Maps, Guides And More - Mozambique

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Mozambique. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Mozambique

Basic information about Mozambique
Mozambique (/moʊzæmˈbiːk/ or /mɔːzæmˈbiːk/), officially the Republic of Mozambique (Portuguese: Moçambique or República de Moçambique, [rɛˈpublikɐ dɨ musɐ̃ˈbikɨ]), is a country in Southeast Africa bordered by the Indian Ocean to the east, Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the northwest, Zimbabwe to the west, and Swaziland and South Africa to the southwest. It is separated from Madagascar by the Mozambique Channel to the east. The capital and largest city is Maputo (known as \Lourenço Marques\ before independence). Between the 1st and 5th centuries AD, Bantu-speaking peoples migrated from farther north and west. Swahili, and later Arab, commercial ports existed along the coasts until the arrival of Europeans. The area was explored by Vasco da Gama in 1498 and colonized by Portugal from 1505. After over four centuries of Portuguese rule, Mozambique gained independence in 1975, becoming the People's Republic of Mozambique shortly thereafter. After only two years of independence, the country descended into an intense and protracted civil war lasting from 1977 to 1992. In 1994, Mozambique held its first multiparty elections and has remained a relatively stable presidential republic. Mozambique is one of the poorest and most underdeveloped countries in the world. Mozambique is endowed with rich and extensive natural resources. The country's economy is based largely on agriculture, but industry, mainly food and beverages, chemical manufacturing, aluminium and petroleum production, is growing. The country's tourism sector is also growing. South Africa is Mozambique's main trading partner and source of foreign direct investment. Belgium, Brazil, Portugal, and Spain are also among the country's most important economic partners. Since 2001, Mozambique's annual average GDP growth has been among the world's highest. However, the country ranks among the lowest in GDP per capita, human development, measures of inequality, and average life expectancy. The only official language of Mozambique is Portuguese, which is spoken mostly as a second language by about half of the population. Common native languages include Makhuwa, Sena, and Swahili. The country's population of around 24 million is composed overwhelmingly of Bantu people. The largest religion in Mozambique is Christianity, with significant minorities following Islam and African traditional religions. Mozambique is a member of the African Union, the Commonwealth of Nations, the Community of Portuguese Language Countries, the Latin Union, the Non-Aligned Movement and the Southern African Development Community, and an observer at La Francophonie.Mozambique (/moʊzæmˈbiːk/ or /mɔːzæmˈbiːk/), officially the Republic of Mozambique (Portuguese: Moçambique or República de Moçambique, [rɛˈpublikɐ dɨ musɐ̃ˈbikɨ]), is a country in Southeast Africa bordered by the Indian Ocean to the east, Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the northwest, Zimbabwe to the west, and Swaziland and South Africa to the southwest. It is separated from Madagascar by the Mozambique Channel to the east. The capital and largest city is Maputo (known as \Lourenço Marques\ before independence). Between the 1st and 5th centuries AD, Bantu-speaking peoples migrated from farther north and west. Swahili, and later Arab, commercial ports existed along the coasts until the arrival of Europeans. The area was explored by Vasco da Gama in 1498 and colonized by Portugal from 1505. After over four centuries of Portuguese rule, Mozambique gained independence in 1975, becoming the People's Republic of Mozambique shortly thereafter. After only two years of independence, the country descended into an intense and protracted civil war lasting from 1977 to 1992. In 1994, Mozambique held its first multiparty elections and has remained a relatively stable presidential republic. Mozambique is one of the poorest and most underdeveloped countries in the world. Mozambique is endowed with rich and extensive natural resources. The country's economy is based largely on agriculture, but industry, mainly food and beverages, chemical manufacturing, aluminium and petroleum production, is growing. The country's tourism sector is also growing. South Africa is Mozambique's main trading partner and source of foreign direct investment. Belgium, Brazil, Portugal, and Spain are also among the country's most important economic partners. Since 2001, Mozambique's annual average GDP growth has been among the world's highest. However, the country ranks among the lowest in GDP per capita, human development, measures of inequality, and average life expectancy. The only official language of Mozambique is Portuguese, which is spoken mostly as a second language by about half of the population. Common native languages include Makhuwa, Sena, and Swahili. The country's population of around 24 million is composed overwhelmingly of Bantu people. The largest religion in Mozambique is Christianity, with significant minorities following Islam and African traditional religions. Mozambique is a member of the African Union, the Commonwealth of Nations, the Community of Portuguese Language Countries, the Latin Union, the Non-Aligned Movement and the Southern African Development Community, and an observer at La Francophonie.
DivisionDescriptionShow
TeteTete is a province of Mozambique. It has an area of 98,417 km² and a population of 1,783,967 (2007 census). Tete is the capital of the province. The Cahora Bassa Dam is situated in this province.Show on map
SofalaSofala is a province of Mozambique. It has a population of 1,642,920 (2007 census). Beira is the capital of the province, named for the ruined port of Sofala which is 35 kilometres (22 mi) to the south.Show on map
NiassaNiassa is a province of Mozambique. It has an area of 122,827 km2 and a population of 1,027,037 (2006). It is the most sparsely populated province in the country. Lichinga is the capital of the province. There are a minimum estimated 450,000 Yao people living in Mozambique. They largely occupy the eastern and northern part of the Niassa province and form about 40% of the population of Lichinga, the capital of this province.Show on map
NampulaNampula is a province of northern Mozambique. It has an area of 79,010 km² and a population of 3,985,613 (2007 census). Nampula is the capital of the province.Show on map
MaputoMaputo is a province of Mozambique; the province excludes the city of Maputo (which comprises a separate province). The province has an area of 22,693 km² and a population of 1,205,709 (2007 census). Its capital is the city of Matola.Show on map
ManicaManica District is a district of Manica Province in western Mozambique. The principal town is Manica.Show on map
InhambaneInhambane is a province of Mozambique located on the coast in the southern part of the country. It has an area of 68,615 km2 and a population of 1,412,349 (2006). The provincial capital is also called Inhambane. The climate is tropical throughout, more humid along the coast and dryer inland. The coast has a number of mangrove swamps.Show on map
GazaGaza is a province of Mozambique. It has an area of 75,334 km2 and a population of 1,416,810 (2015). Xai-Xai is the capital of the province. Inhambane Province is to the east, Manica Province to the north, Maputo Province to the south, South Africa to the west, and Zimbabwe to the northwest.Show on map
Cabo DelgadoCabo Delgado is the northernmost province of Mozambique. It has an area of 77,867 km² and a population of 1,893,156 (2015). As well as bordering the neighboring country of Tanzania, it borders the provinces of Nampula and Niassa. The region is an ethnic stronghold of the Makonde tribe. Macua and Mwani ethnic groups are also present. Pemba is the capital of the province; other important cities include Montepuez and Mocimboa da Praia.Show on map
Maputo CityMaputo (Portuguese pronunciation: [mɐˈputu]), known as Lourenço Marques before independence, is the capital and largest city of Mozambique. It is known as the City of Acacias, in reference to acacia trees commonly found along its avenues, and the Pearl of the Indian Ocean. Today, it is a port city, with its economy centered on the harbour. According to the 2007 census, the population is 1,766,184. Cotton, sugar, chromite, sisal, copra, and hardwood are the chief exports. The city manufactures cement, pottery, furniture, shoes, and rubber. The city is surrounded by Maputo Province, but is administered as its own province.Show on map
ZambeziaZambezia is the second most-populous province of Mozambique, located in the central coastal region south-west of Nampula Province and north-east of Sofala Province. It has a population of 3,85 million (census 2007). The provincial capital is Quelimane on the Bons Sinais River. Zambezia has a total area of 103,478 km2, much of it drained by the Zambezi River. Much of the coast consists of mangrove swamps, and there is considerable forest inland.Show on map