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Map of Dominican Republic

Basic information about Dominican Republic
The Dominican Republic (; Spanish: República Dominicana [reˈpuβlika ðominiˈkana]) is a sovereign state on the island of Hispaniola, in the Greater Antilles archipelago in the Caribbean region. The western three-eighths of the island is occupied by the nation of Haiti, making Hispaniola one of two Caribbean islands, along with Saint Martin, that are shared by two countries. Both by area and population the Dominican Republic is the second-largest Caribbean nation (after Cuba), with 48,445 square kilometres (18,705 sq mi) and nearly 10 million people, one million of whom live in the capital city Santo Domingo. Christopher Columbus landed on the island on December 5, 1492, which the Taíno people had inhabited since the 7th century. It became the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas; namely Santo Domingo, the oldest continuously inhabited city and the first seat of the Spanish colonial rule in the New World. After three centuries of Spanish rule, with French and Haitian interludes, the Dominican Republic became independent in 1821. The ruler, José Núñez de Cáceres, intended that the Dominican Republic be part of the nation of Gran Colombia, but he was quickly removed by the Haitian government and Dominican slave revolts. Victorious in the Dominican War of Independence against Haitian rule in 1844, the Dominican Republic over the next 72 years, experienced mostly internal strife and a brief return to colonial status, the only nation in the hemisphere to do so after gaining its independence, before permanently ousting Spaniard rule during the Dominican War of Restoration of 1865. A United States occupation lasted eight years between 1916–1924, and a subsequent calm and prosperous six-year period under Horacio Vásquez Lajara, were followed by the dictatorship of Rafael Leónidas Trujillo Molina until 1961. A civil war in 1965, the country's last, was ended by U.S. military occupation, and was followed by the authoritarian rule of Joaquín Balaguer, 1966–1978. Since then, the Dominican Republic has moved toward representative democracy, and has been led by Leonel Fernández for most of the time after 1996. Danilo Medina, the Dominican Republic's current president, succeeded Fernandez in 2012, winning 51% of the electoral vote over his opponent ex-president Hipólito Mejía. The Dominican Republic has the tenth largest economy in Latin America and is the second largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. Though long known for agriculture and mining, the economy is now dominated by services. The Dominican Republic has a vibrant national stock market, Bolsa de Valores de la Republica Dominicana (BVRD). The Dominican Republic's economic progress is exemplified by its advanced telecommunication system and transportation infrastructure. Nevertheless, unemployment, government corruption, and inconsistent electric service remain major Dominican problems. The country also has \marked income inequality\. International migration affects the Dominican Republic greatly, as it receives and sends large flows of migrants. Mass illegal Haitian immigration and the integration of Dominicans of Haitian descent are major issues. A large Dominican diaspora exists, mostly in the United States. They contribute to the Dominican Republic's development as they send billions of dollars to their families in remittances. The Dominican Republic is the most visited destination in the Caribbean. The year-round golf courses are among the top attractions on the island. A geographically diverse nation, the Dominican Republic is home to the region's tallest mountain peak, Pico Duarte, as well as the Caribbean's largest lake and lowest elevation, Lake Enriquillo. The island has an average temperature of 26 °C (78.8 °F) and great climatic and biological diversity. The country is also the site of the first cathedral, castle, monastery, and fortress built in all of the Americas, located in Santo Domingo's Colonial Zone, an area declaredThe Dominican Republic (; Spanish: República Dominicana [reˈpuβlika ðominiˈkana]) is a sovereign state on the island of Hispaniola, in the Greater Antilles archipelago in the Caribbean region. The western three-eighths of the island is occupied by the nation of Haiti, making Hispaniola one of two Caribbean islands, along with Saint Martin, that are shared by two countries. Both by area and population the Dominican Republic is the second-largest Caribbean nation (after Cuba), with 48,445 square kilometres (18,705 sq mi) and nearly 10 million people, one million of whom live in the capital city Santo Domingo. Christopher Columbus landed on the island on December 5, 1492, which the Taíno people had inhabited since the 7th century. It became the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas; namely Santo Domingo, the oldest continuously inhabited city and the first seat of the Spanish colonial rule in the New World. After three centuries of Spanish rule, with French and Haitian interludes, the Dominican Republic became independent in 1821. The ruler, José Núñez de Cáceres, intended that the Dominican Republic be part of the nation of Gran Colombia, but he was quickly removed by the Haitian government and Dominican slave revolts. Victorious in the Dominican War of Independence against Haitian rule in 1844, the Dominican Republic over the next 72 years, experienced mostly internal strife and a brief return to colonial status, the only nation in the hemisphere to do so after gaining its independence, before permanently ousting Spaniard rule during the Dominican War of Restoration of 1865. A United States occupation lasted eight years between 1916–1924, and a subsequent calm and prosperous six-year period under Horacio Vásquez Lajara, were followed by the dictatorship of Rafael Leónidas Trujillo Molina until 1961. A civil war in 1965, the country's last, was ended by U.S. military occupation, and was followed by the authoritarian rule of Joaquín Balaguer, 1966–1978. Since then, the Dominican Republic has moved toward representative democracy, and has been led by Leonel Fernández for most of the time after 1996. Danilo Medina, the Dominican Republic's current president, succeeded Fernandez in 2012, winning 51% of the electoral vote over his opponent ex-president Hipólito Mejía. The Dominican Republic has the tenth largest economy in Latin America and is the second largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. Though long known for agriculture and mining, the economy is now dominated by services. The Dominican Republic has a vibrant national stock market, Bolsa de Valores de la Republica Dominicana (BVRD). The Dominican Republic's economic progress is exemplified by its advanced telecommunication system and transportation infrastructure. Nevertheless, unemployment, government corruption, and inconsistent electric service remain major Dominican problems. The country also has \marked income inequality\. International migration affects the Dominican Republic greatly, as it receives and sends large flows of migrants. Mass illegal Haitian immigration and the integration of Dominicans of Haitian descent are major issues. A large Dominican diaspora exists, mostly in the United States. They contribute to the Dominican Republic's development as they send billions of dollars to their families in remittances. The Dominican Republic is the most visited destination in the Caribbean. The year-round golf courses are among the top attractions on the island. A geographically diverse nation, the Dominican Republic is home to the region's tallest mountain peak, Pico Duarte, as well as the Caribbean's largest lake and lowest elevation, Lake Enriquillo. The island has an average temperature of 26 °C (78.8 °F) and great climatic and biological diversity. The country is also the site of the first cathedral, castle, monastery, and fortress built in all of the Americas, located in Santo Domingo's Colonial Zone, an area declared
DivisionDescriptionShow
ValverdeValverde (Spanish pronunciation: [balˈβerðe]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from Santiago Province in 1959.Show on map
Santiago RodriguezSantiago Rodríguez (Spanish pronunciation: [sanˈtjaɣo ɾoˈðɾiɣes]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from Monte Cristi in 1948.Show on map
SantiagoSantiago (Spanish pronunciation: [sanˈtjaɣo]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, in the north of the country. Santiago is an intellectual, educational, and cultural center. It is also a major industrial center with rum, textile, cigarette and cigar industries based there. Shoe manufacturing, leather goods, and furniture making are important parts of the province's economic life. Santiago also has major Free Zone centers with four important industrial free zones; it also has an important cement factory. Santiago is home to one of the largest medical centers in the country, Clínica Unión Médica, which serves all 13 provinces of El Cibao.Show on map
San Pedro de MacorisSan Pedro de Macorís (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsam ˈpeðɾo ðe makoˈɾis]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, also the name of its capital city. The city is fairly active due to its proximity to the national capital of Santo Domingo and also its role in the sugar industry. The province is informally known as San Pedro, SPM or Serie 23 for the first two numbers of their Dominican identification or Cedula.Show on map
San JuanSan Juan (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsaŋ ˈxwan]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. Before 1961 it was known as Benefactor. San Juan is the Republic's largest province, bearing a size of 3,569 square kilometers (1,378 miles), and it is landlocked.Show on map
San CristobalSan Cristóbal (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsaŋ kɾisˈtoβal]) is a province in the southern Dominican Republic, west of the capital Santo Domingo. It was originally named Trujillo after its founder, dictator Rafael Leónidas Trujillo, taking its present name after his assassination in 1961. It included what is now Monte Plata Province until 1992. The provincial capital is San Cristóbal. In 2007, a documentary was filmed near Hato Damas, about a group of coffee and cacao producers who work together, called Convite. It is available on YouTube.Show on map
Sanchez RamirezSánchez Ramírez (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsantʃes ɾaˈmiɾes]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from Duarte in 1952, and is named after Brigadier Juan Sánchez Ramírez, hero of the Battle of Palo Hincado (1808) at which Spanish rebels defeated the French occupying forces.Show on map
SamanaSamaná (Spanish pronunciation: [samaˈna]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. Its capital is Santa Bárbara de Samaná, usually known as Samaná. Samaná is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the northeastern part of the Dominican Republic. It is known for its mountains of which it is almost entirely formed. Samaná has numerous beaches.On 6 November 2006 the Samaná El Catey International Airport,commenced operations.Show on map
Hermanas MirabalHermanas Mirabal (Spanish pronunciation: [erˈmanas miɾaˈβal], Mirabal Sisters) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from Espaillat Province in 1952 and was originally called Salcedo, the name of its capital city; it is still referred to by this name sometimes. The name change came on November 21, 2007. It commemorates the Mirabal sisters, who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country by giving up a privileged life to fight against the powerful Dominican leader, Rafael Trujillo. The Mirabal sisters came from Salcedo and they were buried here after their murder.Show on map
Puerto PlataPuerto Plata (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈpwerto ˈplata], Silver Port) is one of the northern provinces of the Dominican Republic. The area has become an increasingly popular tourist attraction since the late 1990s mainly due to its fine beaches. It borders the Septentrional mountain range to the north (which separates it from Laguna Salada).Show on map
PeraviaPeravia (Spanish pronunciation: [peˈɾaβja]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. Before January 1, 2002 it was included in what is the new San José de Ocoa province, and published statistics and maps generally relate it to the old, larger, Peravia. It is named after the Peravia Valley. Along the Azua Province, Peravia is characterized by its dry climate and its dunes that surround the coast. One popular attraction is the Salinas beach, which recently has grown to be a popular tourist destination with a developed town that has shops and hotels.Show on map
PedernalesPedernales (from Spanish, meaning \Flints\; pronounced: [peðerˈnales]) is the southernmost province of the Dominican Republic, including the offshore island of Isla Beata. It was split from Barahona in 1957. Of its 2,074.53 km², 1374 km² belong to the Jaragua National Park. According to the UNFPA, in 2012 thirty percent of the province’s population was of Haitian origin. As of 2015, it is estimated that Haitians are roughly 50% of the population.Show on map
NacionalThe Distrito Nacional (Spanish pronunciation: [disˈtɾito nasjoˈnal]) (D.N.) is a subdivision of the Dominican Republic enclosing the capital Santo Domingo. It is not in any of the provinces, but in practice, it acts as a province on its own. Before October 16, 2001, the Distrito Nacional was much larger, including what is now known as Santo Domingo Province. Published statistics and maps generally show the former, larger, Distrito Nacional. The Distrito Nacional has no rural or undeveloped areas.Show on map
Monte PlataMonte Plata (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmonte ˈplata]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, and also the name of its capital city. It was split from San Cristóbal in 1992.Show on map
Monte CristiMonte Cristi (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmonte ˈkɾisti]) is a province in the north-west of the Dominican Republic. The capital city is San Fernando de Monte Cristi (usually simply Monte Cristi). The spelling Montecristi is also seen.Show on map
Monsenor NouelMonseñor Nouel (Spanish pronunciation: [monseˈɲor nuˈwel]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from La Vega in 1982. It is named for Monseñor Dr. Adolfo Alejandro Nouel y Bobadilla (1862-1937), Archbishop of Santo Domingo and briefly President of the Republic in 1912-3.Show on map
Maria Trinidad SanchezMaría Trinidad Sánchez (Spanish pronunciation: [maˈɾi.a tɾiniˈðað ˈsantʃes]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from Samaná Province in September 1959 as Julia Molina Province; in November 1961, it got its current name. The name commemorates a distinguished female soldier in the wars of independence.María Trinidad Sánchez was the first woman incarcerated and executed by Pedro Santana, a Dominican annexionist president.Show on map
La VegaLa Vega (Spanish pronunciation: [la ˈβeɣa]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. Until 1992 it included what is now Monseñor Nouel province.Show on map
La RomanaLa Romana (Spanish pronunciation: [la ɾoˈmana]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. The capital is also named La Romana, and is the third-largest city in the country. La Romana was elevated to the category of province in 1944. La Romana is also home to Casa de Campo, one of the world's largest resorts and top golfing destinations. The \Teeth of the Dog\ golf course is world-renowned, and many international and local artists perform at \Altos de Chavón\, an artistic community and university.Show on map
La AltagraciaLa Altagracia (Spanish pronunciation: [la altaˈɣɾasja]) is the easternmost province of the Dominican Republic. Punta Cana is located on the eastern shores of this province.Show on map
IndependenciaIndependencia (Spanish pronunciation: [indepenˈdensja]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, located in the west, on the border with Haiti. It was split from Baoruco Province in 1950.Show on map
Hato MayorHato Mayor (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈato maˈʝor], greater cattle-raising district) is a province of the Dominican Republic. The province was split from El Seibo in 1984.Show on map
EspaillatEspaillat (Spanish pronunciation: [espaiˈʎat]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It is named for Ulises Francisco Espaillat (1823–1878), the 19th-century author who was briefly President of the Republic in 1876.Show on map
El SeiboEl Seibo (Spanish pronunciation: [el ˈseiβo]), alternatively spelt El Seybo, is a province of the Dominican Republic. Before 1992 it included what is now Hato Mayor province.Show on map
Elias PinaElías Piña (Spanish pronunciation: [eˈli.as ˈpiɲa]) is one of the 31 provinces of the Dominican Republic. It is located in the western part of the country, on the border with Haiti. Its capital city is Comendador. It was created on 1942 with the name San Rafael. In 1965, its name was changed to Estrelleta and, finally, in 1972 it got its current name. It was a municipio of the San Juan province before being elevated to the category of province.Show on map
DuarteDuarte (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈdwarte]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It is named after Juan Pablo Duarte, founder of the Dominican Republic. It was created in 1896 as a district (an old country subdivision) with the name Distrito Pacificador but the Constitution of 1907 changed the category to province. In 1925 its name was changed to Duarte.Show on map
DajabonDajabón (Spanish pronunciation: [daxaˈβon]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, on the border with Haiti. Its capital city is also called Dajabón. It was split from Monte Cristi province in 1938, and was called Libertador until 1961.Show on map
BarahonaBarahona (Spanish pronunciation: [baɾaˈona]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. The Barahona Coast is located on the southwestern part of the Dominican Republic approximately three hours drive from Santo Domingo the capital of the Dominican Republic.Show on map
BaorucoBaoruco, alternatively spelt Bahoruco (Spanish pronunciation: [baoˈɾuko]), is a province of the Dominican Republic. Before 1952 it included what is now Independencia Province. Important features are the Sierra de Neiba mountain range and Lake Enriquillo.Show on map
AzuaAzua (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈaswa]) is a province of the Dominican Republic.Show on map
San Jose de OcoaSan José de Ocoa (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsaŋ xoˈse ðe oˈko.a]) is a province of the Dominican Republic, and also the name of the province's capital city. It was split from Peravia on January 1, 2000. Published statistics and maps generally include this province in the old, larger, Peravia.Show on map
Santo DomingoSanto Domingo (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsanto ðoˈmiŋɡo]) is a province of the Dominican Republic. It was split from the Distrito Nacional on October 16, 2001.Show on map