Maps, Guides And More - Madagascar

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Madagascar. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Madagascar

Basic information about Madagascar
Madagascar (/ˌmædəˈɡæskər/ ; Malagasy: Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar (Malagasy: Repoblikan'i Madagasikara [republiˈkʲan madaɡasˈkʲarə̥]; French: République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar (the fourth-largest island in the world), as well as numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar split from the Indian peninsula around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth. The island's diverse ecosystems and unique wildlife are threatened by the encroachment of the rapidly growing human population and other environmental threats. The first archaeological evidence for human foraging on Madagascar dates to 2000 BC. Human settlement of Madagascar occurred between 350 BC and AD 550 by Austronesian peoples arriving on outrigger canoes from Borneo. These were joined around AD 1000 by Bantu migrants crossing the Mozambique Channel from East Africa. Other groups continued to settle on Madagascar over time, each one making lasting contributions to Malagasy cultural life. The Malagasy ethnic group is often divided into 18 or more sub-groups of which the largest are the Merina of the central highlands. Until the late 18th century, the island of Madagascar was ruled by a fragmented assortment of shifting sociopolitical alliances. Beginning in the early 19th century, most of the island was united and ruled as the Kingdom of Madagascar by a series of Merina nobles. The monarchy collapsed in 1897 when the island was absorbed into the French colonial empire, from which the island gained independence in 1960. The autonomous state of Madagascar has since undergone four major constitutional periods, termed republics. Since 1992, the nation has officially been governed as a constitutional democracy from its capital at Antananarivo. However, in a popular uprising in 2009, president Marc Ravalomanana was made to resign and presidential power was transferred in March 2009 to Andry Rajoelina. Constitutional governance was restored in January 2014, when Hery Rajaonarimampianina was named president following a 2013 election deemed fair and transparent by the international community. Madagascar is a member of the United Nations, the Organisation internationale de la francophonie and the Southern African Development Community (SADC). In 2012, the population of Madagascar was estimated at just over 22 million, 90% of whom live on less than $2 per day. Malagasy and French are both official languages of the state. The majority of the population adheres to traditional beliefs, Christianity, or an amalgamation of both. Ecotourism and agriculture, paired with greater investments in education, health, and private enterprise, are key elements of Madagascar's development strategy. Under Ravalomanana, these investments produced substantial economic growth, but the benefits were not evenly spread throughout the population, producing tensions over the increasing cost of living and declining living standards among the poor and some segments of the middle class. As of 2014, the economy has been weakened by the recently concluded political crisis, and quality of life remains low for the majority of the Malagasy population.Madagascar (/ˌmædəˈɡæskər/ ; Malagasy: Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar (Malagasy: Repoblikan'i Madagasikara [republiˈkʲan madaɡasˈkʲarə̥]; French: République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar (the fourth-largest island in the world), as well as numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar split from the Indian peninsula around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth. The island's diverse ecosystems and unique wildlife are threatened by the encroachment of the rapidly growing human population and other environmental threats. The first archaeological evidence for human foraging on Madagascar dates to 2000 BC. Human settlement of Madagascar occurred between 350 BC and AD 550 by Austronesian peoples arriving on outrigger canoes from Borneo. These were joined around AD 1000 by Bantu migrants crossing the Mozambique Channel from East Africa. Other groups continued to settle on Madagascar over time, each one making lasting contributions to Malagasy cultural life. The Malagasy ethnic group is often divided into 18 or more sub-groups of which the largest are the Merina of the central highlands. Until the late 18th century, the island of Madagascar was ruled by a fragmented assortment of shifting sociopolitical alliances. Beginning in the early 19th century, most of the island was united and ruled as the Kingdom of Madagascar by a series of Merina nobles. The monarchy collapsed in 1897 when the island was absorbed into the French colonial empire, from which the island gained independence in 1960. The autonomous state of Madagascar has since undergone four major constitutional periods, termed republics. Since 1992, the nation has officially been governed as a constitutional democracy from its capital at Antananarivo. However, in a popular uprising in 2009, president Marc Ravalomanana was made to resign and presidential power was transferred in March 2009 to Andry Rajoelina. Constitutional governance was restored in January 2014, when Hery Rajaonarimampianina was named president following a 2013 election deemed fair and transparent by the international community. Madagascar is a member of the United Nations, the Organisation internationale de la francophonie and the Southern African Development Community (SADC). In 2012, the population of Madagascar was estimated at just over 22 million, 90% of whom live on less than $2 per day. Malagasy and French are both official languages of the state. The majority of the population adheres to traditional beliefs, Christianity, or an amalgamation of both. Ecotourism and agriculture, paired with greater investments in education, health, and private enterprise, are key elements of Madagascar's development strategy. Under Ravalomanana, these investments produced substantial economic growth, but the benefits were not evenly spread throughout the population, producing tensions over the increasing cost of living and declining living standards among the poor and some segments of the middle class. As of 2014, the economy has been weakened by the recently concluded political crisis, and quality of life remains low for the majority of the Malagasy population.
DivisionDescriptionShow
DianaDiana is a region in Madagascar at the most northerly part of the island. It borders the regions of Sava to the southeast and Sofia to the southwest. It covers an area of 19,266 km2, and had an estimated population of 700,021 in 2013. The regional capital is Antsiranana (previously known as Diego Suarez).Show on map
SavaSava is a region of northern Madagascar. Its capital is Sambava. Until 2009 Sava belonged to Antsiranana Province. The region is situated at the northern part of the east coast of Madagascar. It is bordered by Diana to the north, Sofia to the west, and Analanjirofo to the south. The population was estimated to be 980,807 in 2013 and the total area is 25,518 km2 (9,853 sq mi). The region contains wild areas such as Marojejy National Park.Show on map
SofiaSofia is a region in northern Madagascar. It is named for the Sofia River. The region covers 50,100 km² and had a population of 1,247,037 in 2013. The administrative capital is Antsohihy.Show on map
AnalanjirofoAnalanjirofo is a region in northeastern Madagascar. Until 2009 it was a part of Toamasina Province. It borders Sava Region to the north, Sofia Region to the west, Alaotra-Mangoro Region to the southwest and Atsinanana Region to the south. The capital of the region is Fenoarivo Atsinanana (French: Fénérive Est), and the population was estimated to be 1,035,132 in 2013. The area of Analanjirofo Region is 21,930 km2 (8,467 sq mi).Show on map
BoenyBoeny is a region in northwestern Madagascar. It borders Sofia Region to the northeast, Betsiboka to the south and Melaky to the southwest. The capital of the region is Mahajanga, and the population was estimated to be 799,675 in 2013. The area of Boeny is 31,046 km2 (11,987 sq mi).Show on map
BetsibokaBetsiboka is a region of Madagascar. It borders Boeny Region in north, Sofia in northeast, Alaotra-Mangoro in east, Analamanga and Bongolava in south and Melaky in west. The capital of the region is Maevatanana. Until 2009 Betsiboka belonged to Mahajanga Province. The population was estimated to be 301,480 in 2014 within the area of 30,025 km2 (11,593 sq mi). Betsiboka is one of the least densely populated regions in Madagascar.Show on map
Alaotra MangoroAlaotra-Mangoro is a region in eastern Madagascar. It borders Sofia Region in north, Analanjirofo in northeast, Atsinanana in east, Vakinankaratra in southwest, Analamanga in west and Betsiboka in northwest. The capital of the region is Ambatondrazaka, and the population was estimated to be 1,027,110 in 2013. The area of the region is 31,948 km2 (12,335 sq mi).Show on map
MelakyMelaky is a region in northwestern Madagascar. It borders Boeny Region in northeast, Betsiboka in east, Bongolava in southeast and Menabe in south. The capital of the region is Maintirano. The population was estimated to be 297,446 in 2014 within the area of 38,852 km2 (15,001 sq mi). Melaky has the smallest population and the smallest population density of all Malagasy regions.Show on map
BongolavaThe region is situated in central-western Madagascar. It is bordered by Betsiboka, Melaky, Menabe, Vakinankaratra, Itasy and Analamanga. The altitude ranges from 800 m (2,600 ft) to 1,500 m (4,900 ft).Show on map
VakinankaratraThe kingdom of Vakinankaratra, known as the kingdom of the river Andrantsay, was founded at the beginning of the 17th century by Andrianony, a prince originally from Alasora, south of Antananarivo. The capital of the kingdom used to be Fivavahana in today's Betafo District. The last ruler of the Kingdom of Andrantsay was Andriamanalinarivo who was on the throne when Imerina king Andrianampoinimerina conquered the area with the help of the young prince Radama at the beginning of the 19th century. The territory was integrated into the Merina Kingdom under the new name Vakinankaratra.Show on map
ItasyItasy is a region in central Madagascar. It borders Analamanga region in northeast, Vakinankaratra in south and Bongolava in northwest. The capital of the region is Miarinarivo, and the population was estimated to be 732,834 in 2013. It is the smallest of all the 22 regions in area with 6,993 km2 (2,700 sq mi), and is the most densely populated region after Analamanga.Show on map
AnalamangaThe region extends mainly towards the north of the capital. It is bordered by Betsiboka to the north, Bongolava and Itasy to the west, Alaotra Mangoro to the east, and Vakinankaratra to the south.Show on map
AtsinananaAtsinanana is a region in eastern Madagascar. It borders Analanjirofo region in north, Alaotra-Mangoro in west, Vakinankaratra and Amoron'i Mania in southwest and Vatovavy-Fitovinany in south. The capital of the region is Toamasina, and the population was estimated to be 1,305,132 in 2014. The area of Atsinanana is 21,934 km2 (8,469 sq mi).Show on map
MenabeMenabe is a region in western Madagascar, with its capital at Morondava. It covers an area of 46,121 square kilometres (17,807 square miles), and its population was estimated to be 592,113 in 2013. The population mostly belongs to the Sakalava ethnic group. The region is named after the 18th-century Sakalava Kingdom of Menabe (16th-18th centuries). The name \Menabe\, in turn, means \big red\, after the color of laterite rock that dominates the landscape.Show on map
Amoron'i ManiaAmoron'i Mania is a region in central Madagascar bordering Vakinankaratra Region in north, Atsinanana in northeast, Vatovavy-Fitovinany in southeast, Haute Matsiatra in south, Atsimo-Andrefana in southwest and Menabe in west. The capital of the region is Ambositra, and the population was estimated to be 734,413 in 2014. The area of the region is 16,141 km2 (6,232 sq mi).Show on map
Upper MatsiatraHaute Matsiatra is a region in Madagascar. It borders Amoron'i Mania region in north, Vatovavy-Fitovinany in east, Ihorombe in south and Atsimo-Andrefana in west. The capital of the region is Fianarantsoa, and the population was estimated to be 1,131,700 in 2014. The area is 21,080 km2 (8,139 sq mi).Show on map
Vatovavy FitovinanyVatovavy-Fitovinany is a region located in southeast Madagascar. \n* Capital: Manakara \n* Chief: Georget Mandehatsara (since March 2012) \n* Dialectical: Antemoro \n* Transportation mean: \n* Train (from Fianarantsoa) \n* Car Taxi-Brousse \n* Plane \n* Manakara port is only used for product shipment and transit (Lychee, coffee, ...) The region extends along the southern part of the east coast of Madagascar. It is bordered by Atsinanana (North), Amoron'i Mania and Haute Matsiatra (West) and Atsimo-Atsinanana (South).Show on map
IhorombeIhorombe is a region in Madagascar. It borders Haute Matsiatra region in north, Atsimo-Atsinanana in east, Anosy in south and Atsimo-Andrefana in west. The capital is Ihosy and the population was estimated to be 312,307 in 2013. The area of Ihorombe is 26,391 km2 (10,190 sq mi) and it has one of the lowest population densities of the Malagasy regions.Show on map
Atsimo-AtsinananaAtsimo-Atsinanana (South East) is a region in Madagascar. Its capital is Farafangana. The region used to be part of the Fianarantsoa Province. The region extends along the southern part of the east coast of Madagascar. It is bordered by Vatovavy-Fitovinany and Haute Matsiatra (North), Ihorombe (West) and Anosy (South). The estimated population in the region as of 2004 was 621,200, but had grown to an estimate of 851,545 by 2011. It is among the poorest regions in the country, with a poverty rate of 83.9% according to a 2005 government report.Show on map
AnosyAnosy is one of the 22 regions of Madagascar in the southeast of the country. It is located on the eastern side of what used to be Province of Tulear. The name \Anosy\ means \island(s)\ in Malagasy. Due to a strategic main searoute running along its coast, Anosy has been an osmotic crossroads for Malagasy and the rest of the world over the last 500 years. In the 1500s it served as a supplying area for European ships sailing to and from the Indies, and in the mid-1600s it was the location of an early French colonial settlement in the Indian Ocean. The region was part of the Merina Kingdom for much of the 1800s and part of the French colony of Madagascar from the late 1800s to 1960.Show on map
AndroyAndroy is the most southerly region of Madagascar. It covers an area of 19,540 km2, and had an estimated population of 733,933 inhabitants in 2013. The admninistrative capital is Ambovombe-Androy, and the chief administrator is Andrien Hatrifenjanahary (since 2007).Show on map
Atsimo-AndrefanaAtsimo-Andrefana is a region of Madagascar. It borders Menabe in north, Amoron'i Mania and Haute Matsiatra in northeast, Ihorombe and Anosy in east and Androy in southeast. The capital is Toliara and the population was estimated to be 1,316,756 in 2013. Atsimo Andrefana is geographically the largest of all Malagasy regions with an area of 66,236 km2 (25,574 sq mi).Show on map