Maps, Guides And More - Jersey

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Jersey. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Jersey

Basic information about Jersey
Jersey (/ˈdʒɜːrzi/, [ʒɛʁzɛ]; Jèrriais: Jèrri [ʒɛri]), officially the Bailiwick of Jersey (French: Bailliage de Jersey; Jèrriais: Bailliage dé Jèrri), is a Crown dependency of the United Kingdom, a possession of the Crown in right of Jersey, off the coast of Normandy, France. The bailiwick consists of the island of Jersey, along with surrounding uninhabited islands and rocks collectively named Les Dirouilles, Les Écréhous, Les Minquiers, Les Pierres de Lecq, and other reefs.[which?]Jersey was part of the Duchy of Normandy, whose dukes went on to become kings of England from 1066. After Normandy was lost by the kings of England in the thirteenth century, and the ducal title surrendered to France, Jersey and the other Channel Islands remained attached to the English crown. Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial, legal and judicial systems, and the power of self-determination. The island of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are often referred to collectively as the Channel Islands, the \Channel Islands\ are not a constitutional or political unit. Jersey has a separate relationship to its Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man, although all three Crowns are held by the monarch of the United Kingdom. It is not part of the United Kingdom, and has an international identity separate from that of the UK, but the United Kingdom is constitutionally responsible for the defence of Jersey. The Commission have confirmed in a written reply to the European Parliament in 2003 that Jersey is within the Union as a European Territory for whose external relationships the United Kingdom is responsible. Jersey is not fully part of the European Union but has a special relationship with it, notably being treated as within the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods.Jersey (/ˈdʒɜːrzi/, [ʒɛʁzɛ]; Jèrriais: Jèrri [ʒɛri]), officially the Bailiwick of Jersey (French: Bailliage de Jersey; Jèrriais: Bailliage dé Jèrri), is a Crown dependency of the United Kingdom, a possession of the Crown in right of Jersey, off the coast of Normandy, France. The bailiwick consists of the island of Jersey, along with surrounding uninhabited islands and rocks collectively named Les Dirouilles, Les Écréhous, Les Minquiers, Les Pierres de Lecq, and other reefs.[which?]Jersey was part of the Duchy of Normandy, whose dukes went on to become kings of England from 1066. After Normandy was lost by the kings of England in the thirteenth century, and the ducal title surrendered to France, Jersey and the other Channel Islands remained attached to the English crown. Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial, legal and judicial systems, and the power of self-determination. The island of Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands. Although the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey are often referred to collectively as the Channel Islands, the \Channel Islands\ are not a constitutional or political unit. Jersey has a separate relationship to its Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man, although all three Crowns are held by the monarch of the United Kingdom. It is not part of the United Kingdom, and has an international identity separate from that of the UK, but the United Kingdom is constitutionally responsible for the defence of Jersey. The Commission have confirmed in a written reply to the European Parliament in 2003 that Jersey is within the Union as a European Territory for whose external relationships the United Kingdom is responsible. Jersey is not fully part of the European Union but has a special relationship with it, notably being treated as within the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods.
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St ClementSaint Clement (Jèrriais: St Cliément) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It is in the south east of the Island, and contains some of the suburbs of Saint Helier. It is the smallest parish by surface area, but the second most densely populated. St. Clement stretches west to east from Le Dicq to within a quarter mile of La Rocque harbour (at the end of Rue de la Lourderie). Its surface area is around 1,044 acres (4.22 km2). The parish is subdivided into three vingtaines, and is administered at local level by the Connétable.Show on map
St SaviourSaint Saviour (Jèrriais: St Saûveux/St Sauveur) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It has a land surface area of 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2), borders with five other parishes, and has a very small coastline at Le Dicq.Show on map
St. BreladeSaint Brélade is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey. Its population is around 9,560, and it occupies the southwestern part of the island. It is the only parish to border only one other parish, St. Peter. The parish is the second-largest parish by surface area, covering 7,103 vergées (3,157 acres or 12.78 km²), which is 11% of the total land surface of the island.Show on map
GrouvilleGrouville is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. The parish is in the south east of the island and is dominated by the broad sweep of the Royal Bay of Grouville. The parish covers a surface area of 4,354 vergées (7.8 km²). It borders Saint Clement, Saint Saviour and Saint Martin.Show on map
St MarySaint Mary (Jèrriais: Sainte Mathie) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It is situated in the north west and covers an area of 3,604 vergées (6.5 km²). It borders four other parishes: Saint Ouen, Saint John, Saint Peter and Saint Lawrence. The parish and its eponymous church derive their name from a medieval monastery, probably destroyed during Viking raids some time between the 8th and 10th centuries. In 1042 Duke William gave \Saint Mary of the Burnt Monastery\ to the abbey of Cerisy.Show on map
St LawrenceSaint Lawrence (Jèrriais: St Louothains) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. The parish covers 5,258 vergées (9.5 km²) and occupies the centre of the Island. Much of the parish is inland, though it has a short stretch of coastline in St. Aubin's Bay. It borders St Peter and St Mary to the west, St John to the north and east, and St Helier to the east.Show on map
St PeterSaint Peter (Jèrriais: St Pièrre) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It is in the west central part of the island. It is the only parish with two separate coastlines, stretching from St. Ouen's Bay in the west to St. Aubin's Bay in the south, and thereby cutting St. Brelade off from other parishes. The parish is the fourth-largest parish by surface area, covering 6,469 vergées (11.6 km2 (4.5 sq mi)) It borders four other parishes: \n* Saint Ouen to the north \n* Saint Mary to the north-east \n* St Lawrence to the east \n* St Brelade to the southShow on map
St OuenSaint Ouen (Jèrriais: Saint Ouën) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It is in the north west of Jersey. The parish is the largest parish by surface area, covering 8,341 vergées (15 km²).Show on map
St JohnSaint John (Jèrriais: St Jean) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey and is situated on the north coast of the island.Show on map
TrinityTrinity (French: La Trinité, Jèrriais: La Trinneté) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands, and located the north east of the island. Les Platons is the highest point in Jersey. The coat of arms of the Parish of Trinity shows the Shield of the Trinity diagram.Show on map
St MartinSaint Martin (Jèrriais: St Martîn) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. Historically it was called \Saint Martin le Vieux\ to distinguish it from the present day parish of Grouville (historically \Saint Martin de Grouville\). St. Martin is the only parish in Jersey not to conduct its municipal business from a Parish Hall. St. Martin has a Public Hall instead, having accepted money from the States of Jersey to provide an assembly room.Show on map
St HelierSaint Helier (/sintˈhɛliər/) is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. St Helier has a population of about 33,500, roughly 34.2% of the total population of Jersey, and is the capital of the Island (although Government House is situated in St Saviour). The urban area of the parish of St Helier makes up most of the largest town in Jersey, although some of the town area is situated in adjacent St Saviour, with suburbs sprawling into St Lawrence and St Clement. The greater part of St Helier is rural.Show on map