Maps, Guides And More - Faroe Islands

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Faroe_Islands. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Faroe Islands

Basic information about Faroe Islands
The Faroe Islands (/ˈfɛəroʊ/; Faroese: Føroyar [ˈfœɹjaɹ]; Danish: Færøerne, [ˈfæɐ̯øːˀɐnə]) are an archipelago between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, approximately halfway between Norway and Iceland, 320 kilometres (200 mi) north-northwest of Great Britain. The area is approximately 1,400 km2 (540 sq mi) with a 2015 population of 48,700. The islands are an autonomous country within the Danish Kingdom. The archipelago is very rugged and has an extremely moderated subpolar oceanic climate that is windy, wet, cloudy and cool year round. In spite of its northerly latitude, temperatures average above freezing year round. Between 1035 and 1814, the Faroe Islands were part of the Kingdom of Norway. The 1814 Treaty of Kiel granted Denmark control over the islands, along with two other Norwegian regions: Greenland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands have been a self-governing country within the Danish Realm since 1948. The Faroese have control of most domestic matters; areas that remain the responsibility of Denmark include military defence, police, justice, currency and foreign affairs. The Faroe Islands have representation in the Nordic Council as members of the Danish delegation. The Faroe Islands also compete as an independent country in certain sports.The Faroe Islands (/ˈfɛəroʊ/; Faroese: Føroyar [ˈfœɹjaɹ]; Danish: Færøerne, [ˈfæɐ̯øːˀɐnə]) are an archipelago between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, approximately halfway between Norway and Iceland, 320 kilometres (200 mi) north-northwest of Great Britain. The area is approximately 1,400 km2 (540 sq mi) with a 2015 population of 48,700. The islands are an autonomous country within the Danish Kingdom. The archipelago is very rugged and has an extremely moderated subpolar oceanic climate that is windy, wet, cloudy and cool year round. In spite of its northerly latitude, temperatures average above freezing year round. Between 1035 and 1814, the Faroe Islands were part of the Kingdom of Norway. The 1814 Treaty of Kiel granted Denmark control over the islands, along with two other Norwegian regions: Greenland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands have been a self-governing country within the Danish Realm since 1948. The Faroese have control of most domestic matters; areas that remain the responsibility of Denmark include military defence, police, justice, currency and foreign affairs. The Faroe Islands have representation in the Nordic Council as members of the Danish delegation. The Faroe Islands also compete as an independent country in certain sports.
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VagarVágar (Danish: Vågø) is one of the 18 islands in the archipelago of the Faroe Islands and the most westerly of the large islands. With a size of 178 square kilometres (69 square miles) (about 70 sq. miles), it ranks number three, behind Streymoy and Eysturoy. Vágar region also comprises the island of Mykines. The Vagar island shape is very distinct, since it resembles a dog's head. Sørvágsfjørður is the mouth and Fjallavatn is the eye.Show on map
SuduroySuðuroy (literally South Island, Danish: Suderø) is the southernmost of the Faroe Islands. The island covers 163.7 square kilometres (63.2 sq mi). In 2012 there were 4,678 inhabitants, but there has been a gradual decline in the population numbers ever since the 1950s. In 2005 the population had been 5,036. Suðuroy region comprises this island and Lítla Dímun. Two more settlements were started in the early and mid-20th century: Botni, north west of Vágur, and Tjaldavík, in a bay south east of Øravík. Both sites have been abandoned again.Show on map
StreymoyStreymoy (Danish: Strømø) is the largest and most populated island of the Faroe Islands. The capital, Tórshavn, is located on its east coast. The name means \island of currents\. It also refers to the largest region of the country that also includes the islands of Hestur, Koltur and Nólsoy.Show on map
SandoySandoy (Danish: Sandø. English: Sandisland) is the first of the five southern islands that make up the Faroe chain, the fifth biggest of all the Faroe Islands, an autonomous region of the Kingdom of Denmark. It also refers to the region that includes this island along with Skúvoy and Stóra Dímun. As of 2011, the largest population center on the island is the village of Sandur with a population of 599. Other settlements include Skarvanes, Skopun, Skálavík, Húsavík and Dalur. There are similarly named islands, Sanday in the Orkney Islands, Sanday in the Inner Hebrides and Sandøy in Norway.Show on map
NordoyarShow on map
EysturoyEysturoy (pronounced ['estroi]) (Danish: Østerø) meaning 'East Island' is a region and the second-largest of the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic, both in size and population.Show on map