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Places and geographical objects on the map of Homs.

Map of Homs district in Syria

Basic information about Homs
Homs Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة حمص / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ḥimṣ) is one of the fourteen muhafazat (governorates or provinces) of Syria. It is situated in central Syria. Its area differs in various sources, from 40,940 km2 (15,807 sq mi) to 42,223 km2 (16,302 sq mi). It is thus geographically the largest governorate of Syria. Homs Governorate has a population of 1,763,000 (2010 estimate). The Homs governorate is divided into 6 administrative districts (mantiqah). Homs is the capital city of the district of Homs. Its governor is Talal al-Barazi. A Homs Governorate also formed part of Ottoman Syria, when it was also known as the Sanjak of Homs.
Cities, towns & villages in Homs
NameDescriptionShow
Qal`at al ḨişnKrak des Chevaliers (French pronunciation: ​[kʁak de ʃəvaˈlje]; Arabic: حصن also Crac des Chevaliers, Ḥoṣn al-Akrād (حصن الأكراد), Castle Alhsn, formerly Crac de l'Ospital, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurdish troops garrisoned there by the Mirdasids; as a result it was known as Hisn al-Akrad, meaning the \"Castle of the Kurds\". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271. It became known as Crac de l'Ospital; the name Krak des Chevaliers was coined in the 19th century. Show Qal`at al Ḩişnon the map
TadmurPalmyra (/ˌpælˈmaɪrə/; Aramaic: Tedmurtā; Arabic: تدمر‎‎ Tadmor) is an ancient Semitic city in present-day Homs Governorate, Syria. Archaeological finds date back to the Neolithic period, and the city was first documented in the early second millennium BC. Palmyra changed hands on a number of occasions between different empires before becoming a subject of the Roman Empire in the first century AD. Show Tadmuron the map
HomsHoms (/hɔːms/; Arabic: حمص‎‎ / ALA-LC: Ḥimṣ), previously known as Emesa (Greek: Ἔμεσα Emesa), is a city in western Syria and the capital of the Homs Governorate. It is 501 metres (1,644 ft) above sea level and is located 162 kilometres (101 mi) north of Damascus. Located on the Orontes River, Homs is also the central link between the interior cities and the Mediterranean coast. Show Homson the map
RablahThe ancient town of Riblah (meaning \"fruitful\"), today a tell covered by a cemetery not far from the town of Ribleh on the Syrian side of the border with Lebanon, was in biblical times located on the northern frontier of the land of Canaan. The site lays on the eastern bank of the Orontes, in a wide and fertile plain, 35 miles north-east of Baalbek and 10 or 12 miles south of the artificial Lake Homs created by the Romans. The town is described in Num. 34:11 as \"on the eastern side of Ain.\" A place still called el-Ain, i.e., \"the fountain\", can still be found about 10 miles away. Show Rablahon the map
Ar RastanAr-Rastan (Arabic: الرستن‎‎) is the third largest city in the Homs Governorate, located 25 kilometers (16 mi) north of its administrative capital Homs and 22 kilometers (14 mi) from Hama. Nearby localities include Talbiseh and al-Ghantu to the south, al-Zaafaraniyah and al-Mashrafah to the southeast, Murayj al-Durr to the northeast, Tumin to the north, Deir al-Fardis to the northwest and Kafr Nan and the Houla village cluster to the west. Ar-Rastan had a population of nearly 40,000 in 2004. Show Ar Rastanon the map
‘ArjūnArjoun (Arabic: عرجون‎‎, also spelled Arjun or Arjoon), is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located southwest of Homs. Nearby localities include Aqrabiyah to the southwest, al-Qusayr to the southeast, al-Dabaah to the east, Kafr Mousa and al-Ghassaniya to the north and al-Houz to the northwest. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Arjoun had a population of 2,465 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. Show ‘Arjūnon the map
TalldawwTaldou (also spelled Tall Daww, Taldo, Tall Dhu or Taldao Arabic: تلدو‎‎) is a town in the Houla region of northern Syria, north of Homs in the Homs Governorate. Nearby towns include Burj al-Qa'i to the east, Tallaf to the northeast, Kafr Laha and Tell Dahab to the north, Qarmas and Maryamin to the northwest, al-Taybah al-Gharbiyah and al-Shinyah to the west, Kabu to the southwest, Sharqliyya to the south and Ghur Gharbiyah to the southeast. In 2004 it had a population of 15,727 according to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. Show Talldawwon the map
Al FitāyāLiftaya (Arabic: لفتايا‎‎, also spelled Laftaya) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located southwest of Homs near Lake Homs. Nearby localities include Wujuh al-Hajar to the southeast, Khirbet Ghazi, Khirbet al-Sawda and Khirbet Tin Nur to the northeast. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Liftaya had a population of 2,047 in the 2004 census. Show Al Fitāyāon the map
Al Kashf Show Al Kashfon the map
ĀbilAbil (Arabic: آبل‎‎, also spelled Abel or Aabel) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located 10 kilometers south of Homs. Nearby localities include al-Nuqayrah and Kafr Aya to the north, Maskanah to the northeast, Judaydat al-Sharqiyah to the east, Shinshar to the southeast, Damina al-Sharqiyah to the south, al-Buwaydah al-Sharqiyah to the southwest and Qattinah to the west. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Abil had a population of 2,873 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. Show Ābilon the map
TiyāsTiyas (Arabic: التياس‎‎, also known as al-Safa Arabic: الصفا‎‎) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, east of Homs. It is situated in the Syrian Desert, and the closest localities are Tadmur (Palmyra) to the east, the subdistrict center of al-Qaryatayn to the southwest, Furqlus to the west and Uqayribat to the northwest. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Tiyas had a population of 2,564 in the 2004 census. Show Tiyāson the map
ḨadīdahHadidah (Arabic: حديدة‎‎, also spelled Hadideh) is a town in the northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located west of Homs and just east of the border with Lebanon. Nearby localities include Liftaya to the southeast, Khirbet al-Hamam to the east, Shin to the north, al-Mazinah and al-Huwash to the northwest, and al-Zarah and Talkalakh to the west. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Hadidah had a population of 2,544 in the 2004 census. It is the administrative center of the Hadidah nahiyah (\"subdistrict\") which consists of 27 localities with a collective population of 25,998 in 2004. The inhabitants of the town are predominantly Alawites. Show Ḩadīdahon the map
MarmarītāMarmarita (Arabic: Syriac: ܡܪܡܪܝܬܐ‎, Marmarītā) is a village in northwestern Syria, located west of Homs. Marmarita is one of the largest villages in Wadi al-Nasarah (\"Valley of the Christians\"), a region north of Talkalakh. In 2004, Marmarita had a population of 2,206, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). Its inhabitants are predominantly Greek Orthodox Christians and is one of the largest Christian villages in the Wadi al-Nasara ('valley of the Christians'). Marmarita is a popular summer destination and tourist attraction in Syria. The village has been part of the Homs Governorate since 1953; prior to that, it was part of the Latakia Governorate. Show Marmarītāon the map
TallkalakhTalkalakh (Arabic: تلكلخ) is a city in western Syria administratively belonging to the Homs Governorate as the capital of the Talkalakh District just north of the border with Lebanon and west of Homs. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) Talkalakh had a population of 18,412 in 2004. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims, while the surrounding villages are mostly inhabited by Alawites. Most of the city's residents have fled as a result of the ongoing Syrian civil war. Show Tallkalakhon the map
TasnīnTasnin (Arabic: تسنين‎‎, also spelled Tasneen) is a village in northern Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located 32 kilometers northwest of Homs in between the cities of al-Rastan and Talbiseh. Other nearby localities include Kafr Nan and Kissin to the northwest, Gharnatah to the northeast and Akrad Dayasinah to the southwest. Show Tasnīnon the map
Kafr RāmKafr Ram (Arabic: كفرام‎‎, also spelled Kfar Ram or Kafram) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located 50 kilometers northwest of Homs in the Taldou Subidistrict. The name of the village is Syriac in origin, with Kafr meaning \"small village\" or \"the spot\", and Ram meaning \"mountain\". In the northern part of the village is the small, historic church of al-Qasr. The first primary school in the village was founded around 1935. Among Kafr Ram's water sources are several springs, the largest of which is known as 'Ayn al-Hamra. Show Kafr Rāmon the map
Ash Sha‘īrātShayrat (Arabic: also spelled Sha'irat) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located southeast of Homs on the western fringes of the Syrian Desert. Nearby localities include Dardaghan to the west, al-Manzul and al-Riqama to the northwest, Sadad to the south and al-Hamrat to the southwest. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Shayrat had a population of 1,443 in the 2004 census. Shayrat had been classified as an abandoned village or khirba by English scholar Eli Smith in 1838. Show Ash Sha‘īrāton the map
HisyaHisyah (Arabic: حسياء‎‎, also spelled Hasya, Hasiyah, Hesa or Hessia) is a town in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located about 35 kilometers south of Homs. Situated on the M5 Highway between Homs and Damascus, nearby localities include al-Qusayr and Rableh to the northwest, Shamsin and Jandar to the north, Dardaghan to the northeast, Sadad to the southeast and Bureij to the south. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Hisyah had a population of 5,425 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are mostly Sunni Muslims and Catholics. Show Hisyaon the map
MahīnMahin or Mheen (Arabic: مهين‎‎) is a town in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, south of Homs. It is situated on an oasis in the Syrian Desert, between Sadad to the west and al-Qaryatayn to the east, adjacent to the ancient village of Huwwarin. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Mahin had a population of 11,064 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. In mid-late 2015, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant captured Mahin. The city was regained by the Syrian Army the 29 December 2015. Show Mahīnon the map
QaţţīnahQattinah (Arabic: قطينة‎‎, also spelled Kattineh) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located south of Homs. It is situated at the northeastern end of Lake Homs which is also known as \"Lake Qattinah.\" Nearby localities include al-Buwaydah al-Sharqiyah to the south, Aabel to the east, al-Nuqayrah to the northeast, Tell al-Shur to the north and Khirbet Ghazi to the west on the opposite end of Lake Homs. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Qattinah had a population of 6,018 in the 2004 census. Show Qaţţīnahon the map
TallbīsahTalbiseh (Arabic: تلبيسة‎‎, also spelled Talbisa, Tell Bisa, Talbeesa) is a large town in northwestern Syria administratively part of the Homs Governorate, about 10 kilometers north of Homs. Nearby localities include al-Rastan to the north, al-Ghantoo to the southwest and al-Mashrafah to the east. The old town of Talbiseh is situated on an isolated hill. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) Talbiseh had a population of 30,796 in 2004. Its inhabitants are mostly Sunni Muslims with significant Arab and Turkmen ethnic groups. Show Tallbīsahon the map
Kafr NānKafr Nan (Arabic: كفرنان‎‎, also spelled Kfarnan) is a village in northern Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located north of Homs. Nearby localities include Burj Qa'i to the west, Kisin to the northwest, Gharnatah to the northeast, al-Zaafaraniyah to the east, Talbiseh to the southeast, Tasnin to the south and Akrad Dayasinah to the southeast. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Kafr Nan had a population of 3,231 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Kafr Nānon the map
Al FurqlusFurqlus (Arabic: Furglus or Furklus) is a town in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, east of the city of Homs. Situated at the eastern approaches of the Syrian Desert, the town is located between al-Qaryatayn to the south, Sadad to the southwest, Shinshar to the west, Fatim al-Amuq and al-Sayyid to the northwest, al-Mukharram to the north and Palmyra to the east. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Furqlus had a population of 5,096 in the 2004 census. Show Al Furqluson the map
ShamsīnShamsin (Arabic: شمسين‎‎ Shamsîn also spelled Shemsin, Shamsinn or Shimsan) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located south of Homs. Nearby localities include al-Qusayr to the west, Damina al-Sharqiya to the northwest, Shinshar to the north, Dardaghan to the southeast and Hisyah to the south. According to the Syrian Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Shamsin had a population of 811 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. Show Shamsīnon the map
RabāḩRabah (Arabic: رباح‎‎) is a village in northwestern Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located west of the city of Homs. Nearby localities include Muklous to the west, Hawash and Zweitina to the southwest, Shin to the southeast, al-Mahfurah to the east, al-Qabu, Syria to the northeast and Fahel to the north. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Rabah had a population of 2,341 in 2004. Its inhabitants are predominantly Greek Orthodox Christians. Show Rabāḩon the map
Kafr LāhāKafr Laha (Arabic: is a town in the Homs Governorate north of Homs in northern Syria. In 2004 it had a population of 20,041 according to the Central Bureau of Statistics of Syria. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. It is the largest town in the Houla region. Nearby localities include Tallaf to the northeast, Tell Dahab to the north, Aqrab to the northwest, Qarmas and Maryamin to the west, al-Taybah al-Gharbiyah to the southwest and Taldou to the southeast. Show Kafr Lāhāon the map
AkkūmAkkum (Arabic: أكوم‎‎, also spelled Akoum, also known as Ayn al-Safa) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located southwest of Homs and immediately north and south of the border with Lebanon. Nearby localities include al-Hawik, Wadi Hanna, Baluzah and al-Aqrabiyah to the east. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Akkum had a population of 506 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Shia Muslims. Show Akkūmon the map
Al MashrafahQatna (Arabic قطنا, modern Tell el-Mishrife, Arabic المشرفة) is an archaeological site in the Wadi il-Aswad, a tributary of the Orontes, 18 km northeast of Homs, Syria. It consists in a tell occupying 1 km², which makes it one of the largest Bronze Age towns in western Syria. The tell is located at the edge of the limestone-plateau of the Syrian desert towards the fertile Homs-Bassin. The tell is named after the adjacent modern town of al-Mishirfeh. Show Al Mashrafahon the map
ZaydalZaidal (Arabic: زيدل‎‎, also spelled Zaydal) is a town in the Homs Governorate of central Syria, just east of Homs, forming a part of its suburbs. Nearby localities include Fairouzeh to the south and the Homs neighborhoods of Karm al-Zaitun, al-Sabil and al-Zahra to the west. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Zaidal had a population of 5,710 in 2004. The town has a large Christian community. Show Zaydalon the map
Karād ad DāsinīyahKarad Dayasinah (Arabic: كراد داسنية‎‎, also known as Akrad Dayasinah or Akrad Dasnieh, also known as Shamah) is a village in northern Syria, administratively part of the Homs District, located northwest of Homs. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Karad Dayasinah had a population of 2,028 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims of Turkmen descent. Show Karād ad Dāsinīyahon the map
ArakArak (Arabic: آراك‎‎, also spelled Urak or Araq) is a village in eastern Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate. It is situated on an oasis in the Syrian Desert along the road between Palmyra which is 28 kilometers to the southwest and al-Sukhnah to the northeast. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics of Syria (CBS), Arak had a population of 111 in the 2004 census. Show Arakon the map
Abū HamāmahAbu Hamamah (Arabic: عسيلة‎‎, also known as Abu Humama) is a village in northern Syria, administratively part of the Rastan District, located north of Homs on the southern banks of the Orontes River. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Abu Hamamah had a population of 255 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Circassians from the Shapsugh tribe. Show Abū Hamāmahon the map
FāḩilFahil (Arabic: فاحل‎‎) is a town in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, northwest of Homs. Nearby localities include Taldou and Kafr Laha to the northeast and al-Qabu to the west. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Fahil had a population of 5,775 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites and Greek Orthodox Christians. Show Fāḩilon the map
HawariniHuwwarin (Arabic: حوارين‎‎, also spelled Hawarin, Huwarin or Hawarine) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, south of Homs. Situated in the Syrian Desert, the village is adjacent to the larger town of Mahin to its south and lies between the towns of Sadad to the west and al-Qaryatayn to the east. Its inhabitants are predominantly Muslims. Show Hawarinion the map
ShinshārShinshar (Arabic: شنشار‎‎, also spelled Shanshar) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, located between Homs to the north, al-Qusayr to the southwest and Shamsin to the south. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Shinshar had a population of 3,118 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims. Show Shinshāron the map
Jibāb ḨamadJabab Hamad (Arabic: جباب حمد‎‎, also spelled Jbab Hamad or Jibab Hamad) is a village in central Syria, administratively part of the Homs Governorate, east of Homs. Situated in the Syrian Desert, nearby localities include Furqlus, al-Sayyid and Fatim al-Amuq to the west. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics, Jabab Hamad had a population of 378 in the 2004 census. Show Jibāb Ḩamadon the map
Ghajar AmīrGharnatah (Arabic: غرناطة‎‎, also known as Ghajar Amir) is a village in northern Syria, administratively part of the Rastan District, located north of Homs. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Gharnatah had a population of 5,366 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims of Turkmen descent. Show Ghajar Amīron the map
FayrūzahFairouzeh (Arabic: فيروزه) is a village 3 miles southeast of the city of Homs in Syria. Due to urban development in the area, Fairouzeh, like nearby Zaydal, is now considered one of Homs' suburbs. In 2004, it had a population of 6,456. Its inhabitants are predominantly Syriac Christians. Show Fayrūzahon the map
ŞufrSufr (Arabic: صفر‎‎, also spelled Suffur, also known as Suqur Abu Wardah) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Sufr had a population of 712 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Şufron the map
JankamrahJankamrah (Arabic: جنكمرة‎‎; also spelled Jen Kamrah) is a village in northern Syria located west of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Jankamrah had a population of 1,514 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Christians and Alawites. Show Jankamrahon the map
TannūnahTannunah (Arabic: تارين‎‎, also spelled Tannoula or Tenuny) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Tannunah had a population of 882 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Tannūnahon the map
ŪtānAutan (Arabic: أوتان‎‎, also spelled Otan, Awtan or Wetan) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Autan had a population of 583 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Maronites. Show Ūtānon the map
Harqal'Harqal (Arabic: هرقل‎‎; also spelled Hurukul or Hreiqel) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Harqal had a population of 489 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Harqalon the map
QumayrīQumayrah (Arabic: قميرة‎‎, also spelled Qmeiry or Qumairy) is a village in northern Syria located west of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Qumayrah had a population of 310 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Qumayrīon the map
Bsās'Bisas (Arabic: بساس‎‎, also spelled Bsas or Besas) is a village in northern Syria located west of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, 'Ish al-Shuhah had a population of 533 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Bsāson the map
Al KunaysahKunaysah (Arabic: كنيسة‎‎, also spelled Knisa) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Kunaysah had a population of 1,504 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Al Kunaysahon the map
BaḩzīnahBahzinah (Arabic: بحزينا‎‎, also spelled Bahzina) is a village in northern Syria located west of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Bahzinah had a population of 586 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Christians. Show Baḩzīnahon the map
GhuzaylahGhuzaylah (Arabic: غزيلة‎‎) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Ghuzaylah had a population of 1,229 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Ghuzaylahon the map
TārīnTarin (Arabic: تارين‎‎) is a village in northern Syria located northwest of Homs in the Homs Governorate. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Tarin had a population of 1,585 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites. Show Tārīnon the map
ŞadadSadad (Arabic: صدد‎‎ / ALA-LC: Ṣadad; Syriac: ܣܕܕ‎, ) is a town in Syria, 60 kilometers (37 mi) south of Homs, and 101 kilometers (63 mi) northeast of Damascus. It had over 3,500 inhabitants in the 2004 census, the majority of whom were Arameans belonging to the Syriac Orthodox Church. Show Şadadon the map
States, regions, administrative units in Homs
NameDescriptionShow
Imperium PalmyrenumThe Palmyrene Empire (270–273), a splinter state centered at Palmyra, broke away from the Roman Empire during the crisis of the third century. It encompassed the Roman provinces of Syria Palaestina, Arabia Petraea, Egypt and large parts of Asia Minor.Show on map
Homs GovernorateHoms Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة حمص‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ḥimṣ) is one of the fourteen muhafazat (governorates or provinces) of Syria. It is situated in central Syria. Its area differs in various sources, from 40,940 km2 (15,807 sq mi) to 42,223 km2 (16,302 sq mi). It is thus geographically the largest governorate of Syria. Homs Governorate has a population of 1,763,000 (2010 estimate). The Homs governorate is divided into 6 administrative districts (mantiqah). Homs is the capital city of the district of Homs. Its governor is Talal al-Barazi.Show on map
Homs DistrictHoms District (Arabic: منطقة حمص‎, translit. manṭiqat Ḥimṣ‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of Homs. The district was split in 2010, when three sub-districts were separated to form the new Taldou District. At the 2004 census, the remaining sub-districts had a total population of 945,299.Show on map
Tadmur DistrictTadmur District (Arabic: منطقة تدمر‎, translit. manṭiqat Tadmur‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of Tadmur, near ancient Palmyra/Tadmor. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 76,942.Show on map
Al-Mukharram DistrictAl-Mukharram District (Arabic: منطقة المخرم‎, translit. manṭiqat al-Mukharram‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of al-Mukharram. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 52,068.Show on map
Al-Qusayr DistrictAl-Qusayr District (Arabic: منطقة القصير‎, translit. manṭiqat al-Qusair‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of Al-Qusayr. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 107,470.Show on map
Al-Rastan DistrictAr-Rastan District (Arabic: منطقة الرستن‎, translit. manṭiqat ar-Rastan‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of ar-Rastan. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 127,806.Show on map
Talkalakh DistrictTalkalakh District (Arabic: منطقة تلكلخ‎, translit. manṭiqat Talkalaḫ‎) is a district of the Homs Governorate in central Syria. Administrative centre is the city of Talkalakh. At the 2004 census, the district had a population of 129,429.Show on map
Different buildings in Homs
NameDescriptionShow
Qaşr al ḨayrQasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi castle or qasr (Arabic: قصر الحير located 80 km south-west of Palmyra on the Damascus road in Syria, is a twin palace of Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, built by the Umayyad caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik in 727 CE. It was built in the Byzantine architectural style. It was used as an eye of the king during the Umayyad era, to control the movement of the desert tribes and to be a barrier against them, as well as being a hunting lodge. Later it was utilized by the Ayyubids and the Mamelukes but was abandoned permanently after the Mongol invasions.Show on map
Ma‘bad BalThe Temple of Bel (Arabic: معبد بل‎‎), sometimes also referred to as the \"Temple of Baal\", was an ancient temple located in Palmyra, Syria. The temple, consecrated to the Mesopotamian god Bel, worshipped at Palmyra in triad with the lunar god Aglibol and the sun god Yarhibol, formed the center of religious life in Palmyra and was dedicated in 32 AD. Its ruins were considered among the best preserved at Palmyra, until they were further destroyed by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in August 2015. The arched main entrance into the temple is still intact.Show on map
Harbaqa DamThe Harbaqa Dam or Kharbaqa Dam (Arabic: سد خربقة‎‎) was a Roman gravity dam in the Syrian desert about 70 kilometres (43 mi) southwest from Palmyra on the road to Damascus. The dam, built of rubble, concrete, and dressed with ashlar stones, dates to the first or second century AD. The dam later was used as a water supply for the Umayyad palace of Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi.Show on map
KadeshKadesh (also Qadesh) was an ancient city of the Levant, located on or near the headwaters or ford of the Orontes River. It was of some importance during the Late Bronze Age, and is mentioned in the Amarna letters. It was the site of the Battle of Kadesh between the Hittite and Egyptian empires in the 13th century BC.Show on map
Lakes, rivers, streams and other bodies of water in Homs
NameDescriptionShow
Buḩayrat QaţţīnahLake Homs (Arabic: بحيرة حمص‎‎) (also called Lake Qattinah, Arabic: بحيرة قطينة‎‎) is a lake near Homs, Syria, fed by the Orontes River. The lake is 15 km (9.3 mi) from the city of Homs, and spans over 60 km2 (23 sq mi). The lake is artificial, created by the Lake Homs Dam at its northern end. The dam's original structure was one of the most visible works of ancient engineering in Syria and in the Fertile Crescent. Built by the ancient Romans, the dam had created a reservoir whose water was conducted to nearby fields through a network of canals.Show on map