Maps, Guides And More - Syria

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Syria. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Syria

Basic information about Syria
Syria (/ˈsɪ.rɪə/; Arabic: سوريا or سورية, Sūriyā or Sūrīyah), officially the Syrian Arab Republic, is a country in Western Asia. De jure Syrian territory borders Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest, but the government's control now extends to approximately 30–40% of the de jure state area and less than 60% of the population. A country of fertile plains, high mountains, and deserts, Syria is home to diverse ethnic and religious groups, including Syrian Arabs, Greeks, Armenians, Assyrians, Kurds, Circassians, Mandeans and Turks. Religious groups include Sunnis, Christians, Alawites, Druze, Mandeans, Shiites, Salafis, and Yazidis. Sunni Arabs make up the largest population group in Syria. In English, the name \Syria\ was formerly synonymous with the Levant (known in Arabic as al-Sham), while the modern state encompasses the sites of several ancient kingdoms and empires, including the Eblan civilization of the 3rd millennium BC. Its capital Damascus is among the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. In the Islamic era, Damascus was the seat of the Umayyad Caliphate and a provincial capital of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt. The modern Syrian state was established after the end of centuries of Ottoman control in World War I as a French mandate, and represented the largest Arab state to emerge from the formerly Ottoman-ruled Arab Levant. It gained independence as a parliamentary republic on 24 October 1945 when Syria became a founding member of the United Nations, an act which legally ended the former French Mandate – although French troops did not leave the country until April 1946. The post-independence period was tumultuous, and a large number of military coups and coup attempts shook the country in the period 1949–71. In 1958, Syria entered a brief union with Egypt called the United Arab Republic, which was terminated by the 1961 Syrian coup d'état. The Arab Republic of Syria came into being in late 1961 after December 1 constitutional referendum, and was increasingly unstable until the Ba'athist coup d'état, since which the Ba'ath Party has maintained its power. Syria was under Emergency Law from 1963 to 2011, effectively suspending most constitutional protections for citizens, and its system of government is considered to be non-democratic by American NGO Freedom House Bashar al-Assad has been president since 2000 and was preceded by his father Hafez al-Assad, who was in office from 1970 to 2000. Syria is a member of one international organization other than the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement; it is currently suspended from the Arab League and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, and self-suspended from the Union for the Mediterranean. Since March 2011, Syria has been embroiled in an uprising against Assad and the Ba'athist government as part of the Arab Spring, a crackdown that contributed to the Syrian Civil War and to Syria's becoming one of the least peaceful countries in the world. The Syrian Interim Government was formed by the opposition umbrella group, the Syrian National Coalition, in March 2013. Representatives of this alternative government were subsequently invited to take up Syria's seat at the Arab League.Syria (/ˈsɪ.rɪə/; Arabic: سوريا or سورية, Sūriyā or Sūrīyah), officially the Syrian Arab Republic, is a country in Western Asia. De jure Syrian territory borders Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest, but the government's control now extends to approximately 30–40% of the de jure state area and less than 60% of the population. A country of fertile plains, high mountains, and deserts, Syria is home to diverse ethnic and religious groups, including Syrian Arabs, Greeks, Armenians, Assyrians, Kurds, Circassians, Mandeans and Turks. Religious groups include Sunnis, Christians, Alawites, Druze, Mandeans, Shiites, Salafis, and Yazidis. Sunni Arabs make up the largest population group in Syria. In English, the name \Syria\ was formerly synonymous with the Levant (known in Arabic as al-Sham), while the modern state encompasses the sites of several ancient kingdoms and empires, including the Eblan civilization of the 3rd millennium BC. Its capital Damascus is among the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. In the Islamic era, Damascus was the seat of the Umayyad Caliphate and a provincial capital of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt. The modern Syrian state was established after the end of centuries of Ottoman control in World War I as a French mandate, and represented the largest Arab state to emerge from the formerly Ottoman-ruled Arab Levant. It gained independence as a parliamentary republic on 24 October 1945 when Syria became a founding member of the United Nations, an act which legally ended the former French Mandate – although French troops did not leave the country until April 1946. The post-independence period was tumultuous, and a large number of military coups and coup attempts shook the country in the period 1949–71. In 1958, Syria entered a brief union with Egypt called the United Arab Republic, which was terminated by the 1961 Syrian coup d'état. The Arab Republic of Syria came into being in late 1961 after December 1 constitutional referendum, and was increasingly unstable until the Ba'athist coup d'état, since which the Ba'ath Party has maintained its power. Syria was under Emergency Law from 1963 to 2011, effectively suspending most constitutional protections for citizens, and its system of government is considered to be non-democratic by American NGO Freedom House Bashar al-Assad has been president since 2000 and was preceded by his father Hafez al-Assad, who was in office from 1970 to 2000. Syria is a member of one international organization other than the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement; it is currently suspended from the Arab League and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, and self-suspended from the Union for the Mediterranean. Since March 2011, Syria has been embroiled in an uprising against Assad and the Ba'athist government as part of the Arab Spring, a crackdown that contributed to the Syrian Civil War and to Syria's becoming one of the least peaceful countries in the world. The Syrian Interim Government was formed by the opposition umbrella group, the Syrian National Coalition, in March 2013. Representatives of this alternative government were subsequently invited to take up Syria's seat at the Arab League.
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TartusTartus Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة طرطوس‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ṭarṭūs) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in western Syria, bordering Lebanon to the south, the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Latakia Governorate to the north, and Homs and Hama Governorates to the east. It is one of the few governorates in Syria that has an Alawite majority. Sources list the area as 1,890 km² or 1,892 km². The governorate has a population of 785,000 (2010 estimate). The capital is Tartus.Show on map
DimashqDamascus Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة دمشق‎‎ Muḥāfaẓat Dimashq) is one of the 14 governorates of Syria and consists of only the city of Damascus and the suburb of Yarmouk Camp. The governorate is completely surrounded on all sides by Rif Dimashq Governorate.Show on map
IdlibIdlib Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة ادلب‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Idlib) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in northwestern Syria, bordering Turkey. Reports of its area vary, depending on the source, from 5,933 km² to 6,097 km². The Governorate has a population of 1,464,000 (2010 estimate). The capital is Idlib.Show on map
HomsHoms Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة حمص‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ḥimṣ) is one of the fourteen muhafazat (governorates or provinces) of Syria. It is situated in central Syria. Its area differs in various sources, from 40,940 km2 (15,807 sq mi) to 42,223 km2 (16,302 sq mi). It is thus geographically the largest governorate of Syria. Homs Governorate has a population of 1,763,000 (2010 estimate). The Homs governorate is divided into 6 administrative districts (mantiqah). Homs is the capital city of the district of Homs. Its governor is Talal al-Barazi.Show on map
HamaHama Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة حماة‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ḥamā) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in western-central Syria. Its area depends on sources. It varies from 8,844 km² to 8,883 km². Governorate has a population of 1,593,000 (2010 estimate). The capital is Hama.Show on map
AleppoAleppo Governorate (Arabic: محافظة حلب‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Ḥalab / [muˈħæːfazˤat ˈħælæb]) is one of the fourteen governorates of Syria. It is the most populous governorate in Syria with a population of more than 4,868,000 (2011 Est.), almost 23% of the total population of Syria. The governorate is the fifth in area with an area of 18,482 km², about 10% of the total area of Syria. The capital is the city of Aleppo. The governorate is represented by 52 deputies in the parliament (out of 250), of whom 20 come from the city of Aleppo.Show on map
Rif-dimashqRif Dimashq Governorate (Arabic: محافظة ريف دمشق‎‎ Moḥaafaẓat Reef Demashq, literally, the \Governorate of the Countryside of Damascus\) is one of the 14 governorates of Syria. It is situated in the southwestern part of the country. It borders the governorates of Quneitra, Daraa and al-Suwayda (comprising the historic Hauran region) in the southwest, Homs in the north, Lebanon in the west and Jordan in the south.Show on map
Deir ez-ZorDeir ez-Zor Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة دير الزور‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Dayr az-Zawr) is one of the fourteen governorates of Syria. It is situated in eastern Syria, bordering Iraq. It has an area of 33,060 km² and a population of 1,202,000 (2010 estimate). The capital is Deir ez-Zor.Show on map
DaraaDara`a Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة درعا‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Dar‘ā ) is one of the fourteen Governorates of Syria. It is situated in the south-west of the country and covers an area of 3,730 km². It is bordered by Jordan to the south, Quneitra Governorate to the west, Rif Dimashq Governorate to the north and Al-Suwayda Governorate to the east. The governorate has a population of 998,000 (2010 census office estimate). The capital is the city of Daraa. Several clashes have occurred within the governorate throughout the Syrian civil war.Show on map
As-SuwaydaAl-Suwayda Governorate (Arabic: السويداء‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat as-Suwaydā’) is the southernmost of Syria's 14 governorates. It has an area of 5,550 km² and forms part of the historic Hawran region. Its capital and major city is al-Suwayda. A large majority of the population are Druze. Geographically the governorate comprises almost all of Jabal al-Druze, the eastern part of Lejah, and a part of the arid eastern steppe of Harrat al-Shamah.Show on map
Ar-RaqqahAl-Raqqah Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة الرقة‎‎ ALA: Muḥāfaẓat ar-Raqqah) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in the north of the country and covers an area of 19,616 km². The governorate has a population of 921,000 (2010 census office estimate). The capital is al-Raqqah. The Islamic State of Iraq and Levant claimed full control of this province as of August 24, 2014 when its fighters captured Tabaqa Airbase in the southwest part of the province. However, the Kurdish People's Protection Units now control much of the northern section of the province.Show on map
QuneitraQuneitra Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة القنيطرة‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat Al-Qunayṭrah) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in southern Syria, notable for the location of the Golan Heights. The governorate borders Lebanon, Jordan and Israel. Its area varies, according to different sources, from 685 km² to 1,861 km². The governorate had a population of 87,000 at the 2010 estimate. The nominal capital is the now abandoned city of Quneitra, destroyed by Israel before they're withdrawal in June 1974 in the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War; the de facto capital is Ba'ath City, a planned town built to replace Quneitra city.Show on map
LatakiaLatakia Governorate (Arabic: مُحافظة اللاذقية‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat al-Lādhiqīyah) is one of the fourteen governorates (provinces) of Syria. It is situated in western Syria, bordering Turkey. Its reported area varies in different sources from 2,297 km² to 2,437 km². The governorate has a population of 991,000 (2010 estimate). Members of the Alawite sect form a majority in the governorate, although Armenians, Turkmen, and Sunni Arabs form the majorities in the Kessab, Jabal Turkman, and Jabal al-Akrad regions respectively. The capital of Latakia had, by 2010 estimates, 400,000 inhabitants, 50% of whom were Alawites, 30% were Sunni, and 20% Christian.Show on map
Al-HasakahAl-Hasakah Governorate (Arabic: محافظة الحسكة‎‎ / ALA-LC: Muḥāfaẓat al-Ḥasakah, Kurdish: پارێزگای حەسیچە/Parêzgeha Hesîçe‎, Syriac: ܓܙܪܬܐ‎ Gozarto) is a governorate in the far north-east corner of Syria. It is distinguished by its fertile lands, plentiful water, picturesque nature, and more than one hundred archaeological sites. It was formerly known as Al-Jazira province. Prior to the Syrian Civil War nearly half of Syria's oil was extracted from the region.Show on map