Maps, Guides And More - Czechia

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Places and geographical objects in Czechia. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Czechia

Basic information about Czechia
The Czech Republic (/ˈtʃɛk rᵻˈpʌblɪk/ CHEK-rə-PUB-lik; Czech: Česká republika [ˈt͡ʃɛskaː ˈrɛpuˌblɪka]) is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west, Austria to the south, Slovakia to the southeast and Poland to the northeast. The capital and largest city, Prague, has over 1.2 million residents. The Czech Republic includes the historical territories of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia. The Czech state was formed in the late 9th century as the Duchy of Bohemia under the Great Moravian Empire. After the fall of the Empire in 907, the centre of power transferred from Moravia to Bohemia under the Přemyslids. In 1004, the duchy was formally recognized as part of the Holy Roman Empire, becoming the Kingdom of Bohemia in 1212, and reaching its greatest territorial extent in the 14th century. The King of Bohemia ruled not only Bohemia itself, but also other lands, which together formed the so-called Crown of Bohemia, and he had a vote in the election of the Holy Roman Emperor. In the Hussite wars of the 15th century driven by the Bohemian Reformation, the kingdom faced economic embargoes and defeated five crusades proclaimed by the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church and organized mainly by the emperor and princes of the Holy Roman Empire. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the whole Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy alongside the Archduchy of Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary. The Protestant Bohemian Revolt (1618–20) against the Catholic Habsburgs led to the Thirty Years' War, after which the monarchy consolidated its rule, reimposed Catholicism, and adopted a policy of gradual Germanization. With the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the Bohemian Kingdom became part of the Austrian Empire and the Czech language experienced a revival as a consequence of widespread romantic nationalism. In the 19th century, the Czech lands became the industrial powerhouse of the monarchy and were subsequently the core of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, which was formed in 1918 following the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after World War I. Czechoslovakia was occupied by Germany in World War II, and was liberated in 1945 by Soviet and American forces. Most of the German-speaking inhabitants were expelled after the war and thus the country lost its sizeable minority and its bilingual character. The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia won the 1946 elections. Following the 1948 coup d'état, Czechoslovakia became a one-party communist state under Soviet influence. In 1968, increasing dissatisfaction with the regime culminated in a reform movement known as the Prague Spring, which ended in a Soviet-led invasion. Czechoslovakia remained occupied until the 1989 Velvet Revolution, when the communist regime collapsed and a multiparty parliamentary republic was formed. On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The Czech Republic is a highly developed country with an advanced, high income economy and high living standards. The UNDP ranks the country 15th in inequality-adjusted human development. The Czech Republic also ranks as the 10th most peaceful country, while achieving strong performance in democratic governance. Its capital, Prague, has the lowest unemployment rate in the European Union. It is a member of the United Nations, the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the OSCE, and the Council of Europe.The Czech Republic (/ˈtʃɛk rᵻˈpʌblɪk/ CHEK-rə-PUB-lik; Czech: Česká republika [ˈt͡ʃɛskaː ˈrɛpuˌblɪka]) is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west, Austria to the south, Slovakia to the southeast and Poland to the northeast. The capital and largest city, Prague, has over 1.2 million residents. The Czech Republic includes the historical territories of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia. The Czech state was formed in the late 9th century as the Duchy of Bohemia under the Great Moravian Empire. After the fall of the Empire in 907, the centre of power transferred from Moravia to Bohemia under the Přemyslids. In 1004, the duchy was formally recognized as part of the Holy Roman Empire, becoming the Kingdom of Bohemia in 1212, and reaching its greatest territorial extent in the 14th century. The King of Bohemia ruled not only Bohemia itself, but also other lands, which together formed the so-called Crown of Bohemia, and he had a vote in the election of the Holy Roman Emperor. In the Hussite wars of the 15th century driven by the Bohemian Reformation, the kingdom faced economic embargoes and defeated five crusades proclaimed by the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church and organized mainly by the emperor and princes of the Holy Roman Empire. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the whole Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy alongside the Archduchy of Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary. The Protestant Bohemian Revolt (1618–20) against the Catholic Habsburgs led to the Thirty Years' War, after which the monarchy consolidated its rule, reimposed Catholicism, and adopted a policy of gradual Germanization. With the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the Bohemian Kingdom became part of the Austrian Empire and the Czech language experienced a revival as a consequence of widespread romantic nationalism. In the 19th century, the Czech lands became the industrial powerhouse of the monarchy and were subsequently the core of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, which was formed in 1918 following the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after World War I. Czechoslovakia was occupied by Germany in World War II, and was liberated in 1945 by Soviet and American forces. Most of the German-speaking inhabitants were expelled after the war and thus the country lost its sizeable minority and its bilingual character. The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia won the 1946 elections. Following the 1948 coup d'état, Czechoslovakia became a one-party communist state under Soviet influence. In 1968, increasing dissatisfaction with the regime culminated in a reform movement known as the Prague Spring, which ended in a Soviet-led invasion. Czechoslovakia remained occupied until the 1989 Velvet Revolution, when the communist regime collapsed and a multiparty parliamentary republic was formed. On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The Czech Republic is a highly developed country with an advanced, high income economy and high living standards. The UNDP ranks the country 15th in inequality-adjusted human development. The Czech Republic also ranks as the 10th most peaceful country, while achieving strong performance in democratic governance. Its capital, Prague, has the lowest unemployment rate in the European Union. It is a member of the United Nations, the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the OSCE, and the Council of Europe.
DivisionDescriptionShow
Central BohemiaCentral Bohemia (Czech: Středočeský kraj) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the central part of its historical region of Bohemia. Its administrative center is placed in the Czech capital Prague (Czech: Praha), which lies in the center of the region. The city is not, however, a part of it and creates a region of its own.Show on map
UsteckyÚstí nad Labem Region or Ústecký Region (Czech: Ústecký kraj), also Region Aussig (after the German name of the capital), is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the north-western part of its historical land of Bohemia and the whole country. It is named after its capital Ústí nad Labem. It covers the majority of the former North Bohemia province and is part of the broader area of North Bohemia.Show on map
ZlinZlín Region (Czech: Zlínský kraj) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the central-eastern part of the historical region of Moravia. It is named after its capital Zlín. Together with the Olomouc Region it forms a cohesion area of Central Moravia. It is located in the eastern part of the Czech Republic, where the borders with Slovakia (Trenčín and Žilina Regions) are formed by its eastern edge. It borders with South Moravian Region in the southwest, Olomouc Region in the northwest and Moravian-Silesian Region in the north. The region consists of Kroměříž District, Uherské Hradiště District, Vsetín District and Zlín District. Culturally, the region is composed of parts of three traditional Moravian regions: Hanakia, the Moravian Slovakia and the MoravianShow on map
PrahaPrague (/ˈprɑːɡ/; Czech: Praha, [ˈpraɦa] (13px listen), German: Prag) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. It is the 15th largest city in the European Union. It is also the historical capital of Bohemia. Situated in the north-west of the country on the Vltava river, the city is home to about 1.26 million people, while its larger urban zone is estimated to have a population of nearly 2 million. The city has a temperate climate, with warm summers and chilly winters.Show on map
South MoravianThe South Moravian Region (Czech: Jihomoravský kraj; Slovak: Juhomoravský kraj) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the south-western part of its historical region of Moravia (an exception is Jobova Lhota which belongs to Bohemia). Its capital is Brno, the 2nd largest city in the Czech Republic. The region has 1,169,000 inhabitants (as of 30 June 2013) and the total area of 7,196.5 km². It is bordered by the South Bohemian Region (west), Vysočina Region (north-west), Pardubice Region (north), Olomouc Region (north east), Zlín Region (east), Slovakia (south east) and Austria (south).Show on map
JihoceskySouth Bohemia (Czech: Jihočeský kraj) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located mostly in the southern part of its historical land of Bohemia, with a small part in southwestern Moravia. The western part of the South Bohemian Region is former Prachens (Prácheňsko), a huge archaic region with distinctive features with its capital, Písek. In 2011, there were 623 municipalities in the region, whereof 54 had a status of town.Show on map
VysocinaThe Vysočina Region (IPA: [ˈvɪsot͡ʃɪna]; Czech: Kraj Vysočina \Highlands Region\), is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located partly in the south-eastern part of the historical region of Bohemia and partly in the south-west of the historical region of Moravia. Its capital is Jihlava.Show on map
KarlovarskyThe Karlovy Vary Region or Carlsbad Region (Czech: Karlovarský kraj) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the westernmost part of its historical region of Bohemia. It is named after its capital Karlovy Vary. The region is world-famous for its spas, including Karlovy Vary and Mariánské Lázně.Show on map
KralovehradeckyHradec Králové Region (Czech: Královéhradecký kraj, pronounced [ˈkraːlovɛːˌɦradɛt͡skiː ˈkraj]; Polish: Kraj hradecki) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the north-eastern part of its historical region of Bohemia. It is named after its capital Hradec Králové. The region neighbours with Pardubice Region in the south, with Central Bohemian Region in south-west and with Liberec Region in the west. It also shares 208 km long international border with Polish Lower Silesian Voivodship in north and east.After the state administration reform took place (1 January 2000) the territory of the Region comprises five districts: Hradec Králové District, Jičín District, Náchod District, Rychnov nad Kněžnou District and Trutnov District. As for area, Trutnov District iShow on map
LibereckyLiberec Region (Czech: Liberecký kraj) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the northernmost part of its historical region of Bohemia. It is named after its capital Liberec. The region shares international borders with Germany and Poland. Domestically the region borders the Ústí nad Labem Region to the west, the Central Bohemian Region to the south and the Hradec Králové Region to the east.Show on map
OlomouckyOlomouc Region (Czech: Olomoucký kraj) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the north-western and central part of its historical region of Moravia (Morava) and in a small part of the historical region of Czech Silesia (České Slezsko). It is named for its capital Olomouc. It consists of five districts: Jeseník District, Olomouc District, Prostějov District, Přerov District and Šumperk District. On the territory of the region there are 13 administrative districts of municipalities with extended powers and 20 administrative districts of municipalities with authorised local authority. Olomouc region borders with the Moravian-Silesian Region (in the east), Zlín Region (in the south-east), South Moravian Region (in the south-west) and Pardubice Region (in theShow on map
MoravskoslezskyThe Moravian-Silesian Region (Czech: Moravskoslezský kraj; Polish: Kraj morawsko-śląski; Slovak: Moravsko-sliezsky kraj), is one of the 14 administrative Regions of the Czech Republic. Before May 2001 it was called the Ostrava Region (Czech: Ostravský kraj). The region is located in the north-eastern part of its historical region of Moravia and in most of the Czech part of the historical region of Silesia. The region borders the Olomouc Region to the west and the Zlín Region to the south. It also borders two other countries – Poland (Opole and Silesian Voivodeships) to the north and Slovakia (Žilina Region) to the east.Show on map
PardubickyPardubice Region (Czech: Pardubický kraj; Polish: Kraj pardubicki) is an administrative unit (Czech: kraj) of the Czech Republic, located mainly in the eastern part of its historical region of Bohemia, with a small part in northwestern Moravia. It is named after its capital Pardubice. There are a total of 451 municipalities in the region (as of 2011). Among these are 15 municipalities with extended powers and 26 municipalities with a delegated municipal office. Thirty-two of the municipalities are classified as towns. The regional central offices are in Pardubice.Show on map
PlzenskyPlzeň Region (Czech: Plzeňský kraj) is an administrative unit (kraj) in the western part of Bohemia in the Czech Republic. It is named after its capital Plzeň (English Pilsen, German: Pilsen). In terms of area, Plzeň region is with 7,561 km2 the third largest region in the Czech Republic. However, with the population of 572,459 inhabitants (as of 31 December 2012) it was the ninth most populous region. After the South Bohemian Region it is the second least densely populated region. The region can be roughly divided into two parts: a highly industrialized north-eastern part with a strong engineering tradition around Pilsen (Czech: Plzeň) and a more hilly and rural south-western part with smaller-sized manufacturing companies processing natural resources.Show on map