Maps, Guides And More - Iraq

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Iraq. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Iraq

Basic information about Iraq
Iraq (/ɪˈræk/, /ɪˈrɑːk/, or /aɪˈræk/; Arabic: العراق al-‘Irāq, Kurdish: Êraq), officially the Republic of Iraq (Arabic: About this sound جمهورية العراق Jumhūrīyat al-‘Irāq; Kurdish: كۆماری عێراق Komar-i ‘Êraq), is a country in Western Asia. The country borders Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest, and Syria to the west. The southern part of Iraq is within the Arabian Peninsula. The capital, Baghdad, is in the centre of the country and its largest city. The largest ethnic groups in Iraq are Arabs and Kurds. Other ethnic groups include Assyrians, Turkmen, Shabakis, Yazidis, Armenians, Mandeans, Circassians, and Kawliya. Around 95% of the country's 36 million citizens are Shia or Sunni Muslims, with Christianity, Yarsan, Yezidism, and Mandeanism also present. Iraq has a narrow section of coastline measuring 58 km (36 miles) on the northern Persian Gulf and its territory encompasses the Mesopotamian Alluvial Plain, the northwestern end of the Zagros mountain range, and the eastern part of the Syrian Desert. Two major rivers, the Tigris and Euphrates, run south through the centre of Iraq and flow into the Shatt al-Arab near the Persian Gulf. These rivers provide Iraq with significant amounts of fertile land. The region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, historically known as Mesopotamia, is most often referred to as humanity's cradle of civilisation. It was here that mankind first began to read, write, create laws, and live in cities under an organised government—notably Uruk, from which Iraq was derived. The area has been home to continuous successive civilisations since the 6th millennium BC. At different periods in its history, Iraq was the centre of the indigenous Akkadian, Sumerian, Assyrian, and Babylonian empires. It was also part of the Median, Achaemenid, Hellenistic, Parthian, Sassanid, Roman, Rashidun, Umayyad, Abbasid, Ayyubid, Mongol, Safavid, Afsharid, and Ottoman empires, and under British control as a League of Nations mandate. Iraq's modern borders were mostly demarcated in 1920 by the League of Nations when the Ottoman Empire was divided by the Treaty of Sèvres. Iraq was placed under the authority of the United Kingdom as the British Mandate of Mesopotamia. A monarchy was established in 1921 and the Kingdom of Iraq gained independence from Britain in 1932. In 1958, the monarchy was overthrown and the Iraqi Republic was created. Iraq was controlled by the Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party from 1968 until 2003. After an invasion by the United States and its allies in 2003, Saddam Hussein's Ba'ath Party was removed from power and multi-party parliamentary elections were held in 2005. The American presence in Iraq ended in 2011, but the Iraqi insurgency continued and intensified as fighters from the Syrian Civil War spilled into the country.Iraq (/ɪˈræk/, /ɪˈrɑːk/, or /aɪˈræk/; Arabic: العراق al-‘Irāq, Kurdish: Êraq), officially the Republic of Iraq (Arabic: About this sound جمهورية العراق Jumhūrīyat al-‘Irāq; Kurdish: كۆماری عێراق Komar-i ‘Êraq), is a country in Western Asia. The country borders Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest, and Syria to the west. The southern part of Iraq is within the Arabian Peninsula. The capital, Baghdad, is in the centre of the country and its largest city. The largest ethnic groups in Iraq are Arabs and Kurds. Other ethnic groups include Assyrians, Turkmen, Shabakis, Yazidis, Armenians, Mandeans, Circassians, and Kawliya. Around 95% of the country's 36 million citizens are Shia or Sunni Muslims, with Christianity, Yarsan, Yezidism, and Mandeanism also present. Iraq has a narrow section of coastline measuring 58 km (36 miles) on the northern Persian Gulf and its territory encompasses the Mesopotamian Alluvial Plain, the northwestern end of the Zagros mountain range, and the eastern part of the Syrian Desert. Two major rivers, the Tigris and Euphrates, run south through the centre of Iraq and flow into the Shatt al-Arab near the Persian Gulf. These rivers provide Iraq with significant amounts of fertile land. The region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, historically known as Mesopotamia, is most often referred to as humanity's cradle of civilisation. It was here that mankind first began to read, write, create laws, and live in cities under an organised government—notably Uruk, from which Iraq was derived. The area has been home to continuous successive civilisations since the 6th millennium BC. At different periods in its history, Iraq was the centre of the indigenous Akkadian, Sumerian, Assyrian, and Babylonian empires. It was also part of the Median, Achaemenid, Hellenistic, Parthian, Sassanid, Roman, Rashidun, Umayyad, Abbasid, Ayyubid, Mongol, Safavid, Afsharid, and Ottoman empires, and under British control as a League of Nations mandate. Iraq's modern borders were mostly demarcated in 1920 by the League of Nations when the Ottoman Empire was divided by the Treaty of Sèvres. Iraq was placed under the authority of the United Kingdom as the British Mandate of Mesopotamia. A monarchy was established in 1921 and the Kingdom of Iraq gained independence from Britain in 1932. In 1958, the monarchy was overthrown and the Iraqi Republic was created. Iraq was controlled by the Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party from 1968 until 2003. After an invasion by the United States and its allies in 2003, Saddam Hussein's Ba'ath Party was removed from power and multi-party parliamentary elections were held in 2005. The American presence in Iraq ended in 2011, but the Iraqi insurgency continued and intensified as fighters from the Syrian Civil War spilled into the country.
DivisionDescriptionShow
BasraBasra Governorate (Arabic: محافظة البصرة‎‎‎ Muḥāfaẓa al-Baṣra) (or Basra Province) is a governorate in southern Iraq, bordering Kuwait to the south and Iran to the east. The capital is the city of Basra. Other districts of Basra include Al-Qurnah, Az Zubayr, Al Midaina, Shatt Al Arab, Abu Al Khaseeb and Al Faw located on the Persian Gulf.Show on map
WasitWasit Governorate (Arabic: واسط Wāsit‎‎) is a governorate in eastern Iraq, south-east of Baghdad and bordering Iran. Prior to 1976 it was known as Kut Province. Major cities include the capital Al Kut, Al-Hai and Al-Suwaira. The governorate contains the Mesopotamian Marshes of Shuwayja, Al-Attariyah, and Hor Aldelmj. Its name comes from the Arabic word meaning \middle,\ as the former city of Wasit lay along the Tigris about midway between Baghdad and Basra. Wasit city was abandoned after the Tigris shifted course.Show on map
Salah ad DinSaladin Governorate (Arabic: صلاح الدين‎‎ Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn) (or Salah ad Din Province) is a governorate in Iraq, north of Baghdad. The governorate has an area of 24,363 square kilometres (9,407 sq mi). The estimated population in 2003 was 1,042,200 people. The capital is Tikrit; the governorate also contains the significantly larger city of Samarra. Before 1976 the governorate was part of Baghdad Governorate.Show on map
NinawaNineveh Governorate (Arabic: نینوى‎‎) is a governorate in northern Iraq that contains the ancient Assyrian city of Nineveh. It was an integral part of Assyria from the 25th century BC to the 7th century AD, and still retains an indigenous Assyrian community to this day. It has an area of 37,323 km2 (14,410 sq mi) and an estimated population of 2,453,000 people in 2003. Its chief city and provincial capital is Mosul, which lies across the Tigris river from the ruins of ancient Nineveh. Tal Afar is the second-biggest city. Before 1976, it was called Mosul Province and included the present-day Dohuk Governorate.Show on map
MaysanAmarah (Arabic: العمارة‎‎; BGN: Al ‘Amārah; also spelled Amara), is a city in south-eastern Iraq, located on a low ridge next to the Tigris River waterway south of Baghdad about 50 km from the border with Iran. It lies at the northern tip of the marshlands between the Tigris and Euphrates. Predominantly Shia Muslim, it had a population of about 340,000 as of 2002 and about 420,000 as of 2005. It is the administrative capital of the Maysan province. A major trading center for the surrounding agricultural area, it is known for woven goods and silverware.Show on map
Muhafazat Karbala'Karbala Governorate (Arabic: كربلاء‎‎ Karbalāʾ) is a governorate in central Iraq. Its administrative center is the city of Karbala, a holy city for Shia Muslims for housing the shrine of the revered Imam Hussein. The population is over 99.6% Shia. The governorate includes part of the artificial Lake Milh.Show on map
ArbilErbil Governorate (Kurdish: Parêzgeha Hewlêr - پارێزگای ھەولێر‎, Syriac: ܗܘܦܲܪܟܝܵܐ ܕܐܲܪܒܝܠ‎ , Arabic: محافظة أربيل‎‎ Muḥāfaẓat Arbīl), sometimes referred to by the alternative spelling Arbil Governorate, is a governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. It derives its name from the city of Erbil (Kurdish: Hewler), which is its capital. Erbil Governorate covers an area of 15,074 km2 in the north of Iraq, with a population of 2,009,367 (2015) people. It is largely populated by Kurds but has minority populations of Assyrians, Turkmen and Arabs.Show on map
DiyalaDiyala Governorate (Arabic: محافظة ديالى Muḥāfażah Diyālā‎‎) or Diyala Province is a governorate in eastern Iraq.Show on map
Dhi QarDhi Qar Governorate (Arabic: ذي قار Dhī Qār‎‎) is a governorate in southern Iraq. The provincial capital is Nasiriyah. Prior to 1976 the governorate was known as Muntafiq Governorate. Dhi Qar was the heartland of the ancient Iraqi civilization of Sumer, and includes the ruins of Ur, Eridu, Lagash, Larsa, Girsu, Umma, and Bad-tibira. The southern area of the governorate is covered by Mesopotamian Marshes.Show on map
DahukDohuk Governorate (Kurdish: پارێزگای دھۆک‎, Syriac: ܗܘܦܲܪܟܝܵܐ ܕܕܸܗܘܟ‎ , Arabic: محافظة دهوك‎‎ Muḥāfaẓat Dahūk) is a governorate in Iraq. Its capital is the city of Dohuk. It includes the city of Zakho, which has at various times served as a checkpoint for the border with Turkey. Prior to 1976 it was part of Nineveh Governorate, which was called Mosul Governorate. Dohuk Governorate is mainly inhabited by Kurds and Assyrians, with a small number of Yazidis and Armenians. The estimated population in 2015 was 1,423,114.Show on map
BaghdadBaghdad Governorate (Arabic: محافظة بغداد‎‎ Muḥāfaẓät Baġdād), also known as the Baghdad Province, is the capital governorate of Iraq. It includes the Baghdad as well as the surrounding metropolitan area. The governorate is the smallest of the 18 provinces of Iraq but the most populous.Show on map
BabilBabil Governorate or Babylon Province (Arabic: محافظة بابل‎‎ Muḥāfaẓa Bābil) is a governorate in central Iraq. It has an area of 5,119 square kilometres (1,976 sq mi), with an estimated population of 1,651,565 people in 2002. The provincial capital is the city of Hillah, which lies opposite the ancient city of Babylon (بابل), on the Euphrates river.Show on map
KirkukKirkuk Governorate (Arabic: محافظة كركوك‎‎ Muḥāfaẓat Karkūk, Kurdish: پارێزگای کەرکووک‎, Syriac: ܟܪܟ ܣܠܘܟ‎ Karḵ Sloḵ, Turkish: Kerkük ili) or Kirkuk Province is a governorate in northern Iraq, occupied by Iraqi Kurdistan since 2014. The governorate has an area of 9,679 square kilometres (3,737 sq mi). In 2011 the estimated population was 1,395,614 people. The provincial capital is the city of Kirkuk. It is divided into four districts.Show on map
As SulaymaniyahSulaymaniyah Governorate (Central Kurdish: پارێزگای سلێمانی‎, Arabic: محافظة السليمانية‎‎) or Sulaymaniyah Province is a mountainous governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. Its capital is the city of Sulaymaniyah. Halabja Governorate was formerly the Halabja District of Sulaymaniyah, until it became a separate governorate in 2014.Show on map
An NajafNajaf Governorate (Arabic: النجف‎‎ An Najaf) (or Najaf Province) is a governorate in central and southern Iraq. The capital is the city of Najaf. The other major city is Al Kufah. Both cities are holy to Shia Muslims, who form the majority of the population. Prior to 1976 it was part of the Karbala Governorate.Show on map
Al QadisiyahAl-Qadisiyah Governorate (Arabic: القادسية Al Qādisiyah‎‎) is one of the governorates of Iraq. It is in the center-south of the country. Its capital is Al Diwaniyah. Before 1976, it was part of the ad-Diwāniyah Governorate, along with al-Muthannā and Najaf. The province is named after the historical city of Al-Qādisiyah, the site of the Battle of al-Qādisiyah, where in 636 CE the Islamic Rashidun forces defeated the forces of the Sassanid Empire. The governorate is predominately Shia Arab. It includes the Mesopotamian marsh of Hor Aldelmj.Show on map
Al MuthannaMuthanna Governorate (Arabic: المثنى Al Muthannā‎‎) (or Al Muthanna Province) is a province in Iraq, named after the 7th-century Arab general al-Muthanna ibn Haritha. It is in the south of the country, bordering Saudi Arabia. Its capital is the city of Samawah. Before 1976 it was part of the Diwaniya Province, which included present-day Najaf Governorate and Al-Qādisiyyah Governorate.Show on map
AnbarAl Anbar Governorate (Arabic: محافظة الأنبار‎‎; muḥāfaẓa al-’Anbār), or Anbar Province, is the largest governorate in Iraq by area. Encompassing much of the country's western territory, it shares borders with Syria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. The provincial capital is Ramadi; other important cities include Fallujah and Haditha. The governorate was known as Ramadi up to 1976, when it was renamed Al Anbar Province, and it was known as Dulaim before 1962. Nearly all the inhabitants of the province are Sunni Muslims and most belong to the Dulaim tribe.Show on map