Suntrana lies 3½ miles (5½ km) east of Healy, the county seat of the Denali Borough. The population was 61 at the 1930 census. The town and mine at Suntrana no longer exist, the site of company housing is now reforested, no remains of the mine, power house or old tipple complex remains. Show on map
UnalakleetUnalakleet (/ˈjuːnələkliːt/ EW-nə-lə-kleet; Uŋalaqłiq in Iñupiaq) is a city in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States, in the western part of the state. At the 2010 census the population was 688. Unalakleet is known in the region and around Alaska for its salmon and king crab harvests; the residents rely heavily on caribou, ptarmigan, oogruk (bearded seal), and various salmon species. Unalakleet is also known for its aesthetic value, as it resides right next to the Bering Sea, immediately next to a large, clean river (Unalakleet River) and has trees, tundra, and hills behind it. Show on map
KanakanakKanakanak is a neighborhood within the city of Dillingham in the Dillingham Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located at 59°00′14″N 158°32′06″W / 59.00389°N 158.53500°W, about 10 km (6 mi) southwest of downtown Dillingham. Kanakanak is the location of an Indian Health Service hospital operated by the Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation. The name has been cited as the longest geographic palindrome. It is Yupik in origin and is said to mean \"many noses,\" referring to the orphanage census that was located at the Kanakanak site after the 1918-1919 influenza epidemic. Show on map
Tetlin JunctionTetlin Junction (also Forty Mile, Tetlin Center, or Tetling Junction) is an unincorporated community in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Its elevation is 1,745 feet (532 m), along the north bank of the Tanana River. The official spelling of its name has been \"Tetlin Junction\" since a Board on Geographic Names ruling in 1950. The community is named for its location at the junction of the Alaska and Taylor highways: it lies 8 miles (13 km) east of Tok Junction, 13 miles (21 km) north-northwest of Tetlin, and 11 miles (18 km) east-southeast of Tanacross. Show on map
NanwalekNanwalek, formerly Alexandrovsk (Russian: Александровск) and English Bay, is census-designated place (CDP) in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States that contains a traditional Alutiiq village. The population was 177 at the 2000 census. There is one school located in the community, attended by 76 students. Subsistence activities are a large part of the culture for indigenous people and Nanwalek is no exception, especially when it comes to salmon and seal harvesting. The sale of alcohol is banned in the village, although importing and possession are allowed. Show on map
KipnukKipnuk (Qipneq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 639. Kipnuk consists mostly Yupik speaking Eskimos; the name means a \"bend\" referring to the bend in the (Qukaqliq) Kugkaktlik River where it is situated. The original settlement was situated along \"Nukallpiarcunarli\", a slough feeding into the (Qukaqliq) Kugkaktlik. This slough was thus named, because it was hard to detect during the Eskimo Wars. It was ideal for ambushing \"Nukallpiaqs\" or warrior/providers. Show on map
SewardSeward (Alutiiq: Qutalleq) is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. According to 2014 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 2,528. It was named after William H. Seward, United States Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. In 1867, he fought for the U.S. purchase of Alaska which he finally negotiated to acquire from Russia. Mile 0 of the historic Iditarod Trail is at Seward. In the early 1900s the trail was blazed in order to transport people and goods to and from the port of Seward to interior Alaska. Show on map
AdakAdak /ˈeɪdæk/, formerly Adak Station, (Unangax̂: Adaax) is a city located on Adak Island, in the Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 326. It is the westernmost municipality in the United States and the southernmost city in Alaska. (See Extreme points of the United States.) The city is the former location of the Adak Army Base and Adak Naval Operating Base, NAVFAC Adak. There are no radio stations within 200 miles (320 km) of Adak; radio can be received in Adak only through satellite or shortwave receivers. Currently the shortest days in winter solstice are now around 7 hours. Show on map
CordovaCordova /kɔːrˈdoʊvə/, /ˈkɔːrdəvɒ/ is a small town located near the mouth of the Copper River in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States, at the head of Orca Inlet on the east side of Prince William Sound. The population was 2,239 at the 2010 census. Cordova was named Puerto Cordova by Spanish explorer Salvador Fidalgo in 1790. No roads connect Cordova to other Alaskan towns, so a plane or ferry is required to travel there. In the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 1989, an oil tanker ran aground northwest of Cordova, heavily damaging ecology and fishing. Show on map
PoormanPoorman is an unincorporated community in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska, in the Kilbuck-Kuskokwin Mountains. It lies along the left bank of Poorman Creek on an unpaved road 44 miles (71 km) south of the city of Ruby on the Yukon River. Its elevation is 502 feet (153 m). Founded as a gold mining camp in 1913, Poorman possessed a post office from 1915 to 1932. The community's name (given for the nearby Poorman Creek) was officially decided by the Board on Geographic Names in 1944. Show on map
Cape YakatagaCape Yakataga is a community in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Also known as Yakataga, its coordinates are 60°03′59″N 142°25′51″W / 60.06639°N 142.43083°W and its elevation is 20 feet (6 m). Yakataga is a Native American name meaning \"canoe road\", because of two reefs which form a canoe passage to the village. A post office was established here in 1935. The community is served by the Yakataga Airport, which until 2012 had scheduled passenger service subsidized by the U.S. Essential Air Service program. Show on map
BarrowBarrow or Utqiaġvik /ˈbæroʊ/ (Inupiaq: Utqiaġvik /utqiaʁvik/ or Ukpiaġvik /ukpiaʁvik/) is the largest city of the North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska and is located above the Arctic Circle. It is the 11th northernmost public community in the world and is the northernmost city in the United States, with nearby Point Barrow being the nation's northernmost point. In an October 2016 referendum, the city voted to change its name from Barrow to its traditional Iñupiaq name, Utqiaġvik. Show on map
Jakolof BayJakolof Bay is an unincorporated community in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. As of the 2000 Census, the population was 40. The location of this community is south of the city of Seldovia, across Kachemak Bay from Homer. Jakolof Bay is connected by road with Seldovia but neither community is otherwise accessible by road to the outside world. There is a rough gravel airstrip on the beach which is underwater during some high tides. Jakolof Bay was recognized as a census-designated place in the 1980 Census. Show on map
Port LionsPort Lions (Masiqsirraq in Alutiiq) is a city located on Kodiak Island in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 194. Port Lions was built to house the inhabitants of Ag'waneq from the neighboring island of Afognak and Port Wakefield from Raspberry Island, after their villages were destroyed by the Good Friday earthquake in 1964. Port Lions was built with help from the United States government and the Lions Club. It was named in honor of the club. Show on map
Cooper LandingCooper Landing is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States, about 100 miles (160 km) south of Anchorage, at the confluence of Kenai Lake and Kenai River. The town was first settled in the 19th century by gold and mineral prospectors, and has become a popular Summer tourist destination thanks to its scenic wilderness location and proximity to the world-class salmon fishery of the Kenai River and Russian River. As of the 2010 census, the population in Cooper Landing was 289. Show on map
SavoongaSavoonga (Central Siberian Yupik: Sivunga) is a city in Nome Census Area, Alaska, one of two on St Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea. As of the 2010 census, Savoonga's population was 671. Savoonga was incorporated in 1969, and in 1971 became the joint owner with Gambell of the entire island. The local economy consists largely of subsistence hunting for walrus, seals, fish, and bowhead whales; the city calls itself the \"Walrus Capital of the World\". A dogsled mail service operated here until 1963. Show on map
WaterfallWaterfall is an Unincorporated community on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island in Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, Alaska, United States, approximately 60 miles (100 km) west of Ketchikan. The primary industry was Waterfall Cannery, built in 1912 as a salmon processing facility. The cannery closed in 1973 and was renovated into the Waterfall Resort, a sport fishing lodge. Waterfall is not connected to the island's road system; visitors to the resort arrive by floatplane from Ketchikan. Show on map
KennicottKennecott, also known as Kennecott Mines or AHRS Site No. XMC-001, is an abandoned mining camp in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska that was the center of activity for several copper mines. It is located beside the Kennicott Glacier, northeast of Valdez, inside Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The camp and mines are now a National Historic Landmark District administered by the National Park Service. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986. Show on map
Toksook BayToksook Bay (TOOK- sook or TUCK-sook) (Nunakauyaq, Tuksuk in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city and village on Nelson Island in Alaska. As of 2013 there are 617 people living there, making it the largest village on the island. Toksook Bay was established in 1964 by residents of nearby Nightmute. Almost the entire population are members of the Alaska Native Nunakauyarmiut ('People of Nunakauyaq'), who rely on fishing and other subsistence activities. Toksook Bay is 51 years old today in 2016. Show on map
Circle Hot SpringsCircle Hot Springs is a hot spring and an unincorporated community in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of Alaska in the United States. The community is home to a hot spring and is the site of the now-closed Arctic Circle Hot Springs resort. The hot spring can be accessed either by automobile via the Steese Highway or by plane via the small-scale Circle Hot Springs Airport. The area surrounding the hot spring is rich in mining history and retains a certain degree of mystery and folklore. Show on map
Saint TereseSaint Terese is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is named for Thérèse of Lisieux and home to a shrine dedicated to her, a Juneau-area visitor attraction which long predates the current cruise ship era. It is 1.2 miles (1.9 km) south of Dobson Landing and 18 miles (29 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Arctic VillageArctic Village (Vashrąįį K’ǫǫ in Gwich’in) is an unincorporated Native American village and a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2000 census, the population of the CDP was 152. The village is located in the large Gwitch'in speaking region of Alaska, and the local dialect is known as Di'haii Gwitch'in or Kutchin. As of 1999, over 95% of the community speaks and understands the language. (Kraus, 1999) Show on map
Clear, AlaskaClear is an unincorporated community in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States. The small community is along the George Parks Highway at milepost 280 and encompasses residential homes and businesses. Its elevation is 518 feet (158 m). Clear is 4 miles south of the Alaska Railroad Clear Site station established about 1918 at mile 392.9 ARR. The Geographic Names Information System reference for Clear refers to this station. Clear is 5 miles south of Clear Air Force Station (AFS). Show on map
MorzhovoiMorzhovoi (also known as Morzhovia, New or Old Morzhovoi, Protassof, or Selo Morzhovskoe) is an unincorporated community in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The name was published by the Russian Hydrographic Department on an 1847 map; it originates from a Russian phrase meaning Walrus Village. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
WainwrightWainwright (WANE-rite) (Ulġuniq in Iñupiaq), also known as Ulguniq or Kuuk, is a city in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 556, making it the third largest city in the North Slope Borough. The community was named after Wainwright Lagoon, which in turn was named after Lt. John Wainwright, an officer under Capt. F.W. Beechey, who both discovered the lagoon in 1826. Wainwright was founded in 1904. Show on map
BadgerBadger is a CDP in Fairbanks North Star Borough. The population of the CDP was 19,482 as of the 2010 Census. It has an area of 66.71 sq. mi, 65.63 of land and 1.08 of water. The town would be a major city in Alaska if it were incorporated and not as close to Fairbanks. Along with North Pole and Fairbanks, Badger is a major community of the Fairbanks, AK Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was one of the CDPs created in 2010 out of small suburbs and outskirts of Fairbanks. Show on map
SeldoviaSeldovia (Alutiiq: Angagkitaqnuuq) is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. Its population was 255 at the 2010 census. It is located along Kachemak Bay southwest of Homer. There is no road system connecting the town to other communities, so all travel to Seldovia is by airplane or boat. The Alaska Native people of Seldovia make up approximately 1/4 of the population and have ancestors of Aleut and Alutiiq (Sugpiaq) descent, as well as some Dena'ina. Show on map
DeeringDeering (Ipnatchiaq in Iñupiaq) is a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on a sandy spit on the Seward Peninsula where the Inmachuk River flows into Kotzebue Sound, 92 km (57 mi) southwest of Kotzebue. As of the 2010 census, the population was 122. As of 2003, the village includes a community hall, a clinic run by the U.S. Public Health Service, a post office, a church, two stores, and a National Guard armory. Show on map
FairhavenFairhaven is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is 12 miles (19 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was published in 1962 by the United States Geological Survey, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Fairhaven in Alaska may also refer to a defunct recording district located on the Seward Peninsula. The Fairhaven Recording District was merged into the Cape Nome Recording District on June 13, 1975. Show on map
Nash HarborNash Harbor is an unincorporated community on Nunivak Island in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. Nash Harbor is located on the western shore of the bay of the same name, on the northern coast of the island. It lies 35 miles (56 km) west of Mekoryuk, the main city on the island. The community was originally an Yupik settlement and had a population of 49 in 1950. Ellikarrmiut Summer Science Field Camp, a college-level biology camp, is held in Nash Harbor. Show on map
White MountainWhite Mountain (Iñupiaq: Nasirvik) is a city in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 190 at the 2010 census. The city is an Iġaluiŋmuit (Fish River tribe) Iñupiat village, with historical influences from and relationships with Kawerak and Yupiaq Eskimos. 86.2% of the population is Alaska Native or part Native. Subsistence activities are prevalent. White Mountain is the only village on the Seward Peninsula located inland, not on the ocean. Show on map
KachemakKachemak, locally known as Kachemak City, is a small city in the southern portion of the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. The city consists of several subdivisions and other miscellaneous properties along an approximately 2-mile (3.2 km) stretch of East End Road, adjoining the northeast corner of the much larger (both in terms of area and population) city of Homer. The population was 431 at the 2000 census and 472 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
NaknekNaknek (Nakniq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place located in Bristol Bay Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 544. Naknek is located on the north bank of the Naknek River, close to where the river runs into the Kvichak Bay arm of the northeastern end of Bristol Bay. South Naknek is on the other side of the river. The local economy is almost entirely based on salmon fishing. Show on map
Farmers LoopFarmers Loop is a census-designated place in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States, one of several CDPs created out of various Fairbanks suburbs and outskirts during the 2010 census, at which time it had a population of 4,853. The CDP is located due north of Fairbanks and is centered on and named for Farmers Loop Road, a road that runs along the foothills north of Fairbanks between the Steese Highway and the northeastern corner of the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. Show on map
AnvikAnvik (Gitr’ingithchagg in Deg Xinag) is a city, home to the Deg Hit'an people, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. The name Anvik, meaning \"exit\" in the Central Alaskan Yup'ik language, became the common usage despite multiple names at the time, and may have come from early Russian explorers. The native name in the Deg Xinag language is Deloy Ges. The population was 85 at the 2010 census. Show on map
AlpineAlpine is an unincorporated community and former census-designated place in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 0 at the 2000 United States Census, but it was not included in the 2010 census. Alpine is the site of a major oil drilling and production operation operated by ConocoPhillips. Most employees, staffed primarily by commuter residents of Nuiqsut, work a two-week on and two week off work schedule. Show on map
Fort YukonFort Yukon (Gwichyaa Zheh in Gwich’in, originally, Gwich’in: Gwich'yaa Zhee; translation: \"house on the Flats\") is a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population, predominately Gwich'in Alaska Natives, was 583 at the 2010 census. Fort Yukon is the hometown of Alaska Congressman Don Young. It is served by Fort Yukon Airport. It is also known for having the record highest temperature in Alaska. Show on map
MintoMinto (Tanana: Menhti) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2000 census, the population of the CDP is 258. The name is an anglicized version of the Lower Tanana Athabaskan name Menhti mən̥tʰi, meaning 'among the lakes'. After repeated flooding the village was relocated to its present location in 1969. The former village site is now known as Old Minto. Show on map
ChickenChicken is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Chicken is a community founded on gold mining and is one of the few surviving gold rush towns in Alaska. The population was 7 at the 2010 Census. However, usually year round, there are 17 inhabitants. Due to mining, Chicken's population peaks during the summer. It has frequently been noted on lists of unusual place names. Show on map
ChariotChariot is a populated area on the coast of the Chukchi Sea in the western part of North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located close to the mouth of Ogotoruk Creek in the Ogotoruk Valley, 10 km ESE of Cape Thompson, Arctic Slope. Maximum elevation 20 m. The place was named around 1962 after Project Chariot by personnel of the project. The name likely refers to a headquarters building on the site. Show on map
King SalmonKing Salmon is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bristol Bay Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is two hundred and eighty-four miles southwest of Anchorage. As of the 2010 census the population was 374. It is home to Katmai National Park and Preserve. King Salmon is the borough seat of neighboring Lake and Peninsula Borough, but does not serve that purpose in its own borough, whose borough seat is in Naknek. Show on map
Tin CityTin City is not a populated place except for a nearby minimally manned radar station, located at 65°33′31″N 167°56′53″W / 65.55861°N 167.94806°W in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated at mouth of Cape Creek, on the Bering Sea coast, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Cape Prince of Wales on the Seward Peninsula. They also have the nearby Tin City LRRS (Long Range Radar Site) Airport. Show on map
Nunam IquaNunam Iqua, formerly called Sheldon Point, is a city in the Kusilvak Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2010 census the population was 187. Nunam Iqua is a Yupik name meaning \"the end of the tundra\". A man named Sheldon opened a fish saltery there in the 1930s, and the city was incorporated under the name Sheldon Point in 1974. The name was changed to Nunam Iqua in a November 1999 referendum. Show on map
Halibut CoveHalibut Cove is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 76 at the 2010 census. Originally a fishing village, Halibut Cove is now home to several artists and businesses. One of the only floating U.S. post offices is there. A popular tourist destination, the cove offers several lodges and cabins and the only way to get around the cove is by boat. Show on map
EagleEagle (Tthee T’äwdlenn in Hän Athabascan) is a city located along the south bank of the Yukon River near the Canada–US border in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. It includes the Eagle Historic District, a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The population was 86 at the 2010 census. Every February, Eagle hosts a checkpoint for the long-distance Yukon Quest sled dog race. Show on map
NoorvikNoorvik (Nuurvik in Iñupiaq) is a primarily Inupiat city in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 668. Located in the NANA Region Corp, Noorvik has close ties with the largest city in the region, Kotzebue. Residents speak a dialect of Inupiaq known as Noorvik Inupiaq. Noorvik was the first town to be counted in the 2010 census. Show on map
Delta JunctionDelta Junction is a city in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. According to 2012 population estimate, the number of residents in Delta Junction city area is 974. The city is located a short distance south of the confluence of the Delta River with the Tanana River, which is at Big Delta. It is about 160 km (99 mi) south of Fairbanks. Native inhabitants are Tanana Athabaskans. Show on map
KakeKake is a first-class city in Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 710 at the 2000 census and 557 as of the 2010 census. The name (pronounced just like English cake) comes from the Tlingit word Ḵéix̱ (Northern Tlingit) or Ḵéex̱ (Southern Tlingit), which is derived from ḵée “dawn, daylight” and x̱ʼé “mouth”, i.e. “mouth of dawn” or “opening of daylight”. Show on map
RubyRuby is an incorporated town in central western Alaska, situated on the south bank of the Yukon River at the northwestern-most tip of the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge. It is accessible only by boat or air. A formerly sizeable gold-mining and lumbering town servicing the region, at the 2010 census the population was just 166, with only a general store and post office remaining as businesses. Show on map
Navy TownNavy Town is a populated place in the Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is located on the southeast coast of Attu Island, on the western shore of Massacre Bay, and was named during the military occupation of the area in World War II. The name was first published by the United States Army Map Service and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Meyers ChuckMeyers Chuck is a former census-designated place in the City and Borough of Wrangell, Alaska, United States. The population was 21 at the 2000 census, at which time it was in the former Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area. On June 1, 2008, it was annexed into the newly created City and Borough of Wrangell, most of whose territory came from the former Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area. Show on map
GraylingGrayling (Sixno' Xidakagg in Holikachuk language) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 194. Since 1977, the Athabaskan village has seen a surge of interest on odd-numbered years, when it is the site of a checkpoint during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. It is situated after the checkpoint at Anvik and before Eagle Island. Show on map
HolikachukHolikachuk or Huligachagat(Xiyighelinghdi in Holikachuk language, Xiyeghelinghdi in Deg Xinag) is an abandoned village on the Innoko River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The residents of Holikachuk relocated to Grayling in 1962. The name of the village is also the source for the name of the Holikachuk Athabaskan language. Show on map
Russian MissionRussian Mission (Iqugmiut in Central Yup'ik) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska. It was the location of the first fur trading post of the Russian-American Company in 1842. It was officially named Russian Mission after the sale of Russian American possessions to the United States. The sale of alcohol is prohibited. At the 2000 census the population was 296. Show on map
WalesWales (Kiŋigin in Iñupiaq) is a city in the Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 145. It is the westernmost city on mainland North America. The westernmost city in Alaska, however, is Adak, located on Adak Island, in the Aleutians West Census Area. Wales Airport serves Wales with flights on Bering Air and Ravn Alaska to Nome. Show on map
ShishmarefShishmaref (SHISH-muh-reff) (Qiġiqtaq in Iñupiaq; Russian: Шишмарёв) is a city and village in the Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is located on Sarichef Island in the Chukchi Sea, just north of the Bering Strait and five miles from the mainland. Shishmaref lies within the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. The population was 563 at the 2010 census. Show on map
ButteButte is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census, the population was 3,246. Butte is located between the Matanuska River and the Knik River, approximately 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Palmer. It is accessible via the Old Glenn Highway. Show on map
DonnellyDonnelly is an unincorporated community in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Its elevation is 1,785 feet (544 m). Located along the Richardson Highway 26 miles (42 km) south of Delta Junction, it was founded around 1904 as a telegraph station between Chitina and Fairbanks. Donnelly's buildings during its early years were log constructed. Show on map
KivalinaKivalina (kiv-uh-LEE-nuh; Kivalliñiq in Iñupiaq) is a city and village in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 377 at the 2000 census and 374 as of the 2010 census. The island on which the village lies is threatened by rising sea levels and coastal erosion. As of 2013, it is predicted that the island will be inundated by 2025. Show on map
Thoms PlaceThoms Place is a former census-designated place (CDP) on Wrangell Island in the city of Wrangell, Alaska, United States. The population was 22 at the 2000 census, at which time it was an unincorporated part of the former Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, Alaska. It is now included in the City and Borough of Wrangell, which became a borough on June 1, 2008. Show on map
Eagle RiverEagle River is a community within the Municipality of Anchorage situated on the Eagle River for which it is named, between Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson and Chugach State Park in the Chugach Mountains. Its ZIP code is 99577. If Eagle River were not part of the Municipality of Anchorage, it would be classified as one of the five largest cities in Alaska. Show on map
LawingLawing is an unincorporated community on Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. Lawing is located on the eastern shore of Kenai Lake along the Alaska Railroad and Seward Highway, 21 miles (34 km) north of Seward. Alaska Nellie's Homestead, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located in Lawing. Show on map
HyderHyder is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 87 at the 2010 census. Hyder has achieved notice as a point in Alaska accessible to automobile and motorbike travelers in Canada and the United States who want to say that they have been to Alaska. Hyder is also the easternmost town in Alaska. Show on map
AkhiokAkhiok (Kasukuak in Alutiiq) is a second-class city in Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska, United States. Akhiok is Kodiak's southernmost village. The population was 71 at the 2010 census. Akhiok, which does not have a post office, is a rural location in postal code 99615 that belongs to Kodiak. The village is sometimes called Alitak, after a nearby bay. Show on map
CantwellCantwell (Yidateni Na’ in Ahtna Athabascan) was a railway flag stop at the junction with the Denali Highway. The original town is off the Parks Highway. It is a census-designated place (CDP) in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 219. Cantwell is the western terminus of the Denali Highway. Show on map
Dutch HarborDutch Harbor is a harbor on Amaknak Island in Unalaska, Alaska. It was the location of the Battle of Dutch Harbor in June 1942, and was one of the few sites, besides the attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, in American territory to be bombed by the Japanese during World War II. Dutch Harbor is now the home of an important fishing industry. Show on map
ChickaloonChickaloon (Nay’dini’aa Na’ in Ahtna Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 272 at the 2010 census. The Alaska Native people of Chickaloon are a mixture of Ahtna and Dena'ina Athabaskan. Show on map
ValdezValdez /vælˈdiːz/,/vəlˈdɛz/ (Alutiiq: Suacit) is a city in Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. According to the 2010 US Census, the population of the city is 3,976. The city is one of the most important ports in Alaska. The port of Valdez was named in 1790 after the Spanish Navy Minister Antonio Valdés y Fernández Bazán. Show on map
KlawockKlawock (Tlingit: Láwaak) is a city in Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, in the U.S. state of Alaska, on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island, on Klawock Inlet, across from Klawock Island. The population was 854 at the 2000 census. It is 90 km (56 mi) from Ketchikan, 11 km (seven mi) from Craig, and 39 km (24 mi) from Hollis. Show on map
MendenhavenMendenhaven is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is 2 miles (3 km) north of the Juneau International Airport and 8 miles (13 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was published in 1962 by the United States Geological Survey, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
TellerTeller (Tala in Iñupiaq) is a city in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 229. It is situated on the southern half of the spit called Nook (or \"Nooke\") in Inupiaq, which separates Port Clarence Bay (see also Port Clarence, Alaska) and Grantley Harbor, at the outlet of the Imuruk Basin. Show on map
TatitlekTatitlek /təˈtɪtlᵻk/ (Alutiiq: Taatiilaaq) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 88 at the 2010 census. Tatitlek is in the Chugach School District and has one school, Tatitlek Community School, serving about 15 students from preschool through high school. Show on map
HoustonHouston is a city in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located roughly 33 miles from downtown Anchorage \"as the crow flies\", although it is a 58-mile drive by car between the two points. The population was 1,912 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Herendeen BayHerendeen Bay is a populated place in the Aleutians East Borough of Alaska. Located on the Alaska Peninsula, it is 90 miles (140 km) northeast of Fort Randall. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
CandleCandle is an unincorporated community in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Candle was the turnaround point for the first major mushing competition in 1908, the All Alaska Sweepstakes, which was started by Allan \"Scotty\" Alexander Allan, and ran 408 miles (657 km) from Nome to Candle and back. Show on map
IkatanIkatan is an unincorporated community in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Named after Ikatan Peninsula, it is located on Unimak Island. The name was published by the United States Geological Survey on a 1949 map, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on February 5, 1999. Show on map
McGrathMcGrath (Tochak’ in Upper Kuskokwim, Digenegh in Deg Xinag) is a city and village in on the Kuskokwim River in Alaska, United States. The population was 401 at the 2000 census and 346 as of the 2010 census. Despite its small population, the village is an important transportation and economic hub for the area. Show on map
LoringLoring The official website for the community is www.loringalaska.info www.loringalaska.info created in 2000 to share history,community and area information. Loring was established in 1885 with the first post office in the District of Alaska and is a census-designated place (CDP) in Ketchikan Gateway Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 4 at the 2010 census.Though this varies with the season when the population is around 50 in the summer months. Show on map
KathakneKathakne is an unincorporated community in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Its name is derived from an Indian language. Its elevation is 1,696 feet (517 m). The community is situated on the northeastern shore of Fish Lake, 3 miles (5 km) east of Northway, near the Northway Airport. Show on map
Point PossessionPoint Possession is an unincorporated community on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. As of April 1, 2010, the village's population was 3. It is 15 miles southwest of Anchorage. Since 2009 Point Possession has been owned by the federal government and has been made a part of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Show on map
Two RiversTwo Rivers is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It lies between mile 13 (the Little Chena River) and mile 25 (the Chena River) on the Chena Hot Springs Road, northeast of Fairbanks. As of the 2010 United States Census, the CDP had a population of 719. Show on map
Sutton-AlpineSutton is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 1,447. The CDP includes the former coal mining community and road construction camp of Sutton. Show on map
Fox RiverFox River is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 616. It was first reported by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1895. The Fox River, which flows by the CDP, might have been named for Theodore Fox, a local mining magnate. Show on map
AngoonAngoon (sometimes formerly spelled Angun) (Tlingit: Aangoon) is a city on Admiralty Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 572; by the 2010 census the population had declined to 459. The name in Tlingit, Aangóon, means roughly \"isthmus town.\" Show on map
Saint PaulSt. Paul (Aleut: Tamax̂ Amix̂) is a city in Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is the main settlement of Saint Paul Island in the Pribilofs, a small island group in the Bering Sea. Saint Paul Island is well known as a birdwatching haven. The population was 479 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Alcan BorderAlcan Border, also known as Port Alcan, is a census-designated place in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. Alcan Border is part of the Unorganized Borough and is the main port of entry for persons arriving in Alaska by road. The population was 33 at the 2010 census. Show on map
BluffBluff, also known as Apookauchuk, was a 20th-century mining town in Alaska. It was built on the Seward Peninsula in 1900, as a result of the Nome Gold Rush. The town was located 55 miles (89 km) southeast of Nome. The settlement was served by a post office for eighteen years, from 1901 to 1919. Show on map
PaimiutPaimuit is an unincorporated community in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population is 2. The nearest town is Hooper Bay, Alaska. The elevation is 197 feet. Paimiut is an Eskimo name meaning, \"people of the stream's mouth\". The town is on the east bank of the Lithkealik River. Show on map
HusliaHuslia (HOOS-lee-uh) (Ts’aateyhdenaade kk’onh Denh in Koyukon) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. Rarely known as Hussliakatna, it is inhabited by Koyukuk-hotana Athabascans. The population was 293 at the 2000 census and 275 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
North PoleNorth Pole, a suburb of Fairbanks (located to the southeast of Fairbanks), is a small city in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska metropolitan statistical area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 2,117. Show on map
HomerHomer is a city located in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is two hundred and eighteen miles southwest of Anchorage. According to the 2010 Census, the population is 5,003. Long known as The \"Halibut Fishing Capital of the World.\" Homer is also nicknamed \"the end of the road,\" and more recently, \"the cosmic hamlet by the sea.\" Show on map
Big DeltaBig Delta is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 591 at the 2010 census. Big Delta is at the confluence of the Delta River and the Tanana River and gets its name from the huge river delta formed by the confluence. Show on map
Point MacKenziePoint MacKenzie is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 529. Seward's Success was once proposed to be constructed here in the 1970s. Show on map
ShaktoolikShaktoolik (Saqtuliq in Iñupiaq) is a city in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 251. Shaktoolik is one of a number of Alaskan communities threatened by erosion and related global warming effects. The community has been relocated twice. Show on map
Trapper CreekTrapper Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area and is known as the southern gateway to Denali State Park. According to the 2000 census the population was 423. Show on map
NinilchikNinilchik (Russian: Нинильчик) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 883. The Alaska Native people of Ninilchik have ancestors of Aleut and Alutiiq (Sugpiaq) descent, as well as some Dena'ina. Show on map
SagwonSagwon is a small unincorporated community in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. It is above the Arctic Circle. It is known for the Gallagher Flint Station Archeological Site which was discovered during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Show on map
MetlakatlaMetlakatla /ˌmɛtləˈkætlə/ (Tsimshian: Maaxłakxaała \"Saltwater pass\") is a census-designated place (CDP) on Annette Island in Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 1,375; this had grown to 1,405 by the 2010 census. Show on map
IgiugigIgiugig (Igyaraq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 50 at the 2010 census. The village is at the mouth of the Kvichak River, on Lake Iliamna, in the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
South Van HornSouth Van Horn is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 558, the 107th largest city or CDP in Alaska. It has a population density of 65.42 people per sq mi (25.26 per km2). Show on map
KoyukukKoyukuk (Meneelghaadze’ T’oh in Koyukon) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 101. As of 2009, Koyukuk is one of a number of Alaskan communities threatened by erosion. Show on map
TyonekTyonek (Dena'ina: Qaggeyshlat) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2000 census the population was 193. In 1973, Tyonek formed Tyonek Native Corporation (TNC) under ANCSA and is federally recognized. Show on map
AtkaAtka (Unangax̂: Atx̂ax̂) is a hamlet located on the east side of Atka Island, in Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 61 at the 2010 census. The population of Atka is nearly entirely Aleut (Unangan). The major industry is fishing. Show on map
Lena BeachLena Beach is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. The name was first published by the Bureau of the Census in 1940 and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 23, 2001. It is 14 miles (23 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. Show on map
HainesHaines (Tlingit: Deishú) is a census-designated place located in Haines Borough, Alaska, United States. It is in the northern part of the Alaska Panhandle, near Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. As of the 2010 census, the population of the area was 2,508. Show on map
PrimrosePrimrose is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 93 at the 2000 census and 78 at the 2010 census. Primrose is one of a number of small communities located north of Seward alongside the Seward Highway. Show on map
St. Mary'sSt. Mary's (Negeqliq in Central Yup'ik) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, United States. By 2015 the population was 600. Within Saint Mary's there are two federally-recognized tribes the Algaaciq Tribal Government and the Yuupiit of Andreafsky. Show on map
SolomonSolomon is an unincorporated community in the Nome Census Area of the Unorganized Borough of Alaska. The Solomon State Field Airport is located near here. The elevation is 23 feet (7.0 m). As of 2003, the population was 4. The nearest town is Nome, Alaska. Show on map
TakotnaTakotna (Tocho’no’ in Upper Kuskokwim) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 52 as of the 2010 Census, an increase of 4% from 50 at the 2000 Census. Show on map
HydaburgHydaburg (/ˈhaɪdəbɜːrɡ/, HIGH-duh-burg) is a first-class city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 382 at the 2000 census and 376 as of the 2010 census. The name \"Hydaburg\" refers to the Haida people. Show on map
Charlieskin VillageCharlieskin Village is an unincorporated community in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. Its elevation is 1,696 feet (517 m). The community lies along Charlieskin Creek, 5.5 miles (8.8 km) south of Northway Junction, near Kathakne. Show on map
KotzebueKotzebue /ˈkoʊtsʌˌbjuː/ or Kikiktagruk (Qikiqtaġruk /qikiqtaʁʐuk/ in Iñupiaq) is a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the borough's seat, by far its largest community and the economic and transportation hub of the subregion of Alaska encompassing the borough. The population of the city was 3,201 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
AfognakAfognak (/əˈfɒɡnæk/; also Ag’waneq in Alutiiq) was an Alutiiq village on the island of Afognak in Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska, United States. It was located on Afognak Bay on the southwest coast of the island, three miles north of Kodiak Island. Show on map
DillinghamDillingham /ˈdɪlɪŋhæm/ (Curyuk in Central Alaskan Yup'ik), also known as Curyung and (for the southwestern section) Kanakanak, is a city in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 2,329. Show on map
AndersonAnderson is a city in the Denali Borough, Alaska, United States, and the borough's only incorporated community. At the 2010 census the population was 246, down from 367 at the 2000 census. The city is named after one of the original homesteaders. Show on map
Saint GeorgeSt. George (Aleut: Anĝaaxchalux̂) is a city in Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 102. It is the main settlement of St. George Island in the Pribilofs, a small island group in the Bering Sea. Show on map
KasaanKasaan /kəˈsæn/ (Haida: Gasa'áan; Tlingit: Kasa'aan) is a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 39 at the 2000 census. The name \"Kasaan\" comes from Tlingit kasa'aan, meaning \"pretty town\". Show on map
KasiglukKasigluk /kəˈsɪɡlʊk/ (Kassigluq in Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2010 census the population was 569. Kasigluk consists of two smaller villages, called Akiuk and Akula. Show on map
ChitinaChitina (/tʃɪtˈ.nʌ/ or /tʃɪ.tiːˈ.nʌ/; Ahtna Athabascan Tsedi Na’ [tʃɛ.diː.näʔ] < tsedi \"copper\" + na’ \"river\") is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 126. Show on map
Cold BayCold Bay (Udaamagax in Aleut) is a city in Aleutians East Borough, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 108. Cold Bay is one of the main commercial centers of the Alaska Peninsula, and is home to Cold Bay Airport. Show on map
CoppervilleCopperville is an unincorporated community and former census-designated place in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 179 at the 2000 United States Census, but it was not included in the 2010 census. Show on map
KongiganakKongiganak (Kangirnaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States, and primarily sits on the eastern shore of the Kongiganak River. As of the 2010 census, the population was 439. Show on map
NikolaevskNikolaevsk (Russian: Николаевск) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP is 318. Nikolaevsk School serves school-age children from the area. Show on map
WevokWevok is a former Inupiat village in the western part of North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its name is derived from the Iñupiat name of Cape Lisburne, which is 5 km (3.1 mi) to the west. Its maximum elevation is 17 m (56 ft). Show on map
Cape PoleCape Pole is one of only two populated towns on Kosciusko Island, the other being Edna Bay, and has both year-round and seasonal residents. It was a thriving logging camp from 1954 until it was shut down by a federal court ruling in 1978. Show on map
AlakanukAlakanuk (ah-LUCK-uh-nuck) (Alarneq in Central Yup'ik) is a 2nd-class city in the Kusilvak Census Area of the Unorganized Borough in the western part of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city was 652. Show on map
Moose PassMoose Pass is an unincorporated community of just over two hundred people on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. It is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 219. Show on map
TalkeetnaTalkeetna (Dena'ina: K'dalkitnu) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska, Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 876. Show on map
CentralCentral is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 134. Every February, Central hosts a checkpoint for the long-distance Yukon Quest sled dog race. Show on map
GlennallenGlennallen /ɡlɛˈnælən/ (Ciisik’e Na’ in Ahtna) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez–Cordova Census Area in the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 483. Show on map
Dobson LandingDobson Landing is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981 and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Anaktuvuk PassAnaktuvuk Pass (Uhn-uk-too-vuk) (Anaqtuuvak or Naqsraq in Iñupiaq) is a city in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 282 at the 2000 census and 324 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
SleetmuteSleetmute (Cellitemiut in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 86. Hometown of The Sleetmute Sweetheart, Miss Emma Hill. Show on map
Hooper BayHooper Bay or Naparyarmiut (Naparyaarmiut in Central Yup'ik) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 1,014. The Boards of Canada EP Hooper Bay was named after the city. Show on map
Kenny LakeKenny Lake is a farming community - one of the last to be homesteaded in America. Kenny Lake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 355. Show on map
KlukwanKlukwan (Tlingit: Tlákw.aan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alaska, United States. It is technically in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, though it is an enclave of Haines Borough. At the 2000 census the population was 139. Show on map
PaxsonPaxson is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 40. It is located on the Richardson Highway at the junction with the Denali Highway. Show on map
Harding-Birch LakesHarding-Birch Lakes is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 299. Show on map
Knik RiverKnik River /ˈknɪk/ is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 744 at the 2010 census. Show on map
KatallaKatalla (pronounced KA-tell-ah) is a ghost town in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 76 km (47 mi) southeast of Cordova. The name of this town was sometimes spelled Catalla. It is now abandoned. Show on map
Crown PointCrown Point is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 75 at the 2000 census. Land access to this area is by either the Alaska Railroad or the Seward Highway. Show on map
AlatnaAlatna /əˈlætnə/ (Alaasuq in Iñupiaq) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the Unorganized Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 37 at the 2010 census. Show on map
AleknagikAleknagik is located at 59°16′42″N 158°37′23″W / 59.27833°N 158.62306°W (59.278362, -158.622928) (Sec. 31, T010S, R055W, Seward Meridian), in the Bristol Bay Recording District. Aleknagik is located at the head of the Wood River on the southeast end of Lake Aleknagik, 16 miles (26 km) northwest of Dillingham. The city is named after Aleknagik Lake. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 41.5 square miles (107.5 km2), of which 24.5 square miles (63.5 km2) is land and 17.0 square miles (44.0 km2), or 40.89%, is water. Show on map
SusitnaSusitna is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP is 18. Show on map
Pleasant ValleyPleasant Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 725 at the 2010 census, up from 623 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Fort RichardsonFort Richardson was a United States Army installation in the U.S. state of Alaska, adjacent to the city of Anchorage. In 2010, it was merged with nearby Elmendorf Air Force Base to form Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Show on map
Lake MinchuminaLake Minchumina (Menchuh Mene’ in Koyukon) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2000 census, the population of the CDP is 32. Show on map
SlanaSlana /ˈslænə/ (Stl’ana’ in Ahtna) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 147. Show on map
SelawikSelawik is a city in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 829. Selawik comes from \"siilvik\"which means \"place of sheefish\" in Inupiaq. Show on map
AllakaketAllakaket (/æləˈkækᵻt/ al-ə-KAK-ət) (Aalaa Kkaakk’et in Koyukon) is a 2nd Class City in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the Unorganized Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 105 at the 2010 census. Show on map
TanainaTanaina is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 8,197. Show on map
Meadow LakesMeadow Lakes is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,570. Show on map
SalchaSalcha is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,095 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Buffalo SoapstoneBuffalo Soapstone is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 699 at the 2000 census. Show on map
UngaUnga is a ghost town on Unga Island in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska, about two miles west of Sand Point. The island's length is 15 miles (24 km). Unga's altitude is 59 feet (18 m). Show on map
WillowWillow is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 2,102. Show on map
Knik-FairviewKnik-Fairview is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 14,923. Show on map
Holy CrossHoly Cross (Deloy Chet in Deg Xinag, Ingirraller in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 227. Show on map
TanacrossTanacross (Taats’altęy in Tanacross Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 136. It hosts an air tanker base. Show on map
KupreanofKupreanof is a city at the eastern shore of Kupreanof Island in the Petersburg Borough, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 23 at the 2000 census, making it the smallest incorporated city in the state. Show on map
Dot LakeDot Lake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is located on the Alaska Highway between Delta Junction and Tok. The population was 13 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Farm LoopFarm Loop is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 1,028. Show on map
FishhookFishhook is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 4,679. Show on map
EsterEster is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,422 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Big LakeBig Lake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,635 at the 2000 census. Show on map
GatewayGateway is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 5,552 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Mountain VillageMountain Village (Asaacarsaq in Central Yup'ik) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, United States, located on the Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. At the 2000 census the population was 755. Show on map
PalmerPalmer is the borough seat of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is part of the Anchorage Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city is 5,937. Show on map
GakonaGakona /ɡəˈkoʊnə/ (Ggax Kuna’ in Ahtna Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 218. Show on map
LakesLakes is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 8,364. Show on map
FoxFox is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census the population was 417. Show on map
ChaseChase is a census-designated place (CDP) in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Anchorage, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 34 at the 2010 census. Show on map
PelicanPelican (Tlingit: K'udeis'X̱'e) is a city in the northwestern part of Chichagof Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 163. Show on map
SaxmanSaxman is a city on Revillagigedo Island in Ketchikan Gateway Borough in southeastern Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 411. The city of Ketchikan lies just to its northwest. Show on map
Port GrahamPort Graham, also known as Paluwik (pah-LU-wig) in the Alutiiq language, is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 171. Show on map
Fort GreelyFort Greely is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is home to the Fort Greely military installation. At the 2010 census the population was 539. Show on map
ChalkyitsikChalkyitsik (Jałk’iitsik in Gwich’in) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 83. Show on map
Port ClarencePort Clarence is a census-designated place (CDP) in Nome Census Area, Alaska. The population was 24 at the 2010 census. It is located on the spit separating Port Clarence Bay from the Bering Strait. Show on map
NoatakNoatak (Nuataaq in Iñupiaq) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Northwest Arctic Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 514 at the 2010 census. It is served by Noatak Airport. Show on map
NulatoNulato (Noolaaghe Doh /nuːlaːɣə tɔːχ/, (chum salmon fish camp) in Koyukon) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 336. Show on map
Dot Lake VillageDot Lake Village (Kelt’aaddh Menn’ in Tanacross Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 62 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Funny RiverFunny River is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 877. It is best known for the Funny River Fire in May 2014. Show on map
GambellGambell (GAM-bull) (Central Siberian Yupik: Sivuqaq) is a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Located on St. Lawrence Island, it had a population of 681 at the 2010 census. Show on map
KaktovikKaktovik (kack-TOH-vick) (Qaaktuġvik in Iñupiaq) is a city in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. The population was 293 at the 2000 census and 239 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
CraigCraig (Tlingit: Sháan Séet) is a first-class city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area in the Unorganized Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 1,201 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Elfin CoveElfin Cove is a census-designated place (CDP) near the northwestern corner of Chichagof Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 32 at the 2000 census. Show on map
Crooked CreekCrooked Creek (Tevyaraq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 105. Show on map
FlatFlat is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was 0. Its post office closed in January 2004. Show on map
AkiachakAkiachak (ACK-ee-uh-chuck) (Akiacuaq in Central Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 627 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Healy LakeHealy Lake (Mendees Cheeg in Tanacross Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 13 at the 2010 census. Show on map
McKinley ParkMcKinley Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Denali Borough, in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 185, up from 142 at the 2000 census. Show on map
NondaltonNondalton (Dena'ina: Nundaltin) is a city located on the west shore of Six Mile Lake in the Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census, the population was 164. Show on map
ChignikChignik (Alutiiq: Cirniq) is a city in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. It is two hundred and fifty miles southwest of Kodiak. At the 2010 census the population was 91. Show on map
ChugiakChugiak /ˈtʃuːɡiːæk/ is an unincorporated community in the Municipality of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska, situated approximately 20 miles (32 km) northeast of downtown Anchorage. Show on map
NorthwayNorthway (K’ehtthiign in Upper Tanana Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 71 at the 2010 census. Show on map
TazlinaTazlina /tæzˈliːnə/ (Tezdlen Na’ in Ahtna Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 297. Show on map
ToftyTofty is a ghost town in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was a gold-mining town known for its high production. Show on map
WhittierWhittier is a city at the head of the Passage Canal in the U.S. state of Alaska, about 58 miles southeast of Anchorage. The city is within the Valdez–Cordova Census Area. The 2015 population estimate was 214 people, almost all of whom live in a single building. Whittier is also a port for the Alaska Marine Highway. Show on map
ChistochinaChistochina (Tsiistl’edze’ Na’ in Ahtna Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 93. Show on map
ChuathbalukChuathbaluk (Curarpalek in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a city in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 118. Show on map
RampartRampart (Dleł Taaneets in Koyukon) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 24 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Northway VillageNorthway Village (Upper Tanana: K'ehtthiign) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 98 at the 2010 census. Show on map
NightmuteNightmute (Negtemiut in Central Yup'ik) is a city and village in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 208 at the 2000 census and 280 as of the 2010 census. Show on map
TetlinTetlin (Teełąy in Upper Tanana Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 127. Show on map
KokhanokKokhanok (Qarr’unaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 170. Show on map
Manley Hot SpringsManley Hot Springs (Too Naaleł Denh in Koyukon) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 89. Show on map
GalenaGalena (/ɡəˈliːnə/) (Notaalee Denh in Koyukon) is a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2010 census the population was 470. Show on map
Pilot PointPilot Point (Alutiiq: Agisaq) is a city in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States, on the Alaska Peninsula. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 68. Show on map
NikolskiNikolski (Chalukax̂ in Aleut) is a census-designated place (CDP) on Umnak Island in Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 18 at the 2010 census. Show on map
LevelockLevelock (Liivlek in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 69. Show on map
Pitkas PointPitkas Point (Negeqliim Painga in Central Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 125 at the 2000 census. Show on map
KwigillingokKwigillingok (Kuigilnguq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 321 at the 2010 census. Show on map
KoliganekKoliganek (Qalirneq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census, the population was 209. Show on map
TuntutuliakTuntutuliak (Tuntutuliaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 408. Show on map
Twin HillsTwin Hills (Ingricuar in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 74 at the 2010 census. Show on map
ShagelukShageluk (Łeggi Jitno’ in Deg Xinag) is a city in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 129. Show on map
BeaverBeaver (Ts’aahudaaneekk’onh Denh in Koyukon) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2000 census the population was 84. Show on map
States, regions, administrative units in Alaska
NameDescriptionShow
AlaskaAlaska (/əˈlæskə/) is a U.S. state situated in the northwest extremity of the Americas. The Canadian administrative divisions of British Columbia and Yukon border the state to the east; its most extreme western part is Attu Island; it has a maritime border with Russia to the west across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas–the southern parts of the Arctic Ocean. The Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest. Alaska is the largest state in the United States by area, the 3rd least populous and the least densely populated of the 50 United States. Approximately half of Alaska's residents (the total estimated at 738,432 by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2015) live within the Anchorage metropolitan area. Alaska's economy is dominated by the fishing, natural gas, and o Show on map
Yakutat City and BoroughThe City and Borough of Yakutat (/ˈjækətɑːt/, YACK-uh-tat) (Tlingit: Yaakwdáat) is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Incorporated as a non-unified Home Rule Borough on September 22, 1992, Yakutat was previously a city in the Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area (afterwards renamed the Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area). The name is Tlingit, Yaakwdáat (\"the place where canoes rest\") but it originally derives from an Eyak name diyaʼqudaʼt and was influenced by the Tlingit word yaakw (\"canoe, boat\"). Show on map
Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area Show on map
Lake and Peninsula BoroughLake and Peninsula Borough is a borough in the state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,631. The borough seat of King Salmon is located in neighboring Bristol Bay Borough, although is not the seat of that borough. The most populous community in the borough is the city of Nondalton. With an average of 0.0296 inhabitants/km² (0.0767/sq mi), the Lake and Peninsula Borough is the second least densely populated organized county-equivalent in the United States; only the unorganized Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area has a lower density. Show on map
Matanuska-Susitna BoroughMatanuska-Susitna Borough (often referred to as the Mat-Su Borough) is a borough located in the U.S. state of Alaska. The borough is part of the Anchorage Metropolitan Statistical Area, along with the city and borough of Anchorage on its south. The Mat-Su Borough is so designated because it contains the entire Matanuska and Susitna Rivers. These rivers empty into Cook Inlet which is the southern border of the Mat-Su Borough. This area is one of the few agricultural areas of Alaska. Show on map
Wade Hampton Census AreaKusilvak Census Area, formerly known as Wade Hampton Census Area, is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,459. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest community is the city of Hooper Bay, on the Bering Sea coast. The census area's per-capita income makes it the fourth poorest county-equivalent in the United States. In 2014, it had the highest percentage of unemployed people of any county or census area in the United States, at 23.7 percent. Show on map
Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census AreaPrince of Wales-Hyder Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,559. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Craig and Metlakatla. It was formerly part of the Census Bureau's Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area, but the name was changed in 2008 after most of the Outer Ketchikan (except the parts near the community of Hyder, and Annette Island) was lost to annexation by the Ketchikan Gateway Borough. Show on map
Bristol Bay BoroughBristol Bay Borough is a borough of the U.S. state of Alaska on Bristol Bay or Iilgayaq Bay. As of the 2010 census the borough population was 997. The borough seat is Naknek. There are no incorporated settlements. Incorporated in 1962, Bristol Bay was the first of Alaska's boroughs. It is also among the smallest, consisting of little more than the rectangle of land around Naknek on the coast and King Salmon (which, uniquely, serves as the borough seat for the neighboring Lake and Peninsula Borough) inland. Show on map
North Slope BoroughNorth Slope Borough is a borough located largely in the North Slope region of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,430. The borough seat is Barrow. Since 2011 the mayor is Charlotte Brower. Show on map
Denali BoroughThe Denali Borough is a borough located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of 2010 the population of the borough was 1,826. The borough seat is Healy, and its only incorporated place is Anderson. The borough was incorporated in 1990. The area was previously a part of the Unorganized Borough, with the Upper Railbelt School District serving as the region's rural education attendance area (which was replaced by a school district under the borough's umbrella upon incorporation). Show on map
Aleutians West Census AreaAleutians West Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,561. It is part of the Unorganized Borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest city is Unalaska. It contains most of the Aleutian Islands, from Attu Island in the west to Unalaska Island in the east, as well as the Pribilof Islands, which lie north of the Aleutians in the Bering Sea. Show on map
Fairbanks North Star BoroughThe Fairbanks North Star Borough is a borough located in the state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 97,581. The borough seat is Fairbanks. The borough's land area is slightly smaller than that of the state of New Jersey. Fairbanks North Star Borough comprises the Fairbanks, AK Metropolitan Statistical Area. The borough is home to the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Eielson Air Force Base. Show on map
City of Nunam IquaNunam Iqua, formerly called Sheldon Point, is a city in the Kusilvak Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2010 census the population was 187. Nunam Iqua is a Yupik name meaning \"the end of the tundra\". A man named Sheldon opened a fish saltery there in the 1930s, and the city was incorporated under the name Sheldon Point in 1974. The name was changed to Nunam Iqua in a November 1999 referendum. Show on map
Yukon-Koyukuk Census AreaYukon-Koyukuk Census Area is a census area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,588. It has the largest area of any county or county-equivalent in the United States. It is part of the unorganized borough of Alaska and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are the cities of Galena, in the west, and Fort Yukon, in the northeast. Show on map
Dillingham Census AreaDillingham Census Area is a census area located in the state of Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,847. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest community by far is the city of Dillingham, on a small arm of Bristol Bay on the Bering Sea. Show on map
Bethel Census AreaBethel Census Area is a census area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population is 17,013. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest community is the city of Bethel, which is also the largest city in the unorganized borough. Show on map
Nome Census AreaNome Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska, mostly overlapping with the Seward Peninsula. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,492. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest community by far is the city of Nome. Show on map
Southeast Fairbanks Census AreaSoutheast Fairbanks Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,029. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Deltana and Tok, both unincorporated CDPs. Show on map
Valdez-Cordova Census AreaValdez-Cordova Census Area is a census area located in the state of Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,636. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Valdez and Cordova. Show on map
Ketchikan Gateway BoroughKetchikan Gateway Borough is a borough located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,477. The borough seat is Ketchikan. Ketchikan Gateway Borough comprises the Ketchikan, AK Micropolitan Statistical Area. Show on map
Kenai Peninsula BoroughKenai Peninsula Borough is a borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 55,400. The borough seat is Soldotna. The borough includes the Kenai Peninsula and adjacent areas of the mainland of Alaska. Show on map
Aleutians East BoroughAleutians East Borough (/əˈluːʃənz, -ˈljuː-/;) is a 2nd class borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census the borough's population was 3,141. The borough seat is Sand Point. Show on map
Northwest Arctic BoroughNorthwest Arctic Borough is a borough located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,523. The borough seat is Kotzebue. The borough was formed on June 2, 1986. Show on map
Healy LakeHealy Lake (Mendees Cheeg in Tanacross Athabascan) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 13 at the 2010 census. Show on map
Kodiak Island BoroughKodiak Island Borough is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. At the 2010 census, the population was 13,592. The borough seat is Kodiak. Show on map
Haines BoroughHaines Borough is a home-rule borough located in the state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,508. Show on map
Different buildings in Alaska
NameDescriptionShow
Kensington MineKensington mine is a gold mine located 45 mi (72 km) north of Juneau, Alaska. The present mine is owned by Coeur Alaska Inc., a subsidiary company of Coeur Mining. Disambiguation: The Kensington mine has dual operational timeframes and locations. The historic workings exist near the top of the ore body, about 2000 feet and more above sea level. These workings were mined in the early 1900s, while the modern Kensington mine accesses the ore body 1,100 feet deeper and is advancing up and down from that point, eventually reaching the historic workings sometime in the late teens of 2000. Show on map
Unalaska AirportUnalaska Airport (IATA: DUT, ICAO: PADU, FAA LID: DUT) is a state owned, public use airport in the City of Unalaska, on Amaknak Island in the Aleutian Islands, off the coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the Bering Sea coast of Unalaska Island, 800 miles (1,300 km) southwest of Anchorage and 1,950 miles (3,140 km) from Seattle. Show on map
Alaska Native Medical CenterThe Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC) is a non-profit health center based in Anchorage, Alaska, United States, which provides medical services to 150,000 Alaska Natives and American Indians in Alaska. It acts as both the secondary and tertiary care referral hospital for the Alaska Region of the Indian Health Service (IHS). Established in 1997, ANMC is jointly owned and managed by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and Southcentral Foundation as well as tribal governments, and their regional health organizations. Show on map
High Frequency Active Auroral Research ProgramThe High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) was an ionospheric research program jointly funded by the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Navy, the University of Alaska, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), designed and built by BAE Advanced Technologies (BAEAT). Its purpose was to analyze the ionosphere and investigate the potential for developing ionospheric enhancement technology for radio communications and surveillance. The HAARP program operated a major sub-arctic facility, named the HAARP Research Station, on an Air Force-owned site near Gakona, Alaska. Show on map
University of Alaska FairbanksThe University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is a public research university in Fairbanks, Alaska, United States. It is a flagship campus of the University of Alaska System. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, and it also participates in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. UAF was established in 1917 and opened for classes in 1922. UAF was originally named Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines and later as the University of Alaska from 1925 to 1975. Show on map
Mount Edgecumbe High SchoolMount Edgecumbe High School (abbreviated MEHS) is a public boarding high school in Sitka, Alaska in the United States. Located on Japonski Island, across Sitka Harbor from the northwestern corner of downtown Sitka, the school is situated on a portion of Sitka's former World War II-era military installations. Established in 1947 after the military abandoned the area, the school was originally operated by the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as part of a network of boarding high schools, which included schools in Eklutna and Wrangell. After several decades of operation by the BIA, the school was briefly closed in the 1980s before being reopened by the Alaska Department of Education, which operates it today. Show on map
Fort Tongass (historical)Fort Tongass was a United States Army base on Tongass Island, in the southernmost Alaska Panhandle, located adjacent to the village of the group of Tlingit people on the east side of the island. Fort Tongass was the first US Army base established in Alaska following its purchase from the Russian Empire in 1867 and was garrisoned by the 2nd U.S. Artillery under the command of Captain Charles H. Peirce. Historian Hubert Howe Bancroft notes: \"the site was well chosen, containing a plentiful supply of timber and pasture, while fish and game abound in the neighbourhood. Show on map
Jualin MineJualin Mine is a defunct gold mine located within the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska approximately 44 miles (71 km) northwest of downtown Juneau, Alaska. The Jualin gold deposit was discovered by prospector Frank Cook in 1895 and was initially mined by the Jualin Mining Company. A stamping mill with a daily capacity of 30 stone (0.19 t) of ore was installed early in the mine's operation. The mine operated intermittently from 1896 to 1901 and again from 1905 to 1908, when it was closed at a depth of 210 feet due to water infiltration and power shortages. In 1912, the mine was purchased by a Belgian group, which began investing in better equipment and deeper drilling. In 1914, the shaft was deepened to 325 feet, and mining took place at the 310-foot level. A drainage and haulage tunnel w Show on map
University of Alaska-AnchorageThe University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) is a public research university located in Anchorage, Alaska. UAA also administers four community campuses spread across Southcentral Alaska. These include Kenai Peninsula College, Kodiak College, Matanuska–Susitna College, and Prince William Sound College. Between the community campuses and the main Anchorage campus, over 20,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students are currently enrolled at UAA. This makes it the largest institution of higher learning in the University of Alaska System, as well as the state. Show on map
Brooks CampBrooks Camp is a visitor attraction and archeological site in Katmai National Park and Preserve, noted for its opportunities for visitors to observe Alaskan brown bears catching fish in the falls of the Brooks River during salmon spawning season. The Brooks River connects Lake Brooks and Naknek Lake over about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi). This natural choke point for salmon runs made it an attractive location for prehistoric Alaskans, who occupied the area from 4500 BP. The Aglegmut Eskimo people lived along the Brooks River in historical times. The Brooks River Archeological District, which includes Brooks Camp, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993. Show on map
Cold Bay AirportCold Bay Airport (IATA: CDB, ICAO: PACD, FAA LID: CDB) is a state owned, public use airport located in Cold Bay, a city in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. First built as a United States Army Air Forces airfield during World War II, it is one of the main airports serving the Alaska Peninsula. Scheduled passenger service is available and air taxi operators fly in and out of the airport daily. Formerly, the airport operated as Thornbrough Air Force Base. Show on map
DyeaDyea (/daɪˈiː/ dye-EE) is a former town in the U.S. state of Alaska. A few people live on individual small homesteads in the valley; however, it is largely abandoned. It is located at the convergence of the Taiya River and Taiya Inlet on the south side of the Chilkoot Pass within the limits of the Municipality of Skagway Borough, Alaska. During the Klondike Gold Rush prospectors disembarked at its port and used the Chilkoot Trail, a Tlingit trade route over the Coast Mountains, to begin their journey to the gold fields around Dawson City, Yukon, about 800 km (500 mi) away. Confidence man and crime boss Soapy Smith, famous for his underworld control of the neighboring town of Skagway in 1897-98 is believed to have had control of Dyea as well. Show on map
Mat-Su Regional Medical Center HeliportMat-Su Regional Medical Center is a 74-bed general hospital in the U.S. state of Alaska. The hospital is owned by Community Health Systems (CHS). Located in the Gateway census-designated place, between Palmer and Wasilla, it is the principal hospital for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Owing to its location a short distance from the interchange of the Glenn and Parks Highways, Mat-Su Regional (along with the hospital on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for those eligible to receive care there) serves as a principal hospital for many of the Glenn Highway communities in northern Anchorage, such as Chugiak, Eagle River, Eklutna and Peters Creek. Show on map
Coast Guard Air Station SitkaCoast Guard Air Station Sitka is an Air Station of the United States Coast Guard located in Sitka, Alaska. The station was originally established on Annette Island in March 1944, until relocating to Sitka in 1977. Early aircraft consisted of Grumman G-21's, PBY’s, HU-16’s, HH-52’s, and HH-3 Pelicans. Primary missions performed by the air station are Search and Rescue (SAR), law enforcement, and logistics covering the Southeast part of Alaska.Area of responsibility encompasses approximately 180,000 square miles of water and land extending across Southeast Alaska from Dixon Entrance to Icy Bay, and from the Alaskan-Canadian border to the central Gulf of Alaska. This includes 12,000 miles of coastline distinguished by a rugged coast, mountainous terrain, severe weather, and many remote villag Show on map
Alaska SeaLife CenterThe Alaska SeaLife Center, Alaska’s premier public aquarium and Alaska's only permanent marine mammal rehabilitation facility, is located on the shores of Resurrection Bay in Seward in the U.S. state of Alaska. Open since May 1998, it is dedicated to understanding and maintaining the integrity of the marine ecosystem of Alaska through research, rehabilitation, conservation, and public education. It is the only facility in the world specifically dedicated to studying the northern marine environment and the only one designed at the outset to combine research with public education and visitor components. The Alaska SeaLife Center generates and shares scientific knowledge to promote understanding and stewardship of Alaska's marine ecosystems. Show on map
Providence Alaska Medical CenterProvidence Alaska Medical Center is Alaska's largest hospital, has 371 beds, 766 nurses and more than 850 physicians on staff. It is located at 3200 Providence Drive in Anchorage, Alaska. In the last year with available data, the hospital had 16,358 admissions, 69,133 emergency room visits, 5,350 annual inpatient surgeries and 7,770 outpatient surgeries. The hospital is accredited by the joint commission. Providence Alaska Medical Center offers a Family Residency Program affiliated to the University of Washington. Show on map
Totem Heritage CenterThe Totem Heritage Center is a museum operated by the City of Ketchikan in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Heritage Center houses one of the world's largest collections of unrestored 19th century totem poles. The poles were recovered from uninhabited Tlingit settlements on Village Island and Tongass Island, south of Ketchikan, as well as from the Haida village of Old Kasaan. The Center was founded in 1976 to preserve these totems and act as a cultural center. Sixteen of the museum's thirty-three totem poles are on permanent display, although the rest of the collection is available for research purposes. Show on map
Wildwood Correctional ComplexThe Wildwood Correctional Complex, located three miles north of Kenai, Alaska, is a complex of correctional facilities housing a total of about 360 prisoners and under the jurisdiction of the Alaska Department of Corrections. It consists of Wildwood Correctional Center (Building 10), a 255-bed medium custody long term facility housing sentenced adult male felon and misdemeanor prisoners and also including a correctional industries program, and Wildwood Pre-Trial Facility (Building 5), a 113-bed facility housing male and female adult felon and misdemeanor prisoners of all custody levels. Show on map
Sitka Rocky Gutierrez AirportSitka Rocky Gutierrez Airport (IATA: SIT, ICAO: PASI, FAA LID: SIT) is a state owned, public use airport located west of the central business district of Sitka, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska that has no direct road access to the outside world. Show on map
Fairbanks International AirportFairbanks International Airport (IATA: FAI, ICAO: PAFA, FAA LID: FAI) is a state-owned public-use airport located three miles (5 km) southwest of the central business district of Fairbanks, a city in the Fairbanks North Star Borough of the United States state of Alaska. Fairbanks is the smallest city in the United States with non-stop service to Europe, as Condor offers weekly flights to Frankfurt during the summer tourist season. Show on map
Clear Air Force StationClear Air Force Station (\"Clear\" colloq.) is an Alaska Air National Guard radar station for detecting incoming ICBMs and submarine-launched ballistic missiles to NORAD's Missile Correlation Center (MCC) and to provide Space Surveillance data to Air Force Space Command's Space Control Center (SCC). Clear's AN/FPS-123 Upgraded Early Warning Radar is part of the Solid State Phased Array Radar System (SSPARS) which also includes those at Beale AFB, Cape Cod AFS, RAF Fylingdales and Thule Site J. The \"historic property\" was one of the Alaska World War II Army Airfields and later a Cold War BMEWS site providing NORAD data to Colorado's BMEWS Central Computer and Display Facility (CC&DF). Show on map
Salmon Creek DamThe Salmon Creek Dam is a concrete arch dam on the Salmon Creek, 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Juneau, Alaska. Built in 1914, it is the world's first constant-angle arch variable radius dam. Since it was built, over 100 such dams have been constructed all over the world. Show on map
Lake Hood Seaplane BaseLake Hood Seaplane Base (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD) is a state-owned seaplane base located three nautical miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Lake Hood Strip (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD) is a gravel runway located adjacent to the seaplane base. The gravel strip airport's previous code of (FAA LID: Z41) has been decommissioned and combined with (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD) as another landing surface. Show on map
Brotherhood BridgeThe Brotherhood Bridge is a road bridge in Juneau, Alaska. The bridge carries the Glacier Highway over the Mendenhall River, acting as a demarcation point of sorts between the urban and rural portions of mainland Juneau. The bridge was named in honor of the Alaska Native Brotherhood (ANB). It was designed by civil engineer Roy Peratrovich, Jr., the son of Roy and Elizabeth Peratrovich, who were leaders in the ANB and counterpart Alaska Native Sisterhood. Bronze plaques on the bridge refer to the Raven and Eagle clans of the Tlingit people. The present bridge opened in 1965. Previous bridges across the Mendenhall River, at or near the same spot, were constructed in 1903, 1919 and 1931. The Brotherhood Bridge was slated for replacement, with widening and other improvements, in 2012. Demoliti Show on map
Adak AirportAdak Airport (IATA: ADK, ICAO: PADK, FAA LID: ADK) is a state owned, public use airport located west of Adak, on Adak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is the farthest west for the entire United States at 176.64W. As per the Federal Aviation Administration, this airport had 1,989 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 1,907 in 2009, and 2,097 in 2010. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility (the commercial service category requires at least 2,500 enplanements per year). Show on map
Merle K. (Mudhole) Smith AirportMerle K. (Mudhole) Smith Airport (IATA: CDV, ICAO: PACV, FAA LID: CDV) is a state owned, public use airport located 11 nautical miles (13 mi, 20 km) southeast of the central business district of Cordova, a city in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska which has no road access to the outside world. Airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Soldotna AirportSoldotna Airport (IATA: SXQ, ICAO: PASX, FAA LID: SXQ) is a city-owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southeast of the central business district of Soldotna, Alaska. The airport is located along the south bank of the Kenai River in the southeastern corner of Soldotna city limits, and also adjoins the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Road access to the airport is via Funny River Road, a short distance east of its intersection with the Sterling Highway. Show on map
Circle City AirportCircle City Airport (IATA: IRC, ICAO: PACR, FAA LID: CRC) is a state owned, public use airport located in Circle (also known as Circle City), in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also known as Circle City (New) Airport. Scheduled commercial airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Ketchikan Harbor Seaplane BaseKetchikan Harbor Seaplane Base (IATA: WFB, FAA LID: 5KE) is a privately owned, public use seaplane base located at the harbor of Ketchikan, a city in the Ketchikan Gateway Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located near the Ketchikan International Airport, which also has its own seaplane landing area. Prior to the opening of the Ketchikan International Airport in 1973, scheduled passenger seaplane service was operated with amphibian aircraft between the seaplane base and the Annette Island Airport located approximately 20 miles south as this land plane airfield previously served as the primary airport for Ketchikan with scheduled airline flights being operated by Pan American World Airways, Pacific Northern Airlines and Western Airlines into Annette Island over the years. Show on map
Shishmaref AirportShishmaref Airport (IATA: SHH, ICAO: PASH, FAA LID: SHH) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) south of the central business district of Shishmaref, a village in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It has one asphalt paved runway designated 5/23 and measuring 5,000 x 70 ft. (1,524 x 21 m). Shishmaref is located on Sarichef Island in the Chukchi Sea, just north of the Bering Strait and five miles from the mainland. The old airport was located just east on the edge of town with a north-south runway. Housing now occupies much of the old runway. Show on map
Kodiak Benny Benson State AirportKodiak Benny Benson State Airport (IATA: ADQ, ICAO: PADQ, FAA LID: ADQ) is a public and military use airport located four nautical miles (5 mi, 7 km) southwest of the central business district of Kodiak, a city on Kodiak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is state-owned and operated by the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (DOT&PF). It is home to the co-located Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak and a hub for Servant Air. On April 11, 2013, the Alaska State Legislature passed SB31, which renamed the facility \"Kodiak Benny Benson State Airport,\" in honor of the designer of the Alaska Flag. Show on map
Atka AirportAtka Airport (IATA: AKB, ICAO: PAAK, FAA LID: AKA, formerly 40A) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) north of the central business district of Atka, a city on Atka Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled commercial airline passenger service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AKA by the FAA and AKB by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAAK. Show on map
Nelson Lagoon AirportNelson Lagoon Airport (IATA: NLG, ICAO: PAOU, FAA LID: OUL, formerly Z73) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) east of the central business district of Nelson Lagoon, in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Cold Bay Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned OUL by the FAA and NLG by the IATA (which assigned OUL to Oulu Airport in Oulu, Finland). Show on map
Ketchikan International AirportKetchikan International Airport (IATA: KTN, ICAO: PAKT, FAA LID: KTN) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) west of the central business district of Ketchikan, a city in Ketchikan Gateway Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska which has no direct road access to the outside world nor to the airport. The airport is located on Gravina Island, just west of Ketchikan on the other side of the Tongass Narrows. Passengers must take a seven-minute ferry ride across the water to get to the airport from the town. Show on map
Seldovia AirportSeldovia Airport is a public-use gravel airstrip serving Seldovia, Alaska, about 15 miles (27 km) south-southwest from the fishing town of Homer at the Kenai Peninsula's \"end of the road.\" The two towns are separated by Kachemak Bay, a blue-water arm of the North Pacific Ocean's Gulf of Alaska. Known to pilots as \"Seldovia\", or more formally, (IATA: SOV, ICAO: PASO, FAA LID: SOV) this public airport is located less than a half-mile (2 km) northeast of the small boat harbor serving Seldovia in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. This airport is publicly owned by the State of Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF) - Central Region. A 2-lane gravel street named Airport Avenue leads about a half-mile (1 km) from the airport to the center of Seldovia@en . Show on map
KJNP-TV (North Pole)KJNP-TV, UHF digital channel 20 (or virtual channel 4 via PSIP) is a TBN-affiliated television station located in North Pole, Alaska, United States, that also serves Fairbanks. Owned by the Evangelistic Alaska Missionary Fellowship, the station maintains studios and transmitter facilities near Mission Road on the northeast side of North Pole. KJNP-TV and KJNP AM/FM (which launched in 1967) were founded by Don and Gen Nelson. In addition to TBN and other programs, KJNP-TV also broadcasts Closing Comments, one of the longest-running public affairs programs on local television. Show on map
Port Alexander Seaplane BasePort Alexander Seaplane Base (IATA: PTD, ICAO: PAAP, FAA LID: AHP) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Port Alexander, a city at the southeastern corner of Baranof Island in the Petersburg Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Port Alexander is assigned AHP by the FAA and PTD by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAAP. Show on map
Juneau International AirportJuneau International Airport (IATA: JNU, ICAO: PAJN, FAA LID: JNU) is a city owned, public use airport and seaplane base located seven nautical miles (8 mi, 13 km) northwest of the central business district of Juneau, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska which has no direct road access to the outside world. The airport serves as a regional hub for all air travel, from bush carriers to a major U.S. air carrier, Alaska Airlines. Another major air carrier, Delta Air Lines, also operates flights with mainline jet aircraft from the airport although this service is seasonal in nature. Show on map
Eielson Air Force BaseEielson Air Force Base (AFB) (IATA: EIL, ICAO: PAEI, FAA LID: EIL) is a United States Air Force base located approximately 26 miles (42 km) southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska and just southeast of Moose Creek, Alaska. It was established in 1943 as Mile 26 Satellite Field and taken off deployment in 2007. It has been a Superfund site since 1989. Eielson AFB was named in honor of polar pilot Carl Ben Eielson. The 354 FW is currently commanded by Colonel Michael P. Winkler. Show on map
Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel Fire BrigadeThe Portage Glacier Highway, or Portage Glacier Road, is a highway located in the U.S. state of Alaska. The highway is made up of a series of roads, bridges, and tunnels that connect the Portage Glacier area of the Chugach National Forest and the city of Whittier to the Seward Highway. Most of the highway travels through mainly rural areas just north of the Kenai Peninsula, with the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel passing under Maynard Mountain, part of the Chugach Mountain Range. Parts of the route were first constructed in the early 1900s, and the entire highway was completed on June 7, 2000, as part of the Whittier Access Project. As of 2012, the highway has not been extended or rerouted. The main portion of the highway traveling from the western terminus to the Begich, Boggs visitors ce Show on map
Point Hope AirportPoint Hope Airport (IATA: PHO, ICAO: PAPO, FAA LID: PHO) is a state-owned public-use airport located two miles (3 km) southwest of the central business district of Point Hope, a city in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Point Hope is located in the Lisburne Peninsula, on the Chukchi Sea coast. The airport covers an area of 22 acres (8.9 ha) and contains one asphalt paved runway designated 1/19 which measures 4,000 x 75 ft (1,219 x 23 m). Show on map
Church of the Holy AscensionThe Church of the Holy Ascension is a prominent landmark in Unalaska, the major community of the western Aleutian Islands in southwestern Alaska. The current church was built in 1894, probably on the site of an 1826 church, and likely using timbers and other elements (including one iconostasis) from the older church. It is one of the oldest churches in Alaska, and is significant as the site from which missionaries brought their religion to the local Aleut people. This evangelization effort was so successful that today's Aleut population is still strongly Orthodox. The church was declared a National Historic Landmark for its architecture, and for its role in the history and culture of Alaska. It is the second cathedral church of the Orthodox Church in America Diocese of Alaska, after St. Mi Show on map
PortagePortage is a town and former settlement on Turnagain Arm in Alaska, about 47 miles (76 km) south of Anchorage. This town was destroyed almost entirely in the 1964 Good Friday earthquake when the ground in the area sank about six feet, putting most of it below sea level. All that remains today are the ruins of a few buildings and a \"ghost forest\" of trees that died after salt water inundated their root systems. Where there was once a town there is now only a railroad and road junction linking the Seward Highway and the Alaska Railroad to Portage Glacier park and the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel, which leads to Whittier. Show on map
Spring Creek Correctional CenterSpring Creek Correctional Center is an Alaska Department of Corrections maximum security prison for men located in Seward, Alaska, United States. The prison is located approximately 125 miles (201 km) south of Anchorage. The prison is located on about 328 acres (1.33 km2) of land surrounded by national parks. The prison capacity consists of over 500 inmates and 97 correctional officers. Built as a decentralized campus, the prison construction was completed in 1988 at a cost of $44,678,000. A large portion of the prisoner population consists of \"hard core\" felons who committed violent crimes, such as murder. The Alaska DOC says that these prisoners \"will probably spend the rest of their life in prison.\" Spring Creek also houses prisoners who committed less serious crimes like assault and bu Show on map
Perryville AirportPerryville Airport (IATA: KPV, ICAO: PAPE, FAA LID: PEV, formerly AK5) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of Perryville, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned PEV by the FAA and KPV by the IATA. Show on map
Karluk AirportKarluk Airport (IATA: KYK, ICAO: PAKY, FAA LID: KYK) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Karluk, a community in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service was subsidized by the U.S. Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program until the end of March 2012, after which Island Air Service began providing subsidy-free service. Show on map
Pilot Point AirportPilot Point Airport (IATA: PIP, ICAO: PAPN, FAA LID: PNP) is a state-owned, public-use airport located in Pilot Point, a city in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned PNP by the FAA and PIP by the IATA (which assigned PNP to Girua Airport in Popondetta, Papua New Guinea). Show on map
Levelock AirportLevelock Airport (IATA: KLL, FAA LID: 9Z8) , public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) north of the central business district of Levelock, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and the International Air Transport Association (IATA), this airport is assigned 9Z8 by the FAA and KLL by IATA. Show on map
Minto Al Wright AirportMinto Al Wright Airport (IATA: MNT, FAA LID: 51Z) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Minto, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Formerly known as Minto Airport, it was renamed in August 2009 to honor Al Wright, an Alaskan aviation pioneer and founder of Wright Air Service. Scheduled commercial airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Akhiok AirportAkhiok Airport (IATA: AKK, ICAO: PAKH, FAA LID: AKK) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southwest of the central business district of Akhiok, a city in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service was subsidized by the U.S. Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program until the end of March 2010, after which Servant Air began providing subsidy-free service. Show on map
Akutan Seaplane BaseAkutan Seaplane Base (IATA: was KQA, FAA LID: KQA) is a public use seaplane base located in Akutan, a city on Akutan Island in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled seaplane service was subsidized by the Essential Air Service program until late 2012 when PenAir retired their Grumman Goose amphibious aircraft and a new land-based airport on neighboring Akun Island was built. The new airport is known as Akutan Airport. Show on map
Koliganek AirportKoliganek Airport (IATA: KGK, ICAO: PAJZ, FAA LID: JZZ) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) east of the central business district of Koliganek, in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Dillingham Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned JZZ by the FAA and KGK by the IATA. Show on map
Willow AirportWillow Airport (IATA: WOW, ICAO: PAUO, FAA LID: UUO) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) northwest of the central business district of Willow, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located across the road from Willow Lake and the Willow Seaplane Base (ICAO: 2X2). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Willow Airport is assigned UUO by the FAA and WOW by the IATA. Show on map
Egegik AirportEgegik Airport (IATA: EGX, ICAO: PAII, FAA LID: EII) is a city owned, public use airport serving Egegik, a city in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service is available at this airport. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned EII by the FAA and EGX by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAII. Show on map
Nikolai AirportNikolai Airport (IATA: NIB, ICAO: PAFS, FAA LID: FSP) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) northeast of the central business district of Nikolai, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 364 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 21% from the 459 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Fort Davis (historical)Fort Davis was a United States Army post established in the Nome Census Area of Alaska in 1900. It was named for General Jefferson C. Davis, the military commander of Alaska from 1868 to 1870. The Nome Gold Rush led to unrest from claim jumping, claim filing errors, and a general lack of authority. The Army was sent to the Nome area to maintain order. Before Fort Davis was established, soldiers from the port of St. Michael were sent to maintain order in Nome. St. Michael was a transit harbor for the Klondike gold rush and due to its growth during the rush, a military fort was built there in 1897. Show on map
Wainwright AirportWainwright Airport (IATA: AIN, ICAO: PAWI, FAA LID: AWI, formerly 5WW) is a public use airport located in Wainwright, a city in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by the North Slope Borough. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 3,547 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 3,770 enplanements in 2009, and 4,129 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Ambler AirportAmbler Airport (IATA: ABL, ICAO: PAFM, FAA LID: AFM) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) north of the central business district of Ambler, a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,357 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 0.13% from the 2,354 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Ouzinkie AirportOuzinkie Airport (IATA: KOZ, FAA LID: 4K5) is a state-owned public-use airport serving Ouzinkie, a city on Spruce Island in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport received national media attention in 2009 after being slotted to receive $15 million in federal stimulus money to construct a new airstrip. The new airport opened in 2010. Show on map
Talkeetna AirportTalkeetna Airport (IATA: TKA, ICAO: PATK, FAA LID: TKA) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Talkeetna, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,150 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008. Show on map
Twin Hills AirportTwin Hills Airport (IATA: TWA, FAA LID: A63) is a state-owned, public-use airport serving Twin Hills, in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Dillingham Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 395 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 23% from the 510 enplanements in 2007. Twin Hills Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Red Dog AirportRed Dog Airport (IATA: RDB, ICAO: PADG, FAA LID: DGG) is a private-use airport located at Red Dog Mine, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is privately owned by the NANA (Northwest Arctic Native Association) Regional Corporation. It has one asphalt paved runway designated 2/20 which measures 6,312 x 100 ft. (1,924 x 30 m). As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 7,968 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2005 and 8,475 enplanements (105 scheduled + 8,370 unscheduled) in 2006. Show on map
Nome AirportNome Airport (IATA: OME, ICAO: PAOM, FAA LID: OME) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) west of the central business district of Nome, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 59,984 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 54,994 enplanements in 2009, and 56,658 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a primary commercial service airport (more than 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Petersburg James A. Johnson AirportPetersburg James A. Johnson Airport (IATA: PSG, ICAO: PAPG, FAA LID: PSG) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Petersburg, a city in the Petersburg Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska which has no road access to the outside world. Airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Port Heiden AirportPort Heiden Airport (IATA: PTH, ICAO: PAPH, FAA LID: PTH) is a state owned, public use airport located six nautical miles (7 mi, 11 km) northeast of the central business district of Port Heiden, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
St. George AirportSt. George Airport (IATA: STG, ICAO: PAPB, FAA LID: PBV) is a state owned, public use airport located four nautical miles (5 mi, 7 km) of the central business district of St. George, a city on St. George Island in the Aleutians West Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger airline service is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Tununak AirportTununak Airport (IATA: TNK, FAA LID: 4KA) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of Tununak, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,809 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 9.6% from the 2,001 enplanements in 2007. Tununak Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Haines AirportHaines Airport (IATA: HNS, ICAO: PAHN, FAA LID: HNS) is a state-owned public-use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Haines, a city in the Haines Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the primary airport serving the Haines, Klukwan, Haines Borough area and is situated on the Haines Highway, directly adjacent to the Chilkat River. Show on map
Angoon Seaplane BaseAngoon Seaplane Base (IATA: AGN, ICAO: PAGN, FAA LID: AGN) is a state-owned public-use seaplane base located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Angoon, a city on Admiralty Island in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
West Valley High SchoolWest Valley High School (WVHS) is a public high school in Fairbanks, Alaska, United States, one of four standalone high schools and one of ten schools offering instruction in grades nine through twelve in the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District. Physcially located adjacent to the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) campus in the census-designated place boundaries of College, WVHS and crosstown rival Lathrop High School cover a combined attendance area encompassing the majority of the urban core and outskirts of Fairbanks, with WVHS's attendance area serving the westernmost portions of that area. The Alaska Department of Education & Early Development reported the school's enrollment at 1,027 on October 1, 2015. The school mascot is the Wolfpack and its colors are red and gold. WVH Show on map
Wrangell AirportWrangell Airport (IATA: WRG, ICAO: PAWG, FAA LID: WRG) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of Wrangell, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska which has no road access to the outside world. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Hasselborg Lake North Shelter CabinThe Hasselborg Lake North Shelter Cabin is a historic backcountry shelter in the Admiralty Island National Monument, part of Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska. The three-sided Adirondack-style log cabin, of which at best ruins survive today, was built in 1935 by a Civilian Conservation Corps work crew as part of a canoe route across the island. It is located at the northeast corner of Hasselborg Lake, where a poorly maintained or abandoned trail leads north to Windfall Harbor. Show on map
Yakutat AirportYakutat Airport (IATA: YAK, ICAO: PAYA, FAA LID: YAK) is a state owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) southeast of the central business district of Yakutat, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska which has no road access to the outside world. Airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
New Stuyahok AirportNew Stuyahok Airport (IATA: KNW, ICAO: PANW, FAA LID: KNW) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) west of the central business district of New Stuyahok, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Dillingham Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Atqasuk Edward Burnell Sr. Memorial AirportAtqasuk Edward Burnell Sr. Memorial Airport (IATA: ATK, ICAO: PATQ, FAA LID: ATK) is an uncontrolled public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) south of the central business district of Atqasuk, a city in North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. The airport is owned by North Slope Borough. Show on map
KYES-TV (Anchorage)KYES-TV is a MyNetworkTV-affiliated television station for Anchorage, Alaska, United States. The station is owned by Gray Television as part of a duopoly with NBC affiliate KTUU-TV (channel 2). The station broadcasts a standard definition digital signal on VHF channel 5 from a transmitter located in the city's Eagle River district. KYES maintains studios located on Woodland Avenue in Anchorage, southwest of downtown. Show on map
Gulkana AirportGulkana Airport (IATA: GKN, ICAO: PAGK, FAA LID: GKN) is a state owned, public use airport located four nautical miles (5 mi, 7 km) northeast of the central business district of Gulkana, in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also and five miles (8 km) northeast of Glenallen. Scheduled passenger service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Elim AirportElim Airport (IATA: ELI, ICAO: PFEL, FAA LID: ELI) is a state-owned, public-use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district of Elim, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Galena AirportEdward G. Pitka Sr. Airport (IATA: GAL, ICAO: PAGA, FAA LID: GAL) is a state owned, public use airport located in Galena, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 7,784 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 7,447 enplanements in 2009, and 12,421 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year) based on enplanements in 2008, however it qualifies as a primary commercial service airport based on enplanements in 2010. Show on map
KTNL-TV (Sitka)KTNL-TV is a CBS-affiliated television station located in Sitka, Alaska, United States. Owned by Denali Media Holdings (a subsidiary of local cable provider GCI), the station operates two full-time satellite stations: KUBD (channel 13), in Ketchikan, and low-power KXLJ-LD (channel 24) in Juneau. KTNL is sister to low-power NBC affiliate KSCT-LP (analog channel 5), but it is a translator of KATH-LD (channel 5) in Juneau. The station broadcasts a digital signal on VHF channel 7 (or virtual channel 13 via PSIP) from a transmitter in downtown Sitka. Show on map
Beluga AirportBeluga Airport (IATA: BVU, ICAO: PABG, FAA LID: BLG) is a private use airport located in Beluga, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by Conoco Phillips Alaska (formerly ARCO Alaska). As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,541 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 2,410 enplanements in 2009, and 2,144 in 2010. Show on map
Dillingham AirportDillingham Airport (IATA: DLG, ICAO: PADL, FAA LID: DLG) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) west of the central business district of Dillingham, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service is available at this airport. Show on map
Chignik Lagoon AirportChignik Lagoon Airport (IATA: KCL, FAA LID: KCL) is a state-owned, public-use airport serving Chignik Lagoon, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also known as Chignik Flats Airport. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Fort William H. SewardFort William H. Seward, also known as Chilkoot Barracks or as AHRS Site No. SKG-001, is a site at Port Chilkoot in Haines Borough, Alaska, about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) from the city of Haines. It was the last of a series of 11 military posts established in Alaska during the gold rush era, and was Alaska's only military facility between 1925 and 1940. It provided a policing presence for miners moving into the gold mining areas in the Alaskan interior, and a military presence during negotiations over the nearby international border with Canada. The fort is named for William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State who oversaw the Alaska purchase. Show on map
False Pass AirportFalse Pass Airport (IATA: KFP, ICAO: PAKF, FAA LID: KFP) is a state owned, public use airport in False Pass, a city in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Cold Bay Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Port Lions AirportPort Lions Airport (IATA: ORI, FAA LID: ORI) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Port Lions, a city located on Kodiak Island in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Evergreen CemeteryEvergreen Cemetery is a cemetery in Juneau, the capital of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was established in 1887 to replace the older cemetery on Chicken Ridge, near Main Street, when that location was staked as a gold mine. Most of the graves in this older cemetery were moved to the new cemetery between 1889 and 1892 and the rest were moved about 1915. The grounds were deeded by Evergreen Cemetery Association to the City of Juneau on May 23, 1907. Show on map
King Salmon AirportKing Salmon Airport (IATA: AKN, ICAO: PAKN, FAA LID: AKN) is a state owned, public use airport located just southeast of King Salmon, in the Bristol Bay Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was formerly the Naknek Air Force Base, named for its location near the Naknek River. Show on map
Tenakee Seaplane BaseTenakee Seaplane Base (IATA: TKE, FAA LID: TKE) is a state-owned public-use seaplane base located in Tenakee Springs, a city on Chichagof Island in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Cape Fox VillageCape Fox Village is a locality in Southeast Alaska near present-day Ketchikan. It is the site of a former village called Gaash of the Cape Fox people (Saanyaa ḵwaan) of the Tlingit. The location of the village is on the east side of Revillagigedo Channel, four miles south of Boca de Quadra. The name was recorded in 1880 by Ivan Petroff during the 10th Census, who reported 100 Tlingit still living there. Many native artifacts were taken from this area during early American and European exploration of Alaska, and many of these items have since been returned, including a totem pole that had been on display at Field Museum in Chicago. Show on map
Aleknagik /New AirportAleknagik Airport (IATA: WKK, FAA LID: 5A8), also known as Aleknagik (New) Airport, is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) east of the central business district of Aleknagik, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. The airport formerly had scheduled service provided by PenAir with flights to Dillingham. Show on map
Sand Point AirportSand Point Airport (IATA: SDP, ICAO: PASD, FAA LID: SDP) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) southwest of the central business district of Sand Point, a city in the Aleutians East Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Anchorage International Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Gustavus AirportGustavus Airport (IATA: GST, ICAO: PAGS, FAA LID: GST) is a state owned, public use airport located in Gustavus, a city in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
South Naknek Number 2 AirportSouth Naknek Airport (IATA: WSN, ICAO: PFWS, FAA LID: WSN), also known as South Naknek Nr 2 Airport, is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of South Naknek, in the Bristol Bay Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Girdwood AirportGirdwood Airport (IATA: AQY, FAA LID: AQY) is a state-owned public-use airport located three miles (5 km) northeast of the central business district of Girdwood, in Anchorage Borough, Alaska, United States. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2005 and 8,100 enplanements (all unscheduled) in 2006. According to the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2007–2011, it is a general aviation airport. Show on map
Ralph M Calhoun Memorial AirportRalph M. Calhoun Memorial Airport (IATA: TAL, ICAO: PATA, FAA LID: TAL) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) west of the central business district of Tanana, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Ruby AirportRuby Airport (IATA: RBY, ICAO: PARY, FAA LID: RBY) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southeast of the central business district of Ruby, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Manley Hot Springs AirportManley Hot Springs Airport (IATA: MLY, ICAO: PAML, FAA LID: MLY) is a state owned, public use airport located in Manley Hot Springs, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service at this airport is subsidized by the U.S. Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Elfin Cove Seaplane BaseElfin Cove Seaplane Base (IATA: ELV, ICAO: PAEL, FAA LID: ELV) is a state-owned public-use seaplane base located in Elfin Cove, on Chichagof Island in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Ekwok AirportEkwok Airport (IATA: KEK, FAA LID: KEK) is a state owned, public use airport serving Ekwok, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to Merrill Field in Anchorage,AK is provided by Dena'ina air. Show on map
Venetie AirportVenetie Airport (IATA: VEE, ICAO: PAVE, FAA LID: VEE) is a public use airport located in Venetie, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by the Venetie Tribal Government. Show on map
McCarthy AirportMcCarthy Airport (IATA: MXY, ICAO: PAMX, FAA LID: 15Z) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of McCarthy, in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Nulato AirportNulato Airport (IATA: NUL, ICAO: PANU, FAA LID: NUL) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of Nulato, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Kwigillingok AirportKwigillingok Airport (IATA: KWK, ICAO: PAGG, FAA LID: GGV, formerly A85) is owned by the Native Village of Kwigillingok and is a public-use airport located one mile (two kilometres) northwest of the central business district of Kwigillingok, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. There is also a nearby seaplane landing area known as Kwigillingok Seaplane Base (FAA LID: KWK). Show on map
Alakanuk AirportAlakanuk Airport (IATA: AUK, ICAO: PAUK, FAA LID: AUK) is a state owned, public use airport located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) west of the central business district of Alakanuk, a city in the Kusilvak Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Togiak AirportTogiak Airport (IATA: TOG, ICAO: PATG, FAA LID: TOG) is a state-owned, public-use airport located in Togiak Village, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,781 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 6% from the 1,886 enplanements in 2007 and 43% from the 3,119 enplanements in 2006. Togiak Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013) as commercial service - non-primary, a category for airports with 2,500 to 10,000 enplanements per year. Show on map
Old Harbor AirportOld Harbor Airport (IATA: OLH, FAA LID: 6R7) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Old Harbor, a city in the Kodiak Island Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Excursion Inlet Seaplane BaseExcursion Inlet Seaplane Base (IATA: EXI, FAA LID: EXI) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Excursion Inlet, in the Haines Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service is subsidized by the U.S. Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Aniak AirportAniak Airport (IATA: ANI, ICAO: PANI, FAA LID: ANI) is a state owned, public use airport located in Aniak, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Its location on the Kuskokwim River also allows for the landing of seaplanes. Show on map
May Creek AirportMay Creek Airport (IATA: MYK, FAA LID: MYK) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) south of the central business district of May Creek, in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled passenger service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Bethel AirportBethel Airport (IATA: BET, ICAO: PABE, FAA LID: BET) is a state owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district of Bethel, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Show on map
Igiugig AirportIgiugig Airport (IATA: IGG, ICAO: PAIG, FAA LID: IGG) is a state-owned, public-use airport serving Igiugig, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
Pauloff Harbor Seaplane BasePauloff Harbor is an incorporated community with no year-round population on Pavlov Harbor on the northern coast of Sanak Island, 50 miles (80 km) southeast of False Pass, in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The primary means of transportation is boats and float planes from False Pass or King Cove.While a post office was established in 1949, the village has no permanent population or public facilities, although a village corporation operates from a post office box in Sand Point, where most of the corporation shareholders live. Show on map
Allakaket AirportAllakaket Airport (IATA: AET, ICAO: PFAL, FAA LID: 6A8), is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) north-northwest of the central business district of Allakaket, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is sometimes referred to as the New Allakaket Airport because it was constructed on a site southeast of the original airport which is now closed. Show on map
Nikolski Air StationNikolski Air Station (IATA: IKO, ICAO: PAKO, FAA LID: IKO) is an unattended airport located in Nikolski on Umnak Island in the Aleutians West Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This former military airport is now owned by the Aleut Corporation. Scheduled commercial airline passenger service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Current service to Nikolski is provided by PenAir using a Grumman Goose G-21A. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 165 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 219 enplanements in 2009, and 160 in 2010. Show on map
Cold Bay Air Force Station (historical)Cold Bay Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-26, LRR ID: A-08, DEW ID: COB-MAIN) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 625 miles (1,006 km) southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The ground control intercept (GCI) station F-26 was closed on 1 November 1983. A new minimally attended Long Range Radar (LRR) site, A-08 was built about 5 miles to the southeast of the closed Air Force Station as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air Support Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Rampart AirportRampart Airport (IATA: RMP, FAA LID: RMP) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Rampart, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Commercial service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 224 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 159 enplanements in 2009, and 224 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Anaktuvuk Pass AirportAnaktuvuk Pass Airport (IATA: AKP, ICAO: PAKP, FAA LID: AKP) is a public use airport located in Anaktuvuk Pass, a city in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by North Slope Borough. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 3,832 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 3,856 enplanements in 2009, and 4,031 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Chignik AirportChignik Airport (IATA: KCG, ICAO: PAJC, FAA LID: AJC) is a state-owned, public-use airport two nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of the central business district of Chignik, a city in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 800 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 21% from the 1,017 enplanements in 2007. Chignik Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Napaskiak AirportNapaskiak Airport (IATA: PKA, ICAO: PAPK, FAA LID: PKA) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of Napaskiak, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, Napaskiak Airport had 1,321 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 28.9% from the 1,858 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Birchwood AirportBirchwood Airport (ICAO: PABV, FAA LID: BCV) is a state owned, public use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northwest of the central business district of Birchwood (also known as Chugiak), in the Anchorage Municipality of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 450 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2010, an increase of 20% from the 375 enplanements in 2009. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
University of Alaska SoutheastThe University of Alaska Southeast is a public, four year university that is part of the University of Alaska System. The main campus is located in Juneau, Alaska and the university has extended campuses in Sitka and Ketchikan. The University of Alaska Southeast is abbreviated as UA Southeast, Alaska Southeast, or UAS. UAS was established on July 1, 1987 with the restructuring and consolidation of the former University of Alaska Juneau, Ketchikan Community College, and Islands Community College (Sitka). UAS is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. Show on map
Bartlett Regional HospitalBartlett Regional Hospital (BRH) is a hospital serving Juneau, Alaska, the capital city of Alaska and the largest city in Southeast Alaska. The hospital is owned by the City and Borough of Juneau. BRH is the only hospital in Juneau, and provides the only emergency room in the city. In addition, BRH operates the adjacent Rainforest Recovery Center, an inpatient and outpatient drug and alcohol treatment center. Bartlett Regional Hospital has 45 beds, and 76 doctors on staff. The hospital is located at 3260 Hospital Drive, in the Twin Lakes area of Juneau, adjacent to Egan Drive. Show on map
Kokhanok AirportKokhanok Airport (IATA: KNK, ICAO: PFKK, FAA LID: 9K2) is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of the central business district of Kokhanok, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,166 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 33.9% from the 1,765 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Nondalton AirportNondalton Airport (IATA: NNL, ICAO: PANO, FAA LID: 5NN) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) northwest of the central business district of Nondalton, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 825 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 50.9% from the 1,679 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Port Graham AirportPort Graham Airport (IATA: PGM, FAA LID: PGM) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Port Graham, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, where it is listed as commercial service - non-primary, an FAA category for airports with 2,500 to 10,000 passenger boardings (enplanements) per year. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,916 enplanements in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 1.3% from the 2,953 enplanements in 2007. Show on map
Newtok AirportNewtok Airport (IATA: WWT, ICAO: PAEW, FAA LID: EWU) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) west of the central business district of Newtok, a village in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. There is also a nearby seaplane landing area known as Newtok Seaplane Base (FAA LID: WWT), located at 60°55′25″N 164°39′22″W / 60.92361°N 164.65611°W on the Ninglick River. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned EWU by the FAA and WWT by the IATA. Show on map
Thorne Bay Seaplane BaseThorne Bay Seaplane Base (IATA: KTB, FAA LID: KTB) is a state-owned public-use seaplane base serving Thorne Bay, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,640 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 2,283 enplanements in 2009, and 2,608 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Ugashik Bay AirportUgashik Bay Airport (IATA: UGB, FAA LID: UGB) is a public use airport located 11 nautical miles (13 mi, 20 km) south-southwest of the central business district of Pilot Point, near Ugashik Bay in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Bureau of Land Management. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 180 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 207 enplanements in 2009, and 187 in 2010. Show on map
KAKM-TV (Anchorage)KAKM is a PBS member station serving Anchorage, Alaska, United States. Owned by Alaska Public Media, the station broadcasts a high definition digital signal on VHF channel 8 (or virtual channel 7 via PSIP) from a transmitter located atop the Knik TV Mast. KAKM maintains studios at the Elmo Sackett Broadcast Center on the campus of Alaska Pacific University. KAKM was the only PBS station in Alaska that was not part of AlaskaOne during its existence. The call letters were chosen to represent the 3 major geographic areas served by the station Anchorage, Kenai, and Matanuska. KAKM operates a full-time satellite station, KTOO-TV licensed to Juneau, Alaska. KTOO is owned by Capital Community Broadcasting - who owns and operates non-commercial FM radio stations KTOO (FM), KNLL, and KRNN - but is@en . Show on map
Naknek AirportNaknek Airport (IATA: NNK, FAA LID: 5NK) is a state-owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) north of the central business district of Naknek, in the Bristol Bay Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 161 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 53% from the 105 enplanements in 2007. Naknek Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Pedro Bay AirportPedro Bay Airport (IATA: PDB, FAA LID: 4K0) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) west of the central business district of Pedro Bay, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 678 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 47% from the 1,271 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Cape Sarichef AirportCape Sarichef Airport (IATA: WSF, ICAO: PACS, FAA LID: 26AK) was a small landing strip located on the western end of Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was used to supply and support a United States Coast Guard LORAN station and U.S. Air Force DEW Line site during the Cold War. It is now a private-use facility owned by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and managed by the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. Cape Sarichef was named in 1816 by Russian explorer Otto von Kotzebue after Admiral Gavril Sarychev of the Imperial Russian Navy. Show on map
Craig Seaplane BaseCraig Seaplane Base (IATA: CGA, FAA LID: CGA) is a public use seaplane base owned by and located in Craig, a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 5,844 enplanements (passenger boardings) in calendar year 2008, 4,470 enplanements in 2009, and 4,368 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Lake Hood StripLake Hood Strip (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD) is a state-owned public-use general aviation airstrip adjacent to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD), three miles (5 km) southwest of downtown Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. The airstrip and seaplane base are located at Lake Hood, just east of Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (IATA: ANC, ICAO: PANC, FAA LID: ANC). The gravel strip airport's previous code of (FAA LID: Z41) has been decommissioned and combined with (ICAO: PALH, FAA LID: LHD) as another landing surface. Show on map
Larsen Bay AirportLarsen Bay Airport (IATA: KLN, ICAO: PALB, FAA LID: 2A3) is a state owned, public use airport located in Larsen Bay, a city in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,933 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 3,009 enplanements in 2009, and 2,597 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Buckland AirportBuckland Airport (IATA: BKC, ICAO: PABL, FAA LID: BVK, formerly 7K5) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of Buckland, a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is situated on the Buckland River. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned BVK by the FAA and BKC by the IATA (which assigned BVK to Huacaraje, Bolivia). The airport's ICAO identifier is PABL. Show on map
Kodiak Municipal AirportKodiak Municipal Airport (IATA: KDK, ICAO: PAKD, FAA LID: KDK) is a city-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) northeast of the central business district of Kodiak, a city on Kodiak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. The FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2007-2011 categorized this as commercial service airport. However, that classification last applied in calendar year 2004 when the airport had 6,963 passenger boardings (enplanements). That number decreased to 703 in 2005, 6 in 2006, and none in 2007. Show on map
Fort Mears (historical)The Dutch Harbor Naval Operating Base and Fort Mears are the two military installations built next to each other in Dutch Harbor, on Amaknak Island of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, by the United States in response to the growing war threat with Imperial Japan. In 1938 the Navy Board recommended the construction which began in July 1940. The first army troops arrived in June 1941 and the navy air base was finished in September 1941. At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor, these were the only military installations in the Aleutian Islands. Show on map
Dutch Harbor Naval Operating Base (historical)The Dutch Harbor Naval Operating Base and Fort Mears are the two military installations built next to each other in Dutch Harbor, on Amaknak Island of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, by the United States in response to the growing war threat with Imperial Japan. In 1938 the Navy Board recommended the construction which began in July 1940. The first army troops arrived in June 1941 and the navy air base was finished in September 1941. At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor, these were the only military installations in the Aleutian Islands. Show on map
Kenai Municipal AirportKenai Municipal Airport (IATA: ENA, ICAO: PAEN, FAA LID: ENA) is a city owned, public use airport located in Kenai, a city in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 96,565 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 82,277 enplanements in 2009, and 86,857 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a primary commercial service airport (more than 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
McKinley National Park AirportMcKinley National Park Airport (IATA: MCL, ICAO: PAIN, FAA LID: INR, formerly 5MK) is a public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) of McKinley Park, in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States. It is owned by the U.S. National Park Service and is located at the Denali National Park and Preserve (previously Mount McKinley National Park). Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned INR by the FAA and MCL by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAIN. Show on map
Goose Creek Correctional CenterGoose Creek Correctional Center is an Alaska Department of Corrections state medium-security prison for men, located at the corner of Port Access Road and Alsop Road in Point MacKenzie, Alaska, in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley. The 435,000-square foot, $240 million facility has been controversial for its cost. Construction started in July 2009. It accepted its first prisoners in July 2012, with the state planning for all 1,050 state prisoners formerly housed out of state (in private prisons in Colorado and Arizona) to be housed in Goose Creek by September 2013. Show on map
Central AirportCentral Airport (IATA: CEM, ICAO: PACE, FAA LID: CEM) is a state owned, public use airport located in Central, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Commercial service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 47 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 13 enplanements in 2009, and 20 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Wiley Post-Will Rogers Memorial AirportWiley Post–Will Rogers Memorial Airport, (IATA: BRW, ICAO: PABR, FAA LID: BRW) often referred to as Post/Rogers Memorial is a public airport located in Barrow, a city in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by the state. Situated on the Chukchi Sea at a latitude of 71.29°N, the airport is the farthest north of any in US territory. The airport is named after American humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post, both of whom died about 9 mi (14 km) away at Point Barrow in a 1935 airplane crash. Show on map
KTVA-TV (Anchorage)KTVA, virtual channel 11, is a CBS-affiliated television station in Anchorage, Alaska. Owned by Denali Media Holdings (a subsidiary of local cable provider GCI), its studios are based at the former headquarters of the Anchorage Daily News on Northway Drive in Anchorage, while its transmitter is located in Spenard—covering the Anchorage bowl and much of the adjacent Matanuska-Susitna Valley. Some of its programming is broadcast to rural communities via low-power translators through the Alaska Rural Communications Service (ARCS). Show on map
Eareckson Air StationEareckson Air Station (IATA: SYA, ICAO: PASY), formerly Shemya Air Force Base, is a United States Air Force military airport located on the island of Shemya, in the Alaskan Aleutian Islands. The airport was closed as an active Air Force Station on 1 July 1994. However, it is still owned by the USAF and is operated by the USAF 611th Air Support Squadron at Elmendorf AFB for refueling purposes. It also serves as a diversion airport for civilian aircraft. The base previously hosted the AN/FPS-17 and AN/FPS-80 radars and since 1977 the more powerful AN/FPS-108 COBRA DANE phased-array radar. Show on map
Stony River 2 AirportStony River Airport (IATA: SRV, FAA LID: SRV), also known as Stony River 2 Airport, is a state-owned public-use airport located in Stony River, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 217 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2010, an increase of 51% from the 144 enplanements in 2009. It is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Port Alsworth AirportPort Alsworth Airport (IATA: PTA, ICAO: PALJ, FAA LID: TPO) is a private-use airport serving Port Alsworth which is located in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,938 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 2,592% from the 72 enplanements in 2007. Although many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned TPO by the FAA and PTA by the IATA. Show on map
Tanacross AirportTanacross Airport (IATA: TSG, FAA LID: TSG) is a public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) south of the central business district of Tanacross, in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Bureau of Land Management. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 80 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 32 enplanements in 2009, and 97 in 2010. This general aviation airport is located 166 miles (267 km) southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. Show on map
Kobuk AirportKobuk Airport (IATA: OBU, ICAO: PAOB, FAA LID: OBU) is a state owned, public use airport located in Kobuk, a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per the Federal Aviation Administration, this airport had 1,176 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 1,048 in 2009, and 1,255 in 2010. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility (the commercial service category requires at least 2,500 enplanements per year). Show on map
Cordova Municipal AirportCordova Municipal Airport (IATA: CKU, FAA LID: CKU) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.8 km) east of the central business district of Cordova, a city in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on Eyak Lake on which it also has a landing area for seaplanes. Cordova is also served by the Merle K. (Mudhole) Smith Airport which offers scheduled commercial flights including Alaska Airlines jet service. Formerly, the airport operated as Cordova Army Airfield. Show on map
Cape Lisburne LRRS AirportCape Lisburne LRRS Airport (IATA: LUR, ICAO: PALU, FAA LID: LUR) is a military airport located on Cape Lisburne, at the northwest point of the Lisburne Peninsula in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by the U.S. Air Force. It is also known as Cape Lisburne Airport. It is located within the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern Alaska, between the Arctic Ocean and the Chuckchi Sea. The nearest community is Point Hope, located 25 miles (40 km) to the southwest. Show on map
Eklutna DamThe Eklutna Dam, also referred to as the New Eklutna Dam or Upper Eklutna Dam, is an embankment dam on the Eklutna River about 30 mi (48 km) northeast of Anchorage in Alaska, United States. The primary purpose of the dam is hydroelectric power generation and it supports a 47 MW power plant. It was first completed in 1929 but was rehabilitated or rebuilt on several occasions over its history. Ownership of the dam and power plant is shared by Anchorage Municipal Light & Power, Chugach Electric and Matanuska Electric. Show on map
Golovin AirportGolovin Airport (IATA: GLV, ICAO: PAGL, FAA LID: GLV, formerly N93) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Golovin, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,753 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2010, an increase of 8.4% from the 1,617 enplanements in 2009. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Hoonah AirportHoonah Airport (IATA: HNH, ICAO: PAOH, FAA LID: HNH) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Hoonah, Alaska. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2015-2019, which categorized it as a nonprimary commercial service airport based on 9,564 enplanements in 2012. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 7,680 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 7,651 enplanements in 2009, and 10,759 in 2010. Show on map
Napakiak AirportNapakiak Airport (IATA: WNA, ICAO: PANA, FAA LID: WNA) is a state-owned, public-use airport located in Napakiak, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, Napakiak Airport had 1,840 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 0.7% from the 1,828 enplanements in 2007. Napakiak Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Fort Yukon Air Force StationFort Yukon Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-14, LRR ID: A-01) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 1.6 miles (2.6 km) east-southeast of Fort Yukon, Alaska. The ground control intercept (GCI) station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was redesignated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air and Space Operations Center, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Kulis Air National Guard BaseKulis Air National Guard Base was a National Guard of the United States facility in Anchorage, Alaska. The 127-acre (51 ha) facility adjacent to and south of Ted Stevens International Airport was home to the 176th Wing of the Alaska Air National Guard until that unit moved to Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson (in an area now known colloquially as Camp Kulis) in February 2011. The property thereafter reverted to ownership by the State of Alaska, which as of April 2011 had not yet announced plans for the property. Show on map
Clarks Point AirportClarks Point Airport (IATA: CLP, ICAO: PFCL, FAA LID: CLP) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Clarks Point, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 497 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 15% from the 432 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
McGrath AirportMcGrath Airport (IATA: MCG, ICAO: PAMC, FAA LID: MCG) is a state-owned public-use airport serving McGrath, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Formerly, the facility operated as McGrath Army Airbase. As per the Federal Aviation Administration, the airport had 5,278 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 4,893 in 2009, and 5,242 in 2010. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport. Show on map
Northway AirportNorthway Airport (IATA: ORT, ICAO: PAOR, FAA LID: ORT) is a state owned, public use airport serving Northway, a community located in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. During World War II for northbound Lend-Lease aircraft on the Northwest Staging Route, the flight strip at Northway Army Airfield was the first stop in the Territory of Alaska. Show on map
KTUU-TV (Anchorage)KTUU-TV is an NBC affiliated television station serving Anchorage, Alaska. The station is owned by Gray Television of Atlanta, Georgia as part of a duopoly with MyNetworkTV affiliate KYES-TV (channel 5). The station is broadcast over the air on digital channel 10; on the local cable TV system, GCI on standard cable channel 2 and high-definition cable channel 652. KTUU is also available on DIRECTV and DISH Network for the Anchorage television market. Its over-the-air transmitter is located in Knik, Alaska, while its studios are located on East 40th Avenue in Anchorage. Show on map
King Salmon Air Force StationKing Salmon Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-03, LRR ID: A-07) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 0.4 miles (0.64 km) west of King Salmon, Alaska. The control center station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was re-designated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the Air and Space Operations Center, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Show on map
Goodnews AirportGoodnews Airport (IATA: GNU, FAA LID: GNU) is a state-owned public-use airport located at Goodnews Bay in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,532 commercial passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 2.2% from the 1,567 enplanements in 2007. Goodnews Airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Skwentna AirportSkwentna Airport (IATA: SKW, ICAO: PASW, FAA LID: SKW) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Skwentna, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 496 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 64% from the 303 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Tin City Air Force StationTin City Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-04, LRR ID: A-11) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 106.3 miles (171.1 km) west-northwest of Nome, Alaska. The radar surveillance station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was re-designated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air and Space Operations Center, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Marshall Don Hunter Sr. AirportMarshall Don Hunter Sr. Airport (IATA: MLL, ICAO: PADM, FAA LID: MDM, formerly 3A5) is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) southeast of the central business district of Marshall, a city in the Kusilvak Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Marshall Don Hunter Sr. Airport is assigned MDM by the FAA and MLL by the IATA (which assigned MDM to Munduku, Papua New Guinea). Show on map
Platinum AirportPlatinum Airport (IATA: PTU, ICAO: PAPM, FAA LID: PTU) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Platinum, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,020 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 60.9% from the 634 enplanements in 2007. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Galbraith Lake AirportGalbraith Lake Airport (IATA: GBH, ICAO: PAGB, FAA LID: GBH) is a state-owned, public-use airport located at Galbraith Lake in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has an office at the airport. The lake and airport are located west of the Dalton Highway and north of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System's Pump Station 4. According to the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, it was classified as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Huslia AirportHuslia Airport (IATA: HSL, ICAO: PAHL, FAA LID: HLA) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) east of the central business district of Huslia, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned HLA by the FAA and HSL by the IATA (which assigned HLA to Lanseria Airport in Lanseria, South Africa). The airport's ICAO identifier is PAHL. Show on map
Cape Romanzof Air Force StationCape Romanzof Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-06, LRR ID: A-10) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 12.6 miles (20.3 km) west-southwest of Scammon Bay, Alaska. The radar surveillance station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was redesignated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air Support Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Tatalina Air Force StationTatalina Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-10, LRR ID: A-05) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 13 miles (21 km) west-southwest of McGrath, Alaska. The ground control intercept (GCI) station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was redesignated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air Support Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Skagway AirportSkagway Airport (IATA: SGY, ICAO: PAGY, FAA LID: SGY) is a state-owned public-use airport in the city of Skagway, Alaska. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2015-2019, which categorized it as a nonprimary commercial service airport based on 7,532 enplanements in 2012. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 10,727 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 6,468 enplanements in 2009, and 8,531 in 2010. Show on map
Quinhagak AirportQuinhagak Airport (IATA: KWN, ICAO: PAQH, FAA LID: AQH), is a public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) east of the central business district of Quinhagak (also spelled Kwinhagak), a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also known as Kwinhagak Airport. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AQH by the FAA and KWN by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAQH. Show on map
Murphy Dome Air Force StationMurphy Dome Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-02, LRR ID: A-02) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 20.4 miles (32.8 km) west-northwest of Fairbanks, Alaska. The control center station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was re-designated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air Support Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
Kotzebue Air Force StationKotzebue Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-24, LRR ID: A-12) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Kotzebue, Alaska. The ground control intercept (GCI) station was closed on 1 November 1983, and was re-designated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) site as part of the Alaska Radar System. Today, it remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region under the jurisdiction of the 611th Air Support Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Show on map
West High SchoolWest Anchorage High School (formerly Anchorage High School) is a public high school in Anchorage, the largest city of the U.S. state of Alaska. The school is part of the Anchorage School District (ASD). Opened in 1953, West is the oldest of ASD's eight major high schools. Serving the western parts of downtown and midtown Anchorage, it had an enrollment of 1,901 as of October 1, 2014, making it the second-largest school in Alaska after its cross-town rival East Anchorage High School. Show on map
Dahl Creek AirportDahl Creek Airport (IATA: DCK, FAA LID: DCK) is a state owned, public use airport located 10 nautical miles (19 km) southeast of Dahl Creek, in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility. As per the Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 92 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 10 enplanements in 2009, and 51 in 2010. Show on map
Funter Bay Seaplane BaseFunter Bay Seaplane Base (IATA: FNR, ICAO: PANR, FAA LID: FNR) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Funter Bay, in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2015–2019, which categorized it as a general aviation airport based on 30 enplanements in 2012. Show on map
Manokotak AirportManokotak Airport (IATA: KMO, ICAO: PAMB, FAA LID: MBA, formerly 17Z) is a state-owned public-use airport located one mile (2 km) north of the central business district of Manokotak, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Manokotak Airport is assigned MBA by the FAA and KMO by the IATA (which assigned MBA to Moi International Airport in Mombasa, Kenya). Show on map
Wasilla High SchoolWasilla High School (WHS) is a public secondary school in Wasilla, Alaska, United States, serving students in grades 9–12. The school is part of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District, with admission based primarily on the locations of students' homes. The school received widespread coverage in 2008 following former pupil Governor Sarah Palin's nomination as the Republican vice-presidential running mate to John McCain in the 2008 United States presidential election. Show on map
KTBY-TV (Anchorage)KTBY, virtual channel 4, is a Fox-affiliated television station serving Anchorage, Alaska. The station is owned by Coastal Television Broadcasting Company, LLC. and co-owned with KYUR, both of which use recording studios located on East Tudor Road in Anchorage, while KTBY uses a transmitter tower in historic downtown Anchorage on top of the Hilton Anchorage East Tower hotel. The station is broadcast on digital over-the-air channel 20, and on the local cable TV system, GCI. Show on map
Hydaburg Seaplane BaseHydaburg Seaplane Base (IATA: HYG, ICAO: PAHY, FAA LID: HYG) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Hydaburg, a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Kantishna AirportKantishna Airport (FAA LID: 5Z5) is a federally owned airstrip located two nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of the former mining district of Kantishna in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 985 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2009–2013, which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Coast Guard Air Station KodiakCoast Guard Air Station Kodiak is an Air Station of the United States Coast Guard located in Kodiak, Alaska. It is one of the largest units in the Coast Guard, and the largest in the service's Pacific Area, with a crew of 65 officers and 317 enlisted personnel. It is a tenant command of Base Support Unit Kodiak, and shares its airfield with Kodiak Airport. The station operates HH-60 Jayhawk and HH-65 Dolphin helicopters, and the HC-130 Hercules fixed-wing aircraft. Show on map
Kake AirportKake Airport (ICAO: PAFE, FAA LID: AFE) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Kake, a city in the Petersburg Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Scheduled airline service is available at Kake Seaplane Base (IATA: KAE, FAA LID: KAE). Show on map
Klawock AirportKlawock Airport (IATA: KLW, ICAO: PAKW, FAA LID: AKW) is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of the central business district of Klawock, a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AKW by the FAA and KLW by the IATA, IATA assigns AKW to the Aghajari Airport. Show on map
Takotna AirportTakotna Airport (IATA: TCT, FAA LID: TCT) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) north of Takotna, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per the Federal Aviation Administration, this airport had 206 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 128 in 2009, and 190 in 2010. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Fort GreelyFort Greely is a United States Army launch site for anti-ballistic missiles located approximately 100 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. It is also the home of the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC), as Fort Greely is one of the coldest areas in Alaska, and can accommodate cold, extreme cold, or temperate weather tests depending on the season. It is named in honor of Major General Adolphus Greely. There was an earlier Fort Greely on Kodiak Island. Show on map
Robert (Bob) Curtis Memorial AirportRobert (Bob) Curtis Memorial Airport (IATA: ORV, ICAO: PFNO, FAA LID: D76) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.8 km) north of the central business district of Noorvik, a village in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 6,523 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, a decrease of 5% from the 6,884 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
KGTL-AM (Homer)KGTL (620 AM) is a radio station licensed to serve Homer, Alaska. The station is owned by Peninsula Communications, Inc. It airs an Adult Standards music format. The station was assigned these call letters by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on July 17, 1987. The price of electricity was increased by 47% in July 2008. In February 2009 KGTL applied for Special Temporary Authority from the FCC to operate with 2,500 watts full-time. Show on map
Tyonek AirportTyonek Airport (IATA: TYE, FAA LID: TYE) is a private-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) northeast of the central business district of Tyonek, a village in the Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Village of Tyonek. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 2,356 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 27.7% from the 3,260 enplanements in 2007. Show on map
Deering AirportDeering Airport (IATA: DRG, ICAO: PADE, FAA LID: DEE) is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of the central business district of Deering, a city in the Northwest Arctic Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned DEE by the FAA and DRG by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PADE. Show on map
Chisana AirportChisana Airport (IATA: CZN, FAA LID: CZN) is a state owned, public use airport serving Chisana, a community located in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility. Scheduled airline passenger service at this airport is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Allen Army Air FieldAllen Army Airfield (IATA: BIG, ICAO: PABI, FAA LID: BIG) is a public and military use airport serving Fort Greely and located three miles (5 km) south of the central business district of Delta Junction, a city in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the United States Army, which has an agreement with the City of Delta Junction for joint use of the airfield by both military and civilian aircraft. Show on map
Alpine AirstripAlpine Airstrip (ICAO: PALP, FAA LID: AK15) is a private-use airport located 53 nautical miles (98 km) west of the central business district of Deadhorse, in North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by ConocoPhillips Alaska, Inc. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 786 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 1915% from the 39 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Kongiganak AirportKongiganak Airport (IATA: KKH, ICAO: PADY, FAA LID: DUY) is a state-owned public-use airport located eight nautical miles (15 km) northeast of the central business district of Kongiganak, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned DUY by the FAA and KKH by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PADY. Show on map
Casco Cove Coast Guard StationCasco Cove Coast Guard Station (IATA: ATU, ICAO: PAAT, FAA LID: ATU) is a military facility and private use airfield on Attu Island, one of the Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska. Owned by the United States Coast Guard, Casco Cove CGS is located 1,481 miles (2,383 km) west of Anchorage, Alaska. Also known as LORAN Station Attu, the facility was closed on August 27, 2010, but the airfield remains available for emergency use. Show on map
Millennium Alaskan Hotel AnchorageMillennium Alaskan Hotel is situated on the shores of scenic Lake Spenard, one mile from Anchorage International Airport and four miles from downtown Anchorage. The Millennium Alaskan Hotel is operated as part of the Millennium & Copthorne Hotels chain. It has 248 guest rooms. It opened in 1986 and was known as the Regal Alaskan until 2001. Since it opened it has been the operational headquarters of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Show on map
White Mountain AirportWhite Mountain Airport (IATA: WMO, ICAO: PAWM, FAA LID: WMO) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) north of the central business district of White Mountain, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2,516 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, a decrease of 11% from the 2,821 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Yakataga AirportYakataga Airport (IATA: CYT, ICAO: PACY, FAA LID: CYT) is a public use airport serving Yakataga (also known as Cape Yakataga) in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by Federal Aviation Administration and lies in the western section of Yakutat Borough. Scheduled passenger service to Yakutat Airport (via Alsek Air Service) ended in 2012, when the United States Department of Transportation suspended Essential Air Service subsidies. Show on map
Moses Point AirportMoses Point Airport (IATA: MOS, FAA LID: MOS) is an airport located in Elim, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by the Elim Native Corporation. Formerly, the field operated as Moses Point Army Airfield during World War II. Although many U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned MOS by the FAA but has no designation from the IATA. Show on map
Hughes AirportHughes Airport (IATA: HUS, ICAO: PAHU, FAA LID: HUS) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) southwest of the central business district of Hughes, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,148 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 1% from the 1,137 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Kulik Lake AirportKulik Lake Airport (IATA: LKK, ICAO: PAKL, FAA LID: LKK) is a public use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) south of Kulik Lake, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by Katmai National Park. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, Kulik Lake Airport had 1,842 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, an increase of 21% from the 1,518 enplanements in 2007. Show on map
Toksook Bay AirportToksook Bay Airport (IATA: OOK, ICAO: PAOO, FAA LID: OOK) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.8 km) east of the central business district of Toksook Bay, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 4,875 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 6% from the 4,583 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Tatitlek AirportTatitlek Airport (IATA: TEK, ICAO: PAKA, FAA LID: 7KA) is a state-owned public-use airport serving Tatitlek, in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation facility. Scheduled passenger service at this airport is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Anchorage International AirportTed Stevens Anchorage International Airport (IATA: ANC, ICAO: PANC, FAA LID: ANC) is a major airport in the U.S. state of Alaska, located 5 miles (8 kilometers) southwest of downtown Anchorage. The airport is named in honor of Ted Stevens, the U.S. Senator from Alaska serving from 1968 to 2009. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems, which categorized it as a primary commercial service (medium hub) airport based on 2,249,717 enplanements in 2012. Show on map
Waterfall Seaplane BaseWaterfall Seaplane Base (IATA: KWF, FAA LID: KWF) is a public-use seaplane base located in Waterfall on Prince of Wales Island in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Waterfall Cannery Resort. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, Waterfall SPB had 2,072 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, a decrease of 7% from the 2,237 enplanements in 2007. Show on map
Annette Island AirportAnnette Island Airport (IATA: ANN, ICAO: PANT, FAA LID: ANN) is located on Annette Island in the Prince of Wales – Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is privately owned by the Metlakatla Indian Community. It is located 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Metlakatla, Alaska. The airport was established as the Annette Island Army Airfield during World War II and initially served as a military airbase. Show on map
Palmer High SchoolPalmer High School is a high school located in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the city of Palmer, Alaska. Its mission is to prepare lifelong learners, community assets, and citizens of integrity. It offers in-depth courses in fine arts, mathematics, world languages, physical education and health, science, English, social sciences, and career and technical education. Student support services are available for students. Show on map
Kotlik AirportKotlik Airport (IATA: KOT, ICAO: PFKO, FAA LID: 2A9) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) west of the central business district of Kotlik, a city in the Kusilvak Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 4,117 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 14% from the 3,654 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Barter Island LRRS AirportBarter Island LRRS Airport (IATA: BTI, ICAO: PABA, FAA LID: BTI) is a public/military airport located near the city of Kaktovik on Barter Island, in the North Slope Borough, located 312 miles (502 km) east of Point Barrow, Alaska. The airport is owned by the North Slope Borough. It is also known as Barter Island Airport or Kaktovik Airport. The acronym LRRS stands for Long Range Radar Site or Long Range Radar Station. Show on map
Knik TV MastKnik TV Mast, located near Knik, Alaska, is a 246 metres (807 ft) tall guyed mast used for FM radio and television broadcasting. The mast is operated by Alaska Public Telecommunications, Inc. The mast gained the distinction as the tallest structure in Alaska, following the April 28, 2010 demolition of the 411 metres (1,348 ft) guyed mast at LORAN-C transmitter Port Clarence. The following transmitters are radiated: Show on map
Holy Cross AirportHoly Cross Airport (IATA: HCR, ICAO: PAHC, FAA LID: HCA, formerly 4Z4) is a state-owned public-use airport located one mile (1.6 km) south of the central business district of Holy Cross, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Holy Cross Airport is assigned HCA by the FAA and HCR by the IATA. Show on map
Kasigluk AirportKasigluk Airport (IATA: KUK, ICAO: PFKA, FAA LID: Z09) is a state-owned public-use airport located two nautical miles (4 km) south of the central business district of Kasigluk, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 4,001 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, a decrease of 5% from the 4,218 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Chignik Lake AirportChignik Lake Airport (IATA: KCQ, FAA LID: A79) is a state-owned, public-use airport located at Chignik Lake, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (2009–2013), which categorizes it as a general aviation facility. Scheduled airline service to King Salmon Airport is provided by Peninsula Airways (PenAir). Show on map
KATN-TV (Fairbanks)KATN, virtual channel 2 (digital channel 18), is an ABC-affiliated television station located in Fairbanks, Alaska, United States. Owned by Vision Alaska, KATN is operated through a Time Brokerage agreement by Coastal Television Broadcasting Company, LLC. KATN studios are located in the Lathrop Building on 2nd Avenue in downtown Fairbanks and the transmitter tower is northeast of the city on Cranberry Ridge. Show on map
Lathrop High SchoolLathrop High School is a public high school in Fairbanks in the U.S. state of Alaska, part of the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District. It is named for early Alaska businessman Austin E. \"Cap\" Lathrop. Lathrop serves the central part of the Fairbanks area, including downtown and the Fort Wainwright Army Post. With an enrollment of 1,047 as of October 1, 2014, it is Fairbanks's largest school. Show on map
Shannons Pond Seaplane BaseShannons Pond Seaplane Base (FAA LID: 0Z3) is a public-use seaplane base located three nautical miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Dillingham, a city in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this facility had 1,000 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008. It is 3 miles (5 km) west of Dillingham Airport. Show on map
Seward AirportSeward Airport (IATA: SWD, ICAO: PAWD, FAA LID: SWD) is a state-owned, public-use airport located two nautical miles (2.3 miles; 3.7 km) northeast of the central business district of Seward, a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Amook Bay Seaplane BaseAmook Bay Seaplane Base (IATA: AOS, FAA LID: AK81) is a privately owned seaplane base located in Amook Bay, a community in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although classified by the FAA as \"private use\", Amook Bay has scheduled passenger service to Kodiak, Alaska, which is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Port Moller AirportPort Moller Airport (IATA: PML, ICAO: PAAL, FAA LID: 1AK3) is a publicly owned, private-use airport located 87 nautical miles (161 km; 100 mi) northeast of the central business district of Cold Bay, in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. It was previously known as Port Moller Air Force Station. Show on map
Adak Army Base and Adak Naval Operating BaseNaval Air Facility Adak (IATA: ADK, ICAO: PADK, FAA LID: ADK), was a United States Navy airport located west of Adak, on Adak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. After its closure in 1997, it was reopened as Adak Airport. The facility was designated a National Historic Landmark for its role in World War II, although most of its elements from that period have been demolished or lie in ruins. Show on map
Chefornak AirportChefornak Airport (IATA: CYF, ICAO: PACK, FAA LID: CFK) is a state-owned public-use airport in Chefornak, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is on the Kinia River. Most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, but this airport is assigned CFK by the FAA and CYF by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PACK. Show on map
Nuiqsut AirportNuiqsut Airport (IATA: NUI, ICAO: PAQT, FAA LID: AQT) is a public use airport located in Nuiqsut, a city in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by North Slope Borough. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned AQT by the FAA and NUI by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAQT. Show on map
San Juan /Uganik/ Seaplane BaseSan Juan (Uganik) Seaplane Base (IATA: UGI, FAA LID: WSJ) is a public use seaplane base located in San Juan (Uganik), in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by the San Juan Fishing & Packing Co. Scheduled passenger service to Kodiak, Alaska, is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Tok Junction AirportTok Junction Airport (IATA: TKJ, ICAO: PFTO, FAA LID: 6K8) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) east of the central business district of Tok, in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Chatham Seaplane BaseChatham Seaplane Base (IATA: CYM, FAA LID: CYM) is a privately owned, public use seaplane base located in Chatham in the U.S. state of Alaska. Chatham lies within the limits of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska (near its northeast corner). Scheduled passenger service at this airport is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Hyder Seaplane BaseHyder Seaplane Base (IATA: WHD, FAA LID: 4Z7) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Hyder, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Umnak AirportCape Field at Fort Glen is a historic district made up of the former Cape Air Force Base and Otter Point Naval Air Facility. In 1987, the site was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Cape Field at Fort Glenn. The remains of the base are \"the most comprehensive and intact World War II base in the Aleutian Islands\" It is located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Islands. Show on map
Cape Field at Fort Glenn (historical)Cape Field at Fort Glen is a historic district made up of the former Cape Air Force Base and Otter Point Naval Air Facility. In 1987, the site was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Cape Field at Fort Glenn. The remains of the base are \"the most comprehensive and intact World War II base in the Aleutian Islands\" It is located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Islands. Show on map
Minchumina AirportMinchumina Airport (IATA: LMA, ICAO: PAMH, FAA LID: MHM) is a state owned, public use airport serving Lake Minchumina, in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also known as Lake Minchumina Airport. In the past, the airport used MHM IATA code. Scheduled passenger service at this airport is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Ladd Army AirfieldLadd Army Airfield (IATA: FBK, ICAO: PAFB, FAA LID: FBK) is the military airfield located at Fort Jonathan Wainwright, located in Fairbanks, Alaska. It was originally called Fairbanks Air Base, but was renamed Ladd Field on 1 December 1939, in honor of Major Arthur K. Ladd, a pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps who died in a plane crash near Dale, South Carolina on 13 December 1935. Show on map
Anchorage 5th Avenue Show on map
Nightmute AirportNightmute Airport (IATA: NME, ICAO: PAGT, FAA LID: IGT) is a state-owned public-use airport located southeast of the central business district of Nightmute, a village in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned IGT by the FAA and NME by the IATA. Show on map
Pratt MuseumThe Pratt Museum is a regional natural history museum located in Homer, Alaska, with exhibits exploring life around Kachemak Bay in South Central Alaska. The museum's mission is to preserve \"the stories of the Kachemak Bay region\", through \"collections, exhibits, and programs in culture, science, and art\". Indoor exhibits include early homesteading, Native Alaskan traditions, local contemporary art, and an exploration of the marine and terrestrial life around Kachemak Bay. Outdoor exhibits feature a historic cabin, botanical gardens and a nature trail. Show on map
Big Mountain Air Force StationBig Mountain Air Force Station (IATA: BMX, ICAO: PABM, FAA LID: 37AK) is a military use airstrip located near Big Mountain, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airstrip was built to support the Big Mountain Radio Relay Station, an abandoned Air Force facility located 220 miles (350 km) southwest of Anchorage on the south shore of Iliamna Lake. Show on map
Bethel Seaplane BaseBethel Seaplane Base (IATA: JBT, FAA LID: Z59) is a public use seaplane base located on the Kuskokwim River in Bethel, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The state-owned Bethel Airport is located three nautical miles (5 km) west of this seaplane base. Five nautical miles (9 km) to the south, also on the Kuskokwim River, is the Napaskiak Airport. Show on map
Campion Air Force Station (historical)Campion Air Force Station (AAC ID: F-08) is a closed United States Air Force General Surveillance Radar station. It is located 6.4 miles (10.3 km) east-southeast of Galena, Alaska. The Aircraft Control and Warning station was closed on 1 November 1983, and the site was re-designated as a Long Range Radar (LRR) Station. It remains active as part of the Alaska NORAD Region. Show on map
Nyac AirportNyac Airport (IATA: ZNC, FAA LID: ZNC) is a private airport located two miles (3 km) southwest of the central business district of Nyac, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Nyac is located in the Kilbuck Mountains of southwestern Alaska, approximately 60 miles east of Bethel. Access during the summer months is by chartered flights from Bethel or Aniak. Show on map
Lake Louise AirportLake Louise Airport (FAA LID: Z55) is a state-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of Lake Louise, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Snettisham AirportSnettisham Airport is a publicly owned, private-use aircraft facility near the Snettisham Hydroelectric Project in Snettisham, Alaska. It is managed by Alaska Electric Light & Power. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey from Federal Aviation Administration sources in 1994, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on July 1, 1995. Show on map
Clear Sky Lodge AirportClear Sky Lodge Airport (FAA LID: CLF) is a public-use airport located four nautical miles (7 km) south of the central business district of Clear, Alaska, United States. This airport is privately owned by Rabideau's Clear Sky Lodge. Note that CLF is not the IATA code for that airport; indeed, CLF has been assigned by IATA to the Coltishall military airbase, now closed. Show on map
Alsek River AirportAlsek River Airport (FAA LID: A57) is a public-use airport located 44 nautical miles (81 km) southeast of the central business district of Yakutat, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the USFS Tongass National Forest. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 507 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008. Show on map
Emmonak AirportEmmonak Airport (IATA: EMK, ICAO: PAEM, FAA LID: ENM) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Emmonak, a city in the Kusilvak Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned ENM by the FAA and EMK by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAEM. Show on map
Brevig Mission AirportBrevig Mission Airport (IATA: KTS, ICAO: PFKT, FAA LID: KTS) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Brevig Mission, a city in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2,696 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, a decrease of 14% from the 3,152 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Icy Bay AirportIcy Bay Airport (IATA: ICY, FAA LID: 19AK) is a private use airport serving Icy Bay, in the Yakutat City and Borough of U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by Alaska Mental Health Trust. Scheduled passenger service to Yakutat Airport (via Alsek Air Service) ended in 2012, when the United States Department of Transportation suspended Essential Air Service subsidies. Show on map
Koyukuk AirportKoyukuk Airport (IATA: KYU, ICAO: PFKU, FAA LID: KYU) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Koyukuk, a city in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,018 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, a decrease of 22% from the 1,305 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Hope AirportHope Airport (FAA LID: 5HO) is a state owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) southeast of the central business district of Hope, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Kwethluk AirportKwethluk Airport (IATA: KWT, ICAO: PFKW, FAA LID: KWT) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Kwethluk, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2,923 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 26% from the 2,329 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Dimond High SchoolA. J. Dimond High School (DHS) is a public four-year high school in Anchorage, Alaska, and is a part of the Anchorage School District. It has been accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. Serving students in the Sand Lake, Kincaid, and Bayshore areas of suburban Anchorage, Dimond had an enrollment of 1,698 as of October 1, 2014. Show on map
Ugashik AirportUgashik Airport (IATA: UGS, FAA LID: 9A8) is a state owned, public use airport located one nautical mile (2 km) north of the central business district of Ugashik, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
Coffman Cove Seaplane BaseCoffman Cove Seaplane Base (IATA: KCC, FAA LID: KCC) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Coffman Cove, a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area on Prince of Wales Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
KIFW-AM (Sitka)KIFW (1230 AM) is a radio station broadcasting an Adult Contemporary, Oldies, Full-Service format. Licensed to Sitka, Alaska, USA, the station serves the Alaska Panhandle area. The station is owned by Alaska Broadcast Communications, and features programming from ABC Radio . The studios for KIFW and its sister station KSBZ are at 611 Lake Street in Sitka. Show on map
Kipnuk AirportKipnuk Airport (IATA: KPN, ICAO: PAKI, FAA LID: IIK) is a state-owned public-use airport serving Kipnuk, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, this airport is assigned IIK by the FAA and KPN by the IATA. The airport's ICAO identifier is PAKI. Show on map
Akiak AirportAkiak Airport (IATA: AKI, ICAO: PFAK, FAA LID: AKI) is a state-owned public-use airport serving Akiak, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. According to Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 1,983 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 34% from the 1,483 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Eek AirportEek Airport (IATA: EEK, ICAO: PAEE, FAA LID: EEK) is a state-owned public-use airport serving the city of Eek in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 3,759 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 16% from the 3,241 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Kalskag AirportKalskag Airport (IATA: KLG, ICAO: PALG, FAA LID: KLG) is a public airport located one mile (1.6 km) west of the central business district of Upper Kalskag, a city in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by the state. It is situated on the Kuskokwim River, between the cities of Upper Kalskag and Lower Kalskag. Show on map
St. Mary's AirportSt. Mary's Airport (IATA: KSM, ICAO: PASM, FAA LID: KSM) is a public airport located four miles (6 km) west of the central business district of St. Mary's, in the Kusilvak Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is publicly owned by the State of Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF) - Northern Region. Show on map
Saint Paul LORAN-C TransmitterLORAN-C transmitter Saint Paul is the master station of the North Pacific LORAN-C Chain (GRI 9990). It uses a transmission power of 325 kW. Saint Paul LORAN-C transmitter, situated at Saint Paul, Alaska at (57°9′12″N 170°15′6″W / 57.15333°N 170.25167°W). Saint Paul LORAN-C transmitter uses as antenna a 190.5 meter (625 ft) tall mast radiator. Show on map
Crooked Creek AirportCrooked Creek Airport (IATA: CKD, FAA LID: CJX) is a public airport located two miles (3 km) south of the central business district of Crooked Creek, in the U.S. state of Alaska. Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Crooked Creek Airport is assigned CJX by the FAA and CKD by the IATA. Show on map
Road Commission Number 1 Airport (historical)Road Commission Airport (FAA LID: 0Z2), also known as Road Commission Nr 1 Airport, is a public-use airport located three nautical miles (4 mi, 6 km) south of the central business district of Denali, in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is located near the Denali Highway bridge crossing the Susitna River. Show on map
Delta Junction AirportDelta Junction Airport (IATA: DJN, FAA LID: D66) is a public use airport located in and owned by Delta Junction, a city in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 252 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, and 350 enplanements in 2010. Show on map
Atmautluak AirportAtmautluak Airport (IATA: ATT, FAA LID: 4A2) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Atmautluak, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2,613 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 29% from the 2,018 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Port Protection Seaplane BasePort Protection Seaplane Base (IATA: PPV, FAA LID: 19P) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Port Protection, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
North Whale Seaplane BaseNorth Whale Seaplane Base (IATA: WWP, FAA LID: 96Z) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in North Whale Pass, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Akiachak AirportAkiachak Airport (IATA: KKI, FAA LID: Z13) is a state-owned public-use airport located in Akiachak, in the Bethel Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 2,607 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 44% from the 1,811 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Cape Sabine Airport (historical)Cape Sabine DEW Line Station (FAA LID: Z53) was a public-use airport is a closed United States Air Force facility. It was formerly a Distant Early Warning Line Intermediate type radar station. It was closed in 1963 and has been abandoned ever since. Title to the property has been transferred from the Air Force to the Cully Corporation. Show on map
Point Lay LRRS AirportPoint Lay LRRS Airport (IATA: PIZ, ICAO: PPIZ, FAA LID: PIZ) is a public and military use airport owned by the United States Government and located in Point Lay, in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is also known as Point Lay Airport. The acronym LRRS stands for Long Range Radar Site or Long Range Radar Station. Show on map
Point Baker Seaplane BasePoint Baker Seaplane Base (IATA: KPB, FAA LID: KPB) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Point Baker, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Sparrevohn LRRS AirportSparrevohn LRRS Airport (IATA: SVW, ICAO: PASV, FAA LID: SVW) is a military airstrip located south of Sparrevohn, in the Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airstrip is also located 129 miles (208 km) south of McGrath, Alaska, and 188 miles (303 km) west of Anchorage, Alaska . It is not open for public use. Show on map
New Wasilla AirportWasilla Airport (IATA: WWA, ICAO: PAWS, FAA LID: IYS) is a city-owned public-use airport located about 3.5 miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Wasilla, a city in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Wasilla is 17 miles by air and 47 miles by road from Anchorage, the largest city in Alaska. Show on map
Portage Creek AirportPortage Creek Airport (IATA: PCA, ICAO: PAOC, FAA LID: A14) is a state-owned public-use airport in Portage Creek, located in the Dillingham Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. This airport is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation airport. Show on map
KJNP-FM (North Pole)KJNP-FM (100.3 FM) is a radio station licensed to serve North Pole, Alaska. The station is owned by Evangelistic Alaska Missionary Fellowship. It airs a Religious radio format. KJNP-FM was founded by Don & Gen Nelson. The station was assigned the KJNP-FM call letters by the Federal Communications Commission on January 26, 1981. Show on map
Tatalina LRRS AirportTatalina LRRS Airport (IATA: TLJ, ICAO: PATL, FAA LID: TLJ) is a military airstrip located seven nautical miles (8.1 miles; 13 km) south of Takotna, in the Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airstrip is also located 12.9 miles (20.8 km) west-southwest of McGrath, Alaska. It is not open for public use. Show on map
Alaska Pacific UniversityAlaska Pacific University (APU) is a small liberal arts college located in Anchorage, Alaska, that emphasizes experiential and active learning. The university is a member of the Eco League, a group of five small universities and colleges with strong programs in Psychology and Environmental Studies as well as related topics. Show on map
Stampede AirportStampede Airport (FAA LID: Z90) is a public use airport located 25 nautical miles (29 mi, 46 km) northeast of the central business district of Kantishna, a community in the Denali Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is located in the Denali National Park and Preserve and owned by the U.S. National Park Service. Show on map
Elmendorf Air Force BaseElmendorf Air Force Base (IATA: EDF, ICAO: PAED, FAA LID: EDF) is a United States military facility in Anchorage, the largest city in Alaska. Originally known as Elmendorf Field, it became Elmendorf Air Force Base after World War II, and in 2010 it merged with nearby Fort Richardson to form Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Show on map
Klawock Seaplane BaseKlawock Seaplane Base (ICAO: PAQC, FAA LID: AQC) is a public use seaplane base owned by and located in Klawock, a city in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Five Mile Airport (historical)Five Mile Airport (ICAO: PAFV, FAA LID: FVM) is a private-use airport located in Five Mile (or Five Mile Camp) in the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is owned by the United States Bureau of Land Management (BLM) - Pipeline Office and managed by the Alyeska Pipeline Company. It is also known as Five Mile Camp Airport. Show on map
Chicken AirportChicken Airport (IATA: CKX, FAA LID: CKX) is a state owned, public use airport located in Chicken, a community in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the FAA's National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Show on map
Umiat AirportUmiat Airport (IATA: UMT, ICAO: PAUM, FAA LID: UMT) is a state owned, public use airport located in Umiat, in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per the Federal Aviation Administration, this airport had 197 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 569 in 2009, and 107 in 2010. Show on map
Arctic Village AirportArctic Village Airport (IATA: ARC, ICAO: PARC, FAA LID: ARC) is a public use airport located one nautical mile (1.8 km) southwest of the central business district of Arctic Village, a Native American village in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Venetie Tribal Government. Show on map
Fort Richardson National CemeteryFort Richardson National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located on the Fort Richardson United States Army installation near Anchorage, Alaska. It encompasses 39 acres (16 ha) and as of the end of 2006, it had 4,527 interments. For much of the year, the grave sites are inaccessible due to snow fall. Show on map
Butte Municipal AirportButte Municipal Airport (FAA LID: AK1) is a public-use airport located in Butte, Alaska. It is five nautical miles (9 km) southeast of the central business district of Palmer, a city in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The airport is privately owned by the Butte Airman's Association. Show on map
Clay Street CemeteryClay Street Cemetery is a cemetery located in Fairbanks, Alaska that is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was established in 1903 and contains the remains of many of Fairbanks' founders, including Mary Pedro, wife of Felix Pedro, the miner who discovered the gold that led to the city's founding. Show on map
Saginaw Seaplane BaseSaginaw Seaplane Base (IATA: SGW, FAA LID: A23) is a privately owned public-use seaplane base located at Saginaw Bay, Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 418 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2010, an increase of 27% from the 330 enplanements in 2009. Show on map
Bryant Army HeliportBryant Army Airport (IATA: FRN, ICAO: PAFR, FAA LID: FRN), also known historically as Bryant Army Airfield, is a U.S. Army Airfield located at Fort Richardson, near the city of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. It has one runway designated 17/35 with a 4,086 x 100 ft (1,273 x 30 m) asphalt surface. Show on map
Lakes, rivers, streams and other bodies of water in Alaska
NameDescriptionShow
Cordova BayCordova Bay is a bay in the Alexander Archipelago of southeast Alaska. It opens onto Dixon Entrance to the south, between Cape Muzon on Dall Island and Point Marsh (a group of small islets just off Prince of Wales Island). The name Puerto Cordova y Cordova was given by the Spanish explorer Lieutenant Don Jacinto Caamaño in 1792, in honor of Admiral Luis de Córdova y Córdova. The name was published by George Vancouver in 1798. Show on map
Port of AnchorageThe Port of Anchorage (POA) is a deep-water port located in Anchorage, Alaska with 3 bulk carrier berths, two petroleum berths, and one barge berth. It is an enterprise department of the Municipality of Anchorage. As such, the Port is distinguished from other types of municipal departments largely because it generates enough revenue to support its operations without being a burden to Anchorage property tax payers, and it also pays a fee-in-lieu of taxes to help run city government. Show on map
Sand LakeIn Anchorage, Alaska, Sand Lake is the area surrounding Sand Lake, a stocked lake in the southwest part of the city. It is south of the Ted Stevens International Airport and Lake Spenard. The lake itself is located at 61°09′05″N 149°57′58″W / 61.15139°N 149.96611°W and has a surface area of 78 acres (320,000 m2). It is one of the few big-city lakes in the world with common and Pacific loon populations. Its shores are mostly privately owned, but a small park to the northeast allows public access. Kayakers, fishermen, picnickers and birdwatchers frequent the area. Show on map
Juneau IcefieldNotable peaks on the Juneau Icefield are Devils Paw and the Mendenhall Towers. Show on map
Ikatan BayIkatan Bay is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska. The bay and Isanotski Strait separate Unimak Island from the Alaska Peninsula. They have been used by light-draft craft, intended for service on the Yukon River, in making the passage from Puget Sound ports to St. Michael. Show on map
Portland CanalThe Portland Canal is an arm of Portland Inlet, one of the principal inlets of the British Columbia Coast. It is approximately 114 kilometres (71 mi) long. The Portland Canal forms part of the border between southeastern Alaska and British Columbia. The name of the entire inlet in the Nisga'a language is K'alii Xk'alaan, with /xk/alaan/ meaning \"at the back of (someplace)\". The upper end of the inlet was home to the Tsetsaut (\"Jits'aawit\" in Nisga'a), who after being decimated by war and disease were taken under the protection of the Laxsgiik (Eagle) chief of the Nisga'a, who holds the inlet's title in native law. Show on map
Taku GlacierTaku Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in Taku Inlet in the U.S. state of Alaska, just southeast of the city of Juneau. Recognized as the deepest and thickest alpine temperate glacier known in the world, the Taku Glacier is measured at 4,845 feet (1,477 m) thick. It is about 58 kilometres (36 mi) long, and is largely within the Tongass National Forest. Taku Glacier is the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry M/V Taku. Show on map
McNeil RiverThe McNeil River is a river on the eastern drainage of the Alaska Peninsula near its base and conjunction with the Alaska mainland. The McNeil emerges from glaciers and alpine lakes in the mountains of the Aleutian Range. The river's destination is the Cook Inlet in Alaska's southwest. The McNeil is the prime habitat of numerous animals, but it is famous for its salmon and brown bears. This wealth of wildlife was one of the reasons for the Alaska State Legislature's decision to designate the McNeil River a wildlife sanctuary in 1967. In 1993, this protected area was enlarged to preserve an area that has the highest concentration of brown bears anywhere in the world. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, up to 144 brown bears have been sighted on the river in a single summer@en . Show on map
Bering GlacierBering Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It currently terminates in Vitus Lake south of Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, about 10 km (6.2 mi) from the Gulf of Alaska. Combined with the Bagley Icefield, where the snow that feeds the glacier accumulates, the Bering is the largest glacier in North America. Warmer temperatures and changes in precipitation over the past century have thinned the Bering Glacier by several hundred meters. Since 1900 the terminus has retreated as much as 12 km (7.5 mi). The Bering Glacier exhibits \"surges\", acceleration events of the flow rate of the glacier, every 20 years or so. During these periods the glacier terminus advances. The surges are generally followed by periods of retreat, so despite the periodic advances the glacier has bee Show on map
Dago CreekDago Creek is a stream, 50 miles (80 km) long, on the Alaska Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning in a small lake 16 miles (26 km) southeast of Egegik, it meanders southwest across the flats to enter Ugashik Bay 3 miles (5 km) southeast of Smoky Point. Show on map
Noatak RiverThe Noatak River is a stream in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. T Show on map
Aniak RiverThe Aniak River (/ˌæniːˈæk/) is a 95-mile (153 km) tributary of the Kuskokwim River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning south of Aniak Lake, the river generally flows north. The upper sections drain part of the Kilbuck and Kuskokwim mountains, and the lower portions transition to the Kuskokwim lowlands and tundra. The river empties into the Kuskokwim River slightly east of Aniak. Show on map
Colville RiverThe Colville River (Inupiat: Kuukpik) is a major river of the Arctic Ocean coast of Alaska in the United States, approximately 350 miles (560 km) long. One of the northernmost major rivers in North America, it drains a remote area of tundra on the north side of the Brooks Range entirely above the Arctic Circle. The river is frozen for more than half the year and floods each spring. According to the United States Geological Survey, in 1837 British explorers P. W. Dease and Thomas Simpson named the river for Andrew Colvile, whose last name they spelled \"Colville\". Show on map
Alatna RiverThe Alatna River is a federally designated wild and scenic river partially contained within the boundaries of Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska. It is called one of the most beautiful rivers in the United States. The Alatna River stems from the central Brooks Range flowing through the Endicott Mountains, passing Circle Lake, the Arrigetch Peaks and Takahula Lake before entering the Helpmejack Hills. The last section of the river continues to flow in a SSE direction through the Alatna Hills into its confluence with the Koyukuk River near the small village of Allakaket. The first 25 miles (40 km) of the Alatna are shallow and rocky, followed by 15 miles (24 km) of a continued shallow area with more rapids. The river then mellows out near Takahula and Circle Lake becoming deeper and m Show on map
Margerie GlacierMargerie Glacier is a 21 mi (34 km) long tidewater glacier in Glacier Bay, Alaska, United States within the boundaries of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. The glacier begins on the southern slopes of Mount Root, elevation 12,860 feet (3,920 m), on the Alaska–Canada border flowing southeast down the valley, then turning to the northeast toward its terminus in Tarr Inlet. Margerie Glacier is one of the most active and frequently-visited glaciers in Glacier Bay, which was declared a National Monument in 1925, a National Park and Preserve in 1980, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve in 1986 and a World Heritage Site in 1992. While most of the tidewater glaciers in the park have been receding over the last several decades, Margerie Glacier has become stable, neither growing nor receding, wh Show on map
Prince William SoundPrince William Sound is a sound of the Gulf of Alaska on the south coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the east side of the Kenai Peninsula. Its largest port is Valdez, at the southern terminus of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. Other settlements on the sound, which contains numerous small islands, include Cordova and Whittier plus the Alaska native villages of Chenega and Tatitlek. A 1964 tsunami, a result of the Good Friday earthquake, killed a number of Chugach villagers in the coastal village of Chenega and destroyed the town of Valdez. Show on map
Unimak PassThe Fox Islands Passess are waterways in the Fox Islands area of the U.S. state of Alaska, connecting the Bering Sea with the North Pacific Ocean . From the southward and eastward, bound for Bering Sea, there are three passes used by deep-draft vessels, known collectively as the Fox Islands Passes, and respectively as Unimak, Akutan, and Unalga passes. The largest and most desirable one to use in thick and foggy weather is the eastern one, Unimak Pass. This is clear of hidden dangers, the widest of the three, and is comparatively free from tide rips. It is especially recommended for sailing vessels, and for steamers bound direct to the northward. Akutan and Unalga passes are convenient for steam vessels bound to Unalaska Bay, but, being narrow and having strong currents and tide rips at ti Show on map
Chatanika RiverThe Chatanika River is a 128-mile (206 km) tributary of the Tolovana River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Chatanika River is a clear or lightly tannic stained rapid-runoff stream that has its headwaters in the mountains of the northeastern portion of the Alaska Range and flows westward through valleys between summits and uplands for about four-fifths of its length before it enters Minto Flats. Once in the flats—a marshy area in which multiple streams, rivers, and lakes are located— the Chatanika joins the Tolovana, which flows into the Tanana River and on to the Yukon River. The Chatanika is thus a portion of the Yukon River drainage basin. Show on map
Nushagak BayNushagak Bay is a large estuary covering over 100 km2 in southwest part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It opens to Bristol Bay, a large body of water in the eastern Bering Sea north of the Alaska Peninsula. It is home to the area's largest city, Dillingham, and the bay hosts one of the world's last great sustainable sockeye salmon fisheries. Nushagak Bay is downstream of the proposed Pebble Mine, whose tailings storage lake would sit at the headwaters of the Koktuli River, one of the Nushagak River's tributaries. Villages on the Nushagak are among the major opponents of the proposal. Show on map
Gastineau ChannelGastineau Channel is a channel between the mainland of the U.S. state of Alaska and Douglas Island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska. It separates Juneau on the mainland side from Douglas (now part of Juneau), on Douglas Island. The first European to sight the channel was Joseph Whidbey early in August 1794, first from the south and later from the west. It was probably named for John Gastineau, an English Civil Engineer and Surveyor. The channel is becoming increasingly unnavigable due to shallow water depths. The two principal causes for this are: Show on map
Knik RiverThe Knik River /kˈnɪk/ is a 25-mile-long (40 km) river in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its source is at Knik Glacier, from which it flows northwest and west and empties into the head of Cook Inlet's Knik Arm, near the mouth of the Matanuska River. It is bridged twice (old and new bridges) where the Old Glenn Highway crosses it near the Butte, and also bridged on the Hayflats. Show on map
Port EtchesPort Etches is a bay in the southcentral part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the west side of Hinchinbrook Island and opens onto Hinchinbrook Entrance, a strait between Hinchinbrook Island and Montague Island, connecting Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska. Show on map
Killik RiverThe Killik River is a 105-mile (169 km) tributary of the Colville River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins in the northern portion of Gates of the Arctic National Park and flows north onto property of the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. Major tributaries of the Killik are April and Easter creeks, as well as the Okokmilaga. North of Easter Creek, tributary streams, such as Aniakvik Creek and Nigaktukvik Creek, flow predominantly through short, narrow, V-shaped valleys. Show on map
Ugashik BayUgashik Bay is a bay of the Bering Sea in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is an elongated, comma-shaped estuary formed where the Ugashik River empties into Bristol Bay, on the western coast of the Alaska Peninsula. Its waters are characteristically turbid and turbulent, the result of muddy feeder streams, frequent winds, and very high tides. Some Bristol Bay tides are thought to rank eighth highest in the world, and Ugashik Bay is greatly influenced by this tidal action. Show on map
Tanana RiverThe Tanana River /ˈtænənɑː/ is a 584-mile (940 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. According to linguist and anthropologist William Bright, the name is from the Koyukon (Athabaskan) tene no, tenene, literally \"trail river\". In the marsh regions it is joined by several large tributaries, including the Nenana (near the city of Nenana) and the Kantishna. It passes the village of Manley Hot Springs and empties into the Yukon near the town of Tanana. Show on map
Mendenhall GlacierMendenhall Glacier is a glacier about 13.6 miles long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier and surrounding landscape is protected as part of the 5,815-acre Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area, a federally designated unit of the Tongass National Forest. Show on map
Anikovik RiverAnikovik River (alternate Anakovik) is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska. It heads in the York Mountains about 15 miles (24 km) from the Bering Sea. As it leaves the mountains, it has a westerly course, but bending sharply to the south, it flows in that direction to the sea. It has a broad, flat flood plain, from 300 feet (91 m) to 0.5 miles (0.80 km) in width. In the upper part of its course, the river flows in greenstones, but below its bend, to the south, it cuts phyllites and slates. A rough estimate of the fall of river makes it about 15–18 feet (4.6–5.5 m) per mile. Buhner Creek joins Anakovik River about 2 miles (3.2 km) above the mouth of Deer Creek. Show on map
Tangle LakesThe Tangle Lakes (Long Tangle Lake, Lower Tangle Lake, Round Tangle Lake, and Upper Tangle Lake) are a 16-mile (26 km) long chain of lakes connected by streams in interior Alaska. They form the headwaters for the Delta River. Show on map
Kowee CreekKowee Creek (also spelled as Cowee, Kow-eeh, or Kowie) is a river on Douglas Island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Its origin is southeast of Mount Troy and it flows north-northeast to Gastineau Channel near West Juneau; it is 0.5 miles (0.80 km) southwest of the city of Juneau. Kowee Creek is nearly 10 miles (16 km) long. It has a drainage basin of about 50 square miles (130 km2) and two transverse tributaries. In addition to Chief Kowee's use of the area, other Tlingit hunted and trapped throughout the Douglas Island area from the creek to Point Hilda. Show on map
Nushagak RiverThe Nushagak River (Iilgayaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik) is a river in southwest Alaska, United States. It begins in the Alaska Range and flows southwest 450 km (280 mi) to Nushagak Bay, an inlet of Bristol Bay, east of Dillingham, Alaska. The Mulchatna River is a major tributary. Other navigable tributaries include the Nuyakuk River and the King Salmon River. Jet-boats are commonly used to access these tributaries and the upper Nushagak. The Iowithla River and the Kokwok River are smaller tributaries. Show on map
Port WalterPort Walter is located on the southeastern side of Baranof Island in Sitka City and Borough, Alaska. It is made up of two parts: Little Port Walter and Big Port Walter. Little Port Walter was the home of a herring saltery during the turn on the century and the ruins can still be seen. Little Port Walter had a small community at one time but has been replaced by a research station that studies the life cycles of several species of Salmon. There is a staff of 3–15 state and federal employees running the research station year-round. There is a dock, and the harbor itself is a safe anchorage. Show on map
Fritz CoveFritz Cove is a bay on the northwestern coast of Douglas Island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Lying in Stephens Passage, it is 8 miles (13 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. Historically, Fritz Cove was used for fishing by Alaska Natives, especially the Auke people. A summer camp named Aangoox̱a Yé was located at the mouth of Fish Creek. Scottish-American naturalist John Muir camped at the bay on November 10, 1879. Show on map
Redoubt LakeRedoubt Lake, or Kunaa Shak Áayi, is a long, narrow lake on Baranof Island, near Sitka, Alaska. It is located in a glacially-carved valley in Tongass National Forest. It was named Ozero Glubokoye, meaning \"deep lake\", in 1809 by the Russian navigator Ivan Vasilyev. Redoubt Lake is one of the largest meromictic lakes in North America. Its water is fresh to a depth of 330 ft (100 m), below which is a dense, saltwater layer. The lake's maximum depth is 870 ft (270 m) with a mean depth of 460 ft (140 m). Its surface area covers 3,200 acres (13 km2). Show on map
Chilkoot LakeThe Chilkoot Lake, in the Tlingit Indians region of Alaska, is also spelt Chilcoot Lake. Its other local names are the Akha Lake and Tschilkut S(ee), meaning “Chilkoot Lake”. It is in Haines Borough, Alaska. Chilkoot also means \"big fish\". The lake has a ‘Recreation Site’ at its southern end near the outlet to the Chilkoot River, which is set amidst the Sitka spruce trees. Chilkoot River flows from the lake for a short length and debouches into the Lutak Channel at the head of the Chilkoot inlet near Haines. Chilkoot village, a settlement of Chilkoot Indians existed at the outlet of the lake, which was called Tschilkut or Tananel or Chilcoot; the lake is named after this village. This village is now a camping area developed by the State Parks and Outdoor Recreation Division of the Alaska D Show on map
Nabesna GlacierNabesna Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. Fed by deep snowfall in the Wrangell Mountains, the 53 mile (85 km) long Nabesna is the longest valley glacier in North America and the world's longest interior valley glacier. Show on map
Wrangell NarrowsThe Wrangell Narrows is a winding, 35-km-long (22 mi) channel between Mitkof Island and Kupreanof Island in the Alexander Archipelago in Southeast Alaska. The Wrangell Narrows is one of the six Listed narrows in Southeast Alaska. There are about 60 lights and buoys to mark it because of its winding nature and navigation hazards. It was named \"Proliv Vrangelya\" (English: Wrangell Strait) in 1838 by G. Lindenberg after Admiral Baron Ferdinand Petrovich von Wrangell. The translation Wrangell Strait remained in use while Wrangell Narrows referred to the narrowest central portion. By 1919 Department of Commerce nautical chart 8170 was changed from Wrangell Strait to Wrangell Narrows. Show on map
Chilkoot RiverThe Chilkoot River is a river in Southeast Alaska, United States, that extends about 20 miles (32 km) from its source and covers a watershed area of 100 square miles (260 km2). The source of the river is in the Takshanuk Mountains to the west and the Freebee glacier and unnamed mountains to the east. From its source, the upper reach of the river extends approximately 16 miles (26 km) to the point where it enters Chilkoot Lake. From the downstream end of the lake, the lower reach of the river flows for about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) until it enters the Chilkoot Inlet, a branch at the northern end of the Lynn Canal. Show on map
Ward CoveWard Cove is a bay in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated about 5 miles (8.0 km) to the westward of Ketchikan off the western coast of Revillagigedo Island within the Alexander Archipelago. The town of Ward Cove (also Wacker, Wacker City, or Wards Cove) is located on the waterway. It is a small bay on the northern shore of Tongass Narrows. Ward Cove Stream empties into the head of the cove, and is the outlet to a chain of lakes. It flows in a fairly straight course in a southerly direction over rocky bottom, with a rapid current throughout its length, between high bluff banks well wooded. Tide water extends a short distance within the mouth. The stream water is fairly clear. It is about .75 miles (1.21 km) long, and 300 feet (91 m) below the lake, has a width of 20 feet (6.1 m) and a@en . Show on map
Koyukuk RiverThe Koyukuk River (Ooghekuhno’ in Koyukon) is a 425-mile (684 km) tributary of the Yukon River, in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the last major tributary entering the Yukon before the larger river empties into the Bering Sea. Show on map
Teklanika RiverThe Teklanika River is a 91-mile (146 km) tributary of the Nenana River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Nenana is a tributary of the Tanana River, which is part of the Yukon River drainage in the central interior region of the state. Flowing northward from headwaters at the Cantwell Glacier in the Alaska Range, the Teklanika drains an area widely visited by tourists to Denali National Park and Preserve. The park's only road crosses the river at milepost 31 and a National Park campground is located on its eastern bank at milepost 29. Show on map
Tanaga PassThe Tanaga Pass is a strait between Tanaga Island and the Delarof Islands the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. It is about 40 miles long and 13 miles wide at its narrowest part. Tidal currents commonly range between 2 and 3 knots in the pass. From the U.S. Coast Pilot: \"Depths of 50 fathoms or more can be carried through the pass by keeping 6 miles off Cape Amagalik, Tanaga Island, and 3 miles off the Delarof Islands. Show on map
Russian RiverThe Russian River is a 13-mile-long (21 km) river on the Kenai Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows northward from Upper Russian Lake in the Kenai Mountains through Lower Russian Lake, draining into the Kenai River at the town of Cooper Landing. The native Denaina people called this river Chunuk'tnu. Like the Kenai, the Russian River is famous for its fishing, especially for salmon. There are two runs of sockeye salmon each year, in mid-June and mid-July, and a run of silver salmon in August. Show on map
Galbraith LakeGalbraith Lake is a lake located in the North Slope Borough of Alaska, United States. The surrounding area is uninhabited except for seasonal residents. The lake is located on the west side of the Dalton Highway between miles 272-75 of the highway. The lake is approximately 3.6 miles long and was formed by glaciers, and is known to contain lake trout, burbot and grayling fish, with some reports of Arctic char. A campground is also located near the lake. The lake was named in 1951 after Bart Galbraith, a bush pilot who died in a 1950 plane crash while flying from Barter Island to Barrow. Show on map
Hetta InletHetta Inlet is a deep embayment in the southwestern coast of Prince of Wales Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. It connects with the Pacific Ocean through Cordova Bay. The head of the inlet is separated by a 200 feet (61 m) divide from the West Arm of Cholmondeley Sound. The shores are abrupt from the water's edge, and the channels and inlets are deep. The precipitation is probably a little greater than at Ketchikan, and the mean annual temperature is slightly higher. The white crystalline limestone of the Wales series, striking nearly north and south, is the predominant country rock of Hetta Inlet. In it are intruded many igneous rocks, some schistose, some massive. The white limestones are closely folded and have great variation in dip. The igneous rocks, so far as determined from the s Show on map
Taku HarborTaku Harbor (also spelled Taco, Tacou, or Takou) is a small, remote bay located on the eastern shore of Stephens Passage about 22 miles southeast of central Juneau, Alaska, United States. Taku Harbor is named after the Taku people; this name was applied as early as 1848 by Captain Lieutenant M. N. Vasilief of the Imperial Russian Navy. It was the site of Fort Durham, a trading post established by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1840; this location is now a National Historic Landmark. Show on map
Ugashik RiverThe Ugashik River is a stream, 43 miles (69 km) long, on the Alaska Peninsula of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows from headwaters near Lower Ugashik Lake and empties into Ugashik Bay, an estuary of the Bering Sea's Bristol Bay. The origin of the name Ugashik is somewhat obscure, although early spelling variants such as Oogashik and Ougashick suggest the name pertains to the source of the river: two waters (lakes) and its muddy character. The river hosts several seasonal salmon runs including, during the peak summer season, part of the largest sockeye salmon migration in the world. Show on map
Naknek LakeNaknek Lake is a lake in southern Alaska, near the base of the Alaska Peninsula. Located in Katmai National Park and Preserve, the lake is 64 km (40 mi) long and 5–13 km (3–8 miles) wide, the largest lake in the park The lake drains west into Bristol Bay through the Naknek River. The elevation of the lake has lowered over the past 5,000 years as it has cut through a glacial moraine, separating Naknek Lake and Brooks Lake and creating Brooks Falls about 3500 years ago. Location of King Salmon, Alaska Show on map
Chena RiverThe Chena River /ˈtʃi.nə/ is a 100-mile (160 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the Interior region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows generally west from the White Mountains to the Tanana River near the city of Fairbanks, which is built on both sides of the river. The Tanana empties into the 2,300-mile (3,700 km) long Yukon River. Show on map
Unuk RiverThe Unuk River is a river in the U.S. state of Alaska and the Canadian province of British Columbia. It flows from the Coast Mountains southwest to Behm Canal, northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska. From its headwaters in a heavily glaciated area in British Columbia, south of the lower Iskut River, the Unuk flows west and south for 129 kilometres (80 mi), crossing into Alaska and emptying into Burroughs Bay, an inlet of Behm Canal. In Alaska the river flows through the Misty Fjords National Monument. Show on map
Orca BayOrca Bay is a bay in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Orca Bay is on the north west and west sides of Hawkins Island, extending westward to Johnstone Point of Hinchenbrook Island. Its northwestern corner is demarcated by Knowles Head, between Port Gravina and Fidalgo Bay on the mainland. Its eastern end can be reached from the port of Cordova, Alaska on Orca Inlet. According to the US Board on Geographic Names, Orca Bay was named for the Orca salmon cannery of the Pacific Steam Whaling Company, which operated on the southeast shore of Orca Inlet and in turn was named for that company's ship Orca. Ultimately the name is derived from the orca or killer whale. Show on map
Gilahina RiverGilahina River is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska in the Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The stream rises in mountains 6,000–7,000 feet (1,800–2,100 m) high between Lakina River on the east and Kuskulana River on the west. It is about 12 miles (19 km) long and joins the Chitina River 9 miles (14 km) below the Lakina. Three miles from the Chitina, it forks. The west branch, which is called the Chokosna, drains an area of 50 square miles (130 km2) and is nearly as large as the main stream above the forks. The upper 6 miles (9.7 km) of the Gilahina in its course through the mountains has a grade of about 150 feet (46 m) per mile. As it approaches the Chitina Valley, the grade increases, and for the lower 6 miles (9.7 km), the average grade is about 200 feet (61 m) per mi Show on map
Hunter BayHunter Bay is located in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated 2.5 miles (4.0 km) eastward of Turn Point. The entrance of the bay is about 0.75 miles (1.21 km) wide and is obstructed on its northern side by a number of islets, but the channel close around Turn Point is comparatively clear. About 1 mile (1.6 km) above the entrance, the bay contracts to a width of 825 feet (251 m), with a small grassy islet lying in the middle. The best channel is on the northern side of the islet. At approximately 0.5 miles (0.80 km) eastward of the islet is an arm making northward about 2 miles (3.2 km). The depths are shallow and the tidal currents are strong in the narrowest part. There is good anchorage in Hunter Bay. Near the south shore of the bay is an islet surrounded by a flat of considerable ex Show on map
Kobuk RiverThe Kobuk River (also Kooak, Kowak, Kubuk, Kuvuk, or Putnam) is a river located in the Arctic region of northwestern Alaska in the United States. It is approximately 280 miles (451 km) long. Draining a basin with an area of 12,300 square miles (32,000 km2), the Kobuk River is among the largest rivers in northwest Alaska with widths of up to 1500 feet (460 m) and flow at a speed of 3–5 miles per hour (5–8 km per hour) in its lower and middle reaches. The average elevation for the Kobuk River Basin is 1,300 feet (400 m) above sea level, ranging from near sea level to 11,400 feet (3,475 m). Topography includes low, rolling mountains, plains and lowlands, moderately high rugged mountainous land, and some gently sloped plateaus and highlands. The river contains an exceptional population of shee Show on map
Dog Salmon RiverThe Dog Salmon River is a 70-mile (110 km) tributary of the Ugashik River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning on the flanks of Mount Kialagvik, it flows northwest through the Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge to meet the larger river 4 miles (6 km) southwest of Ugashik, at the head of Ugashik Bay, an arm of Bristol Bay. It descends to the upper reaches of the bay from an elevation of 981 feet (299 m) in a valley of the Aleutian Range between Mount Chiginagak and Mount Kialagvik. Among its feeder streams are Figure Eight, Goblet, and Wandering creeks. Show on map
Norton SoundNorton Sound is an inlet of the Bering Sea on the western coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, south of the Seward Peninsula. It is about 240 km (150 mi) long and 200 km (125 mi) wide. The Yukon River delta forms a portion of the south shore and water from the Yukon influences this body of water. It is ice-free from June to October. Norton Sound was explored by Captain James Cook in September 1778. He named the body of water after Sir Fletcher Norton, then Speaker of the British House of Commons. The seaplane tender USS Norton Sound was named after the inlet. Show on map
Bucareli BayBucareli Bay is a bay in the Alexander Archipelago, in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located off the western coast of Prince of Wales Island, between Baker Island and Suemez Island. To the east it connects to various waterways, such as San Alberto Bay. To the west it opens directly upon the Pacific Ocean. Bucareli Bay is about 25 miles (40 km) long. Show on map
Anaktuvuk RiverThe Anaktuvuk River is a river in Alaska's North Slope. One hundred and thirty-five miles (217 km) long, it flows west from glaciers in the Endicott Mountains changing direction just north of Anaktuvuk Pass to flow north to the Arctic Coastal Plain where it joins the Colville River. Its headwaters are formed by runoff from various glaciers in the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness on the slopes of Fan Mountain, Alapah Mountain and Limestack Mountain, the last of which lies on the watershed divide between the Arctic Coastal Plain and the Koyukuk River, and feeds the Anaktuvuk River via Graylime Creek. Its first major tributary is the John River which joins it at 68°12′14″N 151°36′50″W / 68.20389°N 151.61389°W. The Nanushuk River joins it at 69°18′11″N 150°59′58″W / 69.30306°N 150.99944°W. Show on map
Anchor RiverThe Anchor River is a stream on the Kenai Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning near Bald Mountain on the eastern side of the lower peninsula, if flows generally west for 30 miles (48 km) into Cook Inlet near Anchor Point on the western side of the peninsula. The river mouth is 14 miles (23 km) northwest of Homer. Show on map
Kotzebue SoundKotzebue Sound (Qikiqtaġruk [qikiqtaʁʐuk] in Iñupiaq) is an arm of the Chukchi Sea in the western region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is on the north side of the Seward Peninsula and bounded the east by the Baldwin Peninsula. It is 100 miles (160 km) long and 70 miles (110 km) wide. The towns of Kotzebue, Kiwalik and Deering are on the shores of Kotzebue Sound. Kotzebue Sound was explored and named in 1816 by Baltic German Lieutenant Otto von Kotzebue while searching for the Northeast Passage in the service of Russia. Show on map
Hallo BayHallo Bay is a sandy bay located beneath the peaks of the Aleutian Range within Katmai National Park. The bay is famous for its bear viewing, since large numbers of grizzly bears are attracted to feast on the rich sedges along the tidal flats of the bay. Sometimes they are also observed digging up clams in the mud, and fishing for salmon peaks in July. The food in the bay is so abundant that at times as many as five to six large bears can be seen at one time feeding on sedges, salmon or clams. The bears are usually timid around humans but have learned to trust them over the years due to decades of no hunting and the gentle nature of visitors. However, an incident for getting too close to a bear in 2003 cost bear expert Timothy Treadwell his life, not far from Hallo Bay. Show on map
Prospect CreekProspect Creek is a very small settlement approximately 180 miles (290 km) north of present-day Fairbanks and 25 miles (40 km) southeast of present-day Bettles, Alaska. Years ago it was home to numerous mining expeditions and the camp for the building of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). Today, it is the location of Pump Station 5 (Jim River Station) of the TAPS. Prospect Creek is also home to the United States record for lowest temperature. On January 23, 1971 the record low temperature of −80 °F (−62 °C) was recorded. Wildlife can be found there even with its extreme changes in temperature; local fauna include anything from black and brown bears to bald eagles. The elevation of Prospect Creek is 643 feet (196 m) above sea level. Nearby Moore Creek is widely known for its gold and@en . Show on map
Resurrection BayResurrection Bay is a bay on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska, United States. Its main settlement is Seward, located at the head of the bay. It received its name from Alexandr Baranov, who was forced to retreat into the bay during a bad storm in the Gulf of Alaska. When the storm settled it was Easter Sunday, so the bay and nearby Resurrection River were named in honor of it. The opening of the film The Hunt for Red October was filmed in Resurrection Bay, with the bay serving as a stand-in for Russia's Murmansk Fjord. Show on map
King Salmon RiverThe King Salmon River is a 35-mile (56 km) tributary of the Ugashik River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning at Mother Goose Lake in the Aleutian Range, it flows northwest to meet the larger river near the upper reaches of Ugashik Bay. The lake and the upper course of the King Salmon lie within the Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. The river's gravel bottom and braided channels are ideal for the many king salmon that spawn in its waters, but they limit navigation to small skiff. Show on map
Byers LakeByers lake is a small lake in Denali State Park, Alaska, 28 miles (45 km) north of Talkeetna. The lake is named for a fisherman who was brought there many times by bush pilot Don Sheldon in the 1950s. It is accessible from the George Parks Highway and has a developed campground, several public-use cabins and a small boat dock. The Alaska Veterans Memorial is on a hilltop adjacent to the lake. Gasoline-powered motors and floatplane landings are not permitted on the lake. The lake used to contain a sizable population of lake trout but due to overfishing in the time since the highway was built in 1972 the population has dwindled, and landings of lake trout are now rare, although there are still burbot in the lake as well. Salmon also come into the lake but salmon fishing is not permitted. Cam Show on map
Brady GlacierWhen George Vancouver first set eyes on the Brady Glacier in 1794, it was a calving tidewater glacier that dumped ice into the Taylor Bay. The following century, the glacier advanced eight kilometers. This advance was taken by Bengston (1962) as a sign of the glacier changing from a tidal to non-tidal one. Bengston also stated that the huge outwash plain at the glacier's terminus allows it to preserve itself even as most glaciers in the region retreated. The Brady Glacier has an ELA (the line above which snow remains even after summer's end) of only 800 meters, one of the lowest in Alaska. Show on map
Charley RiverThe Charley River is an 88-mile (142 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Flowing generally northeast from the Mertie Mountains in the northeastern part of the state, the river lies entirely within Yukon–Charley Rivers National Preserve. The Charley River enters the larger river downstream and 55 miles (89 km) southwest of Eagle. Show on map
Kukaklek Lake'Kukaklek is a lake in southern Alaska, near the base of the Alaska Peninsula. Located in Katmai National Park and Preserve, the lake is 46,080 acres (18,650 ha) in area and is the source for the Alagnak River, a designated Wild River. Notable for its excellent sport fishing, it is rated as one of the top wilderness destinations in Alaska. Wildlife in the area is typical of the Alaskan Peninsula, with grizzly bears, moose, gray wolf, and caribou frequently seen around the lake's shores. Grizzly bears in particular are frequently seen around the lake during the salmon run. The lake has recently been the source for a controversial grizzly bear hunt in Katmai Preserve. Show on map
Chilkat RiverThe Chilkat River is a river in British Columbia and southeastern Alaska that flows southward from the Coast Range to the Chilkat Inlet and ultimately Lynn Canal. It is about 80 kilometres (50 mi) long. It begins at Chilkat Glacier, in Alaska, flows west and south in British Columbia for 27 kilometres (17 mi), enters Alaska and continues southwest for another 60 kilometres (37 mi). It reaches the ocean at the abandoned area of Wells, Alaska and deposits into a long delta area. Show on map
Bonanza RiverBonanza River (alternates, Ki-ul-uk, Bonanza California, Bonanza Cal) is a waterway on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. The headwaters lie close to Venetia Creek and the Koksuktapaga River. It flows southeast for 25 miles (40 km) before reaching Safety Sound, as do the Flambeau and Eldorado Rivers, and then through Safety Inlet to Norton Sound. The village of Solomon is approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) away. Across the divide of West Creek, in the Bonanza River drainage, and lying above the West Creek schists, is a series of green chloride schists and sills of greenstone; these chloritic schists are the prevailing rocks of the divide between Eldorado and Bonanza rivers. In its general character, it is similar to the Eldorado River. Also called Bonanza Cal, later maps indicat Show on map
Tustumena LakeTustumena Lake is a lake on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula in southcentral Alaska, within Kenai National Wildlife Refuge and near the town of Kasilof. The lake is 25 miles (40 km) long and up to 6 miles (9.7 km) wide and receives drainage from Tustumena Glacier, and several creeks. Tustumena Lake is Alaska's 8th largest lake. The outlet forms the headwaters of the Kasilof River. The lake and the area around it are known for game hunting, and for the Tustumena 200 Sled Dog Race. This lake has a reputation for being very dangerous to small boats due to the high winds that regularly blow off of Tustumena Glacier. Early Russian explorers wrongly believed that this lake and Skilak Lake were a single body of water. Early trophy hunters from the 1890s and later took world record moose from@en . Show on map
Togiak RiverTogiak River is a stream, 48-mile (77 km) long, in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins at Togiak Lake in the Togiak Wilderness and flows southwest to Togiak Bay, 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Togiak. Large catches of salmon are landed during the summer at the commercial cannery in Togiak, and the fishery is also very important for subsistence harvesting by the local Alaska Natives. Show on map
Indian RiverIndian River was named in 1826 by Russians colonizing the Sitka area as Reka Koloshenka. This was translated in 1883 to the English title used today. Indian River is a large salmon-spawning stream. The river terminates in the heart of Sitka National Historical Park and passes the Alaska Raptor Center. The river extends about five miles into Baranof Island before splitting into two branches. A trail follows the southern branch to a viewpoint of a 21-meter waterfall. The river carries a large volume of water relative to its watershed due the extremely high rainfall of the Baranof Island area. Show on map
Behm CanalBehm Canal is a natural channel in the Alexander Archipelago, in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. About 108 miles (174 km) long, Behm Canal separates Revillagigedo Island from the mainland. From Clarence Strait Behm Canal extends north and northeast, through Behm Narrows and by the mouth of the Unuk River, then south to Revillagigedo Channel. Behm Canal is also the home to a United States Navy Submarine sound testing range. That is used to ensure U.S. Submarines are as quiet as they can be. New Eddystone Rock is a craggy, much-photographed basalt island in Behm Canal. Show on map
Tracy ArmTracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau (outlet at 57° 46' 40\" N 133° 37' 0\" W). It is named after the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Franklin Tracy. It is located about 45 miles (72 km) south of Juneau and 70 miles (110 km) north of Petersburg, Alaska, off of Holkham Bay and adjacent to Stephens Passage within the Tongass National Forest. Tracy Arm is the heart of the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness, designated by the United States Congress in 1980. Show on map
Endicott ArmTracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau (outlet at 57° 46' 40\" N 133° 37' 0\" W). It is named after the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Franklin Tracy. It is located about 45 miles (72 km) south of Juneau and 70 miles (110 km) north of Petersburg, Alaska, off of Holkham Bay and adjacent to Stephens Passage within the Tongass National Forest. Tracy Arm is the heart of the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness, designated by the United States Congress in 1980. Show on map
Kokolik RiverThe Kokolik River is a stream, 200 miles (320 km) long, in the western North Slope of the U.S. state of Alaska. It rises in the De Long Mountains of the western Brooks Range and flows generally north and northwest into the Kasegaluk Lagoon. The river mouth is 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Point Lay, on the Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Its Inuit name, Kokolik, refers to the alpine bistort, an edible plant found in the region. A variant name, Kepizetka (qipigsatqaq), recorded on an Inuit map in the late 19th century, means \"it twists\" or \"crooked\". Show on map
Newhalen RiverThe Newhalen River is a 22-mile (35 km) stream in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning at Six Mile Lake, the Newhalen flows south to enter Iliamna Lake about 3 miles (5 km) south of Iliamna. Alaska Fishing describes the river as \"the major pathway for a mind-boggling migration of sockeye salmon\" that ascend the stream in early summer. The main game fish in addition to sockeye are rainbow trout. Show on map
Bristol BayBristol Bay (Iilgayaq in Central Yup'ik) is the eastern-most arm of the Bering Sea, at 57° to 59° North 157° to 162° West in Southwest Alaska. Bristol Bay is 400 km (250 mi) long and 290 km, (180 mi) wide at its mouth. A number of rivers flow into the bay, including the Cinder, Egegik, Igushik, Kvichak, Meshik, Nushagak, Naknek, Togiak, and Ugashik. Show on map
Draanjik RiverThe Draanjik or Black River is a river in eastern Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. It flows generally northwest 160 miles (260 km) from its source to its mouth on the Black River Slough of the Porcupine River near the city of Fort Yukon. In January 2014, the Alaska Historical Commission voted to rename the river to Draanjik, its Gwich'in name, a decision which later found approval by the Board of Geographic Names. The local Gwich'in name for the river is \"Draanjik,\" which translates as \"Caches Along The River.\" The river gives its name to the Draanjik Gwich'in of Chalkyitsik. Show on map
Elevenmile CreekElevenmile Creek is a river on Douglas Island in the City and Borough of Juneau (CBJ), Alaska, United States. Its origin is in hills to the southeast and it flows northwest to Fritz Cove, a part of Stephens Passage; it is 1.6 miles (2.6 km) southwest of Entrance Point and 8.6 miles (13.8 km) west of the city of Juneau. The name refers to the stream's location, between the ten- and eleven-mile markers of the North Douglas Highway. The name was supplied by the United States Geological Survey in 1962 and it was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Noyes SloughNoyes Slough is a secondary channel of the Chena River contained entirely within the city limits of Fairbanks, Alaska. It is approximately 7 miles (11 km) long and separates the Garden Island district of Fairbanks from the rest of the town. During the summer, the slough is used by canoeists and waterfowl. In the winter, the slough freezes and is used by cross-country skiers, snowshoers, and mushers. It forms part of the route for the annual Open North American Sled Dog Championship and the Iron Dog snowmobile race, each of which end in downtown Fairbanks. Show on map
Portage GlacierPortage Glacier is a glacier on the Kenai Peninsula of the U.S. state of Alaskaand is included within the Chugach National Forest. It is located south of Portage Lake and 6 km (4 mi) west of Whittier. Portage Glacier was a local name first recorded in 1898 by Thomas Corwin Mendenhall of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, so called because it is on a portage route between Prince William Sound and Turnagain Arm. Hundreds of years ago the glacier filled the entire Portage Valley, a distance of 14 miles (23 km), and was connected to what are now five separate glaciers. Show on map
Kvichak RiverThe Kvichak River is a large river, about 50 miles (80 km) long, in southwestern Alaska in the United States. It flows southwest from Lake Iliamna to Kvichak Bay, an arm of Bristol Bay, on the Alaska Peninsula. The communities of Igiugig and Levelock lie along the Kvichak River. The Kvichak is navigable along its entire length, and is used as a short cut by boats getting between Cook Inlet and Bristol Bay via the Lake Iliamna portage. The Kvichak River is home to the largest Red salmon run in the world. Commercial harvests are worth hundreds of millions annually. Show on map
Itkillik RiverThe Itkillik River is a 220-mile (350 km) tributary of the Colville River in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. The river flows northeast then northwest out of the Endicott Mountains near Oohlah Pass to meet the larger stream about 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Harrison Bay on the Beaufort Sea. An Iñupiaq map, drawn in about 1900, identifies the river as It-kil-lik, meaning Indian. Show on map
Anvik RiverThe Anvik River(/ˈæn.vɪk/) is a 140-mile (230 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows southeast from the Nulato Hills to its mouth on the larger river 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Anvik. The annual production of summer chum salmon along the Anvik River is thought to be the largest in the Yukon River basin. The river has excellent fishing for four species of salmon as well as northern pike, sheefish, Arctic char, rainbow trout, and grayling. Show on map
Ninilchik RiverThe Ninilchik River is a 21-mile-long (34 km) stream on the Kenai Peninsula of the U.S. state of Alaska. From headwaters near the west coast of the peninsula, the river flows south, parallel to the coast, then turns sharply west near Ninilchik. Ninilchik Road runs parallel to the lower river along its left bank to near the road's intersection with the Sterling Highway. At Ninilchik, the river passes under the highway, flows through Ninilchik State Recreation Area, and empties into Cook Inlet. Show on map
Skilak Lake Show on map
Shovel Creek Show on map
Icy StraitThe Icy Strait is a strait in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska, at about 58°16′41″N 135°38′48″W / 58.27806°N 135.64667°W. The strait separates Chichagof Island to the south and the Alaska mainland to the north. The strait is 64 km (40 mi) from its west side at the intersection of the Cross Sound and Glacier Bay to its east side at Chatham Strait and the Lynn Canal. The two largest islands in the strait are Pleasant Island and Lemesurier Island. The Cape Spencer Light is an important former lighthouse and currently active aid-to-navigation. Show on map
Kuparuk RiverThe Kuparuk River is a river in Alaska's North Slope that enters a bay on the Beaufort Sea between Beechey Point and Prudhoe Bay. The north-flowing river is about 200 miles (320 km) long, and its delta is about 3 miles (5 km) wide. Its Eskimo name appeared on a map drawn in 1901 by a prospector who spelled it Koopowra, which he translated as Big River (possibly Kugauraq). The Kuparuk River oil field, the second largest oil field in North America, is centered about 40 miles (64 km) west of Prudhoe Bay. Discovered in 1969, it covers about 500 square miles (1,300 km2). Show on map
Nuluk RiverNuluk River (alternate Nooluk River) is a waterway on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It enters the lagoon 40 miles (64 km) northeast of Cape Prince of Wales. It heads in the high mountains made up of the Port Clarence limestone about 35 miles south of the Arctic Ocean. For 15 miles (24 km) from its head, the river occupies a canyon, varying from 100–1,000 feet (30–305 m) in depth, cut in Silurian limestones. Fossils have been reported about the head of the river. Northward along its course, the character of the bed rock changes, and calcareous mica-schists are noted. The Silurian limestones dip toward the schists, and near the contact with them, are very highly folded. The coastal plain gravel extends inland farther along the Nuluk River than it does on the other rivers@en . Show on map
Clarence StraitClarence Strait, originally Duke of Clarence Strait, is a strait in southeastern Alaska, in the United States in the Alexander Archipelago. The strait separates Prince of Wales Island, on the west side, from Revillagigedo Island and Annette Island, on the east side. Clarence Strait is 126 miles (203 km) long, extending from Dixon Entrance to Sumner Strait. Moira Sound is on the west side of the strait. The Guard Island Light and Lincoln Rocks Light, both located adjacent to Clarence Strait, were important aids-to-navigation in the Clarence Strait area in the pre-automated era. Show on map
North Fork Koyukuk RiverThe North Fork of the Koyukuk River is one of the principal forks of the Koyukuk River, approximately 105 mi (160 km) long, in northern Alaska in the United States. It has a watershed area of 1850 square miles (4790 square km). It rises on the south slopes of the Continental Divide in the Brooks Range. It is located the in Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and is part of the Koyukuk Wild and Scenic River as designated by the United States Congress in 1980. Show on map
Kasegaluk LagoonThe Kasegaluk Lagoon is a coastal lagoon located in the western part of the North Slope of Alaska. It is separated from the Chukchi Sea by a series of long, thin barrier islands that stretch south and north-east from the town of Point Lay and westwards down to Icy Cape. There are seven passes through these islands. The lagoon receives the waters from the Kukpowruk, Kokolik, and Utukok Rivers. Kasegaluk Lagoon extends for about 200 km (120 mi), from approximately 69°16′N 163°15′W / 69.267°N 163.250°W to 70°22′N 160°47′W / 70.367°N 160.783°W. Show on map
Twin LakesTwin Lakes is a complex of two large lakes in Lake Clark National Park in the U.S. state of Alaska near the northeast corner of Lake and Peninsula Borough. It contains a 6-mile long (9.7 km) upper lake and a smaller 4-mile long (6.5 km) lower lake, joined by a short connecting stream. The lakes outflow westward into the Chilikadrotna River (and eventually into the Mulchatna and Nushagak Rivers and Nushagak Bay). It is quite remote and unpopulated, except in the late summer as it is a popular hunting spot. Show on map
Fish CreekFish Creek is a river on Douglas Island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Its origin is Cropley Lake, and it flows into Fritz Cove, a part of Stephens Passage. It is 7 miles (11 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The Treadwell gold mine used water from Fish Creek as early as 1885. The Treadwell Ditch, constructed in 1889, brought water sixteen miles from the river to the mines. J. Peters of the United States Geological Survey reported the name in 1902, and it was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Etivluk RiverThe Etivluk River is a 56-mile (90 km) tributary of the Colville River in the U.S. state of Alaska. A bend in the river about 15 miles (24 km) from the mouth has been identified as one of the most remote locations in mainland Alaska. It is about 120 miles (190 km) from the nearest towns of Ambler to the southwest and Atqasuk to the north and farther from any other settled area in the state. Show on map
Chakachatna RiverThe Chakachatna River (Dena'ina Athabaskan Ch'akajatnu) is a stream, 36 miles (58 km) long, in northwestern Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows from Chakachamna Lake southeastward into the McArthur River, which flows into the Gompertz Channel of Cook Inlet. The river mouth is about 3 miles (5 km) north of Trading Bay and 32 miles (51 km) northwest of Kenai. Show on map
Quartz LakeQuartz Lake is a mid-sized lake about 10 mi (16 km) north of Delta Junction, Alaska. It was named Quartz Lake by early mineral prospectors in the area. Much of the lake shore is private property but the Quartz Lake State Recreation Area is also located on the lake via a short access road from the Richardson Highway. The recreation area has campgrounds, hiking trails, public use cabins, and access to both Quartz Lake and nearby Little Lost Lake. The lake is fairly shallow in most places, even if well offshore, but has a few deeper areas as well. It is stocked with rainbow trout, Arctic char and salmon. Stocking is partially funded by the Sportfish Restoration Program, which uses tax money from the purchase of fishing equipment and boating fuels to fund hatchery programs. Show on map
Mulchatna RiverThe Mulchatna River is a 160-mile (260 km) tributary of the Nushagak River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning at Turquoise Lake, it flows generally southwest to meet the larger river 65 miles (105 km) northeast of Dillingham. The Mulchatna's mouth is slightly south (downstream) of the village of Koliganek on the Nushagak, which continues southwest to Nushagak Bay, an arm of Bristol Bay. Show on map
Ruth GlacierRuth Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its upper reaches are almost three vertical miles (4.8 km) below the summit of Denali. The glacier's \"Great Gorge\" is one mile (1.6 km) wide, and drops almost 2,000 feet (610 m) over ten miles (16 km), with crevasses along the surface. Above the surface on both sides are 5,000-foot (1,500-m) granite cliffs. From the top of the cliffs to the bottom of the glacier is a height exceeding that of the Grand Canyon. Ruth Glacier moves at a rate of 3.3 feet (1 m) a day and was measured to be 3,800 feet (1,200 m) thick in 1983. Show on map
Tongass PassageTongass Passage is a strait on the Canada–United States border between Alaska and British Columbia, located on the southwest side of Wales Island. Wales Island, and Pearse Island, to its northeast, were claimed by the United States prior to the settlement of the Alaska boundary dispute in 1903. Prior to that time, numerous American-owned canneries lined its shores. Canadian claims to the islands were affirmed in the Alaska Boundary Settlement of 1903, in which Tongass Passage, Pearse Canal and the Portland Canal were defined as comprising \"Portland Channel\", a term first used in the Anglo-Russian Treaty of 1825 as part of the marine boundary between Russian America and British claims in the region, but which remained undefined until the boundary settlement. Show on map
John RiverThe John River is a 125-mile (201 km) tributary of the Koyukuk River in the northern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was named after John Bremner, a prospector and explorer who was one of the first non-native persons to go there. It flows south from Anaktuvuk Pass in Alaska's Brooks Range, into the larger river at a point near Bettles, slightly north of the Arctic Circle. The John River Valley is an important migration route for Arctic caribou. Show on map
Kasilof RiverThe Kasilof River (/kəˈsiːlɒf/ kə-SEE-lof) or Ggasilatnu in the Dena'ina language is a river on the western Kenai Peninsula in southern Alaska. The name is an anglicization of Reka Kasilova, the name given to the river by early Russian settlers in the area. It begins at Tustumena Lake and flows northwest to Cook Inlet near Kasilof. The upper section of the river is very swift, with several sections considered Class II whitewater, and underwater hazards are difficult to detect, due to the silty nature of the glacial runoff that comprises most of the river. The entire river has powerful currents and is very cold. There is public access to the lower section from the Sterling Highway. Drift and bank fishing for salmon is popular on the lower Kasilof. Show on map
Duncan CanalThe Duncan Canal is a naturally occurring inland waterway in the Alexander Archipelago in Alaska, USA. It deeply penetrates Kupreanof Island, separating the Lindenberg Peninsula, on the southeast side of the island from the main island. It was first charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition. It was named after the English missionary William Duncan. Butterworth Island is located at the mouth of the Duncan Canal where it debouches into the Sumner Strait past the larger Woewodski Island. Show on map
Kuzitrin RiverThe Kuzitrin River is a stream, 95 miles (153 km) long, on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins at Kuzitrin Lake in the central region of the peninsula and flows 95 miles (153 km) west into the Imuruk Basin. The basin drains via the bay of Port Clarence to the Bering Sea. Kuzitrin tributaries include the Noxapaga, Kougarok, Kruzgamepa (Pilgrim), and Kugruk rivers. The river's name, from the Inuit, was recorded in 1900 by the United States Geological Survey. The United States Board on Geographic Names officially adopted the name in 1950. Show on map
Muir GlacierMuir Glacier is a glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is currently about 0.7 km (0.43 mi) wide at the terminus. As recently as the mid-1980s the glacier was a tidewater glacier and calved icebergs from a wall of ice 60 m (200 feet) tall. Show on map
Nugget CreekNugget Creek is fed by the Nugget Glacier, a tributary glacier on the mountainside east of Auke Bay in the borough of Juneau, Alaska, US. The creek feeds Nugget Falls. The valley of Nugget Creek joins that of Mendenhall River about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) above the foot of the glacier. Its basin, about 3 miles (4.8 km) in length, trends east and west, and there are several tributary gulches which head against the Lemon Creek divide. The rocks of the valley belong to the group of schists which lies next to the main diorite, except at the headwaters, where the edge of the intrusive rock appears. The Nugget Mall, located at the opposite end of the Mendenhall Valley and Juneau's largest shopping mall, derives its name from the creek. Show on map
Fish RiverThe Fish River is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska. The 47-mile-long (76 km) river rises in the Bendeleben Mountains and flows south to Golovnin Lagoon, before emptying into Golovnin Bay, Norton Sound, and the Bering Sea. The basin formed by the Fish River is known for its placer gold deposits, and in particular, the Niukluk River and its tributaries; production from this tributary valley is reported to be more than from any other place in the region. A galena mine existed 40 miles (64 km) from the sea, worked on occasion by a San Francisco corporation with a few hundred tons of ore taken to the city for smelting and refining for silver. Walter Curran Mendenhall found obscure fossils on Fish River at White Mountain. Show on map
Andreafsky RiverThe Andreafsky River is a 120-mile (190 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Andreafsky flows south from near Iprugalet Mountain in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge to meet the larger river at Pitkas Point, near the village of St. Mary's. Show on map
Sumner StraitSumner Strait is a strait in the Alexander Archipelago in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is about 80 miles (130 km) long and 10 miles (16 km) wide, extending from the mouth of the Stikine River to Iphigenia Bay on the Gulf of Alaska, separating Mitkof Island, Kupreanof Island, and Kuiu Island on the north from Zarembo Island and Prince of Wales Island on the south. The Cape Decision Light is a notable aid-to-navigation on Sumner Strait. Show on map
Salisbury SoundSalisbury Sound is a sound between the north shore of Kruzof Island and the southwestern end of Chichagof Island in the Alexander Archipelago in Southeast Alaska. It is about 40 km (25 mi) northwest of the city of Sitka, and within the limits of Sitka City and Borough. Salisbury Sound is the namesake of the seaplane tender USS Salisbury Sound. Show on map
Kennicott GlacierKennicott Glacier is a glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It trends southeast 43 km (27 mi) from Mount Blackburn to its terminus at the head of the Kennicott River in the Wrangell Mountains. It is located in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park near the small town of McCarthy, Alaska and the historic ghost town of Kennecott, Alaska. It was named in 1899 by geologist Oscar Rohn of the United States Geological Survey for Robert Kennicott, pioneer Alaska explorer and director of the scientific corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition in 1865. Show on map
Isanotski StraitIsanotski Strait is a strait connecting the northern Gulf of Alaska with the Bering Sea, in the U.S. state of Alaska. Isanax̂ (variously spelled Issannakh, Isanak etc.) is the Aleut name for present day Isanotski Strait, and means gap, hole, rent, or tear in the Aleut language which was rendered as Isanotski (or Issanakskie, Isanotskoi, Isanakh etc.) in transliterated Russian. The strait appears as Исанакъ in 1802 and Исаноцкый in 1844 on Russian maps. Show on map
Tinayguk RiverThe Tinayguk River is a 44-mile (71 km) tributary of the North Fork Koyukuk River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Heading in the Endicott Mountains of the Brooks Range, the river flows generally west then south to meet the larger river about 80 miles (130 km) north of Bettles. In 1980, the entire river was designated \"wild\" and added to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The designation means that the Tinayguk is unpolluted, free-flowing and generally inaccessible except by trail and that its watershed is essentially primitive. Show on map
Beaver CreekBeaver Creek is a 180-mile (290 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The creek begins at the confluence of Champion and Bear creeks in the White Mountains National Recreation Area, about 50 miles (80 km) north of Fairbanks. From there it flows west around the southern end of the White Mountains, then northeast into the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, then west into the Yukon River downstream of Beaver. Show on map
Arctic RiverArctic River is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska. Situated on the northwestern portion of Seward Peninsula, it rises south of Ear Mountain. It is about 25 miles (40 km) long, and flows into the west side of Shishmaref Inlet. Southeast of Ear Mountain, the course of this river is in a broad basin containing a number of small lakes. Below this basin, the river has cut a well-defined canyon. Viewed from the surrounding hills, the basin appears to be an old lake bed. A broad, flat divide, which has what appears to be an abandoned river channel across it, separates this basin from the drainage of the Kugruk River of the Arctic region. Many of the tributaries of Arctic River were staked by gold miners. Show on map
Hollis Clark Bay Seaplane BaseHollis Clark Bay Seaplane Base (IATA: HYL, FAA LID: HYL) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located one nautical mile (2 km) northeast of the central business district of Hollis, a community in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was formerly known as Hollis Seaplane Base. Show on map
Frederick SoundFrederick Sound (also called Prince Frederick Sound or Prince Frederick's Sound) is a passage of water in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska that separates Kupreanof Island to the south from Admiralty Island in the north. Frederick Sound was named by Captain George Vancouver for Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany. It was first charted in 1794 by two of his men, Joseph Whidbey and James Johnstone. The sound may also be known as the Russian transliteration Fridrikhe Zund. The sound is home to the Five Finger Islands Light. Show on map
Aniakchak RiverThe Aniakchak River is a stream, 27 miles (43 km) long, in Lake and Peninsula Borough on the Alaska Peninsula in the United States. It arises in Surprise Lake in the crater of Mount Aniakchak, a volcano in the Aleutian Range. It flows eastward from Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve into Aniakchak Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Show on map
Tazlina GlacierTazlina Glacier is a 25-mile-long (40 km) glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Mount Cashman and flows north to its terminus one mile (1.6 km) south of Tazlina Lake and 43 miles (69 km) north of Valdez. Tazlina Glacier is the largest northward flowing glacier in the Chugach Mountains. The terminus of the glacier is retreating and thinning. Tazlina is the largest north-flowing glacier in the Chugach Mountains. The glacier is around the Valdez area and is also a popular attraction for tourists. There are many restaurants, hotels, and tour companies around the Tazlina Glacier area. At the foot of the glacier lies the Tazlina Lake and the Tazlina River. Show on map
Klehini RiverThe Klehini River is a large, glacially fed stream in the vicinity of Haines in the U.S. state of Alaska. The Klehini River is about 42 miles (68 km) long from its source in British Columbia to its mouth at the Chilkat River, of which it is the largest tributary. The Klehini River is renowned for its salmon runs, its biannual congregation of bald eagles—the second largest in the Haines area after the Chilkat River's Council Grounds—and for the Klehini Falls. The Klehini also delineates the northern boundary of the Chilkat Range. Show on map
Union BayUnion Bay is located in the Alexander Archipelago within the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated on the northeast side of Lemesurier Point, the south point at the entrance to Ernest Sound. It is 3.5 miles (5.6 km) wide at the entrance, 1.25 miles (2.01 km) at its head, and is about 3 miles (4.8 km) long. At its head is a large lagoon, mostly bare at low water, into which empties a large stream. The waters of the bay are deep, but there is anchorage with good protection from southward, on the east side of the head of the bay, in about 18 fathoms. There is a rock with a depth of 18 feet (5.5 m) in the middle of the bay's entrance and 2.5 miles (4.0 km) northward of Lemly Rock. Show on map
Ivishak RiverThe Ivishak River is a 95-mile (153 km) tributary of the Sagavanirktok River in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. Fed by glaciers at the headwaters, the Ivishak flows northeast, then northwest, through the Philip Smith Mountains and the northern foothills of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It enters the Sagavanirktok River on the coastal plain south of Prudhoe Bay. Show on map
Lituya GlacierLituya Glacier is a tidewater glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. Located at 58°43′25″N 137°29′33″W / 58.72361°N 137.49250°W inside Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, its source is in the Fairweather Range and it feeds into Lituya Bay on the gulf coast of Southeast Alaska. The glacier is also the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway ferry M/V Lituya. Show on map
Teedriinjik RiverThe Chandalar River (T’eedriinjik in Gwich’in) is a 100-mile (160 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its peak flow, recorded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) between 1964 and 1974 at a stream gauge at Venetie, was 62,800 cubic feet per second (1,780 m3/s) on June 9, 1968. Show on map
Kake Seaplane BaseKake Seaplane Base (IATA: KAE, FAA LID: KAE) is a public-use seaplane base located in Kake, a city in the Petersburg Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline passenger service is subsidized by the U.S. Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Worthington GlacierThe Worthington Glacier is a 5,774-acre (2,337 ha) valley glacier located adjacent to Thompson Pass in the southeastern mainland section of the U.S. state of Alaska. Located on the Richardson Highway at milepost 28.7 mi (46 km) east of Valdez, it was listed as a National Natural Landmark in 1968. The Worthington Glacier State Recreation Site, a 113-acre (0.46 km2) roadside park operated by the state of Alaska, offers a view of the glacier, and it is acclaimed as one of the remaining U.S. glaciers that is accessible by paved highway. Like most of Alaska’s glaciers, this glacier has been steadily retreating for the last 150 years, but not as dramatically as many others. Show on map
Unalakleet RiverThe Unalakleet River in the U.S. state of Alaska flows southwest 90 miles (145 km) from the Kaltag Mountains to near the town of Unalakleet, on Norton Sound of the Bering Sea. In 1980, the upper 80 miles (130 km) of the river was protected as \"wild\" as part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the wild segment of the river is fished for king and silver salmon, Arctic grayling, and char. Other forms of recreation along the river include boating and camping in summer and snowmobiling, dog mushing, ice fishing, hunting, and trapping in winter. For part of its length, the Iditarod Trail runs along the Unalakleet. Show on map
Stikine StraitThe Stikine Strait is a strait in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska, located between Zarembo Island to the west and Etolin and Woronkofski Islands just southwest of the City of Wrangell. The strait's name derives from that of the Stikine River, the outlet of which is just northeast of Wrangell. The strait is shown on an 1844 Russian chart, but the name was first published on Russian Admiralty charts in 1848 as Proliv Stakhinskiy or Stakhin Strait. Other spelling variants over time have been Frances Strait, Stachin Strait, Stachine Strait, Stackine Strait, Stahkeen Strait, Stahkin Strait, Stakeen Strait, Stakhinski Strait, Stickeen Strait, and Stikeen Strait Show on map
Favorite ChannelFavorite Channel is a channel in Southeast Alaska, northwest of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is 25 kilometres (16 mi) long, extending northwest from Stephens Passage to Lynn Canal, separating Lincoln and Shelter islands from the mainland to the east. It was named in 1880 by U.S. Navy officers after the 80-foot (24 m) steamboat Favorite (built in 1874), which was chartered by the Navy for surveying work in Alaska, later being used to carry out trading and fishing for the herring plant at Killisnoo. The first European to traverse and chart the channel was Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during George Vancouver's 1791–95 expedition, in 1794. Show on map
Massacre Bay Show on map
Kougarok RiverThe Kougarok (Koo-gah-rok) River is a river on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Formed by the merger of the two smaller streams Macklin Creek and Washington Creek, the main stem is about 45 miles (72 km) long, flowing generally south from near Taylor Airport. It flows into the Kuzitrin River, which flows west into the Imuruk Basin, connected to the bay of Port Clarence on the Bering Sea. Show on map
Goose LakeGoose Lake is a small lake in Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska, located near the University of Alaska Anchorage, 1.2 miles (1.9 km) south-east of confluence of North and South Forks Chester Creek, and 2.8 miles (4.5 km) south-east of Anchorage, Cook Inlet Low. It is a popular swimming location in summer, with one of two municipal beaches, and is connected to the city's extensive trail system. It is a kettle lake. Show on map
Kongakut RiverThe Kongakut River flows through parts of North Slope Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins in the Davidson Mountains of the Brooks Range in the northeastern corner of the state, near the border with Yukon Territory in Canada. The Kongakut flows generally northeast and north through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to the Beaufort Sea northwest of Demarcation Point. It was formerly sometimes called the Turner River but that name is now applied to a smaller stream in the vicinity due to confusion as to which was originally meant. The name Kongakut comes from the Inupiaq name for the river, meanining roughly \"deer pond\". Show on map
Salmon LakeSalmon Lake (native name, Nahwazuk, meaning \"salmon\") is a natural lake on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Situated 35 miles (56 km) north of Cape Nome, it drains into Port Clarence through Kruzgamepa River. The lake lies at the foot of the Kigluaik Mountains at an elevavation of about 442 feet (135 m). It has a water surface area of 1,800 acres (730 ha) and a drainage area of 81 square miles (210 km2). Its principal supply comes from Grand Central River, which enters it at its western end. A number of small streams also enter the lake from both the north and the south; Fox Creek and Jasper Creek are the most notable of these. Show on map
Bear LakeBear Lake (one of a dozen lakes by this name in Alaska) is near the town of Seward and Resurrection Bay, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough on the Kenai Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is accessible from Bear Creek Road, which connects it to the Seward Highway. It is the site of salmon enhancement activities since 1962. This program is now managed by the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association.Current projects at Bear Lake focus on increasing sockeye and coho salmon by controlling species that are predators and competitors. Show on map
Iliamna LakeIliamna Lake or Lake Iliamna is a lake in southwest Alaska, at the north end of the Alaska Peninsula, between Kvichak Bay and Cook Inlet, about 100 miles (160 km) west of Seldovia, Alaska. It is the largest lake in Alaska, second largest lake in the United States, and eighth largest in North America. (While all five Great Lakes are considerably larger, only Lake Michigan lies completely within US territory.) Covering about 2,600 km² (1,000 sq. miles), Iliamna Lake is 77 miles (124 km) long and up to 22 miles (35 km) wide, with a maximum depth of 988 feet (301 m). Through the Kvichak River, its waters drain into Bristol Bay. Show on map
Birch CreekBirch Creek is a 150-mile (240 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning at the confluence of Ptarmigan and Eagle creeks near Porcupine Dome, it flows southwest, then south under the Steese Highway and into the Steese National Conservation Area. It then turns east, then north, again passing under the Steese Highway and entering the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Turning northwest, it ends where it splits into two distributaries, Lower Mouth Birch Creek and Upper Mouth Birch Creek, near Birch Creek, Alaska. The distributaries flow into the Yukon River at separate locations downstream of Fort Yukon. Show on map
Three Saints BayThree Saints Bay (Russian: Бухта Трёх Святителей, r Bukhta Trëkh Svyatitelyei) is a 9 miles (14 km)-long inlet on the southeast side of Kodiak Island, Alaska, north of Sitkalidak Strait. It is 97 km (60 mi) southwest of Kodiak. The Three Saints Bay Site is an archaeological site which was the location of the first Russian settlement in Alaska, Three Saints Harbor (Гавань Трех Святителей, Gavan’ Trekh Svyatitelyei). The settlement was founded in 1784 by Grigory Shelikhov, but the main settlement was moved to Pavlovskaya Gavan (Павловская гавань – Paul's Harbor), now the city of Kodiak, in 1792. The Three Saints Bay Site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1978. Show on map
Nowitna RiverThe Nowitna River is a 250-mile (400 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The river flows northeast from the Kuskokwim Mountains through Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge and enters the larger river 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Ruby and southwest of Tanana. Major tributaries include the Titna, Big Mud, Little Mud, Lost, and Sulatna rivers. Show on map
Pelican Seaplane BasePelican Seaplane Base (IATA: PEC, FAA LID: PEC) is a public-use seaplane base located in and owned by the City of Pelican, on Chichagof Island in the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. Scheduled airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Warm Springs BayIt receives its name from the eponymous hot springs. Partly because of this, many fishing boats often take shelter or rest in the bay during the fishing season from Chatham Strait. The City of Sitka maintains a public-use dock on the north side of the bay for all boats although there are no permanent slips. Show on map
Peard BayPeard Bay is a bay in the Chukchi Sea, in Alaska's North Slope. It is located at 70°50′43″N 158°48′39″W / 70.84528°N 158.81083°W. This bay lies just a few miles northeast of Wainwright. It was named by Frederick William Beechey in 1826, after one of his officers. Peard Bay is relatively small and it is limited by Point Franklin on its western side. Peard Bay Airport (WQJ) is close to the bay area. In some documents this bay is named erroneously as \"Pearl Bay\". Its correct name has always been \"Peard Bay\". Show on map
Amchitka PassAmchitka Pass is a strait in Alaska, United States. It is located in the Aleutian Islands, between the Rat Islands group to the west and the Delarof Islands to the east. Amchitka Pass has a least width of 50 miles and depths of 49 to over 1,000 fathoms. The islands on both sides of the pass should be cleared by at least 5 miles. Heavy tide rips have been observed off the E end of Amchitka Island. The pass is dangerous in heavy weather, particularly for small and medium craft; currents appear erratic in direction and velocities may be strong. This may account for reports of very large seas and strong tide rips. Show on map
Walker LakeWalker Lake is the source of the Kobuk River in northwestern Alaska (emptying into Kotzebue Sound). The lake is located near the easternmost part of Northwest Arctic Borough, deep in the remote interior of northern Alaska. Explored during an expedition led by John C. Cantwell in 1885, under the authority of the Revenue Marine. Also known as \"Big Fish Lake\", Inupiaq legend in the area told of giant, ferocious fish that inhabited the waters. An attempt by a native with the Cantwell expedition to catch one of these giant fish involved a hook made of an entire set of reindeer antlers baited with a whole goose. Show on map
Karluk RiverThe Karluk River is a stream, 24 miles (39 km) long, on Kodiak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins at Karluk Lake in the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge and flows north and then northwest through Karluk Lagoon to the Shelikof Strait at Karluk. Show on map
Imuruk LakeImuruk Lake is the largest body of fresh water in Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It measures 31 square miles and has a drainage basin of 102 square miles, It lies on top of a lava plateau at an elevation of 960 feet. The drainage basin is relatively flat, as the maximum elevation, it is only about 1,600 feet. A low gap in the divide between the lake and the head of the right fork of Goodhope River rises only a few feet above the lake. The Fairhaven Ditch takes practically all its water from the lake. Serpentine Hot Springs flow to the Serpentine River, 47 miles northwest of Imuruk Lake. Show on map
Tasakili RiverThe Tasakili River is a tributary of the Stikine River, flowing southeast out of the Boundary Ranges on the United States side of the range to join that river in Canada, just before the Stikine transits the Alaska-British Columbia border. Show on map
Vixen InletVixen Inlet is located within the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated 6.5 miles (10.5 km) north-northeast of Lemesurier Point, the south point at the entrance to Ernest Sound. The inlet has a small islet --Sunshine Island-- in the middle of its entrance, and a stream at its head. A reef is southward from the south side of Vixen Point. A reef, unmarked by kelp, lies in the middle of the entrance, about 1 mile (1.6 km) west-southwestward of Sunshine Island. There is deep water between it and the shore southward. A rock on each side near the entrance, and a rock inside of Sunshine Island, are recorded. Show on map
Yakutat BayYakutat Bay is a 29-km-wide (18 mi) bay in the U.S. state of Alaska, extending southwest from Disenchantment Bay to the Gulf of Alaska. \"Yakutat\" is a Tlingit name reported as \"Jacootat\" and \"Yacootat\" by Yuri Lisianski in 1805. Yakutat Bay was the epicenter of two major earthquakes on September 10, 1899, a magnitude 7.4 foreshock and a magnitude 8.0 main shock, 37 minutes apart. The Shelikhov-Golikov company, precursor of the Russian-American Company, under the management of Alexander Andreyevich Baranov, settled Yakutat Bay in 1795. It was known as New Russia, Yakutat Colony, or Slavorossiya. Show on map
Johns Hopkins GlacierJohns Hopkins Glacier is a 12-mile (19 km) long glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the east slopes of Lituya Mountain and Mount Salisbury, and trends east to the head of Johns Hopkins Inlet, 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of the terminus of Clark Glacier and 79 miles (127 km) northwest of Hoonah. It was named after Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland in 1893 by Harry Fielding Reid. It is one of the few advancing tidewater glaciers of the Fairweather Range. Access to the face of the glacier is limited to the Johns Hopkins Inlet. Show on map
Disenchantment BayDisenchantment Bay extends southwest for 16 km (10 mi) from the mouth of Russell Fiord to Point Latouche, at the head of Yakutat Bay in Alaska. Named \"Puerto del Desengano\", Spanish for \"bay of disenchantment\", by Alessandro Malaspina in 1792, upon finding that the bay was not the entrance to the legendary Northwest Passage. He sailed up the bay as far as Haenke Island, before discovering the passage blocked by ice. Show on map
Lynn CanalLynn Canal is an inlet (not an artificial canal) into the mainland of southeast Alaska. Lynn Canal runs about 90 miles (140 km) from the inlets of the Chilkat River south to Chatham Strait and Stephens Passage. At over 2,000 feet (610 m) in depth, Lynn Canal is the deepest fjord in North America (outside Greenland) and one of the deepest and longest in the world as well. The northern portion of the canal braids into the respective Chilkat, Chilkoot, and Taiya Inlets. Lynn Canal was explored by Joseph Whidbey in 1794 and named by George Vancouver for his birthplace, King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Show on map
Delta RiverThe Delta River is an 80-mile (130 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its name in the Ahtna language is Saas Na’ . Fed by the Tangle Lakes of the Alaska Range, the river flows north to meet the larger river near Big Delta. In 1980, 62 miles (100 km) of waterways in the Delta River basin, including all of the Tangle Lakes and the main stem to within 0.5 miles (0.8 km) of Black Rapids became part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Of this, 20 miles (32 km) are designated \"wild\", 24 miles (39 km) \"scenic\", and 18 miles (29 km) \"recreational\". Show on map
Innoko RiverThe Innoko River is a 500-mile (800 km) tributary of the Yukon River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows north from its origin south of Cloudy Mountain in the Kuskokwim Mountains and then southwest to meet the larger river across from Holy Cross. Most of its upper portion flows through the Innoko National Wildlife Refuge. The entire river is within the Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area. Innoko is a Deg Hit’an name for the river. The Russian colonial administrators also called the river Shiltonotno, Legon or Tlegon, Chagelyuk or Shageluk and Ittege at various times in the 19th century. Show on map
Chenega GlacierChenega Glacier is a tidewater glacier located in Prince William Sound and on the Kenai Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. Chenega Glacier was named in 1905 for Chenega Island and the nearby community of Chenega Bay. The glacier is a tourist attraction, drawing many kayakers and small cruise lines to Nassau Fjord where the glacier meets the ocean. Most individual expeditions to the glacier originate in the Prince William Sound community of Whittier. The Chenega Glacier finds its source in the Sargent Icefield. The glacier is the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway fast ferry M/V Chenega. Show on map
Gulkana GlacierGulkana Glacier is a glacier that flows from the ice fields of the south flank of the eastern Alaska Range. It is accessible by gravel roads from the Richardson Highway near mile post 197 at the Richardson Monument, just two miles north of Summit Lake and 12 miles north of Paxson and the junction with Denali Highway. Closer to the glacier, a suspension bridge allows pedestrians to cross over Phelan Creek. Wildlife includes moose and bears. The peak of a hill just southwest of Gulkana Glacier has a post labeled PEWE 1975. The Arctic Man competition takes place near Gulkana Glacier every spring. Show on map
Surveyor BaySurveyor Bay is a bay in Alaska in the United States. Surveyor Bay is located on the southeast coast of Unalaska Island, one of the Aleutian Islands. It lies on the west side of Cape Aiak, and is about four nautical miles (7.4 kilometers) wide and two nautical miles (3.7 km) deep at its head. Politically, the bay lies in Alaska's Aleutians West Census Area, a part of the Unorganized Borough. The bay was named for a survey ship of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Surveyor, which spent her career operating almost exclusively in the waters of the Territory of Alaska from 1919 to 1956. Show on map
Bremner RiverThe Bremner River is a 40-mile (64 km) tributary of the Copper River in the Valdez–Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was named for John Bremner, a prospector who sought gold along the river and was the first non-native person to go there. Flowing generally southwest from the Chugach Mountains, the Bremner River enters the Copper River 45 miles (72 km) north of Katalla. The North Fork of the Bremner has its headwaters at the Bremner Glacier, which is 8 miles (13 km) long. The entire course of the river lies within Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Show on map
Metlakatla Seaplane BaseMetlakatla Seaplane Base (IATA: MTM, ICAO: PAMM, FAA LID: MTM) is a state owned, public use seaplane base located in Metlakatla, a community on Annette Island in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 3,344 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 3,403 enplanements in 2009, and 4,140 in 2010. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a non-primary commercial service airport (between 2,500 and 10,000 enplanements per year). Show on map
Cozian ReefCozian Reef or Nikolas Rock is located just above the northern tip of Baranof Island in Peril Strait which is in the Panhandle of the U.S. state of Alaska. Cozian Reef is a prime maritime navigational hazard demonstrated by its alternative name, Nikolas Rock, which it received from sinking the Russian steamer Nikolas in 1854. More recently, Cozian Reef grounded the Alaska Marine Highway vessel M/V LeConte on May 10, 2004, which was only saved after an extensive salvage operation. Cozian Reef was named by the U.S. Navy after Anton George Cozian, a navigator with the Russian American Company. Show on map
Funter BayFunter Bay is a two-mile-long (3 km) bay on the western side of Admiralty Island near its northern tip, in the Alexander Archipelago of the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies within the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, in the Unorganized Borough of Alaska. Funter Bay was the site of a World War II internment camp for Aleuts relocated 1500 miles from their homes. It was \"the site of an abandoned cannery in which the St. Paul evacuees were housed. The St. George camp was across the bay at an old mine site.\". The injustices they suffered were the subject of the US Congress' Aleut Restitution Act of 1988. Show on map
Copper RiverThe Copper River or Ahtna River (/ɑːtˈnə/), Ahtna Athabascan ‘Atna’tuu ([ʔät.näʔ.tu]), \"river of the Ahtnas,\" Tlingit Eeḵhéeni ([iː.qʰhiː'.nɪ]), \"river of copper,\" is a 290-mile (470 km) river in south-central Alaska in the United States. It drains a large region of the Wrangell Mountains and Chugach Mountains into the Gulf of Alaska. It is known for its extensive delta ecosystem, as well as for its prolific runs of wild salmon, which are among the most highly prized stocks in the world. The river is the tenth largest in the United States, as ranked by average discharge volume at its mouth. Show on map
Kootznahoo InletKootznahoo Inlet is located on the eastern shore of Chatham Strait in the U.S. state of Alaska. Comprising an area of about 15 square miles (39 km2), it is an intricate group of narrow passages, lagoons, and bays, having its entrance 3 miles (4.8 km) north of Killisnoo. Kootznahoo, which means bear fortress, is also the name given by the Tlingit to mean Admiralty. The Kootznoowoo Wilderness also of the Admiralty Island covers some of the largest reserve areas covering about 1 million acres. The island is inhabited by about 1500 brown bears, the largest number recorded anywhere on the earth. Show on map
Lopp LagoonLopp Lagoon is a tidal lake NE of Cape Prince of Wales (the westernmost tip of the Seward Peninsula) in the U.S. state of Alaska. Many creeks empty into it, but the most water comes from the Mint River. Some salt water from the Pacific Ocean also enters the lagoon through several channels between it and the Bering Strait. It was named in 1900 for William Thomas Lopp, a missionary among the Inuit and the civilian leader of the 1897–98 Overland Relief Expedition. Historically, Lopp Lagoon has been an important source of food (salmon and waterfowl) for people living in the Wales, Alaska area. Show on map
Tustumena GlacierThe Tustumena Glacier is a glacier located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Tustumena Glacier begins in the Harding Icefield and makes its way down west for about 20 miles (32 km) until its terminus roughly 5 miles (8.0 km) before Tustumena Lake. The glacier is retreating due to global warming. A small lake called Arctic Lake sits alongside Tustumena Glacier, with its outflow underneath the ice. This lake periodically fills up and then drains as the glacier moves, leaving icebergs stranded in the sand. The Alaska Marine Highway ferry M/V Tustumena derives its name from this glacier. Show on map
Muldrow GlacierMuldrow Glacier, also known as McKinley Glacier, is a large glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier originates from the Great Icefall of Harper Glacier on the east side of Denali. The glacier moves generally eastwards, receiving Traleika Glacier and Brooks Glacier as tributaries, then turning north to emerge from the Alaska Range as the source of the McKinley River. Muldrow Glacier was named by Alfred Hulse Brooks in 1902 in honor of U.S. Geological Survey topographer Robert Muldrow. Native names include Henteel No' Loo' and Henteel No' Loot. Show on map
Tubutulik RiverThe Tubutulik River is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska. The 25-mile (40 km) long river is situated on the Seward Peninsula. It flows southeastwards to the Kwiniuk Inlet at the northwestern end of Norton Bay, 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Koyuk in the Bering Sea. Its Inuit name was reported as \"Tubuktulik\" in 1849 by Capt. Mikhail Dmitrievich Tebenkov of the Imperial Russian Navy. Exploration for placer gold occurred in the Council district area where the river valley is located, and in 1898, mining commenced. The production was substantial and ranked second only to that of Nome. Show on map
Baranof RiverBaranof River is a glacially-fed river on the eastern side of Baranof Island, in the Alexander Archipelago, in the Alaska Panhandle. The source of the river is the unnamed icefields surrounding Peak 5390. Baranof River feeds into Baranof Lake, and the outlet of Baranof Lake that feeds into Warm Springs Bay is also commonly referred to as Baranof River as well. The maximum discharge measured, taken at the outflow of Baranof Lake, is 4170 cubic feet/second, recorded in September 1922. Baranof River was named for Alexandr Baranov, the first governor of the Russian-American Company. Show on map
Windham BayWindham Bay is located 45 miles (72 km) southeast of Juneau, in the U.S. state of Alaska. Windham Bay is listed as site 6 within Southeast Alaska's Zone 3 of the Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation's Geographic Response Strategy oil spill response plan . Part of the bay is a protected wilderness area; the Chuck River Wilderness, established in 1990 by the United States Congress, covers an area of 74,506 acres (30,152 ha). The Chuck River flows into Windham Bay, which has a protected anchorage north of Port Houghton, where the historic Chuck Mining Camp once operated. Show on map
Stikine RiverThe Stikine River /stɪˈkiːn/ is a river, historically also the Stickeen River, approximately 610 km (379 mi) long, in northwestern British Columbia in Canada and in southeast Alaska in the United States. Show on map
Eldorado RiverEldorado River (alternate Eldorado Creek) is a waterway on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated 14 miles (23 km) west of Solomon. This river has its source within a few miles of Salmon Lake, from which it is separated by a low divide. It flows southeast through a broad gravel-filled valley for 30 miles (48 km) to Flambeau River before emptying into Safety Sound. Its headwaters reach the limestones of the Nome series and much of its course lies in a chlorite-albite-schist belt. The Eldorado River provides a southerly drainage into the Bering Sea. Show on map
English BayNanwalek, formerly Alexandrovsk (Russian: Александровск) and English Bay, is census-designated place (CDP) in the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States that contains a traditional Alutiiq village. The population was 177 at the 2000 census. There is one school located in the community, attended by 76 students. Subsistence activities are a large part of the culture for indigenous people and Nanwalek is no exception, especially when it comes to salmon and seal harvesting. The sale of alcohol is banned in the village, although importing and possession are allowed. Show on map
Eastern ChannelEastern Channel is a body of deep water adjacent to the southern half of Sitka, Alaska. It is the best suited of three channels for large ships to approach the harbor in Sitka. Because Sitka is a prime cruise ship destination, but has no deep water docks, the ships anchor in Eastern Channel and the passengers travel the last two miles to the coast via ferry. Eastern Channel leads most directly to Silver Bay, but also allows access to downtown Sitka. Eastern Channel is also the backdrop behind the stage at Harrigan Centennial Hall and the Sitka Summer Music Festival. Show on map
Norton BayNorton Bay is a waterway classified bay located on the northwestern part of the Norton Sound, on the Seward Peninsula in the Nome Census Area of the Bering Sea of the U.S. state of Alaska. The mouths of several rivers debouch at Norton Bay, including the Kwik, Kwiniuk, and Tubutulik rivers. The name Norton was assigned in 1859 by the Coast Survey. Norton Bay and Norton Sound were discovered as one entity by Captain James Cook in 1778, and named after Sir Fletcher Norton (who later became Lord Grantley), who was the speaker of the House of Commons of Great Britain. Show on map
Buckland RiverThe Buckland River (Kaniq in Inupiaq) is a stream, 67 miles (108 km) long, in the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows northwest to the Chukchi Sea at Eschscholtz Bay, 40 miles (64 km) southwest of Selawik in the Northwest Arctic Borough. Naval officer Frederick William Beechey named the river in 1826 for a geology professor at the University of Oxford in England. Other 19th-century names for the river included Russian translations of the Inuit as Kanyk and the Koyukon Indian as Kotsokhotana. Another translation of the Inuit was Kung-uk. Show on map
Swanson RiverThe Swanson River is a stream, 40 miles (64 km) long, on the Kenai Peninsula of south-central Alaska in the United States. Beginning at Gene Lake in the Swanson Lakes district, it flows southwest then north to Number Three Bay on the Gompertz Channel of Cook Inlet. The river's entire course lies within the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. In its lower reaches, it passes through the Swanson River Oil Field east of Nikiski before turning sharply north. Near its mouth, it flows through Captain Cook State Recreation Area and under North Kenai Road to enter Cook Inlet. Show on map
Matanuska GlacierMatanuska Glacier is a valley glacier in the US state of Alaska. At 27 miles (43 km) long by 4 miles (6.4 km) wide, it is the largest glacier accessible by car in the United States. Its terminus feeds the Matanuska River. It lies near the Glenn Highway about 100 miles (160 km) north-east of Anchorage. Matanuska Glacier flows about 1 foot (30 cm) per day. Due to ablation of the lower glacier, as of 2007, the location of the glacier terminus changed little over the previous three decades. The glacier is the eponym of the Alaska Marine Highway ferry M/V Matanuska. Show on map
Exit GlacierExit Glacier is a glacier derived from the Harding Icefield in the Kenai Mountains of Alaska and one of Kenai Fjords National Park's major attractions. It is one of the most accessible valley glaciers in Alaska and is a visible indicator of glacial recession due to anthropogenic climate change. Exit Glacier retreated approximately 187 feet from 2013 to 2014 and park scientists continue to monitor and record the glacier's accelerating recession. It received its name because it served as the exit for the first recorded crossing of the Harding Icefield in 1968. Show on map
Abyss LakeAbyss Lake is a lake in southeastern Alaska. Lying on the eastern side of the Brady Glacier, it receives meltwater from it, which in turn flows into the Dundas River, Dundas Bay, Cross Sound and thence into the Pacific. A part of the Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, its water is regularly blocked by an ice dam. When such a dam breaks in a glacial lake outburst flood, much of the lake's water is propelled into Dundas Bay, along with trees, ice chunks, and sediment. This has happened in 1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, and again in September 2006. Show on map
Stony RiverStony River (Gidighuyghatno’ Xidochagg Qay’ in Deg Xinag, K’qizaghetnu in Dena'ina) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 54 at the 2010 census. Native inhabitants are mixed Athabaskan and Yup'ik ancestry of Alaska Native. Stony River village is the modern contact point between Yu'pik Eskimo and three distinct Athabaskan peoples: Deg Hit'an, Dena'ina, and Upper Kuskokwim. Today there is considerable multilingualism in Stony River village between Yu'pik and three distinct Athabaskan languages. Show on map
Port Williams Seaplane BasePort Williams Seaplane Base (IATA: KPR, FAA LID: KPR) is a public use seaplane base located in Port Williams (also known as Port William), in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by Washington Fish & Oyster, which is now known as Ocean Beauty Seafoods. Port William is located on the southern tip of Shuyak Island, facing Afognak Island, about 45 miles north of Kodiak. Scheduled passenger service to Kodiak, Alaska, is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Indigo LakeIndigo Lake or simply Indigo is a lake lying ten miles southeast of central Sitka, on the western coast of Baranof Island in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska at 57°00′50″N 135°03′53″W / 57.01389°N 135.06472°W. The name was reported in 1954 by local Sitkan Robert N. DeArmond to the USGS and was so named because its intensely and mysteriously indigo blue color. The lake about eight tenths of a mile across and long (a circular shape) with very steep and cliffed walls. The southern ridge of Indigo Lake plays an important part in the trail to Peak 5390. Show on map
Eek RiverThe Eek River is a 108-mile (174 km) tributary of the Kuskokwim River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is south of the Kwethluk River and north of the Kanektok River, which also drain into the Kuskokwim or Kuskokwim Bay on the Bering Sea. Beginning at a small lake near Mount Oratia in the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, the Eek River flows generally northwest into the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge to meet the larger river near Eek Island in western Alaska. The Eek River supports large populations of pink salmon and Arctic char. Show on map
Douglas HarborDouglas Harbor (Inuit: Qanartalik) is a harbor off the coast of Douglas Island in Juneau, Alaska. The name was published by the United States Geological Survey in 1986 and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2001. In the 2002 regular election, Juneau-area voters approved the issue and sale of bonds totaling $15,000,000 for improving the borough's harbors, utilities, and parks systems. $7.1 million was allocated for the harbors, including Douglas. In January 2009, winter weather caused a boat in the harbor to sink. Show on map
Holitna RiverThe Holitna River is a 110-mile (180 km) tributary of the Kuskokwim River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Formed by the confluence of Shotgun Creek and the Kogrukluk River east of the Kuskokwim Mountains, the river flows generally northeast to meet the larger river near Sleetmute. Operation Holitna, a federal investigation into child pornography, was named after the river. The Holitna River has many tributaries, serving as a metaphor for the fact that each time the investigation makes an arrest, several new victims and leads are discovered. Show on map
Gulkana RiverThe Gulkana River is a 60-mile (97 km) tributary of the Copper River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning near the southeastern end of Summit Lake in the Alaska Range, the river flows generally south to meet the larger river 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Glennallen. The Richardson Highway and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline run north–south, nearby and roughly parallel to the Gulkana River. Slightly south of Summit Lake the river passes under the east–west Denali Highway near its junction with the Richardson Highway at Paxson. Show on map
Kiwalik RiverThe Kiwalik River is a stream on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. The headwaters of the river originate in the eastern portion of the peninsula, around Granite Mountain. The river flows north to its mouth at Kiwalik Lagoon, Chukchi Sea. The start of the 20th century mining town of Candle is found on its western bank at the confluence of Candle Creek. The ore minerals and materials found in the river basin are galena, gold, pyrite, scheelite, silver and sphalerite, and the primary commodities are tungsten, lead and zinc. Show on map
Stephens PassageStephens Passage is a channel in the Alexander Archipelago in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It runs between Admiralty Island to the west and the Alaska mainland and Douglas Island to the east, and is about 170 km (105 mi) long. Juneau, the capital of Alaska, is near the north end, on Gastineau Channel. Stephens Passage was named in 1794 by George Vancouver, probably for Sir Philip Stephens. It was first charted the same year by Joseph Whidbey, master of HMS Discovery during Vancouver's 1791-95 expedition. Show on map
Selawik RiverThe Selawik River is a stream, 140 miles (230 km) long, in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. Originating in the Purcell Mountains near the Zane Hills, it flows generally west through the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge to Selawik Lake, which empties into the Kotzebue Sound in the Chukchi Sea. The river is approximately at the latitude of the Arctic Circle. The village of Selawik is along the river near its mouth. The river is used for subsistence fishing by residents and for rafting and sport fishing by tourists. Show on map
Lake ClarkLake Clark is a lake in southern Alaska. It drains through Six Mile Lake and the Newhalen River into Iliamna Lake. The lake is about 64 km (40 mi) long and about 8 km (5.0 mi) wide. Lake Clark was named for John W. Clark, chief of the Nushagak trading post and the first American non-Native to see the lake, when an expedition financed by a weekly magazine reached it in February 1891. The Dena'ina Athabascan name is Qizjeh Vena which means \"place where people gather lake\". The lake is within Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. Show on map
Salcha RiverThe Salcha River is a 125-mile (201 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Rising in the eastern part of the Fairbanks North Star Borough east of Fort Wainwright, it flows generally west-southwest to meet the larger river at Aurora Lodge, 33 miles (53 km) southeast of Fairbanks. The Salcha drains an area of 2,170 square miles (5,620 km2), making it the second-largest tributary of the Tanana. The Trans-Alaska Pipeline crosses under the Salcha approximately 12 miles (19 km) east of the mouth of the river. Show on map
Icy BayIcy Bay is a body of water in southeast Alaska, formed in the last 100 years by the rapid retreat of the Guyot, Yahtse, and Tyndall Glaciers. It is part of the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness. At the beginning of the 20th century, the bay entrance was permanently blocked by a giant tidewater glacier face that calved icebergs directly into the Gulf of Alaska. A century-long glacial retreat has opened a multi-armed bay more than 30 miles long. Icy Bay is popular destination for sea kayakers, and is reachable by bush plane from Yakutat. Show on map
Zipper CreekZipper Creek is a river in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Located 19 miles (31 km) northeast of the city of Juneau, its origin is in the Brassiere Hills. It flows southward past Taku Glacier and ends at the head of Taku Inlet. The stream's name was reported by David A. Brew and Arthur B. Ford of the United States Geological Survey in 1965; it was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Nancy Bartley of The Seattle Times attributes the naming to photographer Austin Post. Show on map
Revillagigedo ChannelRevillagigedo Channel is an ocean channel in the Alexander Archipelago of the U.S. state of Alaska. Extending 56 km (35 mi) northwest from the Dixon Entrance, it lies between the mainland to the east, Revillagigedo Island to the north, and Duke Island and Annette Island to the southwest. It is part of the Inside Passage to Ketchikan. The channel was named for Juan Vicente de Güemes, 2nd Count of Revillagigedo, viceroy of New Spain, in 1793. The Tree Point Light is an important aid-to-navigation in Revillagigedo Channel. Show on map
Cross SoundCross Sound is a passage in the Alexander Archipelago in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Alaska, located between Chichagof Island to its south and the mainland to its north. It is 48 km (30 mi) long and extends from the Gulf of Alaska to Icy Strait. Cross Sound was named by James Cook in 1778 because he found it on May 3, designated on his calendar as Holy Cross day. The Cape Spencer Light marks the north side of the entrance to the sound from Gulf of Alaska. Dicks Arm is an inlet on northern Cross Sound. Show on map
Kachemak BayKachemak Bay is a 40-mi-long (64 km) arm of Cook Inlet in the U.S. state of Alaska, located on the southwest side of the Kenai Peninsula. The communities of Homer, Halibut Cove, Seldovia, Nanwalek, Port Graham, and Kachemak City are on the bay as well as three Old Believer settlements in the Fox River area, Voznesenka, Kachemak Selo, and Razdolna. One interpretation of the word \"Kachemak\" is \"Smokey Bay\" which supposedly is from an Aleut word describing the smoldering coal seams that used to fill the bay with smoke. Show on map
Kukpowruk RiverThe Kukpowruk River is a stream, 160 miles (260 km) long, in the western North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It arises in the De Long Mountains of the western Brooks Range and flows north into Kasegaluk Lagoon of the Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean. The river mouth is about 9 miles (14 km) south of Point Lay. Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is the major landowner along the river. The Inuit name for the river probably means \"fairly large stream\" or \"a stream.\" A late 19th-century variant was \"Kook Pow ruk.\" Show on map
Eschscholtz BayEschscholtz Bay is an arm of Kotzebue Sound, on the Chukchi Sea-facing coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is only eleven miles wide. It is located on the northern coast of the Seward Peninsula, 45 miles southwest of Selawik, Kotzebue-Kobuk Low. Eschscholtz Bay was discovered and named in 1816 by Lt. Otto von Kotzebue after his ship's physician, Dr. Johann Friedrich von Eschscholtz. The Inuit name of this bay has not been reported, but it was a traditional beluga hunting ground for the local people of the area. Show on map
King Salmon RiverThe King Salmon River is a small stream on the northern tip of Admiralty Island of Southeast Alaska, United States. It flows eastward then south for a total distance of 11 miles (18 km) from headwaters in the low mountains just south of Eagle Peak into King Salmon Bay of the Seymour Canal. Its entire course lies within Kootznoowoo Wilderness of the Admiralty Island National Monument. A relatively small river, it is not navigable. Besides its namesake king salmon, the river hosts a large annual run of pink salmon. Show on map
Kahiltna GlacierKahiltna Glacier is the longest glacier of the Alaska Range in the U.S. state of Alaska. It starts on the southwest slope of Denali near Kahiltna Pass (elevation 10,320 ft (3,150 m)). Its main channel runs almost due south between Mount Foraker to the west and Mount Hunter to the east. The name was first reported as \"Car-ilt-nu Glacier\" by Alaska Range explorer Lt. J.S. Herron in 1902. An alternate name is Kagheltnu Li'a. Kahiltna Glacier is the longest glacier in the Alaska Range at 44 miles (71 km) in length. Show on map
Tlikakila RiverThe Tlikakila River (Dena'ina Athabascan Łiq'a Qilanhtnu, literally \"salmon-are-there river\") is a stream, 51 miles (82 km) long, in the U.S. state of Alaska. The river, lying entirely within Lake Clark National Park, flows southwest from Summit Lake in the Chigmit Mountains of the Aleutian Range to Lake Clark. The Tlikakila is one of three national \"wild rivers\" in Lake Clark National Park. The other two are the Mulchatna and the Chilikadrotna, all added in 1980 to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Show on map
Sitka Seaplane BaseSitka Seaplane Base (FAA LID: A29) is a public use seaplane base owned by and located in Sitka, a city and borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. This seaplane base is located near the Sitka Rocky Gutierrez Airport. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 32 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 22 enplanements in 2009, and 41 in 2010. Show on map
Cosna RiverThe Cosna River is a 44-mile (71 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the central part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows northward from the Bitzshtini Mountains into the Tanana west (downstream) of Manley Hot Springs. In 1899, Lieutenant J. S. Herron attributed the name to the Tanana peoples living in the area. However, a century later linguist William Bright, citing the Koyukon Athabascan Dictionary, attributed the name to the Koyukon words kk' os, schist rock, combined with no', river. Show on map
Dull Ax LakeDull Ax Lake is a lake in the Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area of Alaska. It is located on the western border of Denali National Park and Preserve. The lake drains to the northwest, in Dry Creek. It is 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Carey Lake and 39 miles (63 km) south-southwest of the census-designated place of Lake Minchumina. The name was collected from \"Val\" Blackburn and Fabian Carey by the United States Geological Survey in 1962, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Sheenjek RiverThe Sheenjek River is a 200-mile (320 km) tributary of the Porcupine River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins in the eastern part of the Brooks Range and flows southward to meet the larger river northeast of Fort Yukon. Its name derives from the Gwich'in word \"khiinjik,\" meaning \"dog-salmon river\".\" Explorer J.H. Turner called it the Salmon River. In the United States, the geographic location most remote from human trails, roads, or settlements is found here, at the headwaters of the Sheenjek River. Show on map
Klokerblok RiverKlokerblok River is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska, near Nome. This river rises a few miles from the coast, north of Cape Topkok. It flows in an easterly direction, and joins Fish River in its delta mouth. Front the upper end of Golofnin Sound, a broad depression extends inland, which includes the lower parts of the valleys of Fish, Klokerblok, and Niukluk Rivers. Except for a 50 feet (15 m) gravel terrace on the western side of Golofnin, there are few, if any, terraces or benches in this area. Show on map
Sagavanirktok RiverThe Sagavanirktok River or Sag River is a stream in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is about 180 miles (290 km) long and originates on the north slope of the Brooks Range, flowing north to the Beaufort Sea near Prudhoe Bay. The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System and Dalton Highway roughly parallel it from Atigun Pass to Deadhorse. Also, a glaciation happened approximately at the same time as the Illinoian Stage of central North America at the Sagavanirktok River. Show on map
Utukok RiverThe Utukok River is a 225-mile (362 km) long stream in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It rises in the De Long Mountains at the confluence of Kogruk and Tupik creeks and flows north, northeast, and then northwest. It empties into Kasegaluk Lagoon on the Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean, 20 miles (32 km) southwest of Icy Cape. Utoqaq, meaning old or ancient, is the Inuit name for Icy Cape. Variant names used for the river in the 19th century included \"Utukak\" and \"Ootokok\". Show on map
Iditarod RiverThe Iditarod River is a 325-mile (523 km) tributary of the Innoko River in the U.S. state of Alaska. The river begins north of Chuathbaluk and the Russian Mountains and flows northeast and then west to meet the larger river near Holikachuk. Iditarod is an Anglicization of the Deg Hit’an (Athabascan) name for the river, Haiditirod or Haidilatna, which is probably an English version of the name of a village on the river, that may have corresponded with the village called Iditarod in the 1900s. Show on map
Chuitna RiverThe Chuitna River, sometimes called the Chuit, emerges from a broad expanse of forest and wetlands west of Anchorage and drains into Cook Inlet. The river and its tributaries support all five species of Pacific salmon, Dolly Varden and trout, and the region is home to abundant wildlife, including moose, wolves, and bears. The area attracts sports fishing and hunting enthusiasts, and supports subsistence hunting and fishing activities. River fish stocks enhance Cook Inlet salmon populations. Show on map
Kitoi Bay Seaplane BaseKitoi Bay Seaplane Base (IATA: KKB, FAA LID: KKB) is a public use seaplane base owned by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and located in Kitoi Bay, in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Scheduled passenger service to Kodiak, Alaska, is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Kivalina RiverThe Kivalina River is a 60-mile-long (97 km) river in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska, flowing into Kivalina Lagoon in the Northwest Arctic Borough. It begins in the De Long Mountains and flows southwest 60 miles (97 km) through Kivalina Lagoon to the Chukchi Sea. Its Inuit name was spelled \"Kuveleek\" by Lieutenant G. M. Stoney, United States Navy, in 1885, and its present spelling was adopted in 1904. The village of Kivalina is located on a reef at the mouth of the river. Show on map
Wulik RiverThe Wulik River is a stream, about 80 miles (130 km) long, in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. Originating in the De Long Mountains in the North Slope Borough, it flows southwest to Kivalina Lagoon in the Chukchi Sea, east of Kivalina Umiak Bend, along the river and 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Kivalina, was named after an Inuit skin boat (umiak) was destroyed there by rough water. In 1886, a United States Navy lieutenant reported the Inuit name of this river as \"Woleek.\" Show on map
Kanikula GlacierKanikula Glacier., also known as Little Tokositna Glacier, is an 11-mile (18 km) long glacier in the Alaska Range of Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier originates in a series of glacial amphitheaters in the south side of the range, moving southeast past Mount Goldie and ending before the valley of Tokositna Glacier. Variant forms and spellings of the name include K'enik'ela Li'a, Kahnicula Glacier, Kanicula Glacier and Little Tokasitna Glacier. Show on map
Meares GlacierThe Meares Glacier is a large and only tidewater glacier at the head of Unakwik Inlet in Chugach National Forest, Alaska. The glacier is one of the many in Prince William Sound, and is about 79.6 miles (128 km) east of Anchorage. The glacier is named for eighteenth century British naval captain John Meares. The face of the glacier is one mile (1.6 km) wide where it calves into the inlet. The glacier is sometimes visited by cruises from Valdez. Meares Glacier is currently advancing. Panoramic view of the glacier Show on map
Shishmaref InletThe Shishmaref Inlet is a coastal lagoon on the Chukchi Sea-facing shores of Alaska. It is 5 miles in length. The location of the Shishmaref Inlet is SW 17 mi. to the SW from Sarichef Island, at the mouth of the Serpentine River, Kotzebue-Kobuk Low. This lagoon was named Shishmaref Bay in 1816 by explorer Lt. Otto von Kotzebue, of the Imperial Russian Navy, after Capt. Lt. Gleb Shishmaryov who accompanied him on his exploration. The Inuit name of this lagoon has not been reported. Show on map
Egegik BayEgegik Bay (Central Alaskan Yup'ik: Igyagiim painga) is a bay located just 69.1 miles from Dillingham in Alaska and the northeastern arm of the Bristol Bay. The Egegik (Igyagiiq in Yup'ik) village is located on a high bluff along the southern shore of the Egegik River at the upper extent of Egegik Bay. The nearest places to Egegik Bay are Coffee Point (3 km north), Coffee Point (4 km north), Goose Point (4 km north), Egegik Airport (5 km west), and Bartletts Airport (6 km north). Show on map
Kuk RiverThe Kuk River is a 35-mile (56 km) long stream in the North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It heads at the confluence of the Avalik and Kaolak rivers and flows north to Wainwright Inlet, 6 miles (10 km) southeast of Wainwright. The inlet links to the Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Kuk means river in Inuit. Nineteenth century maps variously listed streams entering the Wainwright Inlet as \"Koh\", \"Kong\", \"Tutua Wing\", \"Ku\", \"Kook\", \"Koo\", and \"Kee\". Show on map
Chichagof HarborChichagof Harbor is an inlet on the northeast coast of the island of Attu in the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. It is named after Russian Admiral and polar explorer Vasily Chichagov.It is the location of the Aleut village served by an American pastor and his wife. It was also where some heavy fighting took place during the recapture of the island from the Japanese during the Battle of Attu in World War II and afterward was the site of Battery B 42nd Coast Artillery Battalion. Show on map
Koyuk RiverThe Koyuk River (also spelled, Kuyuk) is a river on the Seward Peninsula of western Alaska, in the United States. The river originates in the interior of the peninsula, at the Lost Jim Lava Flow of the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, where it flows southeast towards the mouth of Norton Bay on Norton Sound. The native village of Koyuk is located at its mouth. The two major tributaries are the Peace and Salmon rivers; other tributaries include Dime and Sweepstakes. Show on map
Eldridge GlacierEldridge Glacier is a major glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The 30-mile (48 km) long glacier originates on the east side of Explorers Peak, flowing northeast to a basin below Mount Eldridge, gathering flow from several glaciated cirques, then flowing southeast to the valley of the Chulitna River, where it gives rise to the Fountain River. A large unnamed tributary glacier joins Eldridge Glacier a few miles above its terminus. Show on map
Moose CreekMoose Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairbanks North Star Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 747. It is part of the 'Fairbanks, Alaska Metropolitan Statistical Area'. Moose Creek is located south of Fairbanks, Alaska along the Richardson Highway. Moose Creek is bordered by Eielson Air Force Base to the south, the Tanana River to the west, and the Chena River Flood Control Project to the north. Show on map
Chilikadrotna RiverThe Chilikadrotna River is a 55-mile (89 km) tributary of the Mulchatna River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve in northern Lake and Peninsula Borough and flows westward into the larger river 46 miles (74 km) northwest of Nondalton. In 1980, the upper 11 miles (18 km) of the river became part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. This segment, rated \"wild\", lies within the national park. Show on map
Pearse CanalPearse Canal is a channel or strait forming part of the Canada–United States border at the southern end of the Alaska Panhandle and adjacent to the mouth of Portland Inlet. It is on the northwest side of Wales and Pearse Islands, which are in British Columbia, Canada, and forms part of the southwestern edge of Misty Fjords National Monument in Alaska, United States. The southwest entrance to the strait is between Phipp Point and Maie Point, both in Alaska. Show on map
Ninemile CreekNinemile Creek is a river on Douglas Island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Its origin is in hills to the southeast and it flows northwest to Gastineau Channel near West Juneau. It is 1.2 miles (1.9 km) east of Entrance Point and 6.4 miles (10.3 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was supplied by the United States Geological Survey in 1962 and it was entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Tsirku GlacierThe Tsirku Glacier is a large icefield in the Saint Elias Mountains, spanning the border between British Columbia and Alaska, to the south of the Jarvis Glacier. It is the source of the Tsirku River, which flows northwest to become the second-largest tributary of the Chilkat River. GNIS gives its head at 59°17′00″N 136°47′00″W / 59.28333°N 136.78333°W and describes it as flowing across the Canada–US border one mile west of the head of the Tsirku River. Show on map
Naknek RiverNaknek River is a stream, 35 miles (56 km) long, in the Bristol Bay Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows west from Naknek Lake to empty into Kvichak Bay, an arm of Bristol Bay. The river and lake are both known for their sockeye and other salmon. The village of King Salmon is near the head of the river; Naknek and South Naknek lie at its mouth, on the north and south banks respectively. The head lies within Katmai National Park and Preserve. Show on map
Chitina RiverThe Chitina River (/tʃɪtˈ.nʌ/ or /tʃɪ.tiːˈ.nʌ/; Ahtna Athabascan Tsedi Na’ [tʃɛ.diː.näʔ] < tsedi \"copper\" + na’ \"river\") is a 112-mile (180 km) tributary of the Copper River in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins in the Saint Elias Mountains at the base of Chitana Glacier and flows generally northwest through the Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve to meet the larger river near Chitina. The watershed was once a major copper mining region. Show on map
Freshwater BayFreshwater Bay (previously, Novaia and New harbor) is an inlet in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated on the eastern shore of Chichagof Island, Chatham Strait, in the Alexander Archipelago. Overlying rocks of cherty limestones of Silurian age stand nearly vertically and are over 1,000 feet (300 m) thick. On the northeast side of the bay, a thick series of melaphyre lava flows and tuffs are interstratified with limestone of Upper Devonian age. Show on map
Lamplugh GlacierLamplugh Glacier is an 8-mile-long (13 km) glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It leads north to its 1961 terminus in Johns Hopkins Inlet, 1.4 miles (2.3 km) west of Ptarmigan Creek and 76 miles (122 km) northwest of Hoonah. The glacier was named by Lawrence Martin of the U.S. Geological Survey around 1912 for English geologist George William Lamplugh (1859–1926), who visited Glacier Bay in 1884. Show on map
Nichin Cove Bay Seaplane BaseNaukati Bay Seaplane Base, formerly known as Nichin Cove Seaplane Base (IATA: NKI, FAA LID: AK62), is a public use seaplane base located at Nichin Cove on the east side of Tuxekan Island, in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area (formerly Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area) of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the Naukati Bay Community and located 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Naukati Bay which is on Prince of Wales Island. Show on map
Sitka SoundSitka Sound is a body of water near the city of Sitka, Alaska. It is bordered by Baranof Island to the south and the northeast, by Kruzof Island to the northwest and by the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. During the early 19th century it was a major locus of the Maritime Fur Trade. Show on map
Speel RiverThe Speel River is a river in the southeastern portion of the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska. It begins at Speel Glacier and flows for 18 kilometres (11 mi) before entering Port Snettisham. It has a drainage area of 226 miles (363.71 km), typically steep and wooded terrain. A pulp mill operated along the Speel River during the 1920s, which produced 40 tons of pulp per day. The Speel Dam was proposed on the river in the 1950s and 1960s. Show on map
Tongass NarrowsTongass Narrows is a Y-shaped channel, part of Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage. The waterway forms part of the Alaska Marine Highway and as such, is used by charter, commercial fishing, and recreational vessels, as well as commercial freight barges and tanks, kayaks and passenger ferries. A proposal to build the Gravina Island Bridge across the Tongass Narrows was shelved due to a national-level controversy over the \"bridge to nowhere\". Show on map
Chatham StraitChatham Strait, or Shee ya xhaak in the Tlingit language, is a narrow passage of the Alexander Archipelago in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It separates Chichagof Island and Baranof Island to its west from Admiralty Island and Kuiu Island on its east. It is 150 miles (240 km) long and extends southward from the junction of Icy Strait and Lynn Canal to the open sea. The strait is deep and 5–16 km (3–10 miles) wide. Show on map
Columbia GlacierThe Columbia Glacier, a glacier in Prince William Sound on the south coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, is one of the fastest moving glaciers in the world, and has been retreating since the early 1980s. It was named after Columbia University, one of several glaciers in the area named for elite U.S. colleges by the Harriman Alaska Expedition in 1899. The Alaska Marine Highway vessel M/V Columbia is named after the Columbia Glacier. Show on map
Grewingk GlacierGrewingk Glacier is a 13-mile-long (21 km) glacier located in the Kenai Mountains, near Kachemak Bay, in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins at 59°34′51″N 150°57′01″W / 59.58083°N 150.95028°W and trends northwest to 59°36′11″N 151°07′39″W / 59.60306°N 151.12750°W, 15 miles (24 km) east-southeast of Homer. It was named in 1880 by W. H. Dall of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for the Baltic German geologist Constantin Grewingk. Show on map
Eastern PassageEastern Passage is a channel in Southeast Alaska, U.S.A. It extends southeast 29 kilometres (18 mi) from the mouth of the Stikine River to The Narrows, separating the northeastern half of Wrangell Island from the mainland. It was named in 1877 by William Healy Dall of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. It was first traversed and charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition. Show on map
Ernest SoundErnest Sound is a strait in Southeast Alaska, U.S.A. It extends 48 kilometres (30 mi) southwest, from the mouth of Bradfield Canal to Clarence Strait, separating Wrangell and Etolin Islands from the mainland. It was first traversed and charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition. Vancouver later named it \"Prince Ernest's Sound\", after the later Ernest Augustus I of Hanover. Show on map
Guyot GlacierGuyot Glacier is a 34-mile (55 km) long and 8-mile (13 km) wide glacier located in the east end of the Robinson Mountains in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins 5.6 mi (9.0 km) north of Yaga Peak and heads east-southeast to Icy Bay, south of the Guyot Hills and 73 miles (117 km) northwest of Yakutat. It borders Yahtse Glacier on the northeast. The glacier was named by the New York Times expedition of 1886 for Arnold Henry Guyot. Show on map
Harper GlacierHarper Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier originates on Denali at more than 19,000 feet (5,800 m) between Denali's North Peak and South Peak, falling to the northeast between the Karsten Ridge and the Taylor Spur. From about 12,000 feet (3,700 m) it falls between Pioneer Ridge and Karpe Ridge in the Great Icefall down to the Lower Icefall to become Muldrow Glacier. Show on map
Lake Brooks Seaplane BaseLake Brooks Seaplane Base (IATA: BKF, FAA LID: 5Z9) is a public-use seaplane base located near Brooks Camp in Katmai National Park, in the Lake and Peninsula Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is owned by the U.S. Department of the Interior. As per Federal Aviation Administration records, this airport had 4,295 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2007, an increase of 86% from the 2,304 enplanements in 2006. Show on map
Auke LakeAuke Lake (Áak'w in Tlingit, literally 'little lake') is a 160-acre (0.65 km2) lake located in Auke Bay in Juneau, Alaska. Dolly Varden, cutthroat, steelhead and four varieties of salmon all live in Auke Lake. The views of Mt. McGinnis and the Towers from the Glacier Hwy side of Auke Lake are one of the most photographed in Juneau and Alaska. Other claims to fame include the flamingo house and the Auke Lake Curling Club. Show on map
Yahtse GlacierYahtse Glacier is a 40-mile-long (64 km) glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the southeast slope of Mount Miller and trends southeast along the north border of Guyot Glacier to Icy Bay, just east of Guyot Hills and 70 miles (113 km) northwest of Yakutat. The western extent is an icefield. The name derives from the Yahtse River and was adopted after the retreat of Guyot Glacier resulted in a separate branch. Show on map
Nigu RiverThe Nigu River is a 70-mile (110 km) tributary of the Etivluk River in the U.S. state of Alaska. Arising on the north slope of the Brooks Range just west of Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, the Nigu flows generally northwest to meet the Etivluk about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Howard Pass. The Nigu flows through some of the most remote locations in northern Alaska for its entire length. Show on map
Harvard GlacierThe Harvard Glacier is a large tidewater glacier in the Alaska's Prince William Sound. The glacier has a 1.5-mile (2 km) wide face where it calves into the College Fjord. It is 300 ft thick and covers 120,000 acres of Chugach National Forest. The Harvard Glacier is the second largest glacier in the Prince William Sound, after the Columbia Glacier. It is a popular destination of cruise ships in the Prince William Sound. Show on map
Kanektok RiverThe Kanektok River is a 75-mile (121 km) stream in southwestern Alaska in the United States. Beginning in the Ahklun Mountains at Kagati and Pegati lakes, it flows westward into Kuskokwim Bay on the Bering Sea at the city of Quinhagak. Almost all of the river's course lies within the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. The Quinhagak Village Corporation owns the land bordering the lowermost 17 miles (27 km) of the river. Show on map
Vitus LakeVitus Lake is a lake in Alaska. It is 23 km (14 mi) long and 9 km (5.5 mi) wide. It is named for Vitus Bering, leader of the 1741 expedition to Alaska. Vitus Lake forms the southern limit of the Bering Lobe, outlets via the Seal River to the Gulf of Alaska. It is also allegedly home to Vittie, a cryptid and local legend. The name Vittie is a derivation of the name Nessie, the cryptid allegedly living in Loch Ness. Show on map
Hotham InletHotham Inlet is an arm of Kotzebue Sound on the northwestern coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is 50 miles (80 km) long and 5–20 miles (8–32 km) wide. The inlet is the outlet of the Kobuk and Selawik Rivers and it is bounded on the southwest by the Baldwin Peninsula. This inlet was named in 1826 by Royal Navy Captain Frederick William Beechey after Sir Henry Hotham, one of the lords of the British Admiralty. Show on map
Snow RiverThe Snow River is a 28-mile (45 km) tributary of Kenai Lake in the U.S. state of Alaska. Beginning in the Chugach Mountains of the Kenai Peninsula, it flows southwest through Chugach National Forest to near Primrose at the southern inlet of the lake. The river mouth is about 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Seward. Along its final reaches, the river intersects the Iditarod Trail and passes under the Seward Highway. Show on map
Goodhope BayGoodhope Bay is a small bay in the Kotzebue Sound, on the Chukchi Sea-facing coast of Alaska. Its size is only 16 mi. across. It is located on the northern coast of the Seward Peninsula, 30 mi. W of Deering; Kotzebue-Kobuk Low . Lieutenant Otto von Kotzebue named the area while exploring the region in August 1816, as he had had \"good hope\" in making important geographic discoveries. Show on map
Baranof LakeBaranof Lake is a glacially-fed, horseshoe-shaped lake on the eastern side of Baranof Island, in Alaska. Baranof Lake borders the community of Baranof Warm Springs and also has a Forest Service cabin on the northwestern end of the lake. Baranof River flows into the lake's western end and exits on the eastern end in rapids and a waterfall. Baranof Lake was likely named for the community of Baranof Warm Springs. Show on map
Kiska HarborKiska Harbor is an inlet on the east coast of the island of Kiska in the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. Kiska Harbor is bounded by North Head on the north and by South Head on the south. Little Kiska Island lies off the coast of Kiska Island immediately east of Kiska Harbor. During their occupation of Kiska Island from June 1942 to July 1943 during World War II, the Japanese used Kiska Harbor as a naval base. Show on map
Tokositna GlacierTokositna Glacier is a glacier in the Alaska Range of Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier originates in two major arms on the east side of Mount Hunter, moving east until the main arms join, then turning south. Tokositna Glacier is the source of the Tokositna River. Spelling variants and alternate names include Tokasitna Glacier, TokichitnaGlacier and Tuqashitnu Li'a. Show on map
Chichagof PassChichagof Pass is a strait separating Woronkofski and Etolin Islands. The strait is shown in an 1844 Russian chart, but the name was first published in 1853 on a Russian Hydrographic Department chart as \"Proliv Chichagova\" (English: Chichagov Strait). Lieutenant Commander H. E. Nichols, USN, published the present name in the 1891 Coast Pilot; the original name was probably given for the ship Chichagov. Show on map
Bacon GlacierBacon Glacier is a glacier in Juneau City and Borough, Alaska, US, close to the Canada–United States border. It drains into Bacon Creek. The glacier has an elevation of 2,611 feet (796 m), and is located at 58°39′00″N 133°48′29″W / 58.650°N 133.808°W. Like many other place names in Alaska, Bacon Glacier also reflects the importance of food to the early prospectors and miners who came up with many of those names. Show on map
Seymour CanalSeymour Canal is an inlet penetrating deep into the southeastern part of Admiralty Island, Southeast Alaska, United States. The inlet was first charted in 1794 by Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during George Vancouver's 1791–95 expedition. Vancouver later named it \"Seymour's Channel\". Two large islands are located within it: Swan Island to the north, and Tiedeman Island just to its south. Show on map
Riggs GlacierRiggs Glacier is a glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the southern slope of the Takhinsha Mountains, 6 km (4 mi) southeast of Mount Harris and flows south-southeast to the head of Muir Inlet, 69 km (43 mi) southwest of Skagway. It was named by the American Geographical Society in 1947 for Thomas Riggs, Jr., Governor of Alaska from 1918 to 1921. Show on map
Aialik GlacierThe Aialik Glacier is a glacier in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of Alaska. It drains into Aialik Bay. Part of Kenai Fjords National Park, it (along with many other glaciers) drains the Harding Icefield. Aialik Glacier, a little over 15 miles from Seward, is the largest glacier in Aialik Bay, located in Kenai Fjords National Park. While fairly stable, the glacier calves most actively in May and June. Show on map
River LetheRiver Lethe is located 18 km (12 mi) west of Mount Katmai, Alaska Peninsula, and is the middle branch of the Ukak River. It flows through the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and meets the Ukak at 58°23′44″N 155°24′00″W / 58.39556°N 155.40000°W. The river was named in 1917 by R. F. Griggs, National Geographic Society; inspired by Lethe, the \"river of forgetfulness\" in the Hades of Greek mythology. Show on map
Imuruk BasinThe Imuruk Basin is a large interior body of water on western Alaska's Seward Peninsula. The drainage for this brackish saltwater lagoon covers about one quarter of the peninsula. The Kuzitrin, Pilgrim, Cobblestone and Agiapuk rivers empty into the Imuruk Basin. The basin was a strategic waterway for early Iñupiat by providing accessibility to the Bering Sea from the Seward Peninsula's interior. Show on map
Kugruk RiverThe Kugruk River is a stream, 60 miles (97 km) long, in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the largest tributary of the Kuzitrin River. It begins near Imuruk Lake on the Seward Peninsula and flows generally north to Kugruk Lagoon, at Kotzebue Sound on the Chukchi Sea. The river enters the lagoon 5.5 miles (8.9 km) southeast of Cape Deceit in the Northwest Arctic Borough. Show on map
Kukpuk RiverThe Kukpuk River is a stream, about 125 miles (201 km) long, in the western North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows generally west from the De Long Mountains across the Lisburne Peninsula to Marryat Inlet on the Chukchi Sea. The river mouth is about 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Point Hope. The Inuit name \"Kukpak\" means \"big river\". A late 19th-century variant was \"Kookpuk\". Show on map
Dartmouth GlacierThe Dartmouth Glacier is a 3.4-mile (5.5 km)-long glacier in the U.S. state of Alaska. It heads southwest of Mount Castner in the Chugach Mountains and trends southwest to its terminus at the head of the Coghill River, 47 miles (76 km) west of Valdez. The name was reported in 1908 by Grant and Higgins (1910, pl. 2), USGS. It is presumably named for Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Show on map
Brooks GlacierBrooks Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier originates on the east face of Mount Silverthrone at Brooks Gap. The 9-mile (14 km) glacier moves northeast, joining Muldrow Glacier between Mount Brooks and Ragged Peak. Brooks Glacier was named by T.G. Gerdine of the U.S. Geological Survey circa 1900 for geologist Alfred Hulse Brooks. Show on map
Thomas BayThomas Bay is located in southeast Alaska. It lies northeast of Petersburg, Alaska and the Baird Glacier drains into the bay. Thomas Bay is also known as \"The Bay of Death\" due to a massive landslide in 1750. It also has gained the name of \"Devil's Country\" when in 1900 several people claimed to have seen devil creatures in the area. The bay is named for U.S. Navy officer Charles M. Thomas. Show on map
Zimovia StraitZimovia Strait is a narrow strait in the Alexander Archipelago in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is about 100 km (60 mi) long and bounded by Wrangell Island to the east and Woronkofski and Etolin Islands to the west. The strait is shown in an 1844 Russian chart, but the name was first published in 1853 on a Russian Hydrographic Department chart as \"Proliv Zimov'ya\" (English: Winter Strait). Show on map
Iniakuk LakeIniakuk Lake is located on the southern edge of the Brooks Range, 50 miles west of Bettles, Alaska. The lake is one mile wide and just over 5 miles long. It has a maximum depth of 63 meters or 200 feet. It is 6 miles outside Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and 60 miles north of the Arctic Circle. This lake drains into the Iniakuk River from which the lake received its name. Show on map
Berners BayBerners Bay (Daxanaak) is a waterway in the U.S. state of Alaska, approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of Juneau. It is a large and deep indentation, about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) wide at the entrance, which is formed by Point Bridget and Point St. Marys. It runs in a north-northwest direction for 6 miles (9.7 km) from Point Bridget, with a width of 3 miles (4.8 km) opposite Point St. Marys. The bay is surrounded by Tongass National Forest. Show on map
Fairweather GlacierFairweather Glacier is a 19-mile-long (31 km) glacier in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It begins on the west slope of Mount Salisbury and continues west to its 1961 terminus 0.2 miles (300 m) east of Cape Fairweather, 100 miles (161 km) northwest of Hoonah. Fairweather Glacier is the namesake of the Alaska Marine Highway fast ferry M/V Fairweather. Show on map
Baird InletBaird Inlet (Nanvaruk in Yup'ik, literally: ‘big lake’) is a 35-mile-long (56 km) bay in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in the U.S. state of Alaska. It borders Nelson Island and is drained primarily by the Ninglick and Kolavinarak Rivers. Ivan Petrof named the inlet for Spencer Fullerton Baird in 1880. The Eskimo name is \"Nunavarok\" according to a 1949 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey report. Show on map
The NarrowsThe Narrows is a channel in Southeast Alaska, U.S.A. It is the shortest and narrowest stretch of waterway separating Wrangell Island from the mainland, connecting Blake Channel and Eastern Passage. It was named in 1917 by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. It was first traversed and charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition. Show on map
Selawik LakeSelawik Lake is a lake located 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Selawik, Alaska. It is 31 miles (50 km) long. It is adjacent to the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge and the Baldwin Peninsula, feeding into the Hotham Inlet and Kotzebue Sound. Selawik Lake is the third largest lake in Alaska after Iliamna Lake and Becharof Lake, and seventeenth largest lake in the United States of America. Show on map
Petrof BayPetrof Bay is a small bay on the west side of Kuiu Island in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska, United States. It is located at 56°N 134°W / 56°N 134°W and opens into the Chatham Strait. The bay was named in 1924 for U.S. Census Bureau employee Ivan Petrof, whose reports of his travels in the late 19th century are a valuable source of Alaska history for that period. Show on map
Clark GlacierClark Glacier is an 8-mile (13 km) long glacier located in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It leads northwest to its 1961 terminus at the head of Johns Hopkins Inlet, 78 mi (126 km) northwest of Hoonah, Alaska. It was named by W. O. Field and W. S. Cooper in 1936 for Johns Hopkins University professor of geology William Bullock Clark (1860–1917). Show on map
Stepovak BayStepovak Bay is a bay located on the Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, on the Gulf of Alaska. It is framed by the Stepovak Bay group of volcanoes, a chain of 5 cinder cone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. The volcanoes include Kupreanof and four numbered volcanoes (1, 2, 3, 4). It was named Stepovakho Bay or Stepof's Bay by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1888 for Stepanof, a captain. Show on map
Resurrection CreekResurrection Creek is a waterway in the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, US. Along with Bear Creek, Sixmile Creek, and Glacier Creek, it is a tributary of Turnagain Arm. The stream's watershed drains 161 square miles (420 km2) on the north side of the Kenai Peninsula, and the community of Hope, Alaska is located at the creek's mouth. The Hope Highway passes alongside Resurrection Creek. Show on map
Port SnettishamPort Snettisham is a narrow fjord 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Juneau in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is a semi protected deep water port that was developed to transport many mineral deposits found in the Snettisham Peninsula. Lieutenant Joseph Whidbey of the Royal Navy discovered the fjord on August 12, 1794; George Vancouver named it after the town of Snettisham in England. Show on map
Lituya BayLituya Bay (/lᵻˈtjuːjə/; Tlingit: Ltu.aa, meaning \"Lake Within the Point\") is a fjord located on the coast of the Southeast part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is 14.5 km (9.0 mi) long and 3.2 km (2.0 mi) wide at its widest point. The bay was noted in 1786 by Jean-François de La Pérouse, who named it Port des Français. Twenty-one of his men perished in the tidal current in the bay. Show on map
Mother Goose LakeMother Goose Lake is a 6.4 mile long lake located at head of King Salmon River, on the Alaska Peninsula, 21 miles south of Ugashik, Aleutian Range. It was named in 1923 by R. H. Sargent, USGS, as \"suggested by its goose-like shape.\" According to Sargent, the local name was King gautham giri Lake. The lake lies entirely within the Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. Show on map
Chilkoot InletChilkoot Inlet is an inlet in the Southeast region of the U.S. state of Alaska, located on the eastern side of the Chilkat Peninsula in Lynn Canal. Chilkoot Inlet is the terminus of the Chilkoot River and its watershed, and also home to Lutak, Alaska. It was first charted in 1794 by Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during George Vancouver's 1791-95 expedition. Show on map
Yentna GlacierYentna Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier begins in the Alaska Range between Mount Russell and Mount Foraker, moving southwest. It is the source of the east fork of the Yentna River. Lacuna Glacier is a major tributary, and Dall Glacier enters the glacial valley just below Yentna Glacier's present terminus. Show on map
Herron GlacierHerron Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier begins in the Alaska Range on the north side of Mount Foraker, moving northwest for 14 miles (23 km). It is the source of the Herron River. The name was given by A.H. Brooks of the U.S. Geological Survey to honor Lt. Joseph S. Herron, who mapped much of the region. Show on map
West Point Village Seaplane BaseWest Point Village Seaplane Base (IATA: KWP, FAA LID: KWP) is a public use seaplane base located in West Point, in the Kodiak Island Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is privately owned by the West Point Canning Co. Scheduled passenger service to Kodiak, Alaska, is subsidized by the United States Department of Transportation via the Essential Air Service program. Show on map
Grand Pacific GlacierGrand Pacific Glacier is a 25-mile (40 km) long glacier in British Columbia and Alaska. It begins in Glacier Bay National Park in the St. Elias Mountains, 7 miles (11.2 km) southwest of Mount Hay, trends east into the Grand Pacific Pass area of British Columbia, and then southeast to the head of Tarr Inlet at Alaska-Canada boundary, 68 miles (109 km) west of Skagway. Show on map
Peril StraitPeril Strait or Háat Ishkáak is a strait in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska. It is between Chichagof Island to its north and Baranof Island and Catherine Island to its south. The strait is 80 km (50 mi) long and reaches from Salisbury Sound on the west to the Chatham Strait on the east. It is entirely within the limits of the City and Borough of Sitka. Show on map
Ship CreekShip Creek is an Alaskan river that flows from the Chugach Mountains into Cook Inlet. The Port of Anchorage at the mouth of Ship Creek gave its name (\"Knik Anchorage\") to the city of Anchorage that grew up nearby. The river lies entirely within the limits of the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska. Most of its upper length traverses Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Alaska
NameDescriptionShow
Cape EspenbergCape Espenberg is a cape located on the Seward Peninsula in Alaska, on the Chukchi Sea coast. Cape Espenberg points northwards, 42 mi NW of Deering, Kotzebue-Kobuk Low. On its southeastern side there is the small Goodhope Bay, an inlet of the Kotzebue Sound. Named in 1816 by Lt. Otto von Kotzebue (1821, p. 236) for Dr. Karl Espenberg, a surgeon who accompanied Captain (later Admiral, IRN) Adam Johann von Krusenstern on his voyage around the world in 1803-06. Show on map
Pleasant IslandPleasant Island is the largest island in the Icy Strait between northern Chichagof Island and the mainland of the Alaska Panhandle. It lies southeast of the mainland city of Gustavus and southwest of the mainland community of Excursion Inlet. Pleasant Island has a land area of 49.192 km² (18.993 sq mi), had no population at the 2000 census, and is reported to be uninhabited as of 2012. Access: The wilderness is accessible by boat, kayak or float plane. Facilities: There are no public cabins, shelters or maintained trails on the islands Show on map
Shemya IslandShemya or Simiya (Aleut: Samiyax̂) is a small island in the Near Islands group of the Semichi Islands chain in the Aleutian Islands archipelago southwest of Alaska, at 52°43′27″N 174°07′08″E / 52.72417°N 174.11889°E. It has a land area of 5.903 sq mi (15.289 km²), and is about 1,200 miles (1,900 km) southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. It is 4.39 kilometres (2.73 mi) wide and 6.95 kilometres (4.32 mi) long. The Russian vessel Saint Peter and Paul wrecked at Shemya in 1762. Most of the crew survived.(The parameter \"unit snow inch\" is not recognized by )\n Show on map
Douglas IslandDouglas Island is a tidal island in the U.S. state of Alaska, just west of downtown Juneau and east of Admiralty Island. It is separated from mainland Juneau by the Gastineau Channel. The Juneau-Douglas Bridge, connecting the island with Juneau, provides a two lane road to and from the island and accommodates both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Recently, there have been plans to build a new bridge from North Douglas to the Mendenhall Valley. Admiralty Island lies to the west and south, across the Stephens Passage. Douglas Island was named for John Douglas, Bishop of Salisbury, by Captain George Vancouver. Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during Vancouver's expedition, was the first to sight it in 1794. Show on map
Ilak IslandIlak Island (Aleut: Iilax̂) is a small island in the eastern Delarof Islands, Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Ilak island is only .99 miles (1.59 km) across. Its highest point is 190 feet (58 m). Its name was recorded by Commodore Joseph Billings as \"Illuk,\" and published by Lt. Sarichev (1826, map 3) of the Imperial Russian Navy, as \"Illakh.\" The adopted form \"Ilak\" was published in the 1946 supplement to the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1946, p. 120). Show on map
Point BarrowPoint Barrow or Nuvuk is a headland on the Arctic coast in the U.S. state of Alaska, 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Barrow. It is the northernmost point of all the territory of the United States, at 71°23′20″N 156°28′45″W / 71.38889°N 156.47917°W. The distance to the North Pole is 1,122 nautical miles (1,291 mi; 2,078 km). The northernmost point on the Canadian mainland, Murchison Promontory, is 40 miles (64 km) farther north. It is close to Rogers-Post Site, the scene of the airplane crash on August 15, 1935 that killed aviator Wiley Post and his passenger, the entertainer Will Rogers. Show on map
Admiralty IslandAdmiralty Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in Southeast Alaska, at 57°44′N 134°20′W / 57.733°N 134.333°W. It is 145 km (90 mi) long and 56 km (35 mi) wide with an area of 4,264.1 km2 (1,646.4 sq mi), making it the seventh largest island in the United States and the 132nd largest island in the world. It is one of the ABC islands of Alaska. The island is nearly cut in two by the Seymour Canal; to its east is the long, narrow Glass Peninsula. Most of Admiralty Island—more than 955,000 acres (3,860 km2)—is occupied by the Admiralty Island National Monument - a federally protected wilderness area administered by the Tongass National Forest. The Kootznoowoo Wilderness encompasses vast stands of old growth temperate rainforest. These forests provide some of the best habitat avai Show on map
Dall IslandDall Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago off the southeast coast of Alaska, just west of Prince of Wales Island and north of Canadian waters. Its peak elevation is 2,443 feet (745 meters) above sea level. Its land area is 254.0 square miles (657.9 km2), making it the 28th largest island in the United States. Dall is used economically for fishing and limestone quarrying. The 2000 census recorded 20 persons living on the island. Alaska Natives are known to have inhabited coastal caves on the island two to three thousand years ago. Show on map
Koyukuk National Wildlife RefugeThe Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge is a 3,500,000-acre (14,000 km2) conservation area in Alaska. It lies within the floodplain of the Koyukuk River, in a basin that extends from the Yukon River to the Purcell Mountains and the foothills of the Brooks Range. This region of wetlands is home to fish, waterfowl, beaver and Alaskan moose, and wooded lowlands where two species of fox, bears, wolf packs, Canadian lynx and marten prowl. Show on map
Valley of Ten Thousand SmokesThe Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is a valley within Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska which is filled with ash flow from the eruption of Novarupta on June 6–8, 1912. Following the eruption, thousands of fumaroles vented steam from the ash. Robert F. Griggs, who explored the volcano's aftermath for the National Geographic Society in 1916, gave the valley its name, saying that \"the whole valley as far as the eye could reach was full of hundreds, no thousands—literally, tens of thousands—of smokes curling up from its fissured floor.\" Show on map
Gareloi IslandGareloi or Anangusook (Aleut: Anangusix̂) is a volcanic island in the Delarof Islands of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. It is located between the Tanaga Pass and the Amchitka Pass. The island is 6 miles (9.7 km) in length and 5 miles (8.0 km) wide. Its land area is 25.95 square miles (67.2 km2), making Gareloi the largest island in the Delarof group. Gareloi Volcano, a stratovolcano, is situated in the center of the island which reaches a height of 5,161 feet (1,573 m). On the other side of a small saddle lies another peak of the island however it does not equal the height of Mount Gareloi. The island is uninhabited. Show on map
Attu IslandAttu (Aleut: Atan) is the westernmost and largest island in the Near Islands group of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, and the westernmost point of land relative to Alaska, the United States, North America and the Americas. The island became uninhabited in 2010. The island was the site of the only World War II land battle fought on an incorporated territory of the United States (the Battle of Attu), and its battlefield area is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Show on map
Kanuti National Wildlife RefugeKanuti National Wildlife Refuge is a national wildlife refuge in central Alaska, United States. One of 16 refuges in Alaska, it was established in 1980 when Congress passed The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). At 1,640,000 acres (6,600 km2), Kanuti Refuge is about the size of the state of Delaware. Sitting atop the Arctic Circle, the refuge is a prime example of Alaska's boreal ecosystem, and is dominated by black and white spruce with some white birch and poplars. Show on map
Mount BlackburnMount Blackburn is the highest peak in the Wrangell Mountains of Alaska in the United States. It is the fifth highest peak in the United States and the twelfth highest peak in North America. The mountain is an old, eroded shield volcano, the second highest volcano in the United States behind Mount Bona and the fifth highest in North America. It was named in 1885 by Lt. Henry T. Allen of the U.S. Army after Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn, a U.S. senator from Kentucky. It is located in the heart of Wrangell – St. Elias National Park, the largest national park in the country. Show on map
Kodiak IslandKodiak Island is a large island on the south coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, separated from the Alaska mainland by the Shelikof Strait. The largest island in the Kodiak Archipelago, Kodiak Island is the second largest island in the United States and the 80th largest island in the world, with an area of 9,311.24 km2 (3,595.09 sq mi), slightly larger than Cyprus. It is 160 km (99 miles) long and in width ranges from 16 to 97 kilometres (10 to 60 mi). Kodiak Island is the namesake for Kodiak Seamount, which lies off the coast at the Aleutian Trench. The largest community on the island is the city of Kodiak, Alaska. Show on map
Admiralty Island National MonumentAdmiralty Island National Monument is a United States National Monument located on Admiralty Island in Southeast Alaska, and is managed as part of the Tongass National Forest. It was created December 1, 1978, and covers 955,747 acres (3,868 km2) in Southeast Alaska. The remoteness of the monument led Congress to pass legislation designating all but 18,351 acres (74 km2) of the monument as the Kootznoowoo Wilderness, ensuring that the vast bulk of this monument is permanently protected from development. The monument is administered by the U.S. Forest Service from offices in Juneau. Show on map
Mount SpurrMount Spurr is a stratovolcano in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska, named after United States Geological Survey geologist and explorer Josiah Edward Spurr, who led an expedition to the area in 1898. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) currently rates Mount Spurr as Level of Concern Color Code Green. The mountain is known aboriginally by the Dena'ina Athabascan name K'idazq'eni, literally 'that which is burning inside'. Show on map
Eagle SummitEagle Summit is a 3,652 feet (1,113 m)-tall gap through the White Mountains of central Alaska. The gap was named after the nearby Eagle River by prospectors from nearby Circle, Alaska. Eagle Summit is the site of a convergence zone between the Yukon Flats to the north and the low ground of the Tanana Valley to the south. Any differential in the weather within the two valleys causes high winds and precipitation when there is moisture in the atmosphere. In 1916, Hudson Stuck, who was one of the first people to climb Mount McKinley's South Peak, wrote, \"The Eagle Summit is one of the most difficult summits in Alaska. The wind blows so fiercely that sometimes for days together its passage is almost impossible. ... The snow smothers up everything on the lee side of the hill, and the end of ever Show on map
Revelation MountainsThe Revelation Mountains are a small, rugged subrange of the Alaska Range in Alaska, United States. They mark the furthest western extent of the Alaska Range. The range is rarely visited because of the flying time necessary to get there and also because of the notoriously poor weather conditions that are prevalent in the range. The highest peak in the range is Mount Hesperus (9,828 feet/2,996 m). Show on map
Cape Nome Mining District Discovery SitesThe Nome mining district, also known as the Cape Nome mining district, is a gold mining district in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was discovered in 1898 when Erik Lindblom, Jafet Lindeberg and John Brynteson, the \"Three Lucky Swedes\", found placer gold deposits on Anvil Creek and on the Snake River, a few miles from the future site of Nome. Word of the strike caused a major gold rush to Nome in the spring of 1899. Show on map
Mount Saint EliasMount Saint Elias, also designated Boundary Peak 186, is the second highest mountain in both Canada and the United States, being situated on the Yukon and Alaska border. It lies about 40 kilometres (25 mi) southwest of Mount Logan, the highest mountain in Canada. The Canadian side is part of Kluane National Park, while the U.S. side of the mountain is located within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Show on map
DenaliDenali /dᵻˈnɑːli/ (also known as Mount McKinley, its former official name) is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,310 feet (6,190 m) above sea level. At some 18,000 ft (5,500 m), the base-to-peak rise is the largest of any mountain situated entirely above sea level. With a topographic prominence of 20,156 feet (6,144 m) and a topographic isolation of 4,629 miles (7,450 km), Denali is the third most prominent and third most isolated peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, Denali is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve. Show on map
Izembek National Wildlife RefugeThe Izembek National Wildlife Refuge is the smallest of the National Wildlife Refuges located in the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies on the northwest (Bering Sea) coastal side of central Aleutians East Borough. Most of the refuge (300,000 acres) was designated as Wilderness in 1980 under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The refuge is administered from offices in Cold Bay. Show on map
Cape UgatCape Ugat is a rocky point on the northwestern side of Kodiak Island, Alaska. It is the tip of the Spiridon Peninsula and protrudes into the Shelikof Strait. It is the closest point on Kodiak Island to mainland Alaska. In World War II Cape Ugat was occupied by US forces as a lookout station, the rationale being that it was the best vantage point to detect potential Japanese naval forces that could head up the Shelikof Strait towards the Cook Inlet and Anchorage, the logistical center of Alaska. Show on map
Bogoslof IslandBogoslof Island or Agasagook Island (Aleut: Aĝasaaĝux̂) is the summit of a largely submarine stratovolcano located in the Bering Sea in the U.S. state of Alaska, 31 miles (50 km) behind the main Aleutian volcanic arc. It has a land area of 173 acres (0.70 km2) and is unpopulated. The peak elevation of the island is 490 feet (150 m). It last erupted in 1992. It is 1.76 kilometres (1.09 mi) long and 540 metres (0.34 mi) wide. The stratovolcano rises about 6,000 feet (1,800 m) from the seabed but the summit is the only part that projects above sea level. Show on map
Mount DickeyMount Dickey is a peak on the west side of the Ruth Gorge in the Central Alaska Range of mountains, 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Denali and 4 miles (6 km) southwest of The Moose's Tooth. Despite its relatively low elevation, it is notable for its east face, which has around a vertical mile (1600 m) of sheer granite—it achieves this vertical gain in less than half a mile (800m) horizontal distance. This is one of the tallest rock walls in the world, and the face has seen many world-class climbs. Roger Cowles and Brian Okonek made the first winter ascent of Mount Dickey in February 1979. Show on map
Koniuji IslandKoniuji Island (Aleut: Tanĝimax) is one of the Andreanof Islands subgroup of the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska, United States. It lies northwest of Atka Island and east of Kasatochi Island. Koniuji Island has a land area of 0.37 sq mi (237 acres) and is uninhabited. Compass reading differences of as much as 10° from the normal variation have been observed on Koniuji Island and as much as 7° at a distance of 2 miles (3 km) in all directions around the island. A 1998 survey found these birds on Koniuji during the breeding season: Show on map
Kayak IslandKayak Island (59°56′03″N 144°22′06″W / 59.93417°N 144.36833°W), which includes the Bering Expedition Landing Site, is located in the Gulf of Alaska, 100 km (62 mi) SE of Cordova, Alaska Malaspina Coastal Plain, on the eastern edge of Chugach National Forest. It has a land area of 73.695 km² (28.454 sq mi) and no population. It was named \"Kayak\" in 1826 by Lt. Sarichef of the Russian Navy, because of the fancied resemblance of its outline to the Eskimo skin canoe. This island, it is believed, was the one Vitus Bering saw and named \"Saint Elias\" in 1741. Show on map
Tetlin National Wildlife RefugeTetlin National Wildlife Refuge is a dynamic landscape made up of forests, wetlands, tundra, lakes, mountains and glacial rivers bounded by the snowy peaks of the Alaska Range. This upper Tanana River valley has been called the \"Tetlin Passage,\" because it serves as a major migratory route for birds traveling to and from Canada, the lower 48 and both Central and South America. Many of these birds breed and nest on the refuge. Others pass through on their way to breeding and nesting grounds elsewhere in the state. Migrants, including ducks, geese, swans, cranes, raptors and songbirds, begin arriving in the valley in April, and continue into early June. An estimated 116 species breed on Tetlin during the short summer, when long days and warm temperatures accelerate the growth of plants, inse Show on map
Glory of Russia CapeGlory of Russia Cape (Russian: Слава России, Slava Rossii) is the northernmost point of St. Matthew Island in the Bering Sea in the US state of Alaska. The cape is hilly, with the peak 1.3 miles (2.1 km) south of the cape being 1,475 feet (450 m) high, while at its coastline the cape is 5 m above mean sea level. The nearest town is Nash Harbor in Bethel Census Area, about 414 miles (666 km) away. The St. Paul Island Airport is the nearest airport and heliport to the cape, about 234 miles (377 km) away. Show on map
Buldir IslandBuldir Island (also sometimes written Buldyr; Aleut: Idmaax) is a small island in the western Aleutian Islands of the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies midway between the Near Islands in the West and the Rat Islands in the East. It is the most westerly of the Aleutian Islands which formed as a result of volcanic activity in the late Quaternary or Recent times. The rocks from which the island formed are of two different ages with a considerable time gap. The rocks of the older dome are mainly olivine basalts and the younger dome consists of hornblende basalts andbasaltic andesites. That this island is younger than some of the neighboring islands is also suggested by the fact that there are fewer species of flowering plant on this island. Show on map
Pavlof IslandsThe Pavlof Islands (Qudugin in Aleut) are a group of seven islands that lie south of Pavlof Bay on the Alaska Peninsula. They are part of the Aleutians East Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The islands include Dolgoi Island (Anganax̂six̂), Goloi (Atx̂uunux̂), Inner Iliasik (Iluuĝix̂ Ixsaĝdaaĝux̂), Outer Iliasik (Qagaaĝix̂ Ixsaĝdaaĝux̂), Poperechnoi (Kuyagdax̂), Ukolnoi (Kitaĝutax̂̂), and Wosnesenski (Unatxux̂). Dolgoi Island is the largest of these in area. They have a total land area of 206.265 km2 (79.639 sq mi) and are uninhabited. Show on map
Kodiak National Wildlife RefugeThe Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge is a United States National Wildlife Refuge in the Kodiak Archipelago in southwestern Alaska, United States. The Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge includes the southwestern two-thirds of Kodiak Island, Uganik Island, the Red Peaks area of Afognak Island and all of Ban Island in the archipelago. It encompasses 1,990,418 acres (8,054.94 km2). The refuge is administered from offices in Kodiak. Show on map
Tordrillo MountainsThe Tordrillo Mountains are a small mountain range in the Matanuska-Susitna and Kenai Peninsula Boroughs in the southcentral region of the U.S. state of Alaska. They lie approximately 75 miles (120 km) west-northwest of Anchorage. The range extends approximately 60 miles (97 km) north-south and 35 miles (56 km) east-west.The highest point is Mount Torbert (11,413 feet/3,479 m). On a clear day, they are easily visible from Anchorage. A pinner couloir in the \"Meat Curtain\" zone was shredded by Cody Townsend, earning him a Powder Award for Line of the Year 2014. Show on map
Nowitna National Wildlife RefugeThe heart of Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge is a lowland basin of forests and wetlands that forms the floodplain of the meandering Nowitna River. The refuge's climate is typically marked by light precipitation, mild winds, long, hard winters and short, relatively warm, summers. The hills that circle the refuge lowlands are capped by alpine tundra. Show on map
Japonski IslandJaponski Island, or Yak'w Kashaneixí, is a small island in the city of Sitka in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It lies across the Sitka Channel from Sitka's central business district. The Russians named the island Japonski (Russian for \"Japanese\") after some Japanese fishermen who were stranded there in 1805 (unnamed Russians returned them to Yezo (Hokkaidō) in 1806). Show on map
Yukon FlatsThe Yukon Flats are a vast area of wetlands, forest, bog, and low-lying ground centered on the confluence of the Yukon River, Porcupine River, and Chandalar River in the central portion of the U.S. state of Alaska. The Yukon Flats are bordered in the north by the Brooks Range, in the south by the White Mountains, and cover an area of approximately 11,000 square miles (28,490 km2). The Yukon Flats are a critical waterfowl breeding ground due to the large area of wetland provided by the estimated 40,000 small lakes and streams in the area. In recognition of this fact, the area is protected under the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Show on map
Walrus IslandsThe Walrus Islands (Russian: Моржовые острова) are a group of craggy coastal islands in the Bering Sea, close to the northern shores of Bristol Bay, Alaska at the entrance to Togiak Bay. They are located 18 km to the east of Hagemeister Island. The Walrus Islands earned their name because of the big concentration of walruses in the adjacent waters of these islands every summer, the largest concentration being in Round Island. Nowadays this island group forms the Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary and a permit is required to visit Round Island. Show on map
Chichagof IslandChichagof Island, or Shee Kaax, is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of the Alaska Panhandle. At 75 miles (121 km) long and 50 miles (80 km) wide, it has a land area of 2,048.61 square miles (5,305.9 km2), making it the fifth largest island in the United States and the 109th largest island in the world. Its coastline measures 742 miles. There was a 2000 census population of 1,342 persons. It is one of the ABC islands of Alaska.Chichagof Island has the highest population of bears per square mile of any place on Earth. Idaho Inlet into Chichagof Island Show on map
Mitkof IslandMitkof Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in southeast Alaska, at 56°35′54″N 132°48′33″W / 56.59833°N 132.80917°W. between Kupreanof Island to the west and the Alaska mainland to the east. It is about 16 km (9.9 mi) wide and 28 km (17 mi) long with a land area of 539.7 km2 (208.4 sq mi), making it the 30th largest island in the United States. Much of the island is managed as part of the Tongass National Forest. The island is relatively flat with numerous muskegs. The highest point is Crystal Mountain 3,317 ft (1,011 m). Show on map
Leffingwell Camp SiteThe Leffingwell Camp Site, on Flaxman Island, 58 miles (93 km) west of Barter Island on the Arctic Coast of Alaska, was used by polar explorer and geologist Ernest de Koven Leffingwell on his pioneering Anglo-American Polar Expedition of 1906–1908, which aimed to explore the Beaufort Sea. The expedition's ship, the Duchess of Bedford, was allowed to become locked in ice which eventually destroyed it. The camp site was chosen before the ship was locked in ice, and was not merely the nearest landfall. The site was used by Leffingwell over several years, beyond the end of that expedition. Show on map
Mount OkmokMount Okmok is the highest point on the rim of Okmok Caldera (Unmagim Anatuu in Aleut) on the northeastern part of Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands of Alaska. This 5.8 mile (9.3 km) wide circular caldera truncates the top of a large shield volcano. A crater lake once filled much of the caldera, but the lake ultimately drained through a notch eroded in the northeast rim. The prehistoric lake attained a maximum depth of about 150 m (500 ft) and the upper surface reached an elevation of about 475 m (1560 ft), at which point it overtopped the low point of the caldera rim. Small, shallow remnants of the lake remained north of Cone D at an altitude of about 1075 feet: a small shallow lake located between the caldera rim and Cone D; a smaller lake (named Cone B Lake) farther north nea Show on map
Nelson IslandNelson Island (Qaluyaaq in Central Yup'ik) is an island in the Bethel Census Area of southwestern Alaska. It is 42 miles (68 km) long and 20–35 miles (32–56 km) wide. With an area of 843 square miles (2,183 km²), it is the 15th largest island in the United States. It is separated from the Alaska mainland to its north by the Ningaluk River, to its east by the Kolavinarak River and from Nunivak Island to its southwest by the Etolin Strait. The natives are Yupiit who maintain a predominately traditional diet, fishing and hunting musk ox and caribou. Show on map
Cape CorwinCape Corwin is the easternmost point of Nunivak Island in the Bering Sea in the U.S. state of Alaska. In the Cup'ig language it is known as Cing'ig (\"point\", as in point of land). According to Donald Orth (1967, Dictionary of Alaska Place Names) the name marks the southwest entrance point to Etolin Strait. According to local usage the feature is misnamed on official United States Geological Survey maps. Since the name was reported to USGS by the USCGS in \"about 1908\" (the Board of Geographic Names decision was in 1906, and Baker reports USCGS began using it in 1899) it may have subsequently migrated to the next northernmost point of land, Cing'ig. The 1911 USCGS chart does not accurately represent the shape of the coast here; the point and the cape are not separately identifiable. The USGS Show on map
Selawik National Wildlife RefugeSelawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska in the Waring Mountains was officially established in 1980 with the passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). The 3,400 square mile (8,700 km²) refuge is situated on the Arctic Circle to the east of Kotzebue Sound. It is bounded on the north by the Waring Mountains and Kobuk Valley National Park; and to the south by the Selawik Hills and the Purcell Mountains. Refuge lands extend eastward toward the headwaters of the Selawik River and the Continental Divide. The refuge is administered from offices in Kotzebue. Show on map
Bendeleben MountainsThe Bendeleben (/ˈbɛn.dəˌleɪ.bɨn/) Mountains are a mountain range on the heart of the Seward Peninsula in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. This range forms a major divide between drainage basins draining into the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic Ocean. The tallest peak, Mount Bendeleben is 3,730 feet (1,140 m) at the summit, and is located on the west end. Bits of the range go into the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, but most of the peaks remain unclaimed. The Tubutulik River flows in the area. Show on map
Hinchinbrook IslandHinchinbrook Island is an island in the Gulf of Alaska lying at the entrance to Prince William Sound in the state of Alaska, United States. The island has a land area of 171.98 sq mi (445.438 km²), making it the 37th largest island in the United States. There was a population of five permanent residents as of the 2000 census. Cape Hinchinbrook Light is located on the southwest side of the island. Also on the southwest side is the abandoned village of Nuchek on Port Etches (bay). The Chugach Alaska Corporation now runs the Nuchek Spirit Camp at this site. Show on map
Kenai Fjords National ParkKenai Fjords National Park is a United States National Park established in 1980 by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The park covers an area of 669,984 acres (1,046.85 sq mi; 2,711.33 km2) on the Kenai Peninsula in southcentral Alaska, near the town of Seward. The park contains the Harding Icefield, one of the largest ice fields in the United States. The park is named for the numerous fjords carved by glaciers moving down the mountains from the ice field. The field is the source of at least 38 glaciers, the largest of which is Bear Glacier. The park lies just to the west of Seward, a popular port for cruise ships. Exit Glacier is reachable by road and is a popular tour destination. The remainder of the park is primarily accessible by boat. The fjords are glacial valleys@en . Show on map
Kachemak Bay State ParkKachemak Bay State Park and Kachemak Bay Wilderness Park is a 400,000-acre (1,600 km2) park in and around Kachemak Bay, Alaska. Kachemak Bay State Park was the first legislatively designated state park in the Alaska State Parks system. Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park is the state's only legislatively designated wilderness park. There is no road access to most areas of the park, visitors normally fly in or travel by boat from Homer. Kachemak Bay is considered a critical habitat area due to the biodiversity in the area. Wildlife within the park includes marine mammals such as sea otters, sea lions, and whales, large land mammals such as moose and black bears, and numerous sea and land birds. Terrain consists of both rocky and sandy beaches, dense mountain forests, and higher up, glaciers, Show on map
Mount Marcus BakerMount Marcus Baker is the highest peak of the Chugach Mountains of Alaska. It is located approximately 75 miles (121 km) east of Anchorage. This peak is very prominent because of its proximity to tidewater and is only 12 miles (19 km) north of the calving face of Harvard Glacier. When ranked by topographic prominence, Mount Marcus Baker is one of the top 75 peaks in the world. Show on map
Mount JarvisMount Jarvis is an eroded shield volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of eastern Alaska. It is located in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park about 10 miles (16 km) east of the summit of Mount Wrangell. The mountain sits at the northeastern edge of the massive ice-covered shield of Wrangell, rising nearly 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above it in a spectacular series of cliffs and icefalls. Show on map
Mount RussellMount Russell is one of the major peaks of the central Alaska Range, approximately 35 mi (56 km) southwest of Denali. Though much lower than Denali or its neighbor Mount Foraker, Russell is a steep, dramatic peak and a significant mountaineering challenge in its own right. To give a sense of its size and steepness, note that its summit rises 6,560 ft (2,000 m) over the Chedotlothna Glacier to the northwest in only 1.8 mi (3 km), and almost 10,000 ft (3,048 m) above the lower Yentna Glacier to the south in only 8 mi (13 km). Mount Russell is the highest point in the Kuskokwim River watershed. Show on map
Barter IslandBarter Island is an island located on the Arctic coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, east of Arey Island in the Beaufort Sea. It is about four miles (6 km) long and about two miles (3 km) wide at its widest point. Location of Kaktovik, Alaska Until the late 19th century, Barter Island was a major trade center for the Inupiat people and was especially important as a bartering place for Inupiat from Alaska and Inuit from Canada, hence its name. In 1970 3 sounding rockets of Nike-Tomahawk type were launched there for high-altitude research. Show on map
Shishaldin VolcanoMount Shishaldin /ʃᵻˈʃældən/ is a moderately active volcano on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands chain of Alaska. It is the highest mountain peak of the Aleutian Islands. The most symmetrical cone-shaped glacier-clad large mountain on earth, the volcano's topographic contour lines are nearly perfect circles above 6,500 feet (2,000 m). The lower north and south slopes are somewhat steeper than the lower eastern and western slopes. The volcano is the westernmost of three large stratovolcanoes along an east–west line in the eastern half of Unimak Island. The Aleuts named the volcano Sisquk, meaning \"mountain which points the way when I am lost.\" The upper 2,000 meters is almost entirely covered by glacial snow and ice. In all, Shishaldin's glacial shield covers about 35 square miles (91 k Show on map
Wrangell IslandWrangell Island is in the Alexander Archipelago in the Alaska Panhandle of southeastern Alaska. It is 48 kilometres (30 miles) long and 8 to 23 kilometres (5.0–14.3 miles) wide. It has a land area of 544.03 square kilometres (210.05 square miles), making it the 29th largest island in the United States. Wrangell is separated from the mainland by the narrow Blake Channel. Show on map
Islands of Four MountainsIslands of Four Mountains is an island grouping of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, United States. The chain includes, from west to east, Amukta, Chagulak, Yunaska, Herbert, Carlisle, Chuginadak, Uliaga, and Kagamilislands. This island chain is located between Amukta Pass and the Andreanof Islands to the west, and Samalga Pass and the Fox Islands to the east. These islands have a total land area of 210.656 sq mi (545.596 km²) and have no permanent population. The two largest islands are Yunaska and Chuginadak. Chuginadak is mainly made up of the active volcano Mount Cleveland. Show on map
Redoubt VolcanoRedoubt Volcano, or Mount Redoubt, is an active stratovolcano in the largely volcanic Aleutian Range of the U.S. state of Alaska. Located at the head of the Chigmit Mountains subrange in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, the mountain is just west of Cook Inlet, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough about 180 km (110 mi) southwest of Anchorage. At 10,197 feet (3,108 m), in just over 5 miles (8 km) Mount Redoubt attains 9,150 feet (2,700 m) of prominence over its surrounding terrain. It is the highest summit in the Aleutian Range. Show on map
Kenai National Wildlife RefugeThe Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is a 1.92 million acre (7,770 km²) wildlife preserve located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska, United States. The refuge was created in 1941 as the Kenai National Moose Range, but in 1980 it was changed to its present status by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. There is a wide variety of terrain in the refuge, including muskeg and other wetlands, alpine areas, and taiga forest. The refuge protects several large mammals, including wolves, brown bears, black bears, dall sheep, Alaskan moose, and caribou, as well as thousands of migratory and native birds. There are numerous lakes, as well as the Kenai River, and the refuge is a popular destination for fishing for salmon and trout. The refuge has several campgrounds and boat launches, incl Show on map
Aleutian IslandsThe Aleutian Islands (/əˈluːʃən/; possibly from Chukchi aliat, \"island\") are a chain of 14 large volcanic islands and 55 smaller ones belonging to both the United States and Russia. They form part of the Aleutian Arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km2) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900 km) westward from the Alaska Peninsula toward the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia, and mark a dividing line between the Bering Sea to the north and the Pacific Ocean to the south. Crossing longitude 180°, at which point east and west longitude end, the archipelago contains both the westernmost part of the United States by longitude (Amatignak Island) and the easternmost by longitude (Semisopochnoi Island). The westernmost U.S. island in real terms, however, is Attu Is Show on map
Kupreanof IslandKupreanof Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska. The island is 84 km (52 mi) long and 32 km (20 mi) wide with a total land area is 2,802.84 km2 (1,082.18 sq mi), making it the 13th largest island in the United States and the 170th largest island in the world. The Lindenberg Peninsula, on the southeast side of the island is considered part of the island. The peninsula is separated from the rest of the island by a narrow inlet called Duncan Canal. The island's population was 785 at the 2000 census. a muskeg in Kupreanof Island Show on map
Amchitka IslandAmchitka (/æmˈtʃɪtkə/; Aleut: Amchixtax̂) is a volcanic, tectonically unstable island in the Rat Islands group of the Aleutian Islands in southwest Alaska. It is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The island is about 68 kilometers (42 mi) long, and from 3 to 6 km (1.9 to 3.7 mi) wide. The area has a maritime climate, with many storms, and mostly overcast skies. Show on map
Mount MillerMount Miller is an isolated peak of the Saint Elias Mountains in Alaska, United States. It is notable for its position among spectacular icefields, its distance from any inhabited place, and its large rise above local terrain. It is over 65 miles (110 km) from McCarthy, the nearest habitation, and over 105 miles (170 km) away from Yakutat, the nearest significant town. Exemplifying the size of the mountain, the south flank rises 9000 feet (2743 m) above the Duktoth River valley to the south in approximately 9 horizontal miles (14.5 km). Show on map
Mount ClevelandMount Cleveland (also known as Cleveland Volcano) is a nearly symmetrical stratovolcano on the western end of Chuginadak Island, which is part of the Islands of Four Mountains just west of Umnak Island in the Fox Islands of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Mt. Cleveland is 1,730 m (5,676 ft) high, and one of the most active of the 75 or more volcanoes in the larger Aleutian Arc. Aleutian natives named the island after their fire goddess, Chuginadak, who they believed inhabited the volcano. In 1894 a team from the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey visited the island and gave Mount Cleveland its current name, after then-president Grover Cleveland. Show on map
Unalaska IslandUnalaska (Aleut: Nawan-Alaxsxa) is an island in the Fox Islands group of the Aleutian Islands in the US state of Alaska located at 53°38′N 167°00′W / 53.633°N 167.000°W. The island has a land area of 1,051 square miles (2,720 km2). It measures 127.8 km (79.4 mi) long and 55.9 kilometres (34.7 mi) wide. The city of Unalaska, Alaska, covers part of the island and all of neighboring Amaknak Island where the Port of Dutch Harbor is located. The population of the island excluding Amaknak as of the 2000 census was 1,759 residents. Show on map
Mount BonaMount Bona is one of the major mountains of the Saint Elias Mountains in eastern Alaska, and is the fifth-highest independent peak in the United States. Mount Bona and its adjacent neighbor Mount Churchill are both large ice-covered stratovolcanoes. Bona has the distinction of being the highest volcano in the United States and the fourth-highest in North America, outranked only by the three highest Mexican volcanoes, Pico de Orizaba, Popocatépetl, and Iztaccíhuatl. Show on map
Mount FairweatherMount Fairweather (officially gazetted as Fairweather Mountain in Canada but referred to as Mount Fairweather), is one of the world's highest coastal mountains at 4,671 metres (15,325 feet.) It is located 20 km (12 mi) east of the Pacific Ocean on the border of Alaska, United States and western British Columbia, Canada. Most of the mountain lies within Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the City and Borough of Yakutat, Alaska (USA), though the summit borders Tatshenshini-Alsek Provincial Park, British Columbia (Canada), making it the highest point in that province. It is also designated as Boundary Peak 164 or as US/Canada Boundary Point #164. Show on map
Atna PeaksAtna Peaks is an eroded stratovolcano or shield volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of eastern Alaska. It is located in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park about 6 mi (10 km) east of Mount Blackburn, the second highest volcano in the United States, and just south of the massive Nabesna Glacier. Because the mountain is almost entirely covered in glaciers, no geological studies have been done, but published references state and the geological map shows that the mountain is an old eroded volcanic edifice. Show on map
Revillagigedo IslandRevillagigedo Island (locally Revilla /rəˈvɪlə/) is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in Ketchikan Gateway Borough of the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Alaska. Running about 89 km (50 mi) north-south and 48 km (35 mi) east-west, it is 2,754.835 km² (1,063.65 mi²) in area, making it the 12th largest island in the United States and the 166th largest island in the world. Its center is located near 55°38′03″N 131°17′51″W / 55.63417°N 131.29750°W. Show on map
Growden Memorial ParkGrowden Memorial Park is an outdoor baseball park in Fairbanks, Alaska, United States. Originally called Memorial Park, the park was renamed in 1964 in memory of James Growden who, along with his two sons, lost his life in the tsunami created by the Good Friday Earthquake of 1964. Growden had been active in youth activities in Fairbanks for a number of years. It also has played host to the Alaska School Activities Association state baseball championships over the last few years. The ballpark holds 3,500 people and plays host to the Midnight Sun Game. Show on map
Etolin IslandEtolin Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States at 56°05′52″N 132°21′37″W / 56.09778°N 132.36028°W. It is between Prince of Wales Island, to its west, and the Alaska mainland, to its east. It is southwest of Wrangell Island. It was first charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition. He only charted its southwest and east coasts, not realizing it was an island. It was originally named Duke of York Island but was renamed by the United States after the Alaska Purchase. It is named after Adolf Etolin, governor of the Russian American colonies from 1840 to 1845. Show on map
Evans IslandEvans Island is an island in the Prince William Sound of southern Alaska. It lies just east of Bainbridge Island across the Prince of Wales Passage. Elrington Island lies to its south, Latouche Island to its southeast, and Knight Island to its northeast. Although Evans Island had been inhabited up to the time of the Russian exploration of Alaska, the island had no modern-day inhabitants until 1984, when a group of residents and former residents of the original Alutiq village of Chenega, on Chenega Island, decided to build the village of Chenega Bay on Crab Bay on Evans Island. Old Chenega had been destroyed and one-third of its residents had been killed by the tsunami from the 1964 Alaska earthquake. The new community of Chenega is coextensive with Evans Island, which has a land area of 74 Show on map
Tanaga IslandTanaga Island (Aleut: Tanax̂ax) is an island in the western Andreanof Islands, in the southwest part of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The island has a land area of 204 square miles (528 square kilometres), making it the 33rd largest island in the United States. Its highest point is volcano Mount Tanaga (Aleut: Kusuuginax̂) at 5,925 feet (1,806 m). Tanaga Island measures 43 kilometres (27 miles) long and 38 kilometres (24 miles) wide. There are no native land mammals on Tanaga Island. Show on map
Mount POW/MIAMount POW/MIA is a mountain in the U.S. state of Alaska that has been dedicated to all the soldiers that are or have been given the status of Prisoner of War or Missing in Action (POW/MIA). The mountain is just north of Eklutna Lake and is west of Twin peaks and Bull Peak, six miles southeast of Wasilla in Chugach State Park. There is a POW/MIA flag placed atop of Mount POW/MIA and is replaced annually by the Local Colony Army JROTC program during Memorial weekend in May. The black and white flag was designed by the National League and has been flown at the White House. Show on map
Delarof IslandsThe Delarof Islands (Aleut: Naahmiĝun tanangis) (ca. 51°23′13″N 178°57′47″W / 51.38694°N 178.96306°W) are a group of small islands at the extreme western end of the Andreanof Islands group in the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The Delarofs consist of 11 named islands: Amatignak, Gareloi, Ilak, Kavalga (Qavalĝa), Ogliuga (Aglaga), Skagul (Sxaĝulax̂), the Tags (Tagachaluĝis), Tanadak (Tanaadax̂), Ugidak (Qagan-tanax̂), Ulak, and Unalga (Unalĝa). Show on map
Glacier Bay National Park and PreserveGlacier Bay National Park and Preserve is a United States national park and preserve in the Alaska panhandle west of Juneau. President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the area around Glacier Bay a national monument under the Antiquities Act on February 25, 1925. Subsequent to an expansion of the monument by President Jimmy Carter in 1978, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) enlarged the national monument by 523,000 acres (2116.5 km2) on December 2, 1980 and in the process created Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, with 57,000 additional acres (230.7 km2) of public land designated as national preserve to the immediate northwest of the park in order to protect a portion of the Alsek River and related fish and wildlife habitats while allowing sport hunting. Show on map
Sitkinak IslandSitkinak Island is an island of the Kodiak Archipelago of the state of Alaska, United States. It lies south of the southern tip of Kodiak Island in the western part of the Gulf of Alaska. Tugidak Island lies to its west. The two islands are the largest components of the Trinity Islands of Alaska. The Trinity Islands, and thus Sitkinak, are part of the Gulf of Alaska unit of Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Sitkinak Island has a land area of 235.506 km² (90.929 sq mi) and no resident population. Cattle Operation Show on map
Regal MountainRegal Mountain is an eroded stratovolcano or shield volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of eastern Alaska. It is located in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park about 19 mi (31 km) east of Mount Blackburn, the second highest volcano in the United States, and southeast of the massive Nabesna Glacier. Regal Mountain is the third highest thirteener (a peak between 13,000 and 13,999 feet in elevation) in Alaska, ranking just behind its neighbor, Atna Peaks. Because the mountain is almost entirely covered in glaciers, no geological studies have been done, but published references state and the geological map shows that the mountain is an old eroded volcanic edifice. Show on map
Davidof IslandDavidof Island (Qanan-tanax̂ in Aleut) is an island in the Rat Islands archipelago of the Western Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Davidof Island is irregular in shape with a north-south length of 2 miles and a greatest width of 0.7 mile. The high point in the south part is 1,074 feet, and the summit in the north part is 922 feet high. Rocks on the north part of the island are hydrothermally altered. The projecting E point of the island is marked by a prominent cone-shaped grayish-tan summit. Davidof Island supports a substantial colony of Tufted Puffins and Horned Puffins. Show on map
Mount CookMount Cook (or Boundary Peak 182) is a high peak on the Yukon Territory-Alaska border, in the Saint Elias Mountains of North America. It is approximately 15 miles southwest of Mount Vancouver and 35 miles east-southeast of Mount Saint Elias. It forms one of the corners of the jagged border, which is defined to run in straight lines between the major peaks. The same border also separates Kluane National Park in the Yukon Territory from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Show on map
Fox IslandsThe Fox Islands are a group of islands in the eastern Aleutian Islands of the U.S. state of Alaska. The Fox Islands are the closest to mainland North America in the Aleutian chain, and just east of Samalga Pass and the Islands of Four Mountains group. Location of Unalaska, Alaska Inhabited by the Aleut for centuries, the islands, along with the rest of the Aleutians, were first visited by Europeans in 1741, when a Danish navigator employed by the Russian navy, Vitus Bering, was searching for new sources of fur for Russian fur trappers. Show on map
Forrester IslandForrester Island is an island in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located off the coast of the Alaska Panhandle, near its southernmost portion, 20 miles (32 km) west of Dall Island, in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area. The island is 5.2 miles (8.4 km) long and covers an area of 3.97 sq mi (10.29 km2). It is wooded and mountainous, rising 814 feet (248 m) in elevation. The island hosts rookeries of Steller sea lions. The longest recorded migration of a Steller sea lion was 1,600 miles (2,600 km) between Forrester Island and Cape Newenham in Bristol Bay. Show on map
Mount VeniaminofMount Veniaminof is an active stratovolcano located on the Alaska Peninsula. The Alaska Volcano Observatory currently rates Veniaminof as Aviation Color Code YELLOW and Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY as of October 1, 2015, 2000 (UTC) following observations of elevated seismicity. The mountain was named after Ioann (Ivan Popov) Veniaminov (1797–1879), a Russian Orthodox missionary priest (and later a prominent bishop in Russia) whose writings on the Aleut language and ethnology are still standard references. He is a saint of the Orthodox Church, known as Saint Innocent for the monastic name he used in later life. Show on map
Mount NatazhatMount Natazhat is a high peak of the Saint Elias Mountains, of Alaska, United States, just west of the border with the Yukon Territory of Canada. It lies on the northern edge of the range, south of the White River and north of the Klutlan Glacier.Mount Natazhat is a little-noticed peak; however it is a very large peak in terms of rise above local terrain. It rises 9,000 feet (2,743 m) in less than 7 miles (11.3 km) above the lowlands to the north, and 7,500 feet (2,286 m) in about 4 miles (6.4 km) above the Klutlan Glacier to the south. Show on map
Agattu IslandAgattu (Aleut: Angatux̂) is an island in the Near Islands in the western end of the Aleutian Islands. With a land area of 85.558 square miles (221.59 km2) Agattu is one of the largest uninhabited islands in the Aleutians. It is the second largest of the Near Islands, after Attu Island. It is volcanic and considerably mountainous. The treeless island has a tundra-like terrain which reaches a peak of 2,073 feet (632 m) above sea level. Its length is 12.2 miles (19.7 km) and width is 19 miles (30 km). Show on map
Rat IslandsThe Rat Islands (Aleut: Qax̂um tanangis) are a volcanic group of islands in the Aleutian Islands in southwest Alaska, between Buldir Island and the Near Islands group to its west, and Amchitka Pass and the Andreanof Islands group to its east, at about 51°47′17″N 178°18′10″E / 51.78806°N 178.30278°E. The largest islands in the group are, from west to east, Kiska, Little Kiska, Segula, Hawadax or Kryssei, Khvostof, Davidof, Little Sitkin, Amchitka, and Semisopochnoi. The total land area of the Rat Islands is 360.849 sq mi (934.594 km2). None of the islands is inhabited. Show on map
Yukon Delta National Wildlife RefugeThe Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge is a United States National Wildlife Refuge covering about 19.16 million acres (77,500 km2) in southwestern Alaska. It is the second-largest National Wildlife Refuge in the country, only slightly smaller than the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It is a coastal plain extending to the Bering Sea, covering the delta created by the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. The delta includes extensive wetlands near sea level that are often inundated by Bering Sea tides. The refuge is administered from offices in Bethel. Show on map
Chugach State ParkChugach State Park covers 495,204 acres (2,004 square kilometers) immediately east of the Anchorage Bowl in south-central Alaska. Though primarily in the Municipality of Anchorage, a small portion of the park north of the Eklutna Lake area in the vicinity of Pioneer Peak lies within the Matanuska-Susitna Borough. Established by legislation signed into law on August 6, 1970, by Alaska Governor Keith Miller, this state park was created to provide recreational opportunities, protect the scenic value of the Chugach Mountains and other geographic features, and ensure the safety of the water supply for Anchorage. The park, managed by Alaska State Parks, is the third-largest state park in the United States, and consists of geographically disparate areas each with different attractions and facilit Show on map
Cape LisburneCape Lisburne is a cape located at the northwest point of the Lisburne Peninsula on the Chukchi Sea coast in Alaska. It is 40 miles (64 km) northeast of the village of Point Hope, Arctic Slope. It is a part of the Chukchi Sea unit of Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The first European to sight this cape was James Cook. He named it on August 21, 1778 and wrote: \"The southern extreme seemed to form a point which was named Cape Lisburne.\" Show on map
Arrigetch PeaksThe Arrigetch Peaks are a cluster of rugged granite spires in the Endicott Mountains of the central Brooks Range in northern Alaska. The name Arrigetch means 'fingers of the outstretched hand' in the Inupiat language. The peaks ring the glacial cirques at the head of the Kobuk River and 2 tributaries of the Alatna River: Arrigetch Creek and Aiyagomahala Creek (Creek 4662). They are located at latitude 67 degrees 24' N and longitude 154 degrees 10' W. All of the summits of the peaks are around 6,000 ft, 1825 m elevation. The Arrigetch Peaks area was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1968 for its spectacular geography. Show on map
Chamisso WildernessChamisso Wilderness is a 455-acre (184 ha) wilderness area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was designated by the United States Congress in 1975. A small subunit of the Chukchi Sea Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Chamisso Island and nearby Puffin Island were combined as a wildlife refuge in 1912, designated Wilderness in 1975, and added to the AMNWR in 1980. Show on map
Wrangell MountainsThe Wrangell Mountains are a high mountain range of eastern Alaska in the United States. Much of the range is included in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve. The Wrangell Mountains are almost entirely volcanic in origin, and they include the second and third highest volcanoes in the United States, Mount Blackburn and Mount Sanford. The range takes its name from Mount Wrangell, which is one of the largest andesite shield volcanoes in the world, and also the only presently active volcano in the range. The Wrangell Mountains comprise most of the Wrangell Volcanic Field, which also extends into the neighboring Saint Elias Mountains and the Yukon Territory in Canada. Show on map
Chiswell IslandsThe Chiswell Islands are a group of rocky, uninhabited islands, accessible only by boat or airplane, within the Kenai Peninsula Borough of Alaska in the Gulf of Alaska. These islands are 35 miles south of Seward, Alaska. They are part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and an important bird sanctuary. The area is very active seismically and evidence of this can be seen in the rugged landscape, a rough hewn landscape that has also been carved by high tides and rough seas. These island appear to rise vertically out of the sea; there are no horizontal beaches. Starfish, barnacles and other sea life that thrive in a rocky habitat are abundant. The islands are inhabited by millions of marine birds and mammals and is the location of a small rookery of endangered Steller sea lions. Show on map
Mount HesperusMount Hesperus is the highest peak of the Revelation Mountains, the westernmost subrange of the Alaska Range. The Revelations are a small, rarely visited range, but they contain dramatic rock peaks, rising from low bases. Mount Hesperus is particularly impressive in terms of local relief: for example, it drops over 7,500 feet (2,286m) in less than 2 miles (3,219m) on two sides. Such steepness for this amount of relief makes Hesperus comparable to the best peaks in North America. Show on map
Smoky PointSmoky Point is a point of land in the U.S. state of Alaska, located at 57°36′44″N 157°41′24″W / 57.61222°N 157.69000°W, where Ugashik Bay joins the much larger Bristol Bay. The most easily distinguishable landmark is the United States Coast Guard lighthouse which is visible to mariners on the eastern shore of Bristol Bay and all of Ugashik Bay. Show on map
Misty Fjords National MonumentMisty Fiords National Monument (or Misty Fjords National Monument) is a national monument and wilderness area administered by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Tongass National Forest. Misty Fiords is about 40 miles (64 km) east of Ketchikan, Alaska, along the Inside Passage coast in extreme southeastern Alaska, comprising 2,294,343 acres (928,488 ha) of Tongass National Forest in Alaska's Panhandle. All but 151,832 acres (61,444 ha) are designated as wilderness. Show on map
Mount MoffitMount Moffit is a peak in the Alaska Range in central Alaska, United States, about 10 miles (16 km) east-southeast of Mount Hayes. It is notable for its steep faces and large relief above local terrain. For example, the north face drops 7,400 feet in approximately 1.2 miles (2 km) horizontal distance. Show on map
Magnetic IslandMagnetic Island is a small island on the north side of Tuxnedi Bay, an inlet on the lower west side of Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska. The island is surrounded by mudflats that are under water during high tides. The island got its name from the presence of magnetism (believed due to magnetite) identified during a geological survey in 1951. Its shape and geology are heavily influenced by Mount Redoubt and Mount Iliamna, two active volcanoes located less than 20 miles (32 km) away. The island is most notable for its archaeological significance, which includes a prehistoric human habitation site which has been dated to c. 1800-1400 BCE. The sites consists of a series of depressions, which when excavated in 2012, yielded several layers of cultural materials, included fire-cracked stones an Show on map
Montague IslandMontague Island is an island in the Gulf of Alaska lying at the entrance to Prince William Sound in the state of Alaska, United States. The island has a land area of 790.88 km² (305.36 sq mi), making it the 26th largest island in the United States. As of the 2000 census, Montague did not have a permanent resident population, making it the largest uninhabited island in the United States. Montague Island is well known among sport fishing out of the Seward port as it is referred to as 'The Land of the Giants'. In 2007 it produced a 350 lb halibut and many boats full of fish over 100 lbs. Montague Island was named by Captain James Cook in honor of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, one of his greatest supporters. Show on map
Lituya MountainLituya Mountain is a peak in the Fairweather Range of Alaska, United States, south of Mount Fairweather. Its eastern slopes feed a branch of the Johns Hopkins Glacier, which flows into Glacier Bay. On its western side is a large cirque, shared with Mount Fairweather, Mount Quincy Adams, and Mount Salisbury, which heads the Fairweather Glacier; this flows almost to the Pacific coast at Cape Fairweather. The Lituya Glacier flows from the south side of the mountain into Lituya Bay on the Pacific coast. Show on map
Puffin IslandPuffin Island is a rocky islet in the Kotzebue Sound, Alaska. It is located off Spafarief Bay at the mouth of Eschscholtz Bay, just south of the Choris Peninsula, in the Northwest Arctic Borough at 66°13′40″N 161°51′31″W / 66.22778°N 161.85861°W. This island was named in 1826 by Captain Frederick William Beechey (1831, p. 255), RN. He wrote, \"Detached from Chamisso there is a steep rock which by way of distinction we named Puffin Island.\" Show on map
Zarembo IslandZarembo Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It lies directly south of Mitkof Island and northwest of Etolin Island. To the northwest is Kupreanof Island and to the southwest is Prince of Wales Island. It has a land area of 183.14 square miles (474.330 square kilometres), making it the 34th largest island in the United States. It has no permanent resident population. It was first charted in 1793 by James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver’s officers during his 1791-95 expedition. He only charted its north, west, and south coasts, not realizing it was an island. The island is named after Dionizy Zaremba, a Polish employee of the Russian American Company and explorer of Alaska. Usually known as Dionysius Zarembo, he was Commander of the RAC@en . Show on map
Cape Krusenstern National MonumentCape Krusenstern National Monument and the colocated Cape Krusenstern Archeological District is a U.S. National Monument and a National Historic Landmark centered on Cape Krusenstern in northwestern Alaska. The national monument is one of fifteen new National Park Service units designated by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. It was initially declared a national monument under the authority of the Antiquities Act by President Jimmy Carter on December 1, 1978. Show on map
Point HopePoint Hope is a headland in the U.S. state of Alaska, located at the western tip of the Lisburne Peninsula. It lies on the Chukchi Sea coast, 40 miles southwest of Cape Lisburne, Arctic Slope at 68°20′27″N 166°50′00″W / 68.34083°N 166.83333°W (68.347052, -166.762917). The city of Point Hope is located on the foreland. The Inuit name for this cape was Tikarakh or Tikiqaq commonly spelled \"Tiagara,\" meaning \"forefinger\". Show on map
Saint Matthew IslandSt. Matthew Island is a remote island in the Bering Sea in Alaska, 295 km (183 mi) WNW of Nunivak Island. The island has a land area of 137.857 sq mi (357.05 km2), making it the 43rd largest island in the United States. Its most southerly point is Cape Upright which features cliff faces which exceed 1,000 feet (300 m). Similar heights are found at Glory of Russia Cape on the north, and the highest point, 1,476 feet (450 m) above sea level, lies south from the island center. The United States Coast Guard maintained a manned LORAN station on the island during the 1940s. Show on map
Starr HillStarr Hill is a populated place in Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is named for Frank Starr (1849-1898), a soldier from Maine who arrived shortly after the discovery of the Juneau gold fields in 1880, staked some claims but mainly found work in construction. Starr also staked land on the hill near the road leading to the Silver Bow Basin gold fields. The Hill saw significant development beginning in 1913 when Conrad Fries (d. 1922) built six miners’ cabins on the 500 block of Kennedy Street, buildings which are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A few years later Juneau businessman Bernard (B.M.) Behrends (b. 1862) built five smaller cabins on the 400 block of Kennedy. Starr Hill now includes several dozen private homes which overlook upper Juneau and the Alaska Stat Show on map
Cohen IslandCohen Island is an island within the borders of the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Located off the eastern shore of Favorite Channel, it is 1 mile (1.6 km) northwest of Point Stephens and 16 miles (26 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. It is a part of the Channel Islands State Marine Park. Show on map
Krenitzin IslandsThe Krenitzin Islands (centered at ca. 54°10′N 165°35′W / 54.167°N 165.583°W) are a group of small islands located in the eastern portion of the Fox Islands group of the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The Krenitizins are situated between Unalaska Island to the southwest and Unimak Island to the northeast. Named islands in the Krenitzins group include Aiktak, Avatanak, Derbin, Kaligagan (Qisĝagan), Rootok (Aayux̂tax̂), Round, Tigalda, and Ugamak. All of these islands are managed as part of the Aleutian Islands Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The Krenitzins have a total land area of 61.596 sq.mi. (159.533 km²) and have no population. Show on map
Mount PrindleMount Prindle is a granitic mountain in the Yukon-Tanana Uplands, and is located approximately 45 miles (72 km) north-northeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. The plutons that form the core of the Mount Prindle massif are Late Cretaceous or early Tertiary age. These plutons intruded older (Precambrian to Paleozoic) metamorphic rocks. Mount Prindle exhibits classic glacial landforms, unlike most of the surrounding Yukon-Tanana Uplands. It is in the Circle Mining District and many of the surrounding creeks have been or are being mined for placer gold. The area has also been prospected for tin and rare earth minerals. Mine roads and hiking trails provide access to the mountain. A 900 feet (270 m) granite wall on an eastern spur of the massif is an attraction for rock climbers. Show on map
Karta River WildernessKarta River Wilderness is a U. S. wilderness area within the Tongass National Forest, centrally located on Prince of Wales Island. It is 8 miles (13 km) north of Hollis, Alaska just east of the Kasaan Peninsula and may be accessed by a quick 10-minute plane ride or 30-minute boat ride. The wilderness was established by Congress in 1980, as part of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Show on map
Korovin IslandKorovin Island (Tanĝanuk in Aleut) is one of the Shumagin Islands in the Gulf of Alaska south of the Alaska Peninsula in the Aleutians East Borough of Alaska, United States. The island lies northeast of Popof Island and across the Unga Strait from the mainland peninsula. To its southeast are Andronica Island, and further southeast, Nagai Island. Korovin island has a land area of 67.85 km² (26.197 sq mi) and is uninhabited by humans. Show on map
Raspberry IslandRaspberry Island is an island of the Kodiak Archipelago located in the Gulf of Alaska in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located two miles northwest of Whale Island, and just across the mile-wide Raspberry Strait from the southwestern end of Afognak. The island is separated from Kodiak Island by the Kupreanof Strait, with the Shelikof Strait to the northwest. Raspberry Island is 18 miles (29 km) long with a width that varies from 3 miles (4.8 km) to 8 miles (12.9 km). The highest point on the island is 3,300 ft (1000 m). Show on map
Nizki IslandNizki Island (Avayax̂ in Aleut) is an uninhabited island in the Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska. Located at 52°44′28″N 173°59′08″E / 52.74111°N 173.98556°E, it is the middle island of the Semichi Islands group of the Near Islands. Flanked by Shemya to the east and Alaid to the west, three-mile-long (5 km) Nizki is periodically joined to Alaid by a sand spit. The name is said to derive from the Russian nizkiy, meaning \"low,\" a term descriptive of the island's topography, with a maximum elevation of 165 feet. Nizki's shoreline is very irregular and is fringed by numerous rocks, reefs, and kelp-marked shoals. Show on map
Lemesurier IslandLemesurier Island is the second-largest island in the Icy Strait between Chichagof Island and the mainland of the Alaska Panhandle in the U.S. state of Alaska. The island lies about midway between the mainland city of Gustavus and the northwest Chichagof Island community of Elfin Cove. The island was called Tàaś Daa by the Huna Tlingit people, which can be translated as \"Two-headed Tide Island\". The island was used as a place to gather currants, harvest seals and as a fort location. The island was named by W.H. Dall, after William Le Mesurier (1767–1833), a midshipman on the HMS Chatham. Show on map
Tolch RockTolch Rock is a summit in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is located 0.5 miles (0.8 km) west of Mendenhall Lake and 10 miles (16 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was published by the United States Geological Survey in 1962 and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Tugidak IslandTugidak Island is an island of the Kodiak Archipelago in Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska, United States. It lies southwest of the southern tip of Kodiak Island in the western part of the Gulf of Alaska. Sitkinak Island lies to its east. The two islands are the largest components of the Trinity Islands of Alaska. The Trinity Islands, and thus Tugidak, are part of the Gulf of Alaska unit of Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Tugidak Island has a land area of 173.142 km² (66.85 sq mi) and no resident population. The most prominent feature of the island is the large shallow lagoon near its northeastern end. This part of the island was established as the Tugidak Island Critical Habitat Area by the state of Alaska in 1998 as a wildlife conservation area, and is managed by the Alaska Departm Show on map
Ukinrek MaarsThe Ukinrek Maars are two phreatomagmatic vents that formed on the north side of the Aleutian Range on a low area bordering the Bering Sea. The maars are 1.5 km south of Becharof Lake and 12 km northwest of Peulik Volcano. The western of the two is elliptical in shape and up to 170 m in diameter and 35 m deep. The east maar lies 600 m to the east and is circular and up to 300 m in diameter and 70 m deep. The east maar has a 49 m-high lava dome within the crater lake. The eruption occurred in March and April of 1977 and lasted for ten days. There was no previous eruption. The magmatic material was olivine basalt from a mantle source. Pyroclastic surge from the eruptions traveled to the northwest. The volume of lava erupted was 9x105 m3 and the volume of tephra expelled was 2.6x107 m3. Show on map
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical ParkKlondike Gold Rush National Historical Park is a national historical park operated by the National Park Service that seeks to commemorate the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1890s. Though the gold fields that were the ultimate goal of the stampeders lay in the Yukon Territory, the park comprises staging areas for the trek there and the routes leading in its direction. There are four units, including three in Municipality of Skagway Borough, Alaska and a fourth in the Pioneer Square National Historic District in Seattle, Washington. Show on map
Chuginadak IslandChuginadak Island (Aleut: Tanax̂ Angunax̂) is the largest island in the Islands of Four Mountains subgroup of the Aleutian archipelago. Chuginadak is an Aleutian name published by Captain Tebenkov in an 1852 map. According to Knut Bergsland's Aleut Dictionary, the Aleutian word \"chugida-lix\" means \"to fry, to make sizzle.\" The Western half of the island is called Chuginadax in Aleut, meaning 'simmering'. Show on map
Denali National PreserveDenali National Park and Preserve is a national park and preserve located in Interior Alaska, centered on Denali, the highest mountain in North America. The park and contiguous preserve encompasses more than 6 million acres (24,500 km2), of which 4,724,735.16 acres (19,120 km2) are not federally owned by the national park. The national preserve is 1,334,200 acres (5,430 km2), of which 1,304,132 acres (5,278 km2) are federally owned. On December 2, 1980, a 2,146,580 acre (8,687 km2) Denali Wilderness was established within the park. Denali's landscape is a mix of forest at the lowest elevations, including deciduous taiga. The preserve is also home to tundra at middle elevations, and glaciers, rock, and snow at the highest elevations. The longest glacier is the Kahiltna Glacier. Today, 400,0 Show on map
Punuk IslandsThe Punuk Islands are a chain of three small islets in the Bering Sea off the eastern end of St. Lawrence Island. They are located 8.5 km to the southeast of Cape Apavawook and 18 km to the southwest of Niyghapak Point. These islands were drawn on the map with their Siberian Yupik name, which was obtained in 1849 by Capt. M. D. Tebenkov, of the Imperial Russian Navy. They are also known by the names \"Pinik Islands\" and \"Poongook Islands.\" Show on map
Mount SalisburyMount Salisbury is a peak in the Fairweather Range of Alaska, 6 miles (10 km) southeast of Mount Fairweather. Its east slopes feed one of the northern branches of the Johns Hopkins Glacier, which flows into Glacier Bay. On its western side is a large cirque, shared with Mount Fairweather, Mount Quincy Adams, and Lituya Mountain, which heads the Fairweather Glacier; this flows almost to the Pacific coast at Cape Fairweather. Show on map
Mount NesselrodeMount Nesselrode, also known as Boundary Peak 98, 2,474 metres (8,117 ft) prominence: 924 m (3,031 ft), is a peak in the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains, located on and in part defining the border between British Columbia, Canada and Alaska, United States. About 40 miles north of Juneau to the west of the lower Stikine River and in the heart of the Stikine Icecap, it is also the corner point of Alaska's Haines Borough and Juneau Borough. Show on map
Woody IslandWoody Island is located in Chiniak Bay, 2.6 miles (4.2 km) east of Kodiak, Alaska. It was originally settled by the native Alutiiq people who called themselves Tangirnarmiut, \"the people of Tangirnaq.\" They inhabited and used Woody Island for thousands of years. The Russians established an agricultural colony on Woody Island in 1792. It was officially designated Wood Island in 1894 by the US Post Office and was the primary coastal settlement for commerce and trade for many years. The first road in Alaska was built on Woody Island. Aside from the Aleut presence, the island has gone through four periods of occupation by non-natives, and is largely unoccupied today. The island is approximately 2.8 miles long from north to south and 1.8 miles wide and 13 miles in circumference. Sites of archae Show on map
Amak IslandAmak Island (Aleut: Amax) is an uninhabited island in Aleutians East Borough, Alaska, United States. The island lies north of the western tip of the Alaska Peninsula, and northwest of the mainland city of Cold Bay. The island's land area is 5.828 square miles (15.09 km2) and its maximum elevation is 1,601 feet (488 m). The island's volcano, Mount Amak, last erupted in 1796. Show on map
Diomede IslandsThe Diomede Islands (/ˌdaɪ.əˈmiːdiː/; Russian: острова́ Диоми́да, ostrová Diomída), also known in Russia as Gvozdev Islands (Russian: острова́ Гво́здева, ostrová Gvozdjeva), consist of two rocky, mesa-like islands: \n* The Russian island of Big Diomede (part of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug), also known as Imaqliq, Inaliq, Nunarbuk or Ratmanov Island \n* The American island of Little Diomede or Ignaluk, also known as Krusenstern Island Show on map
Hawadax IslandHawadax Island (Aleut: Hawadax) is an island in the Rat Islands archipelago of the western Aleutian Islands in the US state of Alaska. The island was formerly known as Rat Island until May 2012 when it was renamed Hawadax Island, which is an Aleut name meaning \"entry\" and \"welcome\". The island has a land area of 10.3126 sq mi (26.7095 km²) and no permanent population. It is within the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. It is 9.3 miles (15 km) in length and 3.1 miles (5 km) in width. Show on map
Kootznoowoo WildernessThe temperate rainforests of Admiralty Island's Kootznoowoo Wilderness are unique among the 5,700,000 acres (2,300,000 ha) of federally protected Wilderness in Southeast Alaska. The island's towering cathedrals of old growth Sitka spruce and western hemlock could not be more different from the glaciers and alpine tundra found in nearby Wilderness Areas such as Tracy Arm or Misty Fjords. These ancient forests are home to the highest concentrations of brown bears in the world, as well as thousands of bald eagles, Sitka Black-tailed Deer, boreal toads, and all five species of Alaskan salmon. Show on map
Tongass National ForestThe Tongass National Forest /ˈtɒŋɡəs/ in Southeast Alaska is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres (69,000 km2). Most of its area is part of the temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, itself part of the larger Pacific temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, and is remote enough to be home to many species of endangered and rare flora and fauna. The Tongass, which is managed by the United States Forest Service, encompasses islands of the Alexander Archipelago, fjords and glaciers, and peaks of the Coast Mountains. An international border with Canada (British Columbia) runs along the crest of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains. The forest is administered from Forest Service offices in Ketchikan. There are local ranger district offices located in Craig, Hoonah Show on map
Avatanak IslandAvatanak Island (Aleut: Agutanax̂) is the second-largest (with a length of 10 mi) of the Krenitzin Islands, a subgroup of the Fox Islands in the eastern Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies southeast of Akun Island, across the Avatanak Strait. Within the Krenitzin Islands, it lies between Rootok Island (Aayux̂tax̂) to the west, and Tigalda Island to the east. Show on map
Troth Yeddha’In February 2013, the US Board of Geographic Names approved the university, supported proposal to officially name the prominent ridge, on which the University of Alaska Fairbanks is currently located as Troth Yeddha'. This is a Lower Tanana Athabascan place name that derives from words troth, meaning 'Indian potato' or 'wild potato' (Hedysarum alpinum) and yeddha', meaning 'ridge'. The 2200 acre east-west trending ridge has had no official name. Portions of the ridge are referred to unofficially in English as 'College Hill' or 'University Ridge'. Show on map
Little Sitkin IslandLittle Sitkin Island (Aleut: Sitignax̂) is a volcanic island in the Rat Islands archipelago of the Western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, about 3 miles (4.8 km) miles east of Davidof Island. Great Sitkin Island (which is essentially the same size as Little Sitkin) lies 185 miles (298 km) further east in the Andreanof Islands. Show on map
Mount StellerMount Steller is a peak at the far eastern end of the Chugach Mountains of Alaska, United States. It is notable for its isolated location among extensive icefields, and for its large rise above local terrain. For example, it rises 8000 feet (2440 m) above the Bering Glacier to the south in about 4 horizontal miles (6.4 km). The mountain was named for the naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller. Due to its isolated location, poor weather, and comparatively low absolute elevation by Alaskan standards, Mount Steller was not climbed until recently. The first ascent was in 1992. Show on map
Mount DenisonMount Denison is a stratovolcano and one of the highest peaks on the Alaska Peninsula. Discovered in 1923 by Harvard professor Kirtley Fletcher Mather, the mountain was named for the geologist's alma mater, Denison University. The mountain's connection to Denison also include its first climbers: all members of the first two ascent teams as well as the group that attempted in 1977 were either students, alumni, or faculty of the University. Show on map
Mount BassieMount Bassie is a large mountain in the center of Baranof Island, Alaska, United States, within the City and Borough of Sitka. Mount Bassie is a massive hulk of rock, its footprint covering nearly five square miles. It is bordered by the Blue Lake and Medvejie Lake watersheds and the Baranof River watershed, effectively splitting the island in two (one can see both Chatham Strait and the Pacific Ocean from the peak and its surrounding ridges). Mount Bassie is adjacent to Camp Lake, from which ascents typically originate. It is fairly isolated in terms of sister peaks and has only two modest lower ridges running off the south and north sides of the mountain. The rest of the mountain slopes down steeply into surrounding river valleys. Mount Bassie is rarely summitted, although the western fa Show on map
Atka IslandAtka Island (Aleut: Atx̂ax̂) is the largest island in the Andreanof Islands of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The island is 50 miles (80 km) east of Adak Island. It is 65 miles (105 km) long and 2–20 miles (3–30 km) wide with a land area of 404.6 square miles (1,048 km2), making it the 22nd largest island in the United States. The northeast of Atka Island contains the Korovin volcano which reaches a peak of 5,030 feet (1,533 m). Oglodak Island is located 3.4 miles (3.0 nmi; 5.5 km) off Cape Kigun, Atka's westernmost point. Show on map
Cape MuzonCape Muzon is a cape located in the Alexander Archipelago of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the southernmost point of Dall Island and the headland marking the northwestern extremity of the Dixon Entrance. The boundary line separating Alaska from Canada runs very close to Cape Muzon, although according to the Alaska Boundary Treaty Cape Muzon is defined precisely as the western end of the so-called A-B Line, part of the Canada–United States border. Show on map
Atigun PassAtigun Pass (/ˈætɪɡən/ AT-i-gən), elevation 4,739 feet (1,444 m), is a high mountain pass across the Brooks Range in Alaska, located at the head of the Dietrich River. It is where the Dalton Highway crosses the Continental Divide (at mile marker 244), and is the highest pass in Alaska that is maintained throughout the year. Atigun is the only pass in the Brooks Range that is crossed by a road. The pass has been responsible for taking many drivers off the road and is also home to avalanches during the winter. Show on map
Spruce IslandSpruce Island (Russian: Еловый остров) is an island in the Kodiak Archipelago of the Gulf of Alaska in the US state of Alaska. It lies just off the northeast corner of Kodiak Island, across the Narrow Strait. Spruce Island has a land area of 46.066 km² (17.786 sq mi) and a population of 242 as of the 2000 census, mostly in its only city, Ouzinkie, in the southwestern part of the island. Show on map
Lisburne PeninsulaThe Lisburne Peninsula is a peninsula jutting out into the Chukchi Sea on the western coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located at the westernmost point of the North Slope Borough. It is roughly trapezoid-shaped, having two points, the northwestern one being Cape Lisburne and the southwestern one Point Hope. It is limited on its eastern side by the De Long Mountains. Lat 683000N Long 1651500W The Kukpuk River flows through the Lisburne Peninsula. Show on map
Prindle VolcanoPrindle Volcano is an isolated basaltic cinder cone located in eastern Alaska, United States, in the headwaters of the East Fork of the Fortymile River. The cone is fresh-looking and has a base approximately 900 meters wide. It is the northwesternmost expression of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province. The cinder cone, and an approximately 11 km-long lava flow which breached the margin of the cone, erupted in the Pleistocene approximately 176,000 years ago. Rocks forming the Prindle Volcano occur within, and penetrated through, the Yukon-Tanana upland which is a large region of mostly Paleozoic-Mesozoic metamorphosed and deformed sedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks that are intruded by younger Cretaceous and Cenozoic granitic rocks. Xenoliths in the volcano's ejecta provide a@en . Show on map
Russian Jack Springs ParkRussian Jack Springs Park is a public park located in Anchorage, Alaska, managed by the Anchorage Park Foundation. The park is named for Jacob \"Russian Jack\" Marunenko. The park comprises two quarter-sections, minus road rights-of-way, covering approximately 300 acres (120 ha). DeBarr Road, a major east-west arterial road in Anchorage, bisects the park. The land for the park was transferred to the municipality of Anchorage by the Bureau of Land Management in 1948 and it was initially used as a minimum security prison farm. The park's playground was renovated in 2013. Show on map
Brassiere HillsThe Brassiere Hills are a pair of summits in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is located at the northern end of Taku Inlet, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) north of Taku Point and 18 miles (29 km) northeast of the city of Juneau. The peaks are 2,405 feet (733 m) and 2,360 feet (719 m) high and a stream named Zipper Creek runs between them. Ice thickness studies of Taku Glacier were conducted near the hills in 1989, 1990, and 1993. Nancy Bartley of The Seattle Times attributes the naming to photographer Austin Post. Show on map
Adak IslandAdak Island (Aleut: Adaax) is an island near the western extent of the Andreanof Islands group of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. Alaska's southernmost town, Adak, is located on the island. The island has a land area of 274.59 square miles (711.18 km2), measuring 33.9 miles (54.5 km) on length and 22 miles (35 km) on width, making it the 25th largest island in the United States. The word Adak is from the Aleut word adaq, which means \"father\". Show on map
Gates of the Arctic National ParkGates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is a U.S. National Park in Alaska. It is the northernmost national park in the U.S. (the entirety of the park lies north of the Arctic Circle) and the second largest at 8,472,506 acres (3,428,702 ha), slightly larger in area than Belgium. The park consists primarily of portions of the Brooks Range of mountains. It was first protected as a U.S. National Monument on December 1, 1978, before becoming a national park and preserve two years later in 1980 upon passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. A large part of the park is protected in the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness which covers 7,167,192 acres (2,900,460 ha). The wilderness area adjoins the Noatak Wilderness Area and together they form the largest contiguous wilderne Show on map
Kasaan PeninsulaKasaan Peninsula lies between Clarence Strait and Kasaan Bay in the U.S. state of Alaska. It forms a cut out from the eastern coast of Prince of Wales Island on the south, and by Tolstoi Bay and Thome Bay on the north. A low mountain range forms the backbone of the peninsula, with altitudes ranging from 1,500–2,000 feet (460–610 m). The southern and western shore line is abrupt and almost unbroken, and has practically no shelter from southeasterly storms which sweep up Kasaan Bay. The northeastern coast of the peninsula also rises abruptly from the water, but is broken by a number of indentations, some of which form small harbors. The first discovery of copper deposits in the Ketchikan district was made by the Russians on the southern side of Kasaan Peninsula. Kasaan is the largest settlem Show on map
Homer SpitThe Homer Spit is a geographical landmark located in Homer, Alaska on the southern tip of the Kenai Peninsula. The spit is a 4.5-mile (7.2 km) long piece of land jutting out into Kachemak Bay. The spit is also home to the Homer Boat Harbor. The harbor contains both deep and shallow water docks and serves up to 1500 commercial and pleasure boats at its summer peak. Additional features and attractions include The Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon, which is an artificial \"fishing hole\", campgrounds, hotels, and restaurants and the Salty Dawg Saloon, which is constructed out of several historic buildings from Homer. Hundreds of eagles have gathered there in winter to be fed by Jean Keene, the \"Eagle Lady\". The Spit features the longest road into ocean waters in the entire world, taking up 10–15 minut Show on map
Steese National Conservation AreaThe Steese National Conservation Area encompasses 1,200,000 acres (4,900 km2) of public land about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of Fairbanks, Alaska, and is administered by the Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. Created by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980, the Steese NCA's special values include Birch Creek National Wild River, crucial caribou calving grounds and home range, and Dall sheep habitat. While various land uses are allowed in the Steese NCA, the area is managed so that its scenic, scientific, cultural and other resources are protected. Show on map
Bligh ReefBligh Reef, sometimes known as Bligh Island Reef, is a reef off the coast of Bligh Island in Prince William Sound, Alaska. This was the location of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. After the incident, US Code 33 § 2733 mandated the operation of an automated navigation light to prevent future collisions with the reef. Despite these efforts the tug Pathfinder ran aground on Bligh Reef on Dec 24, 2009, rupturing its tanks and spilling diesel fuel. Bligh Reef is also where Alaska Steamship Company's Olympia ran aground in 1910. Show on map
Little Diomede IslandLittle Diomede Island (Inupiat: Iŋaliq, formerly known as Krusenstern Island is an island of Alaska, United States. It is the smaller of the two Diomede Islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between the Alaska mainland and Siberia. During the Cold War, the section of the border between the USA and the USSR separating Big and Little Diomede became known as the \"Ice Curtain\". In 1987, however, Lynne Cox swam from Little Diomede to Big Diomede (approx. 2.2 miles (3.5 km)) and was congratulated jointly by Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan. Show on map
Suemez IslandSuemez Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It lies just off the west-central coast of Prince of Wales Island. The northern tip of Dall Island lies to its southeast, while Baker Island lies to its northwest. Suemez Island has a land area of 151.713 km² (58.5768 sq mi) and was unpopulated at the 2000 census. The Tlevak Strait-Suemez Island volcano at 55°15′0″N, 133°18′0″W is 50 metres (164 feet)high. Show on map
Sagchudak IslandSagchudak Island (also spelled Sagtchudakh) is a small island in the Andreanof Islands group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The roughly rectangular island is approximately 1.4 miles (2.3 km) long and 0.6 mi (1 km) wide and lies about 0.93 mi (1.50 km) off the southern coast of Atka Island. The island's current name is nearly identical to the native Aleut name for the island and it entered navigational charts by the early 1850s. In the 1900s and 1910s, the island was one of many Aleutian islands stocked with foxes by the United States government for hunting and fur trading purposes. Although the foxes on uninhabited Sagchudak were not directly hunted, some were occasionally trapped and moved to and from the island to help ensure genetic stability in the various separated co Show on map
Flattop MountainFlattop Mountain is a 3,510-foot (1,070 m) mountain in the U.S. state of Alaska, located in Chugach State Park just east of urban Anchorage. It is the most climbed mountain in the state. It is usually reached by driving to the Glen Alps trailhead and following a well-maintained 1.5-mile (2.4-km) trail, with an elevation gain of 1280 feet (390 m) from the parking lot to the summit. Since it is the most accessible mountain to Anchorage, Flattop is a very popular location for hiking, climbing, berry picking, paragliding, and backcountry skiing. Campouts are held on the summit at the summer and winter solstices. Show on map
Benjamin IslandBenjamin Island (or Benjamin Islet) is an island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It was named by Captain Lester A. Beardslee of the United States Navy in 1880. Located off the eastern shore of Favorite Channel, it is 25 miles (40 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Mount GriggsMount Griggs, formerly known as Knife Peak Volcano, is a stratovolcano, which lies 10 km behind the volcanic arc defined by other Katmai group volcanoes. Although no historic eruptions have been reported from Mount Griggs, vigorously active fumaroles persist in a summit crater and along the upper southwest flank. The fumaroles on the southwest flank are the hottest, and some of the flank fumaroles can roar so loudly that they can be heard from the valley floor. The slopes of Mount Griggs are heavily mantled by fallout from the 1912 eruption of Novarupta volcano. Show on map
Hayes VolcanoHayes Volcano is a stratovolcano in southwestern Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, that was not discovered until 1975. It is responsible for a series of six major tephra layers in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska. Hayes was mostly destroyed by at least six catastrophic eruptions between 3,400 and 3,800 years ago, and the average volume of these eruptions was 2.4 cubic km. In comparison, the volume of the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was about 1 cubic km. The eruptions of Hayes Volcano during that time were the most voluminous Holocene eruptions to have occurred in the Cook Inlet region. There is currently no fumarolic activity present. The last eruption of Hayes Volcano occurred roughly 1,200 years ago. It is named after the adjacent Hayes Glacie Show on map
Aello PeakAello Peak is the highest peak of a mountain group called The Twaharpies, just west of Mount Bona in the Saint Elias Mountains of Alaska. While not highly significant in terms of prominence or isolation (it is just 5 miles (8 km) west of the summit of Mount Bona), it has a tremendous south face. From the summit, this face drops 7,000 feet (2,130 m) in just over 1 mile (1.6 km), and 8,500 feet (2,590 m) in less than 2.5 miles (4.0 km). In terms of vertical relief and steepness, this is one of the major faces in North America. Show on map
Mount BearMount Bear is a high, glaciated peak in the Saint Elias Mountains of Alaska. It lies within Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park, about 4 miles (6.4 km) west of the Yukon border. The Barnard Glacier flows from its southwest slopes, while the Klutlan Glacier lies to the north. Its principal claim to fame is that it is a fourteener, and in fact one of the highest 20 peaks in the United States. Show on map
Yukon Flats National Wildlife RefugeThe Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge is a protected wetland area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It encompasses most of the Yukon Flats, a vast wetland area centered on the confluence of the Yukon River, Porcupine River, and Chandalar River. The area is a major waterfowl breeding ground, and after a proposal to flood the Yukon Flats via a dam on the Yukon River was turned down, the Yukon Flats were deemed worthy of protection. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act established the refuge in 1980. It is the third-largest National Wildlife Refuge in the United States, although it is less than one-half the size of either of the two largest, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, or the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is administered from offices in Fairbanks. Show on map
New Eddystone RockThe Alaskan island called New Eddystone Rock is a pillar of basalt. The basalt came from fractures in the floor of Behm Canal in the last 5 million years. The broken, haphazard texture of these basalts indicates that New Eddystone Rock was part of a volcanic vent where magma rose repeatedly to the surface of the earth. Show on map
Devils ThumbDevils Thumb, or Taalkhunaxhkʼu Shaa in Tlingit, is a mountain in the Stikine Icecap region of the Alaska–British Columbia border, near Petersburg. It is named for its projected thumb-like appearance. Its name in the Tlingit language has the meaning \"the Mountain That Never Flooded\" and is said to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (\"the Great Flood\"). It is one of the peaks that marks the border, and is also listed on maps as Boundary Peak 71. Show on map
Mollie Beattie WildernessThe Mollie Beattie Wilderness is located in the northeastern section of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It is the second-largest designated wilderness area in the United States, after the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness. It has an area of approximately 8,000,000 acres (3,200,000 ha), and comprises over 40 percent of the area of Arctic NWR. Its territory is centered about a part of the Brooks Range that contains a combination of arctic, subarctic, and alpine ecosystems. Animal life is abundant, including that of large mammals such as brown bears, moose, caribou, musk oxen, and (offshore) polar bears and numerous species of whales and seals. The wilderness is named after conservationist Mollie Beattie, the first female director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Show on map
Trident VolcanoTrident Volcano is an eroded volcanic complex consisting of numerous domes (up to 23), as high as 6,115 feet (1,864 m) in elevation, along a northeast-southwest oriented volcanic front on the Pacific Ocean side of the Alaska Peninsula. A new dome was emplaced beginning in 1953 at an altitude of 3,599 feet (1,097 m) in an amphitheater on the southwest flank of the southwest peak. Show on map
Mount AlverstoneMount Alverstone or Boundary Peak 180, is a high peak in the Saint Elias Mountains, on the border between Alaska and Yukon. It shares a large massif with the higher Mount Hubbard to the south and the slightly lower Mount Kennedy to the east. The summit of Mount Alverstone marks a sharp turn in the Alaska/Canada border; the border goes south from this point toward the Alaska panhandle and west toward Mount Saint Elias. Show on map
Seahorse IslandsThe Seahorse Islands is a chain of long and narrow sandy islands in western North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. They are located between Peard Bay and the Chukchi Sea, 1.7 km (1.1 mi) east of Point Franklin. The longest island is about 5 km (3.1 mi) in length and the highest point of the islands is 2 m (6.6 ft). The shape of these coastal islands has changed over the years. Show on map
Egg IslandEgg Island (Aleut: Ugalĝa) is a small island in the Fox Islands subgroup of the Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies off the eastern end of Unalaska Island and just off the northeastern tip of Sedanka Island. It is the easternmost island in the Aleutians West Census Area of Alaska. The island has a land area of 311.12 acres (1.259 km²) and is uninhabited. It is 19.3 kilometres (12.0 mi) long and 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) wide. Show on map
Shuyak IslandShuyak Island is an island in the northern part of the Kodiak Archipelago in the state of Alaska, USA. It is located just north of Afognak Island, separated from it by the narrow Shuyak Strait. The Stevenson Entrance to Cook Inlet separates it from the Barren Islands further north in the archipelago. The island has an area of 168.3 km² (65 sq mi) and reported an official population of four persons at the 2000 census. Alaska's Shuyak Island State Park comprises most of the island's territory. The island's current major industry is tourism based on camping, recreational fishing, hunting, and kayaking. In the past the island was home to a large fish processing plant at Port William, but that industry has since declined with the advent of factory ships. Show on map
Baby IslandsThe Baby Islands are a group of small islands located about 1.2 miles (1.9 km) northeast of Unalga Island in the Fox Islands group of the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The group consists of five islands ranging from 980 to 3280 feet (300 to 1000 m) long and several smaller islets. The islands are uninhabited and none of them rise more than a few metres above sea level. Large numbers of birds, notably the whiskered auklet, nest on the islands, making them a frequent stop for nature tours in the area (the group is located only 21 miles (34 km) from Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island). However, the ocean near the islands is extremely hazardous for ships because of the shallow water and numerous rocks that lie just below water's surface. Show on map
Mount DouglasMount Douglas is a stratovolcano located south of Kamishak Bay, near the northeasternmost part of the Alaska Peninsula. It lies in the Katmai National Park and Preserve in Kenai Peninsula Borough. The mountain was officially named in 1906 after nearby Cape Douglas based on a 1904 report by USGS geologist G. C. Martin. The Alaska Volcano Observatory currently rates Douglas as Level of Concern Color Code Not Assigned. Show on map
Aziak IslandAziak Island (also called Azki, Azlak, Azik, and Azaik) is a small island in the Andreanof Islands group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The name \"Aziak\" is derived from the Aleut word ha-azax - \"ten,\" and in many books and charts published before 1920, it was often used to refer to Sledge Island, located 930 miles (1,500 km) to the northeast off the Seward Peninsula, or to a native settlement on that island. This practice apparently became rarer as the twentieth century progressed and today Aziak is used almost exclusively to refer the Andreanof-group island. Aziak Island is approximately 1.1 miles (1.8 km) long and reaches a maximum elevation of 190 feet (58 m). Very little is known about the island and it is uninhabited. Show on map
Battleship IslandBattleship Island is an island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Located in the Auke Bay portion of Lynn Canal, it is 1.6 mi (2.6 km) south of the village of Auke Bay, Alaska, and 9.9 mi (15.9 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was reported in a 1957 publication by R. N. DeArmond. It was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Ray MountainsThe Ray Mountains is a mountain range in central Alaska named for the Ray River, itself named for United States Army Captain Patrick Henry Ray, who established a meteorological station in Barrow, Alaska, in 1881. The mountains are within the Yukon-Tanana Uplands, an area of low mountain ranges that also includes the White Mountains. The Ray Mountains cover an area of 10,600 square miles (27,454 km2) and are bordered on the east by the Yukon River, on the south by the Tozitna River, and on the north by Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge. The highest point in the Ray Mountains is Mount Tozi, which has a summit elevation of 5,519 feet (1,682 m). Other notable peaks include Wolf Mountain, Mount Henry Eakin, the Kokrines Hills, and Moran Dome. Show on map
Mount StevensMount Stevens is a mountain located in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska. Mount Stevens is flanked to the northwest by Mount Hunter, and is about 10 miles (16 km) south of Mount McKinley (Denali). The mountain was named in 2010, after Ted Stevens (1923–2010), who had represented Alaska in the U.S. Senate from 1968 to 2009. It had been the highest unnamed peak in Alaska, though unofficially called South Hunter Peak. Show on map
Woewodski IslandWoewodski Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of Southeast Alaska, United States. It is separated from Kupreanof Island to the west by Duncan Canal, and Mitkof Island to the east by the Wrangell Narrows. It is named after Captain Lieutenant Stepan Vasilivich Woewodski, who was chief director of the Russian American colonies from 1854 to 1859. The name first appears on a Russian Hydrographic Department chart of 1848 as \"O(strov)va Voyevodskago\". Earlier, in 1838, G. Lindenberg called part of the island \"Medvezhiy\" (English: of the bear). The first European to sight the island was James Johnstone, one of George Vancouver's officers during his 1791-95 expedition, in 1793. He circumnavigated it, proving its insular nature. Show on map
Seguam IslandSeguam Island (Aleut: Saĝuugamax) is a small volcanic island in the Andreanof Islands group in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The island is mountainous and oval shaped with a land area of 80.04 square miles (207.3 km2). It is 16 miles (26 km) long and 6.8 miles (10.9 km) wide. The 2000 census reported a population of one person. Show on map
Cape GreigCape Greig is a geographical feature of the Alaska Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska, where a 290-foot (88 meter) ridge juts into the Bering Sea. It is located on the Bristol Bay coast eight miles north of Smoky Point (Ugashik Bay) and 32 miles south of Goose Point (Egegik Bay). The bay was named after the Russian admiral Alexey Greig. The highest point of the cape features a navigational lighthouse operated by the United States Coast Guard. Show on map
West Chichagof-Yakobi WildernessThe West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness is a federally designated wilderness. It encompasses 265,286 acres (107,357 ha) in Southeastern Alaska, in the United States. It includes Yakobi Island and the entire western side of Chichagof Island, as well as the many small island systems along their coasts. Show on map
Chamisso IslandChamisso Island is a small island in Kotzebue Sound, Alaska. It is located off Spafarief Bay at the mouth of Eschscholtz Bay, just south of the Choris Peninsula. The island is roughly triangular. It is 1.4 miles (2.3 km) long and an 0.125 miles (0.201 km) wide. The highest point on Chamisso Island is 226 feet (68.9 m) above sea level. This island was named after naturalist Adelbert von Chamisso, who reached the island in 1816. Show on map
Ahklun MountainsThe Ahklun Mountains are located in the northeast section of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. They extend southwest from the Kanektok and Narogurum Rivers to Hagemeister Strait and Kuskokwim Bay and support the only existing glaciers in western Alaska. They are the highest Alaskan mountain range west of the Alaska Range and north of the Alaska Peninsula: some summits in the range have many glaciers. To the west is the Kuskokwim River and to the east are the Bristol Bay lowlands. Show on map
Semichi IslandsThe Semichi Islands (Samiyan in Aleut) are a cluster of small islands in the Near Islands group of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. They are located southeast of Attu Island and northeast of Agattu Island, near 52°44′06″N 173°59′28″E / 52.73500°N 173.99111°E. Named islands in the group include Alaid Island, Hammerhead Island, Lotus Island, Nizki Island, and Shemya. Show on map
Duke IslandDuke Island is an island in the Gravina Islands of the Alexander Archipelago in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. The island is just north of the Canada–United States border. It is 19 kilometres (12 miles) long and 13 kilometres (8.1 miles) wide. It hosts an Alaskan-type ultramafic complex which is currently being explored for magmatic sulfide Cu-Ni-PGE deposits The original name for the island, in the Tlingit language is: Yeixhi (building (verb), referring to it looking like something under construction when viewed from the waters around it. Show on map
Amukta IslandThe undissected stratovolcano of Amukta volcano makes up most of nearly circular, 7.7-km-wide Amukta Island (Amuux̂tax̂ in Aleut). It is the westernmost of the Islands of Four Mountains chain. The cone, about 5.8 km in basal diameter and topped by a 0.4 km wide summit crater, appears on synthetic-aperture radar imagery to be built upon a 300+ meter high, east-west trending arcuate ridge. Extensions of that ridge on the southwest and east sides of the island indicate an older caldera approximately 6 km in diameter and open to the sea on the south side. No hot springs or fumaroles have been reported from Amukta. Sekora (1973, p. 29) reports the presence of a cinder cone near the northeastern shore of the island. Show on map
Semisopochnoi IslandSemisopochnoi Island or Unyak Island (Russian: Семисопочный – \"having seven hills\"; Aleut: Unyax) is part of the Rat Islands group in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The island is uninhabited and provides an important nesting area for maritime birds. The island is of volcanic origin, containing several volcanoes including Mount Cerberus. It has a land area of 85.558 square miles (221.59 km2), measuring 18 kilometres (11 mi) in length and 20 kilometres (12 mi) in width. Show on map
Cape Saint EliasCape Saint Elias is a cape in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located at the southwest end of Kayak Island, 104 km (65 mi) southeast of Cordova, at 59°48′27″N 144°35′12″W / 59.80750°N 144.58667°W. It is commonly believed that Mount Saint Elias, the second highest mountain in the United States and Canada, is named for this landform. Show on map
Walrus IslandWalrus Island is a small islet located 15 km east of Saint Paul Island, Alaska in the Bering Sea. It is part of the Pribilof Islands group. Its length is 2,130 feet (650 m) and its area is 50.3 acres (0.2036 km²). There is no resident population. The name of this island is a translation from the Russian \"Ostrov Morzhovoy\" meaning \"Walrus Island,\" published by Capt. Lt. Vasiliev of the Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) in 1829 (map 3). Show on map
Baker IslandBaker Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It lies off the central west coast of Prince of Wales Island. Its closest significant island neighbors are Noyes Island to its northwest, Lulu Island directly to its north, and Suemez Island across Bucareli Bay to its southeast. The smaller San Juan Bautista Island and St. Ignace Island separate it from Prince of Wales Island and its nearest community, Craig. The island has a land area of 44.44 square miles (115.1 km2) and is uninhabited. Show on map
Togiak National Wildlife RefugeDominated by the Ahklun Mountains in the north and the cold waters of Bristol Bay to the south, Togiak National Wildlife Refuge confronts the traveler with a kaleidoscope of landscapes. The natural forces that have shaped this land range from the violent and powerful to the geologically patient. Earthquakes and volcanoes filled the former role, and their marks can still be found, but it was the gradual advance and retreat of glacial ice that carved many of the physical features of this refuge. Show on map
Cape Prince of WalesCape Prince of Wales (Russian: Мыс Принца Уэльского) (65°35′47″N 168°05′05″W / 65.59639°N 168.08472°W) is the westernmost point on the mainland of the Americas. It was named in 1778 by Captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy, presumably for the Prince of Wales at the time, George Augustus Frederick. Show on map
Hagemeister IslandHagemeister Island is an island in the U.S. state of Alaska, located on the north shore of Bristol Bay at the entrance to Togiak Bay. The island is 16 miles (26 km) long, has a land area of 115.9 square miles (300 km2), and its highest point is 604 feet (184 m). It has no permanent population at the 2000 census. The island is part of the Bering Sea unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Show on map
Mount HubleyMount Hubley is the second highest peak in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA. Located in the eastern Brooks Range, in what are known as the Romanzof Mountains, Mount Hubley is 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Mount Isto, the tallest peak in the Brooks Range. Mount Hubley is within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and was named in 1958 for Dr. Richard Carleton Hubley, a coordinator for the International Geophysical Year who died in 1957 while doing research on the adjacent McCall Glacier. In 2014 new measurement technology established that Mount Hubley is the second highest peak in the Brooks Range after Mount Isto. Previously, Mount Chamberlin was believed to be the tallest, but it is now ranked third. Show on map
Gravina IslandGravina Island is an island in the Gravina Islands of the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska. It is 21 miles (34 km) long and about 9.5 miles (15.3 km) wide, with a land area of 94.81 square miles (245.6 km2). The island had a population of 50 people at the 2000 census. The Spanish explorer Jacinto Caamaño named the Gravina Islands group in 1792. George Vancouver applied the name to Gravina Island itself in 1793. The name honors Federico Carlos Gravina y Nápoli. Show on map
Mount AugustaMount Augusta, also designated Boundary Peak 183, is a high peak of the Saint Elias Mountains on the border between the U.S. state of Alaska and the Canadian territory of Yukon. Mount Augusta lies about 25 km (16 mi) south of Mount Logan and 25 km east of Mount Saint Elias, respectively the first and second highest mountains in Canada. It forms the eastern end of the long ridge of which Mount Saint Elias is the center and highest point. Show on map
Fairway RockFairway Rock (Census block 1047, Nome, Alaska) is a small islet in the Bering Strait, located southeast of the Diomede Islands and west of Alaska's Cape Prince of Wales. It has an area of 0.3 km2 (0.12 mi2). Known to Eskimo natives of the Bering Strait region in prehistory, Fairway was documented by James Cook in 1778 and named by Frederick Beechey in 1826. Although uninhabited, the island is a nesting site for seabirds — most notably the least and crested auklet — which prompt egg-collecting visits from local indigenous peoples. The United States Navy placed radioisotope thermoelectric generator-powered environmental monitoring equipment on the island from the 1960s through the 1990s. Show on map
Chilkat RangeThe Chilkat Range is a mountain range in Haines Borough and the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, west of the city of Juneau. The Chilkat Range is one of the principal divisors between Haines Borough and Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. It also separates Chilkat Inlet and Lynn Canal from Muir Inlet in Glacier Bay. The northern boundary is generally considered to be the Klehini River. The unnamed ice field in the range also feeds many glaciers including the Davidson and Rainbow Glaciers. Show on map
Deer Island Show on map
Mount RecheshnoiMount Recheshnoi (also spelled Recheschnoi) is a heavily eroded stratovolcano located near the center of the SW lobe of Umnak Island in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The northeast flank of Recheshnoi has one of the hottest and most extensive thermal areas in Alaska. The Geyser Bight geothermal area consists of six zones of thermal springs and two fumarolic areas along upper Geyser Creek and contains the only known geysers in the state. In three locations in 1988 here have been found 5 active geysers up to 2 m high and 9 natural fountains up to 0.7 m high. Other thermal areas occur at Hot Springs Cove and Partov Cove on the isthmus between Recheshnoi and Mount Okmok. Show on map
York MountainsYork Mountains are located on the Seward Peninsula in the U.S. state of Alaska. They extend inland from the Bering Sea to the rocky cape of the same name. On the seaward sides, the streams have incised canyon-like valleys. Eastward, the York Mountains are extended by the highlands lying north of Port Clarence. Their western flanks fall off rather abruptly to the York PIateau. The general aspect of these mountains is rugged. The York Mountains and several other highland masses form isolated groups in the northern half of the peninsula, while in the southern half of the peninsula, the Kigluaik, Bendeleben, and Darby mountains form a broken range along a crescentic axis. Show on map
Mount FuruhelmMount Furuhelm is a 3,620 foot (1,104 meters) peak located on Baranof Island just east and adjacent to Peak 5390 in Alaska. It is located at 57°03′00″N 134°55′47″W / 57.05000°N 134.92972°W. Mount Furuhelm was named for Johan Hampus Furuhjelm (known in Russian as Ivan Vasiliyevich Furugelm), who was governor of Russian America from 1859 to 1863. Mount Furuhelm actually has both an east and west peak less than a quarter mile apart, with the west peak being a mere ten feet higher at (3,620 feet) than the eastern one (3,610 feet). Show on map
Innoko WildernessInnoko Wilderness is a 1,240,000-acre (500,000 ha) wilderness area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was designated by the United States Congress in 1980. It lies within the southeastern part of Innoko National Wildlife Refuge. Innoko Wilderness is a transition zone between the boreal forestland of interior Alaska and the open tundra of western Alaska. More than half of the Wilderness is wetlands of muskeg and marsh, lakes, rivers, and streams dotted with islands of black spruce and an understory of mosses, lichens, and shrubs. Along the Yukon and Innoko Rivers are numerous privately owned subsistence camps used periodically for hunting and fishing by Alaska Natives. Show on map
Rootok IslandRootok Island (also called Aektok, Aiaktak, Ouektock, Aiaiepta, Veniaminof, or Goloi (alt: Goly; Russian: родила – \"bare\") is the smallest member of the Krenitzin Islands, a subgroup of the Fox Islands in the eastern Aleutian Islands in Alaska, United States. The island's common spelling of Rooktok appears to have arisen from Aektok. Deviations in compass readings of up to 3 degrees from normal have been observed off the island's north-western side. The island was set aside to house a lighthouse on January 4, 1901; though no navigation aids were ever constructed. The island is uninhabited and it is 6.3 kilometres (3.9 mi) long and 6.2 kilometres (3.9 mi) wide. Show on map
Kuiu IslandKuiu Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in southeastern Alaska. It lies between Kupreanof Island, to its east, and Baranof Island, to its west. The island is 105 km (65 mi) long, and 10 to 23 km (6–14 miles) wide. It is nearly cut in two by Affleck Canal. It has 1,936.16 km2 (747.56 sq mi) of land area, making it the 15th largest island in the United States. The entire island is part of Tongass National Forest. The population was 10 persons at the 2000 census. It is separated from Baranof Island by Chatham Strait. Show on map
Turnagain PassTurnagain Pass (el. 900 feet (274 m)) is a mountain pass just south of the municipal limits of Anchorage, Alaska. It is located in the northeastern part of Kenai Peninsula Borough. The pass marks the highest point on the Seward Highway at approximately milepost 70. Traveling north, the Seward Highway descends into the Anchorage bowl and begins to round the Turnagain Arm. Show on map
Mount BendelebenMount Bendeleben is the highest peak in the Bendeleben Mountains of the Seward Peninsula in Nome Census Area, Alaska, United States. It is located on the western end of the range, 37 mi (60 km) southwest of Inuruk Lake. The mountain was named in 1866 by members of the Western Union Telegraph exploring expedition for the leader of the expedition, Baron Otto von Bendeleben. A. H. Brooks, USGS, reported in 1921 the native name as \"Ahneyiyuk,\" meaning \"looks like a big one.\" Show on map
Yunaska IslandYunaska (Aleut: Yunax̂sxa) is the largest of the Islands of Four Mountains group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska, United States. It has a land area of 66.834 square miles (173.099 square kilometres) and no population at the 2000 census. The island measures 19.5 kilometres (12.1 miles) long and 18.6 kilometres (11.6 miles) wide. Show on map
Mount HayesMount Hayes is the highest mountain in the eastern Alaska Range. Despite not being a fourteener, it is one of the largest peaks in the United States in terms of rise above local terrain. For example, the Northeast Face rises 8,000 feet (2,440 m) in approximately 2 miles (3.2 km). In terms of topographic prominence, Mount Hayes is number 51 in the world. Show on map
Mount KatmaiMount Katmai is a large stratovolcano (composite volcano) on the Alaska Peninsula in southern Alaska, located within Katmai National Park and Preserve. It is about 6.3 miles (10 km) in diameter with a central lake-filled caldera about 3 by 2 mi (4.5 by 3 km) in area, formed during the Novarupta eruption of 1912. The caldera rim reaches a maximum elevation of 6,716 feet (2,047 m). In 1975 the surface of the crater lake was at an elevation of about 4,220 feet (1,286 m), and the estimated elevation of the caldera floor is about 3,400 ft (1,040 m). The mountain is located in Kodiak Island Borough, very close to its border with Lake and Peninsula Borough. Show on map
Mount MoffettMount Moffett is a mountainous stratovolcano that forms the summit of Adak Island of the Aleutian Islands in the U.S. state of Alaska. Its peak reaches 3,924 feet (1,196 m). It is heavily glaciated and is made primarily of high alumina basalt and andesite. It has never had an eruption in recorded history. The southern flank of the mountain is assumed to be its youngest side. In comparison to other Aleutian stratovolcanoes, Moffett is a small vent, characteristic of its mixed composition. It was named by the U.S. Navy in 1936 for Rear Admiral William Adger Moffett. Show on map
Noatak WildernessThe Noatak Wilderness is a wilderness area in Alaska, United States. It is part of the Noatak National Preserve. Together with neighboring Gates of the Arctic Wilderness, Noatak National Preserve, more than 6.5 million acres (2,600,000 ha), protects almost the entirety of the largest untouched river basin in America, that of the Noatak River. All of the preserve, except for about 700,000 acres (280,000 ha) east of the village of Noatak, has been designated Wilderness. The wilderness is the fourth-largest in the United States, following the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness, the Mollie Beattie Wilderness, and the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness. Show on map
Adugak IslandAdugak Island (also spelled Adougakh, possibly from Aleut: Adudak) is a small island in the Fox Islands group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. It is about 1.2 miles (2 km) long and is located 5.0 miles (8 km) off the northwest coast of Umnak Island. The island has been protected as a rookery for the endangered Steller sea lion, which has been observed during the winter feeding on the fish that inhabit the water nearby. The island reaches an elevation of about 102 feet (31 m) above sea level and the area around the island is extremely hazardous to ships because of the numerous rocks that lie just below the surface of the water. Show on map
Tigalda IslandTigalda Island (Aleut: Qigalĝan) is one of the Krenitzin Islands, a subgroup of the Fox Islands in the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Tigalda is located about 19 miles (31 km) east of Akutan Island, is 12 miles (19 km) long and has an area of about 35 square miles (91 km2). Tigalda is an Aleut name published by Captain Lutke (1836). It was called \"Kagalga\" by Captain Lt. Krenitzin and Lt. Levashev (1768). Tigalda Bay (Aleut: Udaĝax̂) is situated on the north side of Tigalda. Father Veniaminov (1840) reported the existence of an Aleut village, which he called \"Tigaldinskoe\" (Aleut: Qagalĝa), of 91 people in 1833. Tigalda is uninhabited. Show on map
Mount WrangellMount Wrangell, in Ahtna K’ełt’aeni or K’ełedi when erupting, is a massive shield volcano located in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in southeastern Alaska, United States. The shield rises over 12,000 feet (3,700 m) above the Copper River to its southwest. Its volume is over 220 cubic miles (920 km3), making it more than twice as massive as Mount Shasta in California, the largest stratovolcano by volume in the Cascades. It is part of the Wrangell volcanic field, which extends for more than 250 km across Southcentral Alaska into the Yukon Territory, and has an eruptive history spanning the time from Pleistocene to Holocene. Show on map
DipyramidDipyramid is a pair of mountain peaks in borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is a part of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in western North America. The summit is 34 miles (55 km) north-northeast of the city of Juneau and 1 mile southeast of The Citadel. The peaks are 0.2 miles (322 m) miles apart. Dipyramid was named by the Juneau Icefield Research Project in 1964, published by the United States Geological Survey in 1966, and entered into the Survey's Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2000. Show on map
Saint Paul IslandSaint Paul Island is the largest of the Pribilof Islands, a group of four Alaskan volcanic islands located in the Bering Sea between the United States and Russia. The city of St. Paul is the only residential area on the island. The three nearest islands to Saint Paul Island are Otter Island to the southwest, Saint George slightly to the south, and Walrus Island to the east. Show on map
Lotus IslandLotus Island is a 0.2-mile-long (320 m) island in the Aleutian Islands chain of the U.S. state of Alaska. Located at 52°43′55″N 174°03′55″E / 52.73194°N 174.06528°E in the Semichi Islands group of the Near Islands, it is the least prominent of the two islands in Shemya Pass, which separates Nizki and Shemya islands. \"Lotus\" is also the name of an island in the Odyssey. Show on map
Mount KimballMount Kimball is the highest mountain in the section of the eastern Alaska Range between Isabel Pass (traversed by the Richardson Highway) and Mentasta Pass (traversed by the Glenn Highway), about 30 miles from Paxson. It is one of the twenty most topographically prominent peaks in Alaska. Show on map
Tongass IslandTongass Island, historically also spelled Tongas Island, is an island in the southern Alaska Panhandle, near the marine boundary with Canada at 54-40 N. it was the site of Fort Tongass, which was first established shortly after the Alaska Purchase as a customs port for travellers bound from British Columbian waters to the Stikine River, which was one of the main routes of access to the Cassiar Gold Rush of the 1870s. it lies west of Port Tongass in Nakat Bay, adjacent to the Dixon Entrance and is 0.8 miles in length. Its Native Alaskan name \"Kut-tuk-wah\" was published in 1869 by USC&GS; its current name was first published in 1891. Show on map
Kenai MountainsThe Kenai Mountains are a mountain range in the U.S. state of Alaska. They extend 192 km (120 mi) northeast from the southern end of the Kenai Peninsula to the Chugach Mountains. The Harding and Sargent Icefields, as well as the many glaciers that originate from them, derive in the Kenai Mountains. Several prime fish-producing rivers, including the Kenai River and the Russian River, also flow from the mountains. Show on map
Nunivak IslandNunivak Island (Nunivaaq in Central Alaskan Yup'ik, Nuniwar in Nunivak Cup'ig), the second largest island in the Bering Sea, is a permafrost-covered volcanic island lying about 30 miles (48 km) offshore from the delta of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers in the state of Alaska, at about 60° North latitude. Nunivak Island is 1,631.97 sq mi (4,226.78 km², or 1.044 million acres) in area, 76.2 kilometres (47.3 mi) long and 106 kilometres (66 mi) wide, making it the eighth largest island in the United States. It has a population of 210 persons as of the 2000 census. The island's entire population lived in the north coast city of Mekoryuk. Show on map
Takli IslandTakli Island is an island off the southern coast of the Alaska Peninsula in the Shelikov Strait of southwestern Alaska. It is located at the mouth of Amalik Bay, off the mainland portion of Kodiak Island Borough, in Katmai National Park and Preserve. The island is part of the Amalik Bay Archeological District, a National Historic Landmark District, and its archaeological sites are separately listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The area was first archaeologically investigated in the 1960s, when the prehistory of the area was little known, and the island's sites are type sites for a series of archaeological cultures. Show on map
Bobrof IslandBobrof Island (Aleut: Walĝa) is one of the Andreanof Islands subgroup of the Aleutian Islands in southwestern Alaska, US. Bobrof Island is a small, uninhabited island about 9 miles (14 km) north and west of Kanaga Island, and 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Cape Sudak on Tanaga Island. Bobrof Island is 2.6 miles (4.2 km) long and 1.8 miles (2.9 km) wide with an area of 3 square miles (7.8 km2), and consists primarily of the 2,421-foot (738 m) high Bobrof Volcano. The volcanic crater, or cone, has been heavily dissected. Underwater deposits adjacent to the island's northeast flank suggest an immense debris-avalanche has taken place. Show on map
Bobrof VolcanoBobrof Island (Aleut: Walĝa) is one of the Andreanof Islands subgroup of the Aleutian Islands in southwestern Alaska, US. Bobrof Island is a small, uninhabited island about 9 miles (14 km) north and west of Kanaga Island, and 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Cape Sudak on Tanaga Island. Bobrof Island is 2.6 miles (4.2 km) long and 1.8 miles (2.9 km) wide with an area of 3 square miles (7.8 km2), and consists primarily of the 2,421-foot (738 m) high Bobrof Volcano. The volcanic crater, or cone, has been heavily dissected. Underwater deposits adjacent to the island's northeast flank suggest an immense debris-avalanche has taken place. Show on map
Kadin IslandKadin Island is an island in the Alaska Panhandle of southeastern Alaska. It is located in the mouth of the Stikine River, 7 km (4 mi) NW of Wrangell Island, Alexander Archipelago. Kadin Island is 3.5 km (2 mi) in length. The highest point on the island is 431 m (1,414 ft) above sea level. It belongs administratively to the City and Borough of Wrangell. Show on map
Mount DeborahMount Deborah is a mountain in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is one of the major peaks of the eastern Alaska Range. Despite its low absolute elevation (compared to other major peaks in North America), it is a particularly large and steep peak in terms of its quick rise over local terrain. For example, the Northeast Face rises 7000 feet (2135m) in approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km). This steepness, combined with difficult access, harsh weather, and classic Alaskan ice and snow features, make this a challenging peak to climb. Show on map
Chena River State Recreation AreaChena River State Recreation Area is a 254,080-acre (1,028.2 km2) state park in the U.S. state of Alaska, located east of Fairbanks. The recreation area is centered on the Chena River. Facilities include campgrounds, hiking, ATV, snowmachine and sled dog trails, a shooting range, fishing ponds, and several public-use cabins. Fishing for Arctic grayling is catch-and-release only in the river, but visitors may keep grayling caught in the three stocked ponds. The area is also noted for several concentrations of granite tors. The road through the recreation area ends at the privately owned and operated Chena Hot Springs resort. Show on map
Kagalaska IslandKagalaska Island (Aleut: Qigalaxsix̂) is an island in the Andreanof Islands of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The island is 9 miles (14 km) in length and 7 miles (11 km) wide. It is separated from Adak Island to the west by Kagalaska Strait (Aakayuudax̂ in Aleut) which is approximately 1,300 feet (400 m) wide at its narrowest point. Little Tanaga Island is located to the east, 1.2 miles (1.9 km) across Little Tanaga Strait. Show on map
Flagstaff HillFlagstaff Hill is a hill on Unga Island, Alaska, United States. Its name comes from the fact that there was a flagpole on the hill. The name may also be connected to the nearby Flagstaff Mine. Flagstaff Hill is on the northern side of the entrance to the island's Delarof Bay. The hill, near the settlement of Unga, had an elevation of up to 80 feet (24 m) in 1916, when the United States Coast Pilot published it in a summary of coastal features. Show on map
Chuck River WildernessChuck River Wilderness is a 74,298-acre (30,067 ha) wilderness area located within the Tongass National Forest in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was designated by the United States Congress in 1990. Located at the head of Windham Bay, Chuck River Wilderness is adjacent to the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness. The Chuck River flows northward from its headwaters near Port Houghton through dense forest with thick vegetation before emptying into Windham Bay where the historic Chuck Mining Camp operated until the 1920s. There is private land in the lower river and in portions of the bay where there was once a small settlement. Show on map
Eldred RockEldred Rock (also known as Nechraje) is an island in the boroughs of Juneau and Haines, Alaska, United States. Located in Lynn Canal, it is 2.7 miles (4.3 km) southeast of Kataguni Island and 55 miles (89 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. This island is the site of the Eldred Rock Light, a lighthouse built in 1905 and manned until the United States Coast Guard automated its operation in 1973. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Mount KovenMount Koven is a 12,142-foot (3,701 m) mountain in the Alaska Range, in Denali National Park and Preserve. Mount Eldridge lies to the northeast of Denali on Karstens Ridge, with Mount Carpe to the northeast on the Carpe Ridge extension of Denali's northeast buttress. Mount Koven overlooks the Great Icefall of Muldrow Glacier, with the west fork of Traleika Glacier to the east. It was named for Theodore G. Koven, who, while trying to rescue Allen Carpe (for whom Mount Carpe is named) from a crevasse in Muldrow Glacier, fell into the same crevasse and was killed while on the Rockefeller Cosmic Ray Expedition in May 1932. Show on map
Mount GannettMount Gannett is a 9,649-foot (2,941 m) peak in the Chugach Mountains of eastern Alaska, United States, located 50 miles (80 km) east of the city of Anchorage. It was named by Lawrence Martin of the U.S. Geological Survey in 1911 for Henry Gannett. One arm of the Knik Glacier flows from the ice fields of Mount Gannett's north and east slopes, and the Colony Glacier rises on the west and southwest slopes, flowing into Inner Lake George. In between, the Gannett Glacier flows down a narrow valley northwest of the summit to join the Knik Glacier. The mountain has an estimated topographic prominence of 4,300 feet (1,300 m). Show on map
Pogromni VolcanoPogromni Volcano is a stratovolcano on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands. Near it are 5 cinder cones, and a mountain called Pogromni's Sister. Pogromni is old and eroded with a single glacier on its flank and base. Eruptions have been attributed to it in 1795, 1796, 1826, 1827, and 1830, but historic eruptions attributed to it may have come from nearby Westdahl volcano. Show on map
Annette IslandThe meaning of the Tlingit name for the island is Winter Town. Since the late 19th century, it has been the base of the Annette Islands Reserve of the Metlakatla Indian Community, composed mostly of Tsimshian people. This is the only remaining Native reservation in Alaska, as the Metlakatla voted to opt out of giving up their lands under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of the 1970s. In 2016 they elected Audrey Hudson as their first Tribal Chairwoman. Show on map
Cape KrusensternCape Krusenstern is a cape on the northwestern coast of the U.S. state of Alaska, located near the village of Kivalina at 67°07′41″N 163°44′43″W / 67.12806°N 163.74528°W. It is bounded by Kotzebue Sound to the south and the Chukchi Sea to the west, and consists of a series of beach ridges and swales with numerous ponds and lakes. The entire shoreline of the cape consists of barrier bars, lagoons and spits. Cape Krusenstern was named for the Baltic German explorer Adam Johann von Krusenstern, who explored the area under the Russian flag. Show on map
Saint Lawrence IslandSt. Lawrence Island (Central Siberian Yupik: Sivuqaq) is located west of mainland Alaska in the Bering Sea, just south of the Bering Strait. The village of Gambell is located on the northwest cape, 58 kilometres (36 miles) from the Chukchi Peninsula in the Russian Far East. The island is part of Alaska, but closer to Siberia than to the Alaskan mainland. St. Lawrence Island is thought to be one of the last exposed portions of the land bridge that once joined Asia with North America during the Pleistocene period. It is the sixth largest island in the United States and the 113th largest island in the world. Show on map
White MountainsThe White Mountains is a 71-mile (115 km) mountain range in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It lies between Beaver Creek and Preacher Creek, and was named by prospectors for its composition of white limestone. The range reaches a maximum elevation of 3,176 feet (968 m). Some of the range is located in the White Mountains National Recreation Area, a 1-million-acre (4,000 km2) wilderness just 30 miles (48 km) north of Fairbanks. The White Mountains and Ray Mountains together constitute the Yukon-Tanana Uplands, an area of low mountain ranges and high ground in Interior Alaska. Show on map
Kuskokwim MountainsThe Kuskokwim Mountains is a range of mountains in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States, west of the Alaska Range and southeast of the Yukon River. The Kuskokwim Mountains begin in the interior west of Fairbanks. The mountain range is about 400 km (250 mi) long from northeast to southwest and about 80 km (50 mi) wide. The range takes its name from the Kuskokwim River, which flows through the mountains. Show on map
Mount WilburMount Wilbur is a high peak of the Fairweather Range, the southernmost part of the Saint Elias Mountains. It lies approximately 14 miles (22 km) southeast of Mount Fairweather and 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Mount Crillon. It is included in Glacier Bay National Park. The peak is the higher of a pair of peaks, Mounts Wilbur and Orville, named after the Wright Brothers. Show on map
Samalga IslandSamalga Island (Aleut: Samalĝa) is the westernmost island in the Fox Islands group of the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska. It is 5.36 miles (8.63 km) long and is situated at the southwestern tip of Umnak Island. It has a land area of 1.589 square miles (4.12 km2) and is uninhabited. It is separated from the Islands of Four Mountains group to the west by the Samalga Pass. Samalga is the farthest point west on the Aleutian Island chain that still keeps the Alaska UTC−9 time zone (UTC−8 daylight time from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November as of 2010). It is also the closest Alaskan island to Hawaii. Show on map
Mount ChamberlinMount Chamberlin is the third highest peak in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA. Located in what are known as the Franklin Mountains of the Brooks Range, Mount Chamberlin is 30 miles (48 km) west-northwest of Mount Isto, the tallest peak in the Brooks Range. Mount Chamberlin is within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and was named for Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin (1843-1928), geologist of the Peary Auxiliary Expedition of 1894. Previously believed to be the highest peak in the Brooks Range, in 2014 new measurement technology established that Mount Chamberlin is the third highest peak in the range. Show on map
Bird IslandBird Island (or Bird Islet) is an island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It was named by Captain Lester A. Beardslee of the United States Navy in 1880. Located off the eastern shore of Favorite Channel, it is 2.4 miles (3.9 km) northwest of Pearl Harbor and 20 miles (32 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The name was first published by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1883, collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. The island is 0.1 miles (0.16 km) across. Show on map
Long IslandLong Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It lies across the Kaigani Strait from the southern portion of Dall Island and west of the southern part of Prince of Wales Island. Directly to its north is Sukkwan Island. Long Island forms part of the western boundary of Cordova Bay, and has a land area of 116.136 km² (44.84 sq mi) and was unpopulated at the 2000 census. Show on map
Cape DeceitCape Deceit is a cape in Alaska. It is located in the Seward Peninsula on the Chukchi Sea coast. Cape Deceit extends into Kotzebue Sound, 2 mi. NW of Deering; Kotzebue-Kobuk Low. This cape's name was given in 1816 by Lt. Otto von Kotzebue. \"Deceit\" is a translation of the German \"Betrug,\" for Kotzebue thought that there was something about the shape of the cape and its surroundings that indicated a bay that did not exist. Thus he declared it to be \"deceitful\". The Inuit name of this cape has not been reported. The Eastern Beringian vole, Microtus deceitensis, has been named after Cape Deceit. Show on map
Herbert IslandHerbert Island (Aleut: Chiĝulax̂) is an island in the Islands of Four Mountains subgroup of the Aleutian archipelago. It is 3.1 miles (5.0 km) from Chuginadak Island, separated by the Chuginadak Pass. Yunaska Island is 16 miles (26 km) southeast of Herbert Island.Measuring 6.2 miles (10.0 km) across, Herbert Island is somewhat circular in shape and is covered by the 4,200 feet (1,300 m) Herbert Volcano, whose two km wide caldera is one of the largest in the Aleutian Islands. There have been no recorded eruptions here. The island is 8.95 km (5.56 mi) long and 9.14 kilometres (5.68 mi) wide. Show on map
Zubof RockZubof Rock (also known as Zuboff Rock) is a small island near Sitka, Alaska, United States, off the northeast coast of Baranof Island. Located in an area of Kelp Bay known as The Basin, it was entered into the United States Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Its name dates back to 1895 as Zuboff, which was a Russian surname, as reported by Lieutenant Commander J. F. Moser of the United States Navy. Typically seen at low tides, Zubof Rock is about 400 yards (365.8 m) long from north to south. It is about 0.375 miles (0.6 km) southwest of Crow Island. Show on map
Mount IstoMount Isto is the highest peak in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA. Located in the eastern Brooks Range, in what are known as the Romanzof Mountains, Mount Isto is 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Mount Hubley, the second tallest peak in the Brooks Range. Mount Isto is within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and was named in 1966 for Reynold E. (Pete) Isto, a civil engineer for the U.S. Geological Survey. In 2014, new measurement technology established that Mount Isto is the highest peak in the Brooks Range. Previously, Mount Chamberlin was believed to be the tallest, but it is now ranked third. Show on map
Camp 15 PeakCamp 15 Peak is a mountain in the borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is part of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in western North America. On the divide east of Battle Glacier, it is located 3 miles southwest of The Tusk and 28 miles north-northwest of the city of Juneau. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) included Camp 15 Peak in its 2001 survey of conditions throughout parts of the Juneau Icefield. The peak was noted by the JIRP in 1964 and entered into the United States Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2000. Show on map
Uliaga IslandUliaga Island (also spelled Uliagan, Ouliaga, and Ouilliaghui) is the northernmost member of the Islands of the Four Mountains group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska. The island's name is probably derived from the Aleut place name ulaĝa, which is itself derived from ulaẍ - \"bearberry.\" The triangular shaped island measures about 2.4 miles (3.9 km) across and consists of a single stratovolcano cone that reaches a height of 2,913 feet (888 m). No eruptions have been recorded in historical times, though it is thought to have been active at some time during the Holocene Epoch. Show on map
Amlia IslandAmlia (Aleut: Amlax) is an island in the Aleutian Islands. It is located near the eastern end of the Andreanof Islands and is situated between Atka Island and Seguam Island. The island is 46 miles (74 km) long and 8.7 miles (14.0 km) wide, with a land area of 172.1 sq mi (445.7 km²), making it the 36th largest island in the United States. It has a rough terrain and reaches 2,021 feet (616 m) at its highest point. There is no permanent resident population. Amlia Island is the second-largest uninhabited island in the Aleutian Islands. Nearby islands include Agligadak, Sagigik and Tanadak. Show on map
Mount MageikMount Mageik /məˈɡiːk/ is a stratovolcano on the Alaska Peninsula. It has no confirmed historical eruptions (one in 1946 is now deemed questionable), but its youngest eruptive products are apparently Holocene in age (8750 to 500 BCE). A young crater lies on the northeast flank of the central summit cone, and is the site of vigorous superheated fumarolic activity with prominent sulfur deposits. The volcanic cones are composed of andesite, basaltic andesite and dacite. The volcano is mantled in ash from the 1912 eruption of Novarupta and from the 1953 eruption of nearby Trident Volcano. Show on map
Isanotski PeaksIsanotski Peaks or Isanotski Volcano, known locally as \"Ragged Jack\", is a multipeaked mountain on Unimak Island, the easternmost Aleutian Island in Alaska, United States. It is an old, highly dissected stratovolcano, lying about 10 miles (16 km) east of Shishaldin Volcano, the highest peak in the Aleutian Islands. Its height is also often given as 8,025 feet (2446 m). In contrast to many of the younger, symmetrical volcanoes of the region, Isanotski is topped by multiple rugged pinnacles. This makes climbing or skiing the peak much more challenging than Shishaldin, for example. Show on map
Point FranklinPoint Franklin is a piece of land located on the Chukchi Sea side of North Slope, Alaska. Point Franklin is a few miles north of Wainwright, limiting with the Peard Bay to the east. Point Franklin was named by British mariner Frederick William Beechey on August 15, 1826 after Lieutenant (afterwards Sir) John Franklin. It is a strange coincidence that he named this cape just two days after Sir John Franklin had named his \"farthest point\" after Captain Beechey. Sea otters are a common sight in the waters near Point Franklin. Whales can also be sighted offshore in the point area. Show on map
Mount ForakerMount Foraker is a 17,400-foot (5,304 m) mountain in the central Alaska Range, in Denali National Park, 14 mi (23 km) southwest of Denali. It is the second highest peak in the Alaska Range, and the third highest peak in the United States. It rises almost directly above the standard base camp for Denali, on a fork of the Kahiltna Glacier also near Mount Hunter in the Alaska Range. Its north peak was first climbed on August 6, 1934, and its higher south peak was climbed four days later on August 10, by Charles Houston, T. Graham Brown, and Chychele Waterston, via the west ridge. Show on map
Yukon Island Main Archaeological SiteYukon Island is an island in outer Kachemak Bay, an inlet of the Cook Inlet of south central Alaska. The island is located about 9 miles (14 km) south of Homer. The island is archaeologically sensitive, with a number of sites documenting the prehistory of the bay. The Yukon Island Main Site, a National Historic Landmark, is a major shell midden site at which the pioneering archaeologist Frederica de Laguna was able to sequence 1500 years of the area's prehistory, and other sites have been found on the island since then. The island is now home to an educational retreat center. Show on map
Icy CapeThe Icy Cape is a headland on the Chukchi Sea side of the North Slope Borough, Alaska, United States. It was discovered and named by James Cook on August 17, 1778, on account of the ice along the coast. Icy Cape is in an area of landspits, bounded by Kasegaluk Lagoon to the east and Sikolik Lake further inland. Pink salmon and Arctic char are abundant in the waters near Icy Cape. Whales can also easily be sighted offshore in the Icy Cape area. Icy Cape was formerly the site of the Icy Cape DEW Line Station, a United States Air Force Distant Early Warning Line Radar station Show on map
Derbin IslandDerbin Island is located in the Krenitzin Islands, a subgroup of the Fox Islands in the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, United States. Derbin is a small island (at 0.5 mi across) and is situated near the southwestern shore of Tigalda Island. It is measuring 840 metres (0.52 mi) long and 204 metres (0.127 mi) wide. It was named in 1935 by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey because of its proximity to Derbin Strait, the channel between Avatanak and Tigalda islands. Derbin Strait, in turn, is derived from \"Derbenskoy,\" the Russian name published by Father Veniaminov (1840). Show on map
Becharof National Wildlife RefugeBecharof National Wildlife Refuge is a National Wildlife Refuge in the Aleutian Range of the Alaska Peninsula of southwestern Alaska. Becharof National Wildlife Refuge, which covers an area of 1,200,000 acres (4,900 km2), was established in 1980 to conserve major brown bears, salmon, migratory birds, caribou, marine birds, and mammals and to comply with treaty obligations. It lies primarily in the east-central part of Lake and Peninsula Borough, but extends eastward into the mainland portion of Kodiak Island Borough. The refuge is administered from offices in King Salmon. Show on map
Mount GallatinMount Gallatin, also known as Boundary Peak 67, is a mountain in the Boundary Ranges along the British Columbia-Alaska border. The Tasakili River begins to the north of Mount Gallatin, within Alaska, then crosses the border shortly after its source, flowing southeast at the foot of the mountain to the Stikine River. Mount Gallatin is the peak immediately north of where the Stikine crosses the international boundary. Just inside that boundary on the Canadian side, at the foot of Mount Gallatin, is the locality and former border post of Stikine, formerly known as Boundary. Show on map
Seward MountainsThe Seward Mountains is a small mountain range in southeastern Alaska, United States, located on the upper Portland Canal. It has an area of 107 km2 and is a subrange of the Boundary Ranges which in turn form part of the Coast Mountains. Part of the eastern border of Misty Fjords National Monument transects the range. Despite its name, the Seward Mountains are located nowhere near Seward, Alaska or the Seward Peninsula, though the Seward Peninsula has its own set of four maintain ranges: the Kigluaik Mountains, Bendeleben Mountains, Darby Mountains, and York Mountains. Show on map
Cape LutkeCape Lutke is a headland on Unimak Island, the largest island in the Aleutian Islands chain of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the southern central coast of the island. This headland was named Mys Litke, after Russian explorer Count Fyodor Petrovich Litke, by the Imperial Russian Hydrographic Service in 1847. \"Litke\" is the Russian form of the German \"Lütke\", which is Anglicized as \"Lutke\". This same point was called Mys Sivuchiy (meaning \"Sealion Cape\" in Russian) by Capt. Tebenkov in 1852, and Cape Promontory by the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF) in 1888. Show on map
Fisher CalderaFisher Caldera, also known as Mount Fisher and Fisher Volcano, is a large volcanic caldera, measuring about 6.8 miles (11 km) by 11 miles (18 km), located on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Formed by the destructive eruption of an andesitic stratovolcano about 9,100 years ago, it contains three crater lakes, one 2 miles (3.2 km) wide and two others about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide. Small peaks rising 2,000 feet (600 m) and 2,031 feet (619 m) are also present in the caldera. Fisher Caldera is located just 13 miles (21 km) from the Mount Westdahl volcano. Show on map
Camp 4 PeakCamp 4 Peak (also known as Research Mountain) is a mountain in the city and borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is a part of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in western North America. On the divide between East and West Twin Glaciers, it is located 5 miles north-northwest of Twin Glacier Lake and 27 miles northeast of the city of Juneau. The peak was named by Maynard Miller after its use by the Juneau Icefield Research Program in 1965. It was entered into the United States Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2000. Show on map
Mount GareloiThe Gareloi Volcano is a stratovolcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, United States, about 1,259 miles (2,026 km) from Anchorage. Gareloi is located on Gareloi Island, and comprises most of its land mass. The island also has two small glaciers which protrude to the northwest and southeast. The volcano is 6 miles (10 km) by 5 miles (8 km) at its base, possessing two summits. The southern crater is far greater in size, 984 feet (300 m) wide with fumaroles, which can be attributed to edifice failure in the southern wall, while Gareloi's northern crater is enclosed. Show on map
Augustine VolcanoAugustine Volcano is a central lava dome and lava flow complex, surrounded by pyroclastic debris. It forms Augustine Island in southwestern Cook Inlet in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of southcentral coastal Alaska, 280 kilometers (174 mi) southwest of Anchorage. Augustine Island has a land area of 83.872 square kilometers (32.4 sq mi), while West Island, just off Augustine's western shores, has 5.142 km2 (2.0 sq mi). The island is made up mainly of past eruption deposits. Scientists have been able to discern that past dome collapse has resulted in large avalanches. Show on map
Coghlan IslandCoghlan Island is an island in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Located in Stephens Passage, it is 1.2 miles (1.9 km) south of Fairhaven and 11 miles (18 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. It was named in 1885 by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for United States Navy officer Joseph Coghlan, who commanded the USS Adams during its survey of southeastern Alaska from 1883 to 1884. The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Mount Quincy AdamsMount Quincy Adams (alternate Name Boundary Peak 163) is a mountain located on the border between United States and Canada. It is named after John Quincy Adams (1767–1848), the sixth president of the United States. The southern and eastern flanks of the mountain are in Glacier Bay National Park, in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska. The northern and northwestern flanks are in Tatshenshini-Alsek Park, in Stikine Region, British Columbia, making it the second highest peak in B.C. Mount Quincy Adams is flanked to the west by Mount Fairweather 4,671 m (15,325 ft). Show on map
Saint George IslandSt. George Island is one of the Pribilof Islands of the state of Alaska, United States, in the Bering Sea off the western coast of the state. The island has a land area of 90 km² (35 sq mi) and a population of about 100 people, all living in its only community, the city of St. George, which encompasses the entire island. The island was discovered by Gavriil Pribylov on June 25, 1786, during a search for the breeding grounds of northern fur seals. The island is named after Pribylov's ship, the St. George. St. George Island was the first of the Pribilofs to be discovered. Show on map
Woronkofski IslandWoronkofski Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska, United States. It is separated from Wrangell Island to the east by Zimovia Strait, just west of the city of Wrangell; to the west it is separated from Zarembo Island by Stikine Strait, and to the south from Etolin Island by Chichagof Pass. Woronkofski Island has a land area of 59.382 km² (22.9275 sq mi) and was unpopulated at the 2000 census. The city of Wrangell is exploring the possibility of utilizing Sunrise Lake on the island for hydroelectrical power and drinking water. Show on map
Mount HunterMount Hunter or Begguya is a mountain in Denali National Park in Alaska. It is approximately eight miles (13 km) south of Denali, the highest peak in North America. \"Begguya\" means child (of Denali) in the Dena'ina language. Mount Hunter is the third-highest major peak in the Alaska Range. Mount Hunter has a complex structure: it is topped by a large, low-angled glacier plateau, connecting the North (Main) Summit and the South Summit (13,965 feet or 4,257 m). Long, corniced ridges extend in various directions; between them are exceptionally steep faces. Show on map
Mount TripyramidMount Tripyramid is multi-summited mountain ridge in the Alaska Range, in Denali National Park and Preserve. The main ridge extends along a southwest-northeast line with West Pyramid Peak (11,699 feet (3,566 m)), Central Pyramid Peak (11,247 feet (3,428 m)) and East Pyramid Peak (11,161 feet (3,402 m)). Mount Brooks ends the ridge to the north and Mount Silverthrone is to the south. The ridge is bounded by Traleika Glacier to the west and Brooks Glacier to the east. The mountain was named by Bradford Washburn in 1945 after Mount Tripyramid in New Hampshire. Show on map
Chagulak IslandChagulak Island (also spelled Chugul, Chugula, Chegoula, or Tchougoulok) is a small, uninhabited volcanic island in the Islands of Four Mountains group in the Aleutian Islands of southwestern Alaska, United States. The 1.9 mi (3.1 km)-wide island consists of a single cone that reaches an elevation of 3,747 ft (1,142 m). Chagulak is a stratovolcano and is separated from the nearby Amukta Island by a channel about 4.3 miles (6.9 km) wide; though the two islands are joined underwater. No eruptions have been recorded and very little is known about the volcano. Show on map
Mount TroyMount Troy is a mountain in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is a peak of the Boundary Ranges, located on Douglas Island, west of the head of Kowee Creek and 3 miles (4.8 km) southwest of the city of Juneau. In 1950, the United States Forest Service named the mountain after John Weir Troy, the territorial governor of Alaska from 1933 to 1939. The name was made official by the United States Board on Geographic Names in 1952 and entered into the United States Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System on January 1, 2000. Show on map
Popof IslandPopof Island (Siitikdax̂ in Aleut) is an island in the Shumagin Islands south of mainland Alaska. The largest community in the area, Sand Point, is located on the northwest coast. Popof Island is 10 miles (16 km) long, 5 miles (8 km) wide and the peak elevation is 1,550 feet (472 meters). It is located at 55°18′49″N 160°22′29″W / 55.31361°N 160.37472°W. It has a land area of 93.651 km² (36.159 sq mi) and a total population of 952 persons at the 2000 census. A herd of introduced bison is on the uninhabited side of the island, and currently numbers 120. Show on map
Pioneer PeakPioneer Peak is a 6,398-foot (1,950 m) mountain in the Chugach Mountains in the U.S. state of Alaska. Located beside the Knik River just nine miles (14.5 km) south of Palmer and about six miles outside the Municipality of Anchorage limits, it is a prominent landmark in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, as well as a popular hiking destination. The name was given in 1939 in honor of the pioneers of the Matanuska agricultural colony of the mid-1930s. The Pioneer Ridge Trail leads up the eastern shoulder, beginning below 200', it allows access to the summit. Show on map
Black PeakBlack Peak is a highly eroded stratovolcano comprising a lava dome complex on the Alaska Peninsula of the U.S. state of Alaska. Also called Black Volcano or Sopka Chornaia, the mountain is located within the Lake and Peninsula Borough. The latest eruption from Black Peak less than 4,000 years ago produced an explosive eruption with a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 6 that created a caldera. Ash flow tuffs and block-and-ash-flow deposits from this explosive eruption traveled down the Ash Creek and Bluff Creek valleys that reach depths of 100 m (328 ft). Show on map
Forrester Island WildernessForrester Island Wilderness is a 2,832-acre (1,146 ha) wilderness area in the U.S. state of Alaska at Forrester Island (54°48′10″N 133°31′37″W / 54.80278°N 133.52694°W). It was designated by the United States Congress in 1970. It is part of the Gulf of Alaska unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The island is located off the coast of the Alaska Panhandle, near its southernmost portion, west of Dall Island, in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area. According to the Census Bureau the island has a land area of 3.97 sq mi (10.29 km2). Show on map
Mentasta MountainsThe Mentasta Mountains in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Alaska form the eastern end of the Alaska Range.They lie south of the Alaska Highway, east of the Glenn Highway, north of the Wrangell Mountains, and west of the Nabesna River. Across the Glenn Highway lies the continuation of the Alaska Range, while across the Nabesna River lie the Nutzotin Mountains. They form the northern boundary of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve. The highest point of the Mentasta Mountains is Noyes Mountain with an elevation of 8,147 feet (2,483 m). Show on map
Auke MountainAuke Mountain is a mountain in the city and borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. It is a part of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in western North America. It is 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Fairhaven, Alaska, and 12 miles (19 km) northwest of the city of Juneau. The mountain is named after the local Auke people; the name was first published by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1912. The name was collected by the USGS between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Survey's Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981. Show on map
Ptarmigan PeakPtarmigan Peak is a 4,880-foot (1,487 m) mountain in the Chugach Mountains near Anchorage, Alaska. Its north face is extremely steep and is sometimes attempted by mountaineers. Hikers generally reach the mountain's summit from the less steep southern side. In winter, ski mountaineering is also possible on the mountain. In 1997, 14 members of a mountaineering expedition from the University of Alaska Anchorage (two instructors and twelve students) fell 1,000 feet down the mountain's north face. Two people died, and 11 more were seriously injured. Show on map
Togiak WildernessTogiak Wilderness is a federally designated wilderness area in the Dillingham and Bethel Census Areas in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska. At 2,274,066 acres (920,282 ha), it occupies the northern half of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. It protects pristine rivers, lakes, and steep-sloped mountains, including the rugged Ahklun Mountains and Wood River Range, which are located partly within the wilderness. Parts of the Kanektok, Goodnews, and Togiak drainages are also located within the boundaries of the Togiak Wilderness. Show on map
Kichatna MountainsThe Kichatna Mountains are a small mountain range in the northwestern part of Matanuska-Susitna Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska, approximately 70 miles (110 km) southwest of Denali. Unlike the major snow peaks of much of the rest of the Alaska Range, the Kichatnas boast short, steep rock towers, which are famous both for their high-quality, highly technical climbing, and their terrible weather. The main peaks of the Kichatnas include: \n* Kichatna Spire, 8985 feet \n* Mount Augustin \n* Gurney Peak, 8400 feet \n* Middle Triple Peak, 8835 feet Named glaciers in the Kichatnas include Show on map
Knight IslandKnight Island is an island in western Prince William Sound of the Gulf of Alaska in the U.S. state of Alaska. The island has a land area of 277.166 km² (107.014 sq mi) and no resident population as of 2000. The majority of the island is a part of Chugach National Forest; Alaska native corporations Chugach Alaska Corporation and Chenega Corporation are the two other major landowners. Shorelines on the eastern and northwestern part of the island were heavily covered in oil after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, northeast of the island, in 1989. Show on map
Nunathloogagamiutbingoi DunesNunathloogagamiutbingoi Dunes is the name of a beach on the southeastern coast of Nunivak Island in Bethel Census Area, Alaska. Summer temperatures in the area are frequently 50 to 59 °F (10 to 15 °C), and the night is commonly 40 to 49 °F (4 to 9 °C). The wintertime brings highs down to 10 to 19 °F (−12 to −7 °C) and overnight lows of −19 to −10 °F (−28 to −23 °C). There is little precipitation; the month of August is the wettest, while March is frequently the driest month. Nunathloogagamiutbingoi has been noted for its long place name. Show on map
Cape DenbighCape Denbigh is located on the Seward Peninsula in Eastern Norton Sound in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is notable for the Iyatayet Site, an Archaic Stage hunter gather archaeological site. The headland is a moderately high, rounded hill, joined to the mainland by a low, narrow neck. The head of the bight, eastward of the cape, is shoal, but in approaching the water shoals gradually. A good anchorage in northeasterly winds can be had eastward of the cape. The water shoals rapidly inside a depth of 4 fathoms when approaching the shore. Show on map
Centennial RangeThe Centennial Range is a sub-range of the Saint Elias Mountains. It is located inside Kluane National Park and Reserve in the far west of the Yukon Territory in Canada. It consists of fourteen major peaks, and was named for Canada's Centennial in 1967. Its peaks bear the names of Canada's provinces and territories, with the exception of Nunavut, which was not a territory at the time. The tallest point is Centennial Peak. Nine of the peaks were climbed as part of the Yukon Alpine Centennial Expedition, part of the 1967 celebrations. Show on map
Sitka Spruce PlantationSitka Spruce Park is a public park in the city of Unalaska, Alaska. The roughly 5-acre (2.0 ha) park is located on Biorka Drive on Amaknak Island, south of Unalaska Airport. It is one of the few places on the island where there are a significant number of trees. A small part of the park is a National Historic Landmark, as it was the site of the earliest documented afforestation in North America. In 1805, Russian agents planted an unknown number of Sitka spruce trees in the area, of which six were documented to be surviving in 1978. Show on map
Arey IslandArey Island is a 7-mile-long (11 km) barrier island on the North Slope of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located west of Barter Island, between Arey Lagoon and the Beaufort Sea.In the past, visitors and guides have used Arey Island as a departure point from the coastal plain. Though this may still be possible, most of Arey Island is private land, so permission for its use must be obtained from, and the access fees paid to, the Kaktovik Inupiat Corporation (KIC). Without this permission, public access to Arey Island is limited. Show on map
Afognak IslandAfognak (Alutiiq: Agw’aneq) is an island 5 km (3.1 mi) north of Kodiak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is 43 miles from east to west and 23 miles from north to south and has a land area of 1,812.58 km2 (699.84 sq mi), making it the 18th largest island in the United States. The coast is split by many long, narrow bays. The highest point is 2,546 feet. The dense spruce forests of Afognak are home to brown bears, Roosevelt elk and Sitka black-tailed deer. Many people visit the island recreationally for hunting and fishing. Show on map
Chenega IslandChenega Island is an island of Aleuts in Prince William Sound in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the traditional home to the community of Chenega, though much of its population eventually migrated to Chenega Bay on nearby Evans Island after the 1964 Good Friday earthquake and accompanying tsunami. Chenega Island and its surrounding habitat were also heavily impacted by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. The island has a land area of 57.084 km² (22.04 sq mi) and, after the mass emigration, was unpopulated as of the 2000 census. Show on map
Unga IslandUnga Island (Uĝnaasaqax̂ in Aleut) is the largest of the Shumagin Islands off the Alaska Peninsula in southwestern Alaska, United States. The island has a land area of 170.73 sq mi (442.188 km²), making it the 35th largest island in the United States. As of the 2000 census, it had a permanent population of one, however the island is now uninhabited. Unga Island was formerly named Grekodelarovskoe (Greek Delarov) for Evstratii Ivanovich Delarov who explored the area in the late 18th century on behalf of the Russian-American Company. Show on map
Bell IslandBell Island is an island in the Alexander Archipelago in Southeast Alaska, U.S.A. It is 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) long, lying in Behm Canal, north of Revillagigedo Island. George Vancouver first visited the island on August 12, 1793, in the evening dining on its south coast. He suspected that it was an island, but this wasn't proven until later in the same month, when Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery, charted its entire coastline. Vancouver later named it \"Bell's Island\" after one of his crew, a Midshipman Bell. Show on map