Maps, Guides And More - Mongolia

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Mongolia. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Mongolia

Basic information about Mongolia
Mongolia /mɒŋˈɡoʊliə/ (Mongolian: ᠮᠤᠩᠭᠤᠯᠤᠯᠤᠰ [Monggol Ulus] in Mongolian script; Монгол Улс [Mongol Uls] in Mongolian Cyrillic) is a landlocked sovereign state in East Asia. It is bordered by China to the south and Russia to the north. While it does not share a border with Kazakhstan, Mongolia is separated from Kazakhstan by only 36.76 kilometres (22.84 mi). Ulaanbaatar, the capital and largest city, is home to about 45% of the country's population. The area of what is now Mongolia has been ruled by various nomadic empires, including the Xiongnu, the Xianbei, the Rouran, the Turkic Khaganate, and others. In 1206, Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire, and his grandson Kublai Khan conquered China to establish the Yuan dynasty. After the collapse of the Yuan, the Mongols retreated to Mongolia and resumed their earlier pattern of factional conflict, except during the era of Dayan Khan and Tumen Zasagt Khan. In the 16th century, Tibetan Buddhism began to spread in Mongolia, being further led by the Manchu-founded Qing dynasty, which absorbed the country in the 17th century. By the early 1900s, almost one-third of the adult male population were Buddhist monks. During the collapse of the Qing dynasty in 1911, Mongols established the Temporary Government of Khalkha on November 30, 1911. This was before the abdication of the last Qing emperor and the establishment of the Republic of China. On December 29, 1911, Mongolia declared independence from the Qing dynasty; the National Revolution of 1911 ended over 200 years of Qing rule, though it was not until the Revolution of 1921 that de facto independence from the Republic of China was firmly established. Shortly thereafter, the country came under the control of the Soviet Union, which had aided its independence from China. In 1924, the Mongolian People's Republic was declared as a Soviet satellite state. After the anti-Communist revolutions of 1989, Mongolia conducted its own peaceful democratic revolution in early 1990. This led to a multi-party system, a new constitution of 1992, and transition to a market economy. At 1,564,116 square kilometres (603,909 sq mi), Mongolia is the 19th largest and one of the most sparsely populated independent countries in the world, with a population of around 3 million people. It is also the world's second-largest landlocked country. The country contains very little arable land, as much of its area is covered by grassy steppe, with mountains to the north and west and the Gobi Desert to the south. Approximately 30% of the population is nomadic or semi-nomadic; horse culture is still integral. The majority of its population are Buddhists. The non-religious population is the second largest group. Islam is the dominant religion among ethnic Kazakhs. The majority of the state's citizens are of Mongol ethnicity, although Kazakhs, Tuvans, and other minorities also live in the country, especially in the west. Mongolia joined the World Trade Organization in 1997 and seeks to expand its participation in regional economic and trade groups.Mongolia /mɒŋˈɡoʊliə/ (Mongolian: ᠮᠤᠩᠭᠤᠯᠤᠯᠤᠰ [Monggol Ulus] in Mongolian script; Монгол Улс [Mongol Uls] in Mongolian Cyrillic) is a landlocked sovereign state in East Asia. It is bordered by China to the south and Russia to the north. While it does not share a border with Kazakhstan, Mongolia is separated from Kazakhstan by only 36.76 kilometres (22.84 mi). Ulaanbaatar, the capital and largest city, is home to about 45% of the country's population. The area of what is now Mongolia has been ruled by various nomadic empires, including the Xiongnu, the Xianbei, the Rouran, the Turkic Khaganate, and others. In 1206, Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire, and his grandson Kublai Khan conquered China to establish the Yuan dynasty. After the collapse of the Yuan, the Mongols retreated to Mongolia and resumed their earlier pattern of factional conflict, except during the era of Dayan Khan and Tumen Zasagt Khan. In the 16th century, Tibetan Buddhism began to spread in Mongolia, being further led by the Manchu-founded Qing dynasty, which absorbed the country in the 17th century. By the early 1900s, almost one-third of the adult male population were Buddhist monks. During the collapse of the Qing dynasty in 1911, Mongols established the Temporary Government of Khalkha on November 30, 1911. This was before the abdication of the last Qing emperor and the establishment of the Republic of China. On December 29, 1911, Mongolia declared independence from the Qing dynasty; the National Revolution of 1911 ended over 200 years of Qing rule, though it was not until the Revolution of 1921 that de facto independence from the Republic of China was firmly established. Shortly thereafter, the country came under the control of the Soviet Union, which had aided its independence from China. In 1924, the Mongolian People's Republic was declared as a Soviet satellite state. After the anti-Communist revolutions of 1989, Mongolia conducted its own peaceful democratic revolution in early 1990. This led to a multi-party system, a new constitution of 1992, and transition to a market economy. At 1,564,116 square kilometres (603,909 sq mi), Mongolia is the 19th largest and one of the most sparsely populated independent countries in the world, with a population of around 3 million people. It is also the world's second-largest landlocked country. The country contains very little arable land, as much of its area is covered by grassy steppe, with mountains to the north and west and the Gobi Desert to the south. Approximately 30% of the population is nomadic or semi-nomadic; horse culture is still integral. The majority of its population are Buddhists. The non-religious population is the second largest group. Islam is the dominant religion among ethnic Kazakhs. The majority of the state's citizens are of Mongol ethnicity, although Kazakhs, Tuvans, and other minorities also live in the country, especially in the west. Mongolia joined the World Trade Organization in 1997 and seeks to expand its participation in regional economic and trade groups.
DivisionDescriptionShow
UvsUvs (Mongolian: Увс аймаг, Uws aimag) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the west of the country, 1336 km away from the national capital Ulaanbaatar.Its capital is Ulaangom which lies 936 m above sea level. The province is named after Mongolia's biggest lake, Uvs Lake.Show on map
HovdKhovd (Mongolian: Ховд) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the west of the country. Its capital is also named Khovd. The Khovd province is approximately 1,580 km from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia's capital. It takes its name from the Khovd River, which is located in this province.Show on map
Govi-AltayGovi-Altai (Mongolian: Говь-Алтай, Gobi-Altai) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. The province is located in the west of the country and is home to Salkhin Sandag NGO, which works actively to protect its main water source, Zavkhan River.Show on map
DzabkhanZavkhan (Mongolian: Завхан, Zawhan) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the west of the country, 1,104 km from Ulaanbaatar. Its capital is Uliastai. The aimag is named after the Zavkhan River, which forms the border between Zavkhan and Gobi-Altai aimag.Show on map
Bayan-OlgiyBayan-Ölgii (Mongolian: Баян-Өлгий; Kazakh: Бай-Өлке, Rich cradle/region, alternately spelled Olgiy, Ulgii, etc.) is the westernmost of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. The country's only Muslim and Kazakh-majority aimag, it was established in August 1940. Its capital is Ölgii.Show on map
BayanhongorBayankhongor (Mongolian: Баянхонгор) is the capital of the Bayankhongor Province (aimag) in Mongolia. The administration of the Bayankhongor Sum (district) is also located in the same place. The city is at an elevation of 1859 m above sea level, and has a population of 26,252 (2006).Show on map
UlaanbaatarUlaanbaatar or Ulan Bator /ˌuːlɑːn ˈbɑːtər/ (Mongolian: Улаанбаатар, [ʊɮɑːm.bɑːtʰɑ̆r], Ulaγanbaγatur, literally \Red Hero\) is Mongolia's capital and largest city. A municipality, the city is not part of any aimag (province), and its population as of 2014 was over 1.3 million; almost half of the country's total population.Show on map
Central AimakTöv (Mongolian: Төв, lit. \central\) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. The national capital Ulaanbaatar is located roughly at its center, but the city itself is administrated as an independent municipality.Show on map
SuhbaatarSükhbaatar (Mongolian: Сүхбаатар) is one of the 21 aimags of Mongolia, located in the east of the country. Its capital is Baruun-Urt. It is named after Damdin Sükhbaatar.Show on map
SelengeSelenge (Mongolian: Сэлэнгэ) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the north of the country. The name is derived from the Selenge river. The capital is Sükhbaatar. The province of Darkhan-Uul, and its capital Darkhan, is located as an enclave inside Selenge.Show on map
OEvoerhangayÖvörkhangai (Mongolian: Өвөрхангай, Öwörhangai; \southern Khangai\) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the south of the country. Its capital is Arvaikheer. The Shankh Monastery, one of the oldest and most important monasteries, is located in this province, as well as Erdene Zuu monastery and Tövkhön Monastery.Show on map
OEmnoegoviÖmnögovi (Mongolian: Өмнөговь Ömnögovǐ, South Gobi) is an aimag (province) of Mongolia, located in the south of the country, in the Gobi Desert. Ömnögovi is Mongolia's largest aimag. The capital is Dalanzadgad. The province is rich in mineral deposits, including gold and copper. Agriculture is of minor importance. Vegetables are grown in some oases, e.g. in Dal near Dalanzadgad.Show on map
HovsgolKhövsgöl (Mongolian: Хөвсгөл) is the northernmost of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. The name is derived from Lake Khövsgöl.Show on map
HentiyKhentii (Mongolian: Хэнтий) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the east of the country. Its capital is Öndörkhaan. The aimag is named after the Khentii Mountains. It is best known as the birthplace and likely final resting place of Temüjin (otherwise known as Genghis Khan.)Show on map
Middle GoviDundgovi (Mongolian: Дундговь, Middle Gobi) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the south of the country, approximately 245 kilometers (152 mi) south of Ulaanbaatar. Its capital is Mandalgovi.Show on map
East Gobi AymagDornogovi (Mongolian: Дорноговь, East Gobi) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the southeast of the country, bordering PR China's autonomous region of Inner Mongolia. Dornogovi is located in the Gobi desert and frequent sand- and snow storms amplify the hard weather conditions of Mongolia. Temperatures can range from -40 °C to +40 °C with ground temperatures as high as 60 °C. Dornogovi has ample reservers of groundwater, but no lakes or rivers.Show on map
East AimakDornod (Mongolian: Дорнод, literally \the East\) is the easternmost of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. Its capital is Choibalsan.Show on map
BulganBulgan (Mongolian: Булган) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in northern Mongolia. Its capital is also named Bulgan.Show on map
ArhangayArkhangai (Mongolian: Архангай, Arhangai; literally Northern Khangai) is one of the 21 aimags of Mongolia.It is located slightly west of the country's center, on the northern slopes of the Khangai Mountains.Show on map
Darhan UulDarkhan-Uul (Mongolian: Дархан-Уул, literally Sacred Mountain) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the north of the country.Show on map
Govi-SumberGovisümber (Mongolian: Говьсүмбэр, literally Gobi-Sümber) is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the center of the country. Its capital is Choir.Show on map
OrhonOrkhon Aimag (Mongolian: Орхон аймаг) is one of the 21 Aimags (provinces) of Mongolia, located in the north of the country. Its capital is Erdenet. The province is named after Orkhon River.This Aimag was cut out of Bulgan Aimag in 1994, to form a new entity together with its capital Erdenet, which had previously been administrated as a federal municipality.Show on map