Maps, Guides And More - Hong Kong

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Hong_Kong. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Hong Kong

Basic information about Hong_Kong
Hong Kong (香港; \Fragrant Harbour\), officially Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the southern coast of China at the Pearl River Estuary and the South China Sea. Hong Kong is known for its skyline and deep natural harbour. It has a land area of 1104 km2 and shares its northern border with Guangdong Province of Mainland China. With around 7.2 million inhabitants of various nationalities, Hong Kong is one of the world's most densely populated metropolises. After the First Opium War (1839–42), Hong Kong became a British colony with the perpetual cession of Hong Kong Island, followed by Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 and a 99-year lease of the New Territories from 1898. Hong Kong remained under British control for about a century until the Second World War, when Japan occupied the colony from December 1941 to August 1945. After the Surrender of Japan, the British resumed control. In the 1980s, negotiations between the United Kingdom and China resulted in the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, which provided for the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong on 30 June 1997. The territory became a special administrative region of China with a high degree of autonomy on 1 July 1997 under the principle of one country, two systems. Disputes over the perceived misapplication of this principle have contributed to popular protests, including the 2014 Umbrella Revolution. In the late 1970s, Hong Kong became a major entrepôt in Asia-Pacific. The territory has developed into a major global trade hub and financial centre. The 44th-largest economy in the world, Hong Kong ranks top 10 in GDP (PPP) per capita, but also has the most severe income inequality among advanced economies. Hong Kong is one of the three most important financial centres alongside New York and London, and the world's number one tourist destination city. The territory has been named the freest market economy. The service economy, characterised by free trade and low taxation, has been regarded as one of the world's most laissez-faire economic policies, and the currency, the Hong Kong dollar, is the 13th most traded currency in the world. The Hong Kong Basic Law is its quasi-constitution which empowers the region to develop relations and make agreements directly with foreign states and regions, as well as international organizations, in a broad range of appropriate fields. It is an independent member of APEC, the IMF, WTO, FIFA and International Olympic Committee among others. Limited land created a dense infrastructure and the territory became a centre of modern architecture, and has a larger number of highrises than any other city in the world. Hong Kong has a highly developed public transportation network covering 90 per cent of the population, the highest in the world, and relies on mass transit by road or rail. Air pollution remains a serious problem. Loose emissions standards have resulted in a high level of atmospheric particulates. Nevertheless, residents of Hong Kong (sometimes referred to as Hongkongers) enjoy one of the longest life expectancies in the world.Hong Kong (香港; \Fragrant Harbour\), officially Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the southern coast of China at the Pearl River Estuary and the South China Sea. Hong Kong is known for its skyline and deep natural harbour. It has a land area of 1104 km2 and shares its northern border with Guangdong Province of Mainland China. With around 7.2 million inhabitants of various nationalities, Hong Kong is one of the world's most densely populated metropolises. After the First Opium War (1839–42), Hong Kong became a British colony with the perpetual cession of Hong Kong Island, followed by Kowloon Peninsula in 1860 and a 99-year lease of the New Territories from 1898. Hong Kong remained under British control for about a century until the Second World War, when Japan occupied the colony from December 1941 to August 1945. After the Surrender of Japan, the British resumed control. In the 1980s, negotiations between the United Kingdom and China resulted in the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, which provided for the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong on 30 June 1997. The territory became a special administrative region of China with a high degree of autonomy on 1 July 1997 under the principle of one country, two systems. Disputes over the perceived misapplication of this principle have contributed to popular protests, including the 2014 Umbrella Revolution. In the late 1970s, Hong Kong became a major entrepôt in Asia-Pacific. The territory has developed into a major global trade hub and financial centre. The 44th-largest economy in the world, Hong Kong ranks top 10 in GDP (PPP) per capita, but also has the most severe income inequality among advanced economies. Hong Kong is one of the three most important financial centres alongside New York and London, and the world's number one tourist destination city. The territory has been named the freest market economy. The service economy, characterised by free trade and low taxation, has been regarded as one of the world's most laissez-faire economic policies, and the currency, the Hong Kong dollar, is the 13th most traded currency in the world. The Hong Kong Basic Law is its quasi-constitution which empowers the region to develop relations and make agreements directly with foreign states and regions, as well as international organizations, in a broad range of appropriate fields. It is an independent member of APEC, the IMF, WTO, FIFA and International Olympic Committee among others. Limited land created a dense infrastructure and the territory became a centre of modern architecture, and has a larger number of highrises than any other city in the world. Hong Kong has a highly developed public transportation network covering 90 per cent of the population, the highest in the world, and relies on mass transit by road or rail. Air pollution remains a serious problem. Loose emissions standards have resulted in a high level of atmospheric particulates. Nevertheless, residents of Hong Kong (sometimes referred to as Hongkongers) enjoy one of the longest life expectancies in the world.
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Yuen LongYuen Long (Chinese: 元朗), formerly Un Long, is an area and town on the Yuen Long Plain located in the New Territories West, Hong Kong. To its west lie Hung Shui Kiu (洪水橋) and Ha Tsuen, to the south Shap Pat Heung and Tai Tong, to the east Au Tau and Kam Tin (錦田), and to the north Nam Sang Wai.Show on map
Tsuen WanTsuen Wan District (Chinese: 荃灣區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is located in the New Territories and is served by the Tsuen Wan Line of the MTR metro system. Its area is 60,7 km². Its residents, who mostly live in Tsuen Wan Town, enjoy the highest income in the New Territories. Part of the Tsuen Wan New Town is located in the Tsuen Wan District. An exclave of Tsuen Wan is also located on the northeastern part of Lantau island. Presently, there are no direct roads that connect the exclave with the rest of the district.Show on map
Tai PoTai Po District (Chinese: 大埔區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It covers the areas of Tai Po, Tai Po Kau, Ting Kok, Plover Cove and its exclave is northern part of Sai Kung Peninsula on both shores of Tolo Channel. It is located in the Eastern New Territories. The administrative centre of the district is Tai Po Town (the Tai Po New Town).Show on map
Sai KungSai Kung District is the second largest district in Hong Kong in terms of area. It comprises the southern half of Sai Kung Peninsula and Clear Water Bay Peninsula in the New Territories plus a strip to the east of Kowloon. It is made up of the Sai Kung Town, Sai Kung rural areas, Tseung Kwan O New Town and over 70 islands of different sizes. The administrative centre is Sai Kung Town but the district's population is concentrated in Tseung Kwan O. The district has the second youngest residents. Known as the \back garden of Hong Kong\, Sai Kung has been able to retain its natural scenery, and where the Hong Kong Global Geopark is located. Behind the modern buildings, a lot of traditional customs and cultures are still retained in the rural villages.Show on map
IslandsThe Islands District (Chinese: 離島區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is part of the New Territories. It had a population of 137,122 in 2009. Hong Kong consists of a peninsula and 236 islands. The Islands District consists of some twenty large and small islands which lie to the south and southwest of Hong Kong. Other notable areas that are part of the Islands District include Chek Lap Kok, the reclamated island which the Hong Kong International Airport is located, Tung Chung on northern Lantau near the airport, and Discovery Bay, a large private residential area on eastern Lantau.Show on map
Central and WesternThe Central and Western District (Chinese: 中西區) located on northern part of Hong Kong Island is one of the 18 administrative districts of Hong Kong. It had a population of 251,519 in 2011. The district has the most educated residents with the second highest income and the third lowest population due to its relatively small size. Central is the central business district and the core urban area of Hong Kong. Western District covers Shek Tong Tsui, Kennedy Town and Sai Ying Pun, and was part of the City of Victoria, the earliest urban settlement in colonial Hong Kong.Show on map
WanchaiWan Chai District (Chinese: 灣仔區, literally \Cove District\) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. The district is located at the north shore of Hong Kong Island with a population of 167,146 in 2001. The district has the second most educated residents with the highest income, the second lowest population and the third oldest residents, and is also the only district without the presence of public housing estates. It is a relatively affluent district, with one in five persons having liquid assets of more than HKD 1 million.Show on map
EasternThe Eastern District (Chinese: 東區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It had a population of 587,690 in 2006. The district has the second highest population while its residents have the third highest median household income among 18 districts.Show on map
SouthernThe Southern District is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is located in the southern part of Hong Kong Island. It had a population of 290,240 in 2001, the fourth-lowest in Hong Kong.Show on map
Yau Tsim MongYau Tsim Mong District (Chinese: 油尖旺區) is one of 18 districts of Hong Kong, located on the western part of Kowloon Peninsula. It is the core urban area of Kowloon. The district has the third highest population density of all districts. The 2011 By-Census recorded the total population of Yau Tsim Mong District at 307,878. Formerly two districts, the Yau Tsim District and Mong Kok District, it was combined in 1994 as an acronym of three of its major areas: Yau Ma Tei, Tsim Sha Tsui, and Mong Kok.Show on map
Sham Shui Po(This article is about the administrative district. For the area, see Sham Shui Po.) Sham Shui Po District (Chinese: 深水埗區) is one of 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is the poorest district in Hong Kong, with a predominantly working-class population of 365,540 and the lowest median household income of all districts. Sham Shui Po has long been home to poorer new immigrants from mainland China. It also saw the birth of public housing projects in the city, as the government sought to resettle those displaced by a devastating fire in its slums. Sham Shui Po also hosted a Vietnamese refugee camp during the influx of migration in the aftermath of the Vietnam War.Show on map
Kowloon CityKowloon City District (Chinese: 九龍城區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is located in the city of Kowloon. It had a population of 381,352 in 2001. The district has the third most educated residents while its residents enjoy the highest income in Kowloon. Kowloon City District is a relatively low density residential area. Areas include: Ho Man Tin, Hung Hom, Kai Tak Airport, Kowloon Tong, Ma Tau Wai, To Kwa Wan, and Whampoa Garden, and the proper Kowloon City.Show on map
Wong Tai SinWong Tai Sin District (Chinese: 黃大仙區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is the only fully landlocked district throughout Hong Kong. It is located in Kowloon.Show on map
Kwun TongKwun Tong (Chinese: 觀塘區) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is located in Kowloon. It had a population of 639,900 in 2014. The district has the second highest population while the income is below average. The district consists of the following areas: \n* Kwun Tong (觀塘) \n* Ngau Tau Kok (牛頭角) \n* Kowloon Bay (九龍灣) \n* Sau Mau Ping (秀茂坪) \n* Lam Tin (藍田) \n* Yau Tong (油塘) and Lei Yue Mun (鯉魚門)Show on map
Kwai TsingKwai Tsing (Chinese: 葵青區; Cantonese IPA: [kʰwɐi11 tsɪŋ55 kʰɵy55]; Hong Kong Hakka: kwi2 Ciang1 ki1; Putonghua Pinyin: Kuíqīng Qū) is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It consists of two parts - Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi Island. Kwai Tsing is part of the New Territories. It had a population of 477,092 in 2001. The district has the third least educated residents and their income is below average. Over 75% of the district residents live in public housing.Show on map
Tuen MunTuen Mun District (Chinese: 屯門區) is one of the 18 administrative districts of Hong Kong. Its name was previously 'Tsing Shan' and it changed in the 1970s. It is the westernmost continental district of Hong Kong, located about 32 km from the Kowloon Peninsula, 7 km southwest of Yuen Long and 18 km west of Tsuen Wan. It had a population of 488,831 in 2001. Part of the district is the Tuen Mun New Town, which contains one of the largest residential areas in the New Territories.Show on map
NorthNorth District (Chinese: 北區) is the northernmost district of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. It is located in the northwestern part of the New Territories. The new town of Fanling-Sheung Shui is within this district. It had a population of 298,657 in 2001. The district has the second lowest population density. It borders with Shenzhen city with the Sham Chun River. Most major access points to Mainland China from Hong Kong lie in this district.The North District is about 168 km² in area.Show on map
Sha TinSha Tin District is one of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. As one of the 9 districts located in the New Territories, it covers the areas of Sha Tin, Tai Wai, Ma On Shan, Fo Tan, Siu Lek Yuen and Ma Liu Shui. The district is the most populous district in Hong Kong, with a population of 630,273.Show on map