Maps, Guides And More - Guam

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Guam. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Guam

Basic information about Guam
Guam (/ˈɡwɑːm/ or /ˈɡwɒm/; Chamorro: Guåhån; formally the Territory of Guam) is an unincorporated and organized territory of the United States. Located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, Guam is one of five American territories with an established civilian government. The capital city is Hagåtña, and the most populous city is Dededo. In 2015, 161,785 people were residing on Guam. Guamanians are American citizens by birth. Guam has an area of 544 km2 (210 sq mi) and a density of 297/km² (770/sq mi). It is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands, and the largest island in Micronesia. Among its municipalities, Mongmong-Toto-Maite has the highest density at 1,425/km² (3,691/sq mi), whereas Inarajan and Umatac have the lowest density at 47/km² (119/sq mi). The highest point is Mount Lamlam at 406 meters (1,332 ft) above sea-level. The Chamorros, Guam's indigenous people, settled the island approximately 4,000 years ago. Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan discovered the island on March 6, 1521. Guam was colonized in 1668 with settlers, like Diego Luis de San Vitores, a Catholic missionary. Between the 1500s and the 1700s, Guam was an important stopover for the Spanish Manila Galleons. During the Spanish–American War, the United States captured Guam on June 21, 1898. Under the Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded Guam to the United States on December 10, 1898. Guam is amongst the seventeen Non-Self-Governing Territories of the United Nations. Before World War II, Guam and three other territories – American Samoa, Hawaii, and the Philippines – were the only American jurisdictions in the Pacific Ocean. On December 7, 1941, hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Guam was captured by the Japanese, and was occupied for thirty months. During the occupation, Guamanians were subjected to culture alignment, forced labor, beheadings, rape, and torture. Guam endured hostilities when American forces recaptured the island on July 21, 1944; Liberation Day commemorates the victory. Since the 1960s, the economy is supported by two industries: tourism and the United States Armed Forces.Guam (/ˈɡwɑːm/ or /ˈɡwɒm/; Chamorro: Guåhån; formally the Territory of Guam) is an unincorporated and organized territory of the United States. Located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, Guam is one of five American territories with an established civilian government. The capital city is Hagåtña, and the most populous city is Dededo. In 2015, 161,785 people were residing on Guam. Guamanians are American citizens by birth. Guam has an area of 544 km2 (210 sq mi) and a density of 297/km² (770/sq mi). It is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands, and the largest island in Micronesia. Among its municipalities, Mongmong-Toto-Maite has the highest density at 1,425/km² (3,691/sq mi), whereas Inarajan and Umatac have the lowest density at 47/km² (119/sq mi). The highest point is Mount Lamlam at 406 meters (1,332 ft) above sea-level. The Chamorros, Guam's indigenous people, settled the island approximately 4,000 years ago. Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan discovered the island on March 6, 1521. Guam was colonized in 1668 with settlers, like Diego Luis de San Vitores, a Catholic missionary. Between the 1500s and the 1700s, Guam was an important stopover for the Spanish Manila Galleons. During the Spanish–American War, the United States captured Guam on June 21, 1898. Under the Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded Guam to the United States on December 10, 1898. Guam is amongst the seventeen Non-Self-Governing Territories of the United Nations. Before World War II, Guam and three other territories – American Samoa, Hawaii, and the Philippines – were the only American jurisdictions in the Pacific Ocean. On December 7, 1941, hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Guam was captured by the Japanese, and was occupied for thirty months. During the occupation, Guamanians were subjected to culture alignment, forced labor, beheadings, rape, and torture. Guam endured hostilities when American forces recaptured the island on July 21, 1944; Liberation Day commemorates the victory. Since the 1960s, the economy is supported by two industries: tourism and the United States Armed Forces.
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AsanAsan (Chamorro: Assan) is a village located on the western shore of the United States territory of Guam. The municipality of Asan-Maina combines Asan with Maina, a community in the hills to the east. It was a primary landing site for United States Marines during Guam's liberation from the Japanese during World War II. Asan Beach Park is part of the War in the Pacific National Historic Park. Asan and Maina are located in the Luchan (Western) District.Show on map
AgatAgat (Chamorro: Hagat) is a village in the United States territory of Guam. It is located south of Apra Harbor on the island's western shore. The village's population has decreased since the island's 2000 census. The village is 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Hagåtña, with most of the residents ethnic Chamorros, the indigenous people of Guam. Some of Agat's most notable sites are Mount Alifan, the Agat Marina, the Spanish Bridge, and War In The Pacific National Historical Park.Show on map
DededoDededo (Chamorro: Dedidu) is the most populated village in the United States territory of Guam. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Dededo's population was just under 45,000 in 2010. The village is located on the coral plateau of Northern Guam.Show on map
BarrigadaBarrigada (Chamorro: Barigåda) is a village in the United States territory of Guam. A largely residential municipality, its main village is located south of the Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport near the intersections of Routes 8, 10, and 16. The community east of the airport known as Barrigada Heights is considered an affluent neighborhood on the island, where homes have excellent views overlooking much of Guam including the island's airport and hotels along Tumon Bay.Show on map
HagatnaHagåtña (pronounced [həˈɡɑtɲə] ), formerly English Agana /əˈɡɑːnjə/ and in Spanish Agaña, is the capital of the United States territory of Guam. From the 18th through mid 20th century, it was Guam's population center, but today it is the second smallest of the island's 19 villages in both area and population. However, it remains one of the island's major commercial districts in addition to being the seat of government.Show on map
InarajanInarajan (Chamorro: Inalåhan) is a village located on the southeastern coast of the United States territory of Guam. The village's original Chamoru name, Inalåhan, was altered when transliterated during Spanish control of the island.Show on map
Mongmong-Toto-MaiteMongmong-Toto-Maite (Chamorro: Mong Mong-Totu-Maiti) is a municipality in the United States territory of Guam composed of three separate villages east of Hagåtña that experienced development after the Second World War. Mongmong is adjacent to the Hagåtña Swamp; Toto is situated to the north-east near Barrigada; Maite is located on the cliffs overlooking Agana Bay and the Philippine Sea. The village's population has increased slightly following the island's 2000 census.Show on map
PitiPiti is a village located on the western shore of the United States territory of Guam. It contains the commercial port of Guam at Apra Harbor as well as several of the island’s largest power plants. NAVFAC Marianas is located there.Show on map
Santa RitaSanta Rita (Chamorro: Sånta Rita) is a village located on the southwest coast of the United States territory of Guam with hills overlooking Apra Harbor. According to the 2000 census it has a population of 7,500, down from 11,857 in 1990. Santa Rita is the newest village in Guam, having been established after the Second World War.Show on map
SinajanaSinajana (Chamorro: Sinahånña) is smallest (in terms of area) of the nineteen villages in the United States territory of Guam. It is located in the hills south of Hagåtña (formerly Agana). The village's name may have come from the word \china-jan,\ cookware used to cook wild yams that once grew in the area. Sinajana is one of a few villages that was urbanized as a result of a federal urban renewal program. Afame, Agana Springs, and Didigue are a few non-urbanized areas within this same village. There are over 75 homes in Afame, most of which are built below a high cliff, with a few homes high atop a ridge overlooking Hagatna and Mong-Mong. Agana Springs is located below the cliff line of Sinajana and contains a natural spring with small living creatures like frogs and turtles. Didigue is lShow on map
TalofofoTalofofo (Chamorro: Talo fo' fo') is a village located in the southern part of the United States territory of Guam, on the east coast. The village center is located in the hills above the coast, while the smaller coastal community below the cliff is known as Ipan. The village is located south of Yona and north of Inarajan.Show on map
TamuningTamuning, also known as Tamuning-Tumon-Harmon (Chamorro: Tamuneng) is a municipality or village located on the western shore of the United States territory of Guam. The village of Tamuning can be viewed as the economic center of Guam, containing Tumon (the center of Guam's tourist industry), Harmon Industrial Park, and commercial districts in other parts of the municipality. Its central location along Marine Corps Drive (the island's main thoroughfare) has aided in its development.Show on map
UmatacUmatac (Chamorro: Humåtak), formerly called Umata, is a village on the southwestern coast of the United States territory of Guam. The month of March in the Chamorro language is \Umatalaf,\ or \to catch guatafi,\ which is believed to be the root word of Umatac. The village's population has decreased since the island's 2000 census. Nearby (4.5 km) is Mount Bolanos (368 m or 1,207 ft), the 3rd highest peak of Guam.Show on map
YigoYigo (Chamorro: Yigu; pronounced /ˈdʒiːɡoʊ/) is the northernmost village of the United States territory of Guam, and is the location of Andersen Air Force Base. The municipality of Yigo is larger than any other village on the island in terms of area.Show on map
YonaYona (Chamorro: Yoña [d͡zoˈɲa]) is a village in the United States territory of Guam.Show on map
MerizoMerizo (Chamorro: Malesso'), is the southernmost village in the United States territory of Guam. Cocos Island (Chamorro: Islan Dåno) is a part of the municipality. The village's population has decreased since the island's 2000 census.Show on map
MangilaoMangilao is a village on the eastern shore of the United States territory of Guam. The village's population has increased slightly following the island's 2000 census. Cliffs lie along much of the village's shoreline providing dramatic views, but few of Mangilao's beaches are available for recreational uses. The island's main prison is in Mangilao. In the far northeastern part of Mangilao's municipal boundary is a community known as Latte Heights, which is much closer to central Dededo than the main village of Mangilao.Show on map
Agana HeightsAgana Heights (Chamorro: Tutuhan) is one of the nineteen villages in the United States territory of Guam. It is located in the hills south of Hagåtña (formerly Agana), in the central part of the island. The United States Naval Hospital is located in this largely residential village.Show on map
Chalan Pago-OrdotChalan Pago-Ordot (Chamorro: Chalan Pågu-Otdot) is a municipality in the United States territory of Guam, containing the villages of Chalan-Pago and Ordot. It is located in the eastern-central part of the island and is part of the Kattan (Eastern) District. The village's population has increased slightly following the island's 2000 census.Show on map