Maps, Guides And More - Trinidad and Tobago

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Places and geographical objects in Trinidad_and_Tobago. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Trinidad and Tobago

Basic information about Trinidad_and_Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago /ˈtrɪnᵻˌdæd ənd toʊˈbeɪɡoʊ/, officially the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, is a twin island country situated off the northern edge of South America mainland, lying 11 kilometres (6.8 miles) just off the coast of northeastern Venezuela and 130 kilometres (81 miles) south of Grenada. Bordering the Caribbean to the north, it shares maritime boundaries with other nations including Barbados to the northeast, Grenada to the northwest, Guyana to the southeast, and Venezuela to the south and west. The country covers an area of 5,128 square kilometres (1,980 sq mi) and consists of two main islands, Trinidad and Tobago, with numerous smaller landforms. The two main islands are divided into nine regions, and one ward. Sangre Grande is the largest of the country's nine regions, comprising about 18% of the total area and 10% of the total population of the country. Trinidad and Tobago lies outside of the hurricane belt. The island of Trinidad was a Spanish colony from the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1498 to the capitulation of the Spanish Governor, Don José Maria Chacón, on the arrival of a British fleet of 18 warships on 18 February 1797. During the same period, the island of Tobago changed hands among Spanish, British, French, Dutch and Courlander colonizers. Trinidad and Tobago (remaining separate until 1889) were ceded to Britain in 1802 under the Treaty of Amiens. The country Trinidad and Tobago obtained independence in 1962, becoming a republic in 1976. Trinidad and Tobago is the third richest country by GDP (PPP) per capita in the Americas after the United States and Canada. Furthermore, it is recognised as a high income economy by the World Bank. Unlike most of the English-speaking Caribbean, the country's economy is primarily industrial, with an emphasis on petroleum and petrochemicals. The country's wealth attributes to its large reserves and exploitation of oil and natural gas. Trinidad and Tobago is the leading Caribbean producer of oil and gas. Trinidad and Tobago is known for its Carnival and is the birthplace of steelpan, limbo, and the music styles of calypso, soca and chutney. Trinidad and Tobago is one of the most biodiverse nations in the Caribbean and has a wide variety of flora and fauna. Trinidad is also home to the Banwari Trace site, which is the oldest archaeological site in the Caribbean.Trinidad and Tobago /ˈtrɪnᵻˌdæd ənd toʊˈbeɪɡoʊ/, officially the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, is a twin island country situated off the northern edge of South America mainland, lying 11 kilometres (6.8 miles) just off the coast of northeastern Venezuela and 130 kilometres (81 miles) south of Grenada. Bordering the Caribbean to the north, it shares maritime boundaries with other nations including Barbados to the northeast, Grenada to the northwest, Guyana to the southeast, and Venezuela to the south and west. The country covers an area of 5,128 square kilometres (1,980 sq mi) and consists of two main islands, Trinidad and Tobago, with numerous smaller landforms. The two main islands are divided into nine regions, and one ward. Sangre Grande is the largest of the country's nine regions, comprising about 18% of the total area and 10% of the total population of the country. Trinidad and Tobago lies outside of the hurricane belt. The island of Trinidad was a Spanish colony from the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1498 to the capitulation of the Spanish Governor, Don José Maria Chacón, on the arrival of a British fleet of 18 warships on 18 February 1797. During the same period, the island of Tobago changed hands among Spanish, British, French, Dutch and Courlander colonizers. Trinidad and Tobago (remaining separate until 1889) were ceded to Britain in 1802 under the Treaty of Amiens. The country Trinidad and Tobago obtained independence in 1962, becoming a republic in 1976. Trinidad and Tobago is the third richest country by GDP (PPP) per capita in the Americas after the United States and Canada. Furthermore, it is recognised as a high income economy by the World Bank. Unlike most of the English-speaking Caribbean, the country's economy is primarily industrial, with an emphasis on petroleum and petrochemicals. The country's wealth attributes to its large reserves and exploitation of oil and natural gas. Trinidad and Tobago is the leading Caribbean producer of oil and gas. Trinidad and Tobago is known for its Carnival and is the birthplace of steelpan, limbo, and the music styles of calypso, soca and chutney. Trinidad and Tobago is one of the most biodiverse nations in the Caribbean and has a wide variety of flora and fauna. Trinidad is also home to the Banwari Trace site, which is the oldest archaeological site in the Caribbean.
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SipariaSiparia Regional Corporation is the Regional Corporation which handles local government functions in a 510.48 km² area of southwest Trinidad. It is one of 15 local government bodies in Trinidad and Tobago. The Siparia Regional Corporation is headquartered in Siparia. Other urban areas include Cedros, Fyzabad, La Brea, Santa Flora, South Oropouche.Show on map
San Juan_LaventilleSan Juan-Laventille Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 220.39 km². The San Juan-Laventille Regional Corporation is headquartered at MTS Plaza in Aranguez. Other urban areas include Barataria, Laventille, Morvant, St. Joseph and San Juan. It is the smallest Regional municipal in Trinidad. The region is bordered from Port of Spain in the west to St. Joseph in the east.Show on map
Tunapuna_PiarcoTunapuna-Piarco Regional Corporation is a local government body in Trinidad and Tobago. It is one of nine Regional Corporations in Trinidad which replaced the system of Counties as local government bodies in 1992. It is the largest by population of all the Regional Corporations. It contains the eastern end of the densely populated East-West Corridor. The population is diverse.Show on map
TobagoTobago /təˈbeɪɡoʊ/ is an autonomous island within the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. It is located northeast of the mainland of Trinidad and southeast of Grenada. The island lies outside the hurricane belt. According to the earliest English-language source cited in the Oxford English Dictionary, Tobago bore a name that has become the English word tobacco. The national bird of Tobago is the cocrico.Show on map
City of San FernandoSan Fernando (population of 50,208 according to the 2011 census), officially the City of San Fernando, is the second most populous of Trinidadian cities and the second largest municipality after Chaguanas. It occupies 18 km² and is located in the southwestern part of the island of Trinidad. It is bounded to the north by the Guaracara River, the south by the Oropouche River, the east by the Sir Solomon Hochoy Highway, and the west by the Gulf of Paria. The former borough was elevated to the status of a city on November 18, 1988. The motto of San Fernando is: \Sanitas Fortis\ - In a Healthy Environment We Will Find Strength. Many local Trinidadians refer to the city with the shortened name \Sando.\ San Fernando is called Trinidad and Tobago's \industrial capital\ because of its proximity toShow on map
City of Port of SpainPort of Spain, also written as Port-of-Spain and known in Spanish as \Puerto España\, is the capital city of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the country's third-largest municipality, after Chaguanas and San Fernando. The city has a municipal population of 37,074 (2011 census), a metropolitan population of 128,026 (1990 unofficial estimate) and a transient daily population of 250,000. It is located on the Gulf of Paria, on the northwest coast of the island of Trinidad and is part of a larger conurbation stretching from Chaguaramas in the west to Arima in the east with an estimated population of 600,000.Show on map
MayaroMayaro Rio Claro Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 852.81 km². The Mayaro Rio Claro Regional Corporation is headquartered in Rio Claro. Other towns include Mayaro and Guayaguayare.Show on map
Borough of ArimaArima is the easternmost and second largest in area of the three boroughs of Trinidad and Tobago. It is geographically adjacent to Sangre Grande and Arouca at the southcentral foothills of the Northern Range, and to the south is the Caroni-Arena Dam; in addition, Coterminous with Town of Arima since 1888, the borough of Arima is the fourth-largest municipality in population in the country (after Port of Spain, Chaguanas and San Fernando), with a census-estimated 33,606 residents in 2011.Show on map
ChaguanasThe Borough of Chaguanas is the largest borough (83,516 at the 2011 census) and fastest-growing town in Trinidad and Tobago. Located in Central Trinidad about 18 km (11 mi) south of Port of Spain, it originally grew in size due to its proximity to the Woodford Lodge sugar refinery and the Central Trinidad town of Couva. It remained a minor town until the 1980s when it began to grow rapidly as it drew people for its bargain shopping and moderately-priced housing. However, its rapid growth has seen property values increase dramatically.Show on map
Couva-Tabaquite-TalparoCouva-Tabaquite-Talparo Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 719.64 km². Urban areas within Couva-Tabaquite-Talparo Regional Corporation include California, Claxton Bay, Couva, Point Lisas, St. Mary's, Tabaquite and Talparo.Show on map
Diego MartinDiego Martin Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 127.53 km² and is headquartered in Petit Valley. Other urban areas within Diego Martin Regional Corporation include Carenage, Diego Martin, Maraval and Westmoorings.Show on map
Eastern TobagoTobago /təˈbeɪɡoʊ/ is an autonomous island within the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. It is located northeast of the mainland of Trinidad and southeast of Grenada. The island lies outside the hurricane belt. According to the earliest English-language source cited in the Oxford English Dictionary, Tobago bore a name that has become the English word tobacco. The national bird of Tobago is the cocrico.Show on map
Penal_DebePenal-Debe Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 246.91 km². Urban areas within Penal-Debe Regional Corporation include Penal, where the corporation is headquartered, and Debe.Show on map
Princes TownPrinces Town Regional Corporation is a Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It administers a land area of 621.35 km². The Princes Town Regional Corporation is headquartered in Princes Town. Other towns include Moruga. List of Areas in Princes Town Regional Corporation are:Show on map
Point FortinPoint Fortin, the smallest Borough in Trinidad and Tobago,(also the first Republic Borough of Trinidad and Tobago) is located in southwestern Trinidad, about 32 km (20 mi) southwest of San Fernando. After the discovery of petroleum in the area in 1906 the town grew into a major oil-producing centre. The town grew with the oil industry between the 1940s and 1980s, culminating in its elevation to borough status in 1980. After the end of the oil boom Point Fortin was hit hard by economic recession in the 1980s and the closure of its oil refinery. Construction of a Liquefied Natural Gas plant by Atlantic LNG boosted the economy.Show on map
Sangre GrandeSangre Grande Regional Corporation is a Local Government Body and the largest Regional Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago. It has a land area of 898.94 km². The Sangre Grande Regional Corporation is headquartered in Sangre Grande. Other urban areas within include Guaico, Toco and Valencia. For the Council Term of 2013 - 2016 the Sangre Grande Regional Corporation was expanded to include one additional Electoral District.Show on map