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Places and geographical objects on the map of Keryneia.

Map of Keryneia district in Cyprus

Basic information about Keryneia
Kyrenia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. Its main town is Kyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια; Turkish: Girne). It is the smallest of Cyprus' districts, and is the only one controlled by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in its entirety. A district administration in exile exists in the Republic of Cyprus-controlled part of the island, near Ledra Palace, while the TRNC district has a kaymakam.
Cities, towns & villages in Keryneia
NameDescriptionShow
VounóVouno (Greek: Βουνό; Turkish: Yukarı Taşkent or Taşkent) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 299.The village of Vouno (It means mountain in Greek) is located 10 kilometers north of Nicosia in Cyprus. Its name derives from the fact that it lies at an altitude of 380 meters above sea level and is the highest village on the south side of Pentadaktylos Mountain. The village of Vouno is one of the 60 villages in Cyprus originally inhabited by Maronites. In 1192, because of the feudal system implemented by Guy de Lusignan, many unhappy Cypriots began to leave the area. That's when he moved Maronites from Lebanon. The village of Vouno was settled by immigrants from the village of Hadchit which until today Show Vounóon the map
KyreniaKyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια [locally Turkish: Girne [[ˈɟiɾne]]) is a city on the northern coast of Cyprus, noted for its historic harbour and castle. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Kyrenia is a cultural and economical centre, described as the touristic capital of Northern Cyprus. It is home to numerous hotels, nightlife and a port. It hosts an annual culture and arts festival with hundreds of participating artists and performers and is home to three universities with a student population around 14,000. Show Kyreniaon the map
KormakítisKormakitis (Cypriot Maronite Arabic: Kurmajit; Greek: Kormakítis; Turkish: Kormacit or Koruçam) is a small village in Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Kormakitis is one of four traditionally Maronite villages in Cyprus, the other three being Asomatos, Agia Marina and Karpaseia. The Maronites of Kormakitis traditionally speak their own variety of Arabic called Cypriot Maronite Arabic (CMA) in addition to Greek and recently Turkish. Cape Kormakitis is named after the village. Show Kormakítison the map
BélapaïsBellapais is a small village in the Kyrenia District in the northern part of Cyprus, about four miles from the town of Kyrenia. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. The village was the home for some years of Lawrence Durrell, who wrote about life in Cyprus in his book Bitter Lemons. He mentions passing the time drinking coffee under the Tree of Idleness in the village and there are two places which lay claim to being the spot. Unfortunately his book did not identify it completely, or perhaps fortunately, because two establishments can now profit from the name. His house, up a very steep climb, has a plaque on it and one can have the pleasure of returning by a way that passes by old olive presses. Show Bélapaïson the map
Karpáseia(Not to be confused with the Karpass Peninsula or Karpasia (town).) Karpaseia or Karpasha (Greek: Kαρπάσια [locally [kar̥ˈpaʃa]]; Turkish: Karpaşa) is a village in Cyprus, 2 km south of Myrtou. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Karpaseia is the smallest village in population amongst the Maronite villages. In 1778, there were 99 inhabitants; in 1973, they numbered 245. Today, only eleven enclaved Maronites remain in Karpaseia, the rest having fled to the south during the 1974 Turkish invasion. Show Karpáseiaon the map
ÓrgaOrga (Greek: Οργα, Turkish: Kayalar) is a small village in Kyrenia District located on the northern coast of Cyprus, approximately 3 km north of Kormakitis. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Órgaon the map
AsómatosAsomatos (Greek: Ασώματος Turkish: Özhan) is a village near Myrtou in northern Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Asomatos was the second largest Maronite village after Kormakitis. Before the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus, its inhabitants numbered 527, whereas, todaynone. The village is used as a military camp by the Turkish army. The Maronites may visit the village only on Sundays, with limited time restrictions, for mass in the Church of St. Michael the Archangel. Show Asómatoson the map
KontémenosKontemenos (Greek: Turkish: Kılıçaslan) is a town located in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, 7 km northwest of Skylloura. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Since the Turkish invasion in 1974, the village has been used as a Turkish military camp. The etymology of the village's name is unclear. Until 1974, Turkish Cypriots called the village \"Kördemen\" or \"Kördümen\" (\"blind wheel\"); this name was changed after 1974 and the village was named after Seçim Kılıçaslan, a Turkish soldier who died near the village during the invasion. Show Kontémenoson the map
LápithosLapithos or Lapethos (Greek: Λάπηθος; Turkish: Lapta) is a town in Cyprus. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. According to Strabo, the settlement was founded by Spartans. In Assyrian inscriptions, Lapithos is mentioned as one of the eleven Cypriot kingdoms. During the Persian rule, Lapithos was settled by Phoenicians. The last independent king Praxippos was subdued by Ptolemy I in 312 BC. Lambousa is the name currently used for the ancient Roman town on the coast about 3 kilometres (2 miles) north of the current Lapta. Show Lápithoson the map
Larnakas tis LapithouLarnakas tis Lapithou (Greek: Λάρνακας της Λαπήθου; Turkish: Kozan) is a village in Cyprus, near the town of Lapithos. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Until 1911, Larnakas tis Lapithou had a Muslim minority. They are said to have had relocated to nearby Kampyli. In 1973, Larnakas tis Lapithou had an estimated population of 873, consisting entirely of Greek Cypriots. All were displaced to the south of Cyprus in 1974. Today, it is inhabited by displaced Turkish Cypriots from various villages in Paphos District. Show Larnakas tis Lapithouon the map
Ágios ErmólaosAgios Ermolaos (Greek: Aγιος Ερμόλαος, Turkish: Şirinevler) is a village in Cyprus, 5 km east of Kontemenos. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. All of the Agios Ermolaos Greek Cypriots fled before the Turkish army and were displaced as a consequence of the Turkish Invasion of Cyprus in 1974. Formerly enclaved, displaced Turkish Cypriots from the south of the island and Turks from mainland Turkey subsequently moved to this village and it was named Şirinevler in Turkish in 1975. Show Ágios Ermólaoson the map
KampylíKampyli (Greek: Καμπυλή; Turkish: Hisarköy “castle village”, previously Kambilli) is a small Turkish Cypriot village in Cyprus, located approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) east of Myrtou. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. In 1831, 30% of the village's inhabitants were Maronites. They all left by 1940, and, around that time, Muslim families from Larnakas tis Lapithou moved into Kampyli. As of 2011, Kampyli had population of 194. Show Kampylíon the map
Ágios Amvrósios Show Ágios Amvrósioson the map
AgridákiAgridaki (Greek: Αγριδάκι; Turkish: Alemdağ) is a village in Cyprus, located 1 km east of Larnakas tis Lapithou. Agridaki is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Before the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus, the village was inhabited by Greek Cypriots. They fled before the Turkish forces reached the village. Agridaki is now inhabited by Turkish Cypriots from Paphos District. Show Agridákion the map
Ágios EpíktitosAgios Epiktitos (Greek: Άγιος Επίκτητος; Turkish: Çatalköy) is a village in Cyprus, located 6 km (4 mi) east of Kyrenia. Agios Epiktitos, is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus.The village was named after an ascetic monk who fled the Saracens in Palestine in the 9th Century and was a colleague of Saint Ambrose of Kyrenia who gave his name to a village close by. Turkish Cypriot Agios Epiktitos Municipality was founded in 1980. Show Ágios Epíktitoson the map
Agía EiríniAgia Eirini or Agia Irini (Greek: Άγια Ειρήνη, Turkish: Akdeniz) is a village located on Morphou Bay, approximately 10 km north of Morphou. The village is located within Kyrenia District. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Agía Eirínion the map
FótaFotta or Fota (Greek: Φώττα; Turkish: Dağyolu \"mountain road\", previously Fota) is a Turkish Cypriot village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. Fotta is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. As of 2011, it had a population of 525. Show Fótaon the map
PilériPileri (Greek: Πιλέρι; Turkish: Göçeri) is a small village in Cyprus, located 4 km east of Agios Ermolaos and 4 km west of Kiomourtzou. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. In 2011, its population was 228. Show Pilérion the map
SicharíSychari or Sichari (Greek: Συγχαρί [locally [sixːaˈɾi]]; Turkish: Aşağı Taşkent or Kaynakköy) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 290. Show Sicharíon the map
VasíleiaVasileia (Greek: Bασίλεια; Turkish: Karşıyaka) is a village in Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is located 3 km west of Lapithos. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 2,091. In the heart of Vasileia there is an abandoned church. Show Vasíleiaon the map
KiómourtzouKiomourtzou (Greek: Turkish: Kömürcü) is a small village in Cyprus located along the main Kyrenia–Nicosia highway. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 67. Show Kiómourtzouon the map
SýskliposSysklipos (Greek: Σύσκληπος, Turkish: Akçiçek) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, located 3 km east of Larnakas tis Lapithou. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. The Sysklipos church and many houses are now abandoned. Show Sýskliposon the map
TrimíthiTrimithi (Greek: Τριμίθι; Turkish: Edremit) is a small village in Cyprus, located 6 km west of Kyrenia. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 1,268. Show Trimíthion the map
TémplosTemplos (Greek: Τέμπλος, Turkish: Zeytinlik) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, thought to be named by the Knights Templar. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Témploson the map
KaravásKaravas (Greek: Καραβάς; Turkish: Alsancak) is a town in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. As of 2011, the town has a population of 6,597. Show Karaváson the map
AgírdaAgirda (Greek: Αγύρτα; Turkish: Ağırdağ) is a Turkish Cypriot village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 745. Show Agírdaon the map
ThérmeiaThermeia (Greek: Θέρμεια; Turkish: Doğanköy) is a historic village, now a suburb of Kyrenia, Cyprus. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 868. Show Thérmeiaon the map
ChárkeiaCharkeia or Chartzia (Greek: Turkish: Karaağaç) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, east of Kyrenia. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Chárkeiaon the map
DióriosDiorios or Dhiorios (Greek: Διόριος, Turkish: Tepebaşı) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, 2 km west of Myrtou. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Diórioson the map
LiveráLivera (Greek: Λιβερά; Turkish: Sadrazamköy) is a small village on Cape Kormakitis, Cyprus, 8 km northwest of Kormakitis. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. \n* St. Constantine's church in Livera Show Liveráon the map
FtérichaFtericha (Greek: Φτεριχα, Turkish: Ilgaz) is a small village in Kyrenia District in Cyprus, located southeast of Karavas. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Ftérichaon the map
KármiKarmi (Greek: Κάρμι; Turkish: Karaman) is a village in Cyprus, located west of Kyrenia. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 55. Show Kármion the map
TrápezaTrapeza (Greek: Τράπεζα; Turkish: Beşparmak) is a village in Cyprus, east of Kyrenia. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Its population in 2011 was 42. Show Trápezaon the map
MýrtouMyrtou (Greek: Μύρτου, Turkish: Çamlıbel) is a town in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, north of the city of Morphou. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Mýrtouon the map
KoutsovéntisKoutsovendis (Koutsoventis, Greek: Turkish: Güngör) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Koutsovéntison the map
PalaiósofosPalaiosofos (Greek: Turkish: Malatya) is a small village in Cyprus, located southeast of Lapithos. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Show Palaiósofoson the map
KalograíaKalograia (Greek: Καλογραία, Turkish: Bahçeli) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus, east of Kyrenia. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Kalograíaon the map
MótidesMotides (Greek: Μότιδες; Turkish: İncesu) is a small village in Cyprus, to the east of Lapithos. De facto, it is under the control of Northern Cyprus. Show Mótideson the map
OzanköyKazafani or Kazaphani (Greek: Καζάφανι, Turkish: Kazafana or Ozanköy) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. It was traditionally agricultural village, originally based around the feudal estate of Casal Pifani (alternatively spelled Pifane, Piphani or Epiphani). This is referenced in the Histoire de l'Île de Chypre by Louis de Mas Latrie on page 510. It is one of the mountain villages that the former latin inhabitants of Kyrenia Castle were forced into following the Ottoman Conquest of the island, many of their descendants now populating the village. The Monastery of Bellapais has been referred to as the Monastery of Cozzafani (another name of the village), a link that started during the 3rd Crusade. The route that the Crusaders Show Ozanköyon the map
KlepíniKlepini (Greek: Κλεπίνη, Turkish: Arapköy) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Show Klepínion the map
KriníKrini (Greek: Κρηνί, Turkish: Pınarbaşı) is a village in the Kyrenia District of Cyprus. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus. Krini is the starting point of the Nicosia aqueduct. Show Kriníon the map
States, regions, administrative units in Keryneia
NameDescriptionShow
Eparchía KerýneiasKyrenia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. Its main town is Kyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια; Turkish: Girne). It is the smallest of Cyprus' districts, and is the only one controlled by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in its entirety. A district administration in exile exists in the Republic of Cyprus-controlled part of the island, near Ledra Palace, while the TRNC district has a kaymakam.Show on map
Different buildings in Keryneia
NameDescriptionShow
Panagía ApsinthiótissaPanagia Apsinthiotissa or Absinthiotissa (Greek: Παναγία is a Greek Orthodox monastery located at the southern foot of the Pentadaktylos range in the Republic of Cyprus. The nearest settlements are Sychari (Συγχαρί, Tr. Kaynakköy) and Vouno (Βουνό, Tr. Taşkent). The site presently falls within the de facto Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in Lefkoşa District.Show on map
Kástro Agíou IlaríonosThe Saint Hilarion Castle lies on the Kyrenia mountain range, in Cyprus. This location provided the castle with command of the pass road from Kyrenia to Nicosia. It is the best preserved ruin of the three former strongholds in the Kyrenia mountains, the others being Kantara and Buffavento. Much of the castle was dismantled by the Venetians in the 15th century to reduce the up-keeping cost of garrisons.Show on map
VoufavéntoBuffavento Castle is in the Kyrenia mountain range, in Northern Cyprus. Its name is Italian and means, “Defier of the Winds”, reflecting that the winds at its location at 950 metres (3,120 ft) above sea level can reach quite a high velocity. The castle is irregular in shape as it makes use of the mountain itself for its defense. Since 1974 the castle is within the occupied side of the island.Show on map
AntifonitísAntiphonitis -- more correctly the Church of Christ Antiphonitis (Χριστός -- is a domed church in Cyprus, in Kyrenia District, located in the mountains near the village of Kalograia. It is reached from the network of tracks and small roads in the area of the Herbarium and Agios Amvrosios. It is under the de facto control of Northern Cyprus.Show on map
AvvaeíonBellapais Abbey, or \"The Abbey of Peace\" (from French: Abbaye de la Belle Paix), is the ruin of a monastery built by Canons Regular in the 13th century on the northern side of the small village of Bellapais, now in Turkish-controlled Northern Cyprus, about five kilometers from the town of Kyrenia. The ruin is at an altitude of 220m above sea level, and commands a long view down to Kyrenia and the Mediterranean sea.Show on map
Froúrio KyrineíasKyrenia Castle (Greek: Κάστρο της Κερύνειας Turkish: Girne Kalesi), at the east end of the old harbour in Kyrenia is a 16th-century castle built by the Venetians over a previous Crusader fortification. Within its walls lies a twelfth-century chapel showing reused late Roman capitals, and the Shipwreck Museum.Show on map
Mountains, roads, land forms, forests and other objects in Keryneia
NameDescriptionShow
PentadáktylosThe Kyrenia Mountains is a long, narrow mountain range that runs for approximately 160 km (100 mi) along the northern coast of the island of Cyprus. It is primarily made of limestone, with some marble. Its highest peak is Mount Kyparissovouno, at 1,024 m (3,360 ft). Pentadaktylos (also spelt Pentadactylos; Greek: Πενταδάκτυλος; Turkish: Beşparmak is another name for the Kyrenia Mountains, though Britannica refers to Pentadaktylos as the \"western portion\" of the latter, or the part west of Melounta. Pentadaktylos (lit. \"five-fingered\") is so-named after one of its most distinguishing features, a peak that resembles five fingers.Show on map
Akrotírio KormakítisCape Kormakitis (Greek: Ακρωτήριο Κορμακίτη, Akrotírio Kormakíti, Turkish: Koruçam Burnu) is a promontory on the north-western coast of the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, located in the self-proclaimed republic of Northern Cyprus. Named after the nearby Maronite village of the same name, the cape marks the northernmost extent of Morphou Bay. The nearest coastal town to Cape Kormakitis is Kyrenia.Show on map