Maps, Guides And More - Isle of Man

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Isle_of_Man. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Isle of Man

Basic information about Isle of Man
The Isle of Man (/ˈmæn/; Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann, is a self-governing Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann. The Lord of Mann is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Foreign relations and defence are the responsibility of the British Government. The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BCE. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged. In 627, Edwin of Northumbria conquered the Isle of Man along with most of Mercia. In the 9th century, Norsemen established the Kingdom of the Isles. Magnus III, King of Norway, was also known as King of Mann and the Isles between 1099 and 1103. In 1266, the island became part of Scotland by the Treaty of Perth, after being a part of Norway. After a period of alternating rule by the kings of Scotland and England, the island came under the feudal lordship of the English Crown in 1399. The lordship revested into the British Crown in 1765, but the island never became part of the Kingdom of Great Britain or its successor the United Kingdom, retaining its status as an internally self-governing Crown dependency.The Isle of Man (/ˈmæn/; Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann, is a self-governing Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann. The Lord of Mann is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Foreign relations and defence are the responsibility of the British Government. The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BCE. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged. In 627, Edwin of Northumbria conquered the Isle of Man along with most of Mercia. In the 9th century, Norsemen established the Kingdom of the Isles. Magnus III, King of Norway, was also known as King of Mann and the Isles between 1099 and 1103. In 1266, the island became part of Scotland by the Treaty of Perth, after being a part of Norway. After a period of alternating rule by the kings of Scotland and England, the island came under the feudal lordship of the English Crown in 1399. The lordship revested into the British Crown in 1765, but the island never became part of the Kingdom of Great Britain or its successor the United Kingdom, retaining its status as an internally self-governing Crown dependency.
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AndreasAndreas or Kirk Andreas is a village on the Isle of Man. It is located in the north of the island, in the parish of Andreas and the sheading of Ayre. The village has a parish hall and a primary school, Andreas Primary School. St Andrew's Church, which was built in 1802 with stone from Sulby Glen, is in the Church of England Diocese of Sodor and Man. It is the parish church of the area. St Jude's Chapel was built in 1869 in a Romanesque style with a square tower. In March 2005 the Friends of St Jude's took over the upkeep of the chapel and successfully campaigned against its demolition. It is now used for occasional services including weddings, funerals and christenings.Show on map
ArboryArbory (Manx:Skeerey Chairbre) is a parish in the Isle of Man. The name is derived from \Kirk Cairbre\. It forms part of the sheading of Rushen in the south of the island, and its main settlements are Colby and Ballabeg (where the parish church is located). Arbory parish has a population of 1,747 (census 2011).Show on map
BallaughBallaugh (/bəˈlɑːf/ bə-LAHF; from Manx Balley ny Loughey, meaning \town of the lake\) is a small village on the Isle of Man in the parish of the same name. It is the only village in the parish.Show on map
BraddanBraddan is an elongated parish in the sheading of Middle in the Isle of Man, stretching from the parishes of Michael and Lezayre in the north, bordering on the parishes of German, Marown and Onchan in the middle and bordering on Santon in the south. The name Braddan is another form of Brendan, an Irish saint and patron of voyagers. The northern end of the parish is mountainous. The southern end is flatter and includes residential districts adjacent to Douglas. The Middle River runs through the parish in the Kewaigue - Oakhill area where the original Fairy Bridge can be found.Show on map
BrideBride (Manx: Skeerey Vreeshey), named after St. Brigid, is a parish in the Sheading of Ayre and lies in the extreme north of the Isle of Man. The parish lies to the east of Andreas and to the north of Lezayre, bordering the sea to the north and east. The parish covers an area of about 9 square miles (23 km2) and contains the village of Bride or Kirk Bride. The population, according to the 2006 census, is 418 (2001 - 408)Show on map
CastletownCastletown (Manx: Balley Chashtal, pronounced [ˈbalʲə ˈxaʃtʃəl]) is a town geographically within the Malew parish of the Isle of Man but administered separately. Lying at the south of the island, it was the Manx capital until 1869. The centre of town is dominated by Castle Rushen, a well-preserved medieval castle, originally built for a Viking king.Show on map
DouglasShow on map
GermanGerman (Manx: Carmane) is a parish in the sheading of Glenfaba in the Isle of Man. It formerly included Peel, where St German's Cathedral is located. It includes most of the village of St John's (part of the village being in the parish of Patrick), where the Tynwald ceremony is located. It is a mainly hilly area, apart from a small coastal plain near Peel.Show on map
JurbyJurby (Manx: Jourbee) is a parish in Michael Sheading in the Isle of Man and has 659 residents, according to the 2006 census, (2001 census 677). The parish is one of three divisions of the sheading of Michael. The other two are Ballaugh and Michael. It is largely an agricultural district on the north-north-western coast of the island but also has an industrial park on the old RAF Jurby Airfield.Show on map
LaxeyLaxey (Manx: Laksaa) is a village on the east coast of the Isle of Man. Its name derives from the Old Norse Laxa meaning 'Salmon River'. Its key distinguishing features are its 3 working vintage railways, having the largest working waterwheel in the world, and being set in a partly wooded valley.Show on map
LezayreLezayre (\garden of the island\) is a parish in the Sheading of Ayre and lies central and north in the Isle of Man. The parish is bounded by Michael and Ballaugh to the west, Andreas and Bride to the north, the town of Ramsey and the parishes of Lonan and Maughold to the east, and Braddan to the south. Its area is about 57 square kilometres (22 sq mi). The population according to the 2006 census is 1,237 (1,134 in 2001)Show on map
LonanLonan is a parish on the eastern coast of the Isle of Man, in the sheading of Garff. The parish extends from Port Groudle in the south to the Snaefell mines and Brandywell Corner (on the TT course to the east of Beinn-y-Phott), a distance of some 6 miles (10 km), and contains an area of 15 square miles (39 km2). It is an upland district, being hilly and barren, and dropping sharply into the sea, with the exception of a few small deep, sheltered glens. The highest point in the parish is Mullagh Ouyr (near Snaefell) at 491 metres (1,611 ft). Its coastline is high and rocky, and broken by several headlands and small bays. The main headlands are Laxey Head, and Clay Head; and the bays are Bulgham Bay, Laxey Bay, Garwick, and Port Groudle. The only significant valleys are Laxey Glen, famous forShow on map
MalewMalew (Manx: Malew) is a parish in the Isle of Man. It is in the sheading of Rushen together with the neighbouring parishes of Rushen and Arbory. It is named after the Celtic Saint, Malew, also known as Saint Moluag, whose feast day is 25 June.Show on map
MarownMarown (Manx: Skeerey Marooney) is a parish of the Isle of Man in the sheading of Middle. Historically it was in the sheading of Glenfaba.Show on map
MaugholdMaughold is a village and parish in the Isle of Man. It is named for Maughold, the island's patron saint. The village of Maughold lies on the coast some three miles from Ramsey, with mountainous terrain on its landward side. The parish includes most of the North Barrule, the second highest hill on the island. A proportion of the land in the area has been in Manx National Heritage ownership since 1965. Kirk Maughold (the parish church for the area) contains a number of historically important Celtic crosses, suggesting that it was the site of an early Christian monastery. Maughold Head to the east of the village is the easternmost point on the island and has a lighthouse.Show on map
MichaelMichael Sheading (Manx: Sheadin Skylley Maayl) is a sheading (comprising the parishes of Jurby and Ballaugh, and Michael District) in the Isle of Man and has, according to the 2011 census, 3,568 residents (2006 census: 3,341). It is a mainly agricultural area on the west coast of the island. It is also a House of Keys constituency. Its MHK is Alfred Cannan. The TT motorcycle race course known as the Snaefell Mountain Course runs through Kirk Michael village.Show on map
OnchanOnchan /ˈɔːŋkən/ is a village in the parish of Onchan on the Isle of Man. It is at the north end of Douglas Bay. Although administratively a village, it has the second largest population on the island, after Douglas, with which it forms a conurbation. In Manx the name for the village is Kione Droghad meaning \bridge end\.Show on map
PatrickPatrick is a parish in the sheading of Glenfaba, on the west coast of the Isle of Man.Show on map
PeelPeel (Manx: Purt ny h-Inshey – Port of the Island) is a seaside town and small fishing port on the Isle of Man, in the parish of German but administered separately. It has a castle (on an islet) and a cathedral. Peel is the third largest town on the island after Douglas and Ramsey but the fourth largest settlement, as Onchan has the second largest population but is classified as a village. Peel is also a House of Keys constituency, electing one Member of the House of Keys (MHK), who, since September 2015, has been Ray Harmer. Peel has a ruined castle on St Patrick's Isle, and a cathedral, seat of the Diocese of Sodor and Man (the diocese was founded when Mann was ruled by the Norse).Show on map
Port ErinPort Erin (Manx: Purt Çhiarn) is a seaside village in the south of the Isle of Man.Show on map
Port St MaryPort St Mary (Manx: Purt le Moirrey) is a village district located in the south of the Isle of Man. The village takes its name from the former Chapel of St Mary (Manx: Keeill Moirrey) which is thought to have overlooked Chapel Bay in the village. Its population is 1,953 according to the 2011 census.Show on map
RamseyRamsey (Manx: Rhumsaa) is a coastal town in the north of the Isle of Man. It is the second largest town on the island after Douglas. Its population is 7,309 according to the 2006 census (7,322, 2001 census). It has one of the biggest harbours on the island, and has a prominent derelict pier, called the Queen's Pier. It was formerly one of the main points of communication with Scotland. Ramsey has also been a route for several invasions by Vikings and Scots.Show on map
RushenRushen (Manx: Rosien), formerly Kirk Christ Rushen (Manx: Skyll Creest Rosien), is a parish in the sheading of the same name in the Isle of Man. The parish is a fishing and agricultural district at the south-westernmost point of the island. The parish is one of three in the sheading of Rushen. The other two are Arbory and Malew.Show on map
SantonFile:Santon logo sm.JPGShow on map