Maps, Guides And More - Lebanon

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Lebanon. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Lebanon

Basic information about Lebanon
Lebanon (/ˈlɛbənɒn/ or /ˈlɛbənən/; Arabic: لبنان Libnān or Lubnān; [lɪbˈneːn]; Aramaic: לבנאן; French: Liban), officially the Lebanese Republic (Arabic: الجمهورية اللبنانية al-Jumhūrīyah al-Lubnānīyah; [elˈʒʊmhuːɾɪjje l.ˈlɪbneːnɪjje]; French: République libanaise), is a sovereign state in Asia. It is bordered by Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south. Lebanon's location at the crossroads of the Mediterranean Basin and the Arabian hinterland facilitated its rich history and shaped a cultural identity of religious and ethnic diversity. The earliest evidence of civilization in Lebanon dates back more than seven thousand years, predating recorded history. Lebanon was the home of the Canaanites/Phoenicians and their kingdom, a maritime culture that flourished for over a thousand years (c. 1550–539 BC). In 64 BC, the region came under the rule of the Roman Empire, and eventually became one of the Empire's leading centers of Christianity. In the Mount Lebanon range a monastic tradition known as the Maronite Church was established. As the Arab Muslims conquered the region, the Maronites held onto their religion and identity. However, a new religious group, the Druze, established themselves in Mount Lebanon as well, generating a religious divide that has lasted for centuries. During the Crusades, the Maronites re-established contact with the Roman Catholic Church and asserted their communion with Rome. The ties they established with the Latins have influenced the region into the modern era. The region eventually came under the rule of the Ottoman Empire from 1516 to 1918. Following the collapse of the empire after World War I, the five provinces that constitute modern Lebanon were under the French Mandate of Lebanon. The French expanded the borders of the Mount Lebanon Governorate, which was mostly populated by Maronites and Druze, to include more Muslims. Lebanon gained independence in 1943, establishing a unique political system – confessionalism – a Consociationalism type of power sharing mechanism based on religious communities. Bechara El Khoury, first Lebanese president, Riad El-Solh, first Lebanese prime minister and Emir Majid Arslan II, first Lebanese minister of defence, are considered the founders of the modern Republic of Lebanon and are national heroes for having led the country's independence. Foreign troops withdrew completely from Lebanon on 31 December 1946. Lebanon is a member of the Organisation internationale de la francophonie since 1973. Before the Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990), the country experienced a period of relative calm and renowned prosperity, driven by tourism, agriculture, commerce, and banking. Because of its financial power and diversity in its heyday, Lebanon was referred to as the \Switzerland of the East\ during the 1960s., and its capital Beirut attracted so many tourists that it was known as \the Paris of the Middle East\. At the end of the war, there were extensive efforts to revive the economy and rebuild national infrastructure.Lebanon (/ˈlɛbənɒn/ or /ˈlɛbənən/; Arabic: لبنان Libnān or Lubnān; [lɪbˈneːn]; Aramaic: לבנאן; French: Liban), officially the Lebanese Republic (Arabic: الجمهورية اللبنانية al-Jumhūrīyah al-Lubnānīyah; [elˈʒʊmhuːɾɪjje l.ˈlɪbneːnɪjje]; French: République libanaise), is a sovereign state in Asia. It is bordered by Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south. Lebanon's location at the crossroads of the Mediterranean Basin and the Arabian hinterland facilitated its rich history and shaped a cultural identity of religious and ethnic diversity. The earliest evidence of civilization in Lebanon dates back more than seven thousand years, predating recorded history. Lebanon was the home of the Canaanites/Phoenicians and their kingdom, a maritime culture that flourished for over a thousand years (c. 1550–539 BC). In 64 BC, the region came under the rule of the Roman Empire, and eventually became one of the Empire's leading centers of Christianity. In the Mount Lebanon range a monastic tradition known as the Maronite Church was established. As the Arab Muslims conquered the region, the Maronites held onto their religion and identity. However, a new religious group, the Druze, established themselves in Mount Lebanon as well, generating a religious divide that has lasted for centuries. During the Crusades, the Maronites re-established contact with the Roman Catholic Church and asserted their communion with Rome. The ties they established with the Latins have influenced the region into the modern era. The region eventually came under the rule of the Ottoman Empire from 1516 to 1918. Following the collapse of the empire after World War I, the five provinces that constitute modern Lebanon were under the French Mandate of Lebanon. The French expanded the borders of the Mount Lebanon Governorate, which was mostly populated by Maronites and Druze, to include more Muslims. Lebanon gained independence in 1943, establishing a unique political system – confessionalism – a Consociationalism type of power sharing mechanism based on religious communities. Bechara El Khoury, first Lebanese president, Riad El-Solh, first Lebanese prime minister and Emir Majid Arslan II, first Lebanese minister of defence, are considered the founders of the modern Republic of Lebanon and are national heroes for having led the country's independence. Foreign troops withdrew completely from Lebanon on 31 December 1946. Lebanon is a member of the Organisation internationale de la francophonie since 1973. Before the Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990), the country experienced a period of relative calm and renowned prosperity, driven by tourism, agriculture, commerce, and banking. Because of its financial power and diversity in its heyday, Lebanon was referred to as the \Switzerland of the East\ during the 1960s., and its capital Beirut attracted so many tourists that it was known as \the Paris of the Middle East\. At the end of the war, there were extensive efforts to revive the economy and rebuild national infrastructure.
DivisionDescriptionShow
South GovernorateSouth Governorate (Arabic: الجنوب‎‎; transliterated: al-Janub) is one of the governorates of Lebanon. South Lebanon has a population of 500,000 inhabitants and an area of 929.6 km². The capital is Sidon. The lowest elevation is sea-level; the highest is 1,000 meters. The inhabitants are a mixture of Shiites, Sunnis, Orthodox, Maronites and Protestants. Temperatures can drop to 4 °C during winter with a lot of rain and snow on the higher ground. In the humid summer, temperatures can rise to 30 °C in the coastal areas. The governorate has several rivers: the Litani, Zahrani, Naqura, Awali, Qasmiye, and Hasbani. The area is famous for its citrus and banana farms. Its main cities are Sidon, Tyre and Jezzine.Show on map
Mont-LibanMount Lebanon (Arabic: جبل لبنان‎‎) is one of the six governorates of Lebanon. Its capital is located in Baabda. The majority of its population is Christian (chiefly Maronite, Greek Orthodox, and Melkite), with minorities of Druze, Muslims of various sects, as well as irreligious people. This governorate is named after the mountainous region of Mount Lebanon and, except for Beirut, spans the area along the Mediterranean coast between Lebanon's North Governorate and South Governorate.Show on map
BeyrouthThe Beirut Governorate (Arabic: محافظة بيروت‎, Muhāfazat Bayrūt) is the only Lebanese governorate that consists of one district and one city, Beirut, which is also its capital, and the capital of Lebanon.Show on map
Liban-NordNorth Governorate (Arabic: الشمال‎‎, Aš Šamāl) is one of the governorates of Lebanon. Its capital is Tripoli.Show on map
BeqaaBeqaa (Arabic: البقاع‎‎ Al-Biqā') is a governorate in Lebanon with a population of 750,000 inhabitants.Show on map
NabatiyeThe Nabatieh District is a district in the Nabatieh Governorate of Lebanon. The capital of the district is Nabatieh, and it contains the following Villages: \n* Qaaqaait Al Jisr \n* Ansar \n* Aedsheet \n* Ain Qana \n* Ain Boswar \n* Aldawair \n* Arab Saleem \n* Chouqin \n* Der Al Zahrani \n* Doueir \n* Ebba \n* Habboush \n* Harouf \n* Jarjouh \n* Jbaa \n* Jibcheet \n* Kfarfila \n* Kfour \n* Kfarjouz \n* Kafra \n* Kfar Remen \n* Kfarsseer \n* Houmeen \n* Kfar Tebneet \n* Marwania \n* Mayfadoun \n* Schhour \n* Zifta \n* Kaoutariyet Al Siyad \n* Toul \n* Nabatiye AlFawqa \n* Sharqia \n* Zawtar el charkiyeh \n* ZibdeenShow on map
AakkarAkkar District (Arabic: محافظة عكار ‎‎) is located in the North Governorate of Lebanon. It covers an area of 788 km2 (304 sq mi) and has a population of 198,174. The capital lies at Halba. The district is characterized by the presence of a relatively large coastal plain, with high mountains to the east. The largest cities in Akkar are Halba, Bire Akkar and Al-Qoubaiyat.Show on map
Baalbek-HermelBaalbek District (Arabic: قضاء بعلبك‎‎) is an administrative district in the Beqaa Governorate of the Republic of Lebanon, having the city Baalbek as its capital. It is by far the largest district in the country comprising a total of 2319 km2. Major towns of the district are Hallanieh, Tamnine, Chmestar, Duris, Jdeide, and Kasarnaba.Show on map