Maps, Guides And More - Taiwan

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Taiwan. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Taiwan

Basic information about Taiwan
Taiwan (/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/; Chinese: 臺灣 or 台灣; see ), officially the Republic of China (ROC; Chinese: 中華民國; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó), is a sovereign state in East Asia. The Republic of China, originally based in mainland China, now governs the island of Taiwan, which constitutes more than 99% of its territory, as well as Penghu, Kinmen, Matsu, and other minor islands, following its loss of the mainland China territory in 1949 in the Chinese Civil War. This remaining area is also constitutionally called the \Free area of the Republic of China\ which is not ruled by the Communist Party of China in Beijing. Neighboring states include the People's Republic of China (PRC) to the west (mainland China), Japan to the east and northeast, and the Philippines to the south. Taiwan is one of the most densely populated countries in the world with a population density of 649 people per km2 in October 2015. Taipei is the seat of the central government, and together with the surrounding cities of New Taipei and Keelung forms the largest metropolitan area on the island. The island of Taiwan (formerly known as \Formosa\) was mainly inhabited by Taiwanese aborigines until the Dutch and Spanish settlement during the Age of Discovery in the 17th century, when Han Chinese began immigrating to the island. In 1662, the pro-Ming loyalist Koxinga expelled the Dutch and established the first Han Chinese polity on the island, the Kingdom of Tungning. The Qing dynasty of China later defeated the kingdom and annexed Taiwan. By the time Taiwan was ceded to Japan in 1895, the majority of Taiwan's inhabitants were Han Chinese either by ancestry or by assimilation. The Republic of China (ROC) was established in mainland China in 1912. After Japan's surrender in 1945, the ROC gained control of Taiwan. During the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party of China took full control of mainland China and founded the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1949. ROC loyalists fled to Taiwan and re-established the national government there, claiming to be the legitimate government of all of China. Effective ROC jurisdiction was actually now limited to Taiwan and its surrounding islands, with the main island making up 99% of its de facto territory. The ROC continued to represent China at the United Nations until 1971, when the PRC assumed China's seat via Resolution 2758. The ROC lost UN membership. International recognition of the ROC gradually eroded as most countries switched their 'China' recognition to the PRC. 21 UN member states and the Holy See currently maintain official diplomatic relations with the ROC. Numerous other states maintain unofficial ties through representative offices via institutions that function as de facto embassies and consulates. In the 1980s and early 1990s Taiwanese society transformed itself from a military dictatorship employing one-party rule to a multi-party democracy with universal suffrage. Today Taiwan maintains an advanced industrial economy as a result of rapid economic growth and industrialization in the late twentieth century. Taiwan is one of the Four Asian Tigers and a member of the WTO and APEC. The 21st-largest economy in the world, its high-tech industry plays a key role in the global economy. Taiwan is ranked highly in terms of freedom of the press, health care, public education, economic freedom, and human development. The complications of Taiwan's history since 1945 have bequeathed a number of unresolved issues to its citizens. Outstanding among these are the exact nature of Taiwanese national identity, the ambiguous international status of Taiwan, and the difficulty of maintaining relations with the PRC across the Taiwan Strait. Within Taiwanese society these issues generate debate among political parties and candidates. Though the ROC renounced in 1992 the conquest of PRC-controlled territories as a national goal, there is still dispute over whether the constitution still gives legal support to a claim of sovereignty over all of CTaiwan (/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/; Chinese: 臺灣 or 台灣; see ), officially the Republic of China (ROC; Chinese: 中華民國; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó), is a sovereign state in East Asia. The Republic of China, originally based in mainland China, now governs the island of Taiwan, which constitutes more than 99% of its territory, as well as Penghu, Kinmen, Matsu, and other minor islands, following its loss of the mainland China territory in 1949 in the Chinese Civil War. This remaining area is also constitutionally called the \Free area of the Republic of China\ which is not ruled by the Communist Party of China in Beijing. Neighboring states include the People's Republic of China (PRC) to the west (mainland China), Japan to the east and northeast, and the Philippines to the south. Taiwan is one of the most densely populated countries in the world with a population density of 649 people per km2 in October 2015. Taipei is the seat of the central government, and together with the surrounding cities of New Taipei and Keelung forms the largest metropolitan area on the island. The island of Taiwan (formerly known as \Formosa\) was mainly inhabited by Taiwanese aborigines until the Dutch and Spanish settlement during the Age of Discovery in the 17th century, when Han Chinese began immigrating to the island. In 1662, the pro-Ming loyalist Koxinga expelled the Dutch and established the first Han Chinese polity on the island, the Kingdom of Tungning. The Qing dynasty of China later defeated the kingdom and annexed Taiwan. By the time Taiwan was ceded to Japan in 1895, the majority of Taiwan's inhabitants were Han Chinese either by ancestry or by assimilation. The Republic of China (ROC) was established in mainland China in 1912. After Japan's surrender in 1945, the ROC gained control of Taiwan. During the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party of China took full control of mainland China and founded the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1949. ROC loyalists fled to Taiwan and re-established the national government there, claiming to be the legitimate government of all of China. Effective ROC jurisdiction was actually now limited to Taiwan and its surrounding islands, with the main island making up 99% of its de facto territory. The ROC continued to represent China at the United Nations until 1971, when the PRC assumed China's seat via Resolution 2758. The ROC lost UN membership. International recognition of the ROC gradually eroded as most countries switched their 'China' recognition to the PRC. 21 UN member states and the Holy See currently maintain official diplomatic relations with the ROC. Numerous other states maintain unofficial ties through representative offices via institutions that function as de facto embassies and consulates. In the 1980s and early 1990s Taiwanese society transformed itself from a military dictatorship employing one-party rule to a multi-party democracy with universal suffrage. Today Taiwan maintains an advanced industrial economy as a result of rapid economic growth and industrialization in the late twentieth century. Taiwan is one of the Four Asian Tigers and a member of the WTO and APEC. The 21st-largest economy in the world, its high-tech industry plays a key role in the global economy. Taiwan is ranked highly in terms of freedom of the press, health care, public education, economic freedom, and human development. The complications of Taiwan's history since 1945 have bequeathed a number of unresolved issues to its citizens. Outstanding among these are the exact nature of Taiwanese national identity, the ambiguous international status of Taiwan, and the difficulty of maintaining relations with the PRC across the Taiwan Strait. Within Taiwanese society these issues generate debate among political parties and candidates. Though the ROC renounced in 1992 the conquest of PRC-controlled territories as a national goal, there is still dispute over whether the constitution still gives legal support to a claim of sovereignty over all of C
DivisionDescriptionShow
FukienFujian Province, formerly romanized as Fukien Province (Chinese: 福建省; pinyin: Fújiàn Shěng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Hok-kiàn-séng, see other names below), is a streamlined province of the Republic of China (ROC). It includes the small archipelagos of Kinmen (Quemoy) and Matsu Islands off the southeast coast of the People's Republic of China (PRC). The seat of the provincial government is Jincheng Township of Kinmen County.Show on map
TakaoKaohsiung City (Chinese: 高雄市; pinyin: Gāoxióng Shì; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Ko-hiông-chhī; old names: Takao, Takow, Takau) is a special municipality in the Republic of China on Taiwan. Located in southern-western Taiwan and facing the Taiwan Strait, it is by area the largest municipality, at 2,951.85 km2 (1,139.72 sq mi), and second most populous (by city proper) with a population of approximately 2.77 million. Since its start in the 17th century, Kaohsiung has grown from a small trading village, into the political, economic, transportation, manufacturing, refining, shipbuilding, and industrial center of southern Taiwan. It is a global city with sufficiency as categorized by Globalization and World Cities Research Network in 2012.Show on map
TaipeiTaipei (/ˌtaɪˈpeɪ/), officially known as Taipei City, is the capital city and a special municipality of the Republic of China on Taiwan. Sitting at the northern tip of the state, Taipei City is an enclave of the municipality of New Taipei City. It is about 25 km (16 mi) southwest of the northern port city Keelung. Most of the city is located on the Taipei Basin, an ancient lakebed bounded by the two relatively narrow valleys of the Keelung and Xindian rivers, which join to form the Tamsui River along the city's western border. Since 1949, Taipei has been the temporary capital of the ROC after losing the mainland to the Communists in the Chinese Civil War.Show on map
TaiwanTaiwan Province (Chinese: 臺灣省; pinyin: Táiwān Shěng) is one of the two administrative divisions of the Republic of China (ROC) that are officially referred to as \provinces\. The province covers approximately 69% of the actual-controlled territory of the ROC, with around 31% of the total population.Show on map