Maps, Guides And More - Iceland

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Iceland. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Iceland

Basic information about Iceland
Iceland (/ˈaɪslænd/; Icelandic: Ísland [ˈistlant]), also called the Republic of Iceland, is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. It has a population of 329,100 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence still keeps summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate. According to Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in the year 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, mainly Norwegians and to a smaller extent other Scandinavians settled Iceland, bringing with them thralls of Gaelic origin. From 1262 to 1814, Iceland was ruled by Norway and afterwards by Denmark. Until the 20th century, the country relied largely on fishing and agriculture. Iceland became independent in 1918 and a republic in 1944. Industrialisation of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, it became a part of the European Economic Area, which supported diversification into economic and financial services. Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes compared to other OECD countries. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks highly in economic, political and social stability and equality. In 2013, it was ranked as the 13th most-developed country in the world by the United Nations' Human Development Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy. Affected by the ongoing worldwide financial crisis, the nation's entire banking system systemically failed in October 2008, leading to a severe depression, substantial political unrest, the Icesave dispute, and the institution of capital controls. Many bankers were jailed and the economy has made a significant recovery, in large part due to a surge in tourism. Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation's Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Germanic and Gaelic (Celtic) settlers. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old Norse and is closely related to Faroese and West Norwegian dialects. The country's cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisine, Icelandic literature and medieval sagas. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, its lightly armed coast guard being in charge of defence.Iceland (/ˈaɪslænd/; Icelandic: Ísland [ˈistlant]), also called the Republic of Iceland, is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. It has a population of 329,100 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence still keeps summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate. According to Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in the year 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, mainly Norwegians and to a smaller extent other Scandinavians settled Iceland, bringing with them thralls of Gaelic origin. From 1262 to 1814, Iceland was ruled by Norway and afterwards by Denmark. Until the 20th century, the country relied largely on fishing and agriculture. Iceland became independent in 1918 and a republic in 1944. Industrialisation of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, it became a part of the European Economic Area, which supported diversification into economic and financial services. Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes compared to other OECD countries. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks highly in economic, political and social stability and equality. In 2013, it was ranked as the 13th most-developed country in the world by the United Nations' Human Development Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy. Affected by the ongoing worldwide financial crisis, the nation's entire banking system systemically failed in October 2008, leading to a severe depression, substantial political unrest, the Icesave dispute, and the institution of capital controls. Many bankers were jailed and the economy has made a significant recovery, in large part due to a surge in tourism. Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation's Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Germanic and Gaelic (Celtic) settlers. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old Norse and is closely related to Faroese and West Norwegian dialects. The country's cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisine, Icelandic literature and medieval sagas. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, its lightly armed coast guard being in charge of defence.
DivisionDescriptionShow
NorthwestNorthwestern Region (Icelandic: Norðurland vestra) is one of the traditional eight regions of Iceland, located in the north of the island. The biggest town in the region is Sauðárkrókur, with a population of 3000.Show on map
NortheastNortheastern Region (Icelandic: Norðurland eystra) is one of the traditional eight regions of Iceland, located in the north of the island. The biggest town in the region is Akureyri, with a population of 17,300.Show on map
EastEastern Region (Icelandic: Austurland, also known as Austfirðir: \Eastfjords\) is a region in eastern Iceland. Its area is 22,721 square kilometres (8,773 sq mi) and in 2007 its population was 15,300. The largest town in the region is Egilsstaðir, with a population of 2,300. The oldest municipality is Djúpivogur, which got their trading licence in 1589, with a population of 470 in 2015 and thereafter. One of the best known spar mining quarries in the world is in “Helgustöðum” in Eskifjörður with its Iceland spar (solar stones).Show on map
SouthSouthern Region (Icelandic: Suðurland, literally: South Iceland) is a region of Iceland. The population of the region was 23,311 (1 October 2007). The biggest town in the region is Selfoss, with a population of 6,000.Show on map
Capital RegionGreater Reykjavík (Icelandic: Höfuðborgarsvæðið, meaning \The Capital Region\) is a name used collectively for Reykjavík and six municipalities around it. The area is by far the largest urban area in Iceland. Each municipality has its own elected council. Greater Reykjavík's population of 200,852 is over 60% of the population of Iceland, in an area that is only just over 1% of the total size of the country. Municipal governments cooperate extensively in various fields: for example waste policy, shared public transport and a joint fire brigade.Show on map
Southern PeninsulaSouthern Peninsula (Icelandic: Suðurnes) is a region in southwest Iceland. The region has a population of more than 22,000 and is one of the more densely populated parts of the island. The administrative centre is Keflavík, which had 7,000 residents when it merged with the nearby town of Njarðvík several years ago to create Reykjanesbær, which is the second largest settlement outside the Greater Reykjavík area; on 1 January 2013 the town had a population of 14,231.Show on map
WestWestern Region (Icelandic: Vesturland) is one of the traditional eight regions of Iceland, located on the western coast of the island. The biggest town in the region is Akranes, with a population of 6,300.Show on map
WestfjordsThe Westfjords or West Fjords (Icelandic: Vestfirðir, ISO 3166-2:IS: IS-4) is the name of a large peninsula in northwestern Iceland and an administrative district. It lies on the Denmark Strait, facing the east coast of Greenland. It is connected to the rest of Iceland by a 7-km-wide isthmus between Gilsfjörður and Bitrufjörður. The Westfjords are very mountainous; the coastline is heavily indented by dozens of fjords surrounded by steep hills. These indentations make roads very circuitous and communications by land difficult. In addition many of the roads are closed by ice and snow for several months of the year. The Vestfjarðagöng road tunnel from 1996 has improved that situation. The cliffs at Látrabjarg comprise the longest bird cliff in the northern Atlantic Ocean and are at the westeShow on map