Maps, Guides And More - Guatemala

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Guatemala. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Guatemala

Basic information about Guatemala
Guatemala (/ˌɡwɑːtᵻˈmɑːləˌ ɡwæ-ˌ ɡɑː-/ GWAH-tə-MAH-lə, GWAT-ə-MAH-lə or GAH-tə-MAH-lə; [gwateˈmala]), officially the Republic of Guatemala (Spanish: República de Guatemala), is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, Belize to the northeast, the Caribbean to the east, Honduras to the east and El Salvador to the southeast. With an estimated population of around 15.8 million, it is the most populous state in Central America. A representative democracy, Guatemala's capital and largest city is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City. The territory of modern Guatemala once formed the core of the Mayan civilization, which extended across Mesoamerica. Most of the country was conquered by the Spanish in the 16th century, becoming part of the viceroyalty of New Spain. Guatemala attained independence in 1821 as part of the Federal Republic of Central America, which dissolved in 1841. From the mid to late 19th century, Guatemala experienced chronic instability and civil strife. Beginning in the early 20th century, it was ruled by a series of dictators backed by the United Fruit Company and the United States government. In 1944, authoritarian leader Jorge Ubico was overthrown by a pro-democratic military coup, initiating a decade-long revolution that led to sweeping social and economic reforms. A U.S.-backed military coup in 1954 ended the revolution and installed a dictatorship. From 1960 to 1996, Guatemala endured a bloody civil war fought between the U.S.-backed government and leftist rebels, which included massacres of the Mayan population perpetrated by the military. Since a United Nations-negotiated peace accord, Guatemala has witnessed both economic growth and successful democratic elections, though it continues to struggle with high rates of poverty, crime, drug trade, and instability. Guatemala's abundance of biologically significant and unique ecosystems, which includes a large number of endemic species, contributes to Mesoamerica's designation as a biodiversity hotspot. The country is also known for its rich and distinct culture, which is characterized by a fusion of Spanish and Indigenous influences.Guatemala (/ˌɡwɑːtᵻˈmɑːləˌ ɡwæ-ˌ ɡɑː-/ GWAH-tə-MAH-lə, GWAT-ə-MAH-lə or GAH-tə-MAH-lə; [gwateˈmala]), officially the Republic of Guatemala (Spanish: República de Guatemala), is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, Belize to the northeast, the Caribbean to the east, Honduras to the east and El Salvador to the southeast. With an estimated population of around 15.8 million, it is the most populous state in Central America. A representative democracy, Guatemala's capital and largest city is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City. The territory of modern Guatemala once formed the core of the Mayan civilization, which extended across Mesoamerica. Most of the country was conquered by the Spanish in the 16th century, becoming part of the viceroyalty of New Spain. Guatemala attained independence in 1821 as part of the Federal Republic of Central America, which dissolved in 1841. From the mid to late 19th century, Guatemala experienced chronic instability and civil strife. Beginning in the early 20th century, it was ruled by a series of dictators backed by the United Fruit Company and the United States government. In 1944, authoritarian leader Jorge Ubico was overthrown by a pro-democratic military coup, initiating a decade-long revolution that led to sweeping social and economic reforms. A U.S.-backed military coup in 1954 ended the revolution and installed a dictatorship. From 1960 to 1996, Guatemala endured a bloody civil war fought between the U.S.-backed government and leftist rebels, which included massacres of the Mayan population perpetrated by the military. Since a United Nations-negotiated peace accord, Guatemala has witnessed both economic growth and successful democratic elections, though it continues to struggle with high rates of poverty, crime, drug trade, and instability. Guatemala's abundance of biologically significant and unique ecosystems, which includes a large number of endemic species, contributes to Mesoamerica's designation as a biodiversity hotspot. The country is also known for its rich and distinct culture, which is characterized by a fusion of Spanish and Indigenous influences.
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ZacapaZacapa (Spanish pronunciation: [saˈkapa]) is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. The capital is the city of Zacapa. It is approximately 112 kilometers (70 miles) from Guatemala City. To the north lie the departments of Alta Verapaz and Izabal; to the east is the border with the Republic of Honduras; on the south are Chiquimula and Jalapa and to the west is El Progreso.Show on map
TotonicapanTotonicapán is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. The capital is the city of Totonicapán.Show on map
SuchitepequeSuchitepéquez (Spanish pronunciation: [sutʃiteˈpekes]) is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. Its capital is Mazatenango.It is situated in the southwestern region of Guatemala, bordering Quetzaltenango, Sololá, and Chimaltenango to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the south, Escuintla to the east, and Retalhuleu to the west.Show on map
SololaSololá is a department in the west of Guatemala. The capital is the city of Sololá. Lake Atitlan is a key feature surrounded by a number of the municipalities.Show on map
Santa RosaSanta Rosa (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsanta ˈrosa]) is a department in Guatemala. The capital is Cuilapa.Show on map
San MarcosSan Marcos is a department in northwestern Guatemala, on the Pacific Ocean and along the western Guatemala-Mexico border. The department's capital is the city of San Marcos.Show on map
SacatepequezSacatepéquez (Spanish pronunciation: [sakateˈpekes]) is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. Population estimate 265,500 in 2000. The name comes from Sacatepéquez, a city from November 21, 1542 until July 29, 1773 when it was destroyed by the Santa Marta earthquake. Sacatepéquez means grasshill in the Pipil Maya dialect. The capital of Sacatepéquez is Antigua Guatemala. Other important cities include Ciudad Vieja.Show on map
RetalhuleuThe city of Retalhuleu (Spanish pronunciation: [retaluˈleu]) is in south-western Guatemala. It is the departmental seat of Retalhuleu Department as well as the municipal seat of Retalhuleu Municipality. Retalhuleu stands at about 240 metres above sea level. In 2003 the city had a population of about 40,000 people. Locally it is nicknamed \Reu.\Show on map
QuicheEl Quiché (Spanish pronunciation: [el kiˈtʃe]) is a department of Guatemala. El Quiché department is in the heartland of the K'iche' (Quiché) people, to the north-west of Guatemala City. The capital is Santa Cruz del Quiché.Show on map
QuetzaltenangoQuetzaltenango is a department in the western highlands of Guatemala. The capital is the city of Quetzaltenango, the second largest city in Guatemala. The department is divided up into 24 municipalities. The inhabitants include Spanish-speaking Ladinos and the K'iche' and Mam Maya groups, both with their own Maya language. The department consists of mountainous terrain, with its principal river being the Samalá River. the department is seismically active, suffering from both earthquakes and volcanic activity.Show on map
PetenPetén is a department of the nation of Guatemala. It is geographically the northernmost department of Guatemala, as well as the largest in size — at 13,843 sq mi (35,854 km2) it accounts for about one third of Guatemala's area. The capital is Flores. The population at the 2002 Census was 366,735; the latest official estimate as at mid-2012 was 662,779.Show on map
JutiapaJutiapa is a department of Guatemala that borders along El Salvador and the Pacific Ocean. The capital is the city of Jutiapa. It has a population of about 489,085. The population is ethnically \mestizo\ (European and non-indigenous) Though in the northern regions of Jutiapa there are few descendents that once belonged to the now extinct xinca population. The indigenous population is non existent today in Jutiapa with traditional language and culture no longer conserved or practiced. The department is divided into seventeen municipalities. Jutiapa is the country's southeastern-most department. The main crops are sorghum, tobacco, onion and corn. The climate is dry. An important attraction is the cattle fair. It is at 405 m above sea level.Show on map
JalapaJalapa is a department of Guatemala, in the south east-of the republic. The capital is the city of Jalapa. In 2000 the department of Jalapa had an estimated population of 390,500. The majority is ladino, of predominantly European descent, with sizable minorities of K'iche' and Poqomam Maya. The main agricultural products are cattle, sorghum, tobacco, onion and maize (corn).Show on map
IzabalIzabal (Spanish pronunciation: [isaˈβal]) is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. Its coastal areas form part of the homeland of the Garifuna people. Izabal is bordered to the north by Belize, to the north east by the Gulf of Honduras, and to the east by Honduras, and by the Guatemalan departments of Petén to the north west, Alta Verapaz to the west, and Zacapa to the south. From the area around Lake Izabal, the Department of Izabal stretches along the Río Dulce to the coast of the Caribbean Sea.Show on map
HuehuetenangoHuehuetenango is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. It is situated in the western highlands and shares borders with México in the north and west; with El Quiché in the east, with Totonicapán, Quetzaltenango, and San Marcos to the south. The capital is the city of Huehuetenango. Huehuetenango's ethnic composition is one of the most diverse in Guatemala. While the Mam are predominant in the department, other Maya groups are the Q'anjob'al, Chuj, Jakaltek, Tektik, Awakatek, Chalchitek, Akatek and K'iche'. Each of these nine Maya ethnic groups speaks their own language.Show on map
GuatemalaGuatemala is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. The capital is Guatemala City, which also serves as the national capital. The department covers a surface area of 2,126 square kilometres (821 sq mi), and had a population of 2,541,581 at the 2002 census.Show on map
EscuintlaEscuintla (Spanish pronunciation: [esˈkwintla]) is a city in south central Guatemala. It is the capital of the Escuintla Department and the administrative seat of Escuintla Municipality. In 2003 the city had a population of about 68,000 people. It is on the border of the central highlands and the Pacific coastal plain.Show on map
El ProgresoEl Progreso (Spanish pronunciation: [el pɾoˈɣɾeso]) is a department in Guatemala. The capital is Guastatoya and the largest town is Sanarate.Show on map
ChiquimulaChiquimula is a city in Guatemala. It serves both as the capital of the department of Chiquimula and as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name.It is some 174 km from Guatemala City and is in Guatemala often called \La perla del oriente\ (the pearl of the east).Show on map
ChimaltenangoChimaltenango is a department of Guatemala. The capital is Chimaltenango. Located to the east are the departments of Guatemala, home to Guatemala City, and Sacatepéquez, while also bordered by the departments of El Quiché and Baja Verapaz to the north, Escuintla and Suchitepéquez to the south, and Sololá Department to the west. The capital of Chimaltenango is located about 54 kilometers away from Guatemala City.Show on map
Baja VerapazBaja Verapaz (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbaxa βeɾaˈpas]) is a department in Guatemala. The capital is Salamá. Baja Verapaz contains the Mario Dary Biotope Preserve, preserving the native flora and fauna of the region, especially the threatened national bird of Guatemala, the resplendent quetzal.Show on map
Alta VerapazAlta Verapaz (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈalta βeɾaˈpas]) is a department in the north central part of Guatemala. The capital and chief city of the department is Cobán. Verapaz is bordered to the north by El Petén, to the east by Izabal, to the south by Zacapa, El Progreso, and Baja Verapaz, and to the west by El Quiché. Also in Alta Verapaz are the towns of Chisec, San Pedro Carchá and San Cristóbal Verapaz.Show on map