Maps, Guides And More - Bhutan

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Bhutan. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Bhutan

Basic information about Bhutan
Bhutan (/buːˈtɑːn/; Dzongkha འབྲུག་ཡུལ Dru Ü, [ʈʂɦu yː]), officially the Kingdom of Bhutan, is a landlocked country in South Asia at the eastern end of the Himalayas. It is bordered to the north by China and to the south, east and west by India. To the west, it is separated from Nepal by the Indian state of Sikkim, while farther south it is separated from Bangladesh by the Indian states of Assam and West Bengal. Bhutan's capital and largest city is Thimphu. Bhutan existed as a patchwork of minor warring fiefs until the early 17th century. At that time the lama and military leader Ngawang Namgyal, the first Zhabdrung Rinpoche, who was fleeing religious persecution in Tibet, unified the area and cultivated a distinct Bhutanese identity. In the early 20th century, Bhutan came into contact with the British Empire and retained strong bilateral relations with India upon its independence. In 2006, based on a global survey, Business Week rated Bhutan the happiest country in Asia and the eighth-happiest in the world. The country's landscape ranges from subtropical plains in the south to the sub-alpine Himalayan heights in the north, where some peaks exceed 7,000 metres (23,000 ft). Its total area was reported as approximately 46,500 km2 (18,000 sq mi) in 1997 and 38,394 km2 (14,824 sq mi) in 2002. Bhutan's state religion is Vajrayana Buddhism and the population, as of 2015 estimated as 770 thousand people, is predominantly Buddhist. Hinduism is the second-largest religion. In 2008, Bhutan made the transition from absolute monarchy to constitutional monarchy and held its first general election. As well as being a member of the United Nations, Bhutan is a member of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and hosted SAARC's sixteenth summit in April 2010.Bhutan (/buːˈtɑːn/; Dzongkha འབྲུག་ཡུལ Dru Ü, [ʈʂɦu yː]), officially the Kingdom of Bhutan, is a landlocked country in South Asia at the eastern end of the Himalayas. It is bordered to the north by China and to the south, east and west by India. To the west, it is separated from Nepal by the Indian state of Sikkim, while farther south it is separated from Bangladesh by the Indian states of Assam and West Bengal. Bhutan's capital and largest city is Thimphu. Bhutan existed as a patchwork of minor warring fiefs until the early 17th century. At that time the lama and military leader Ngawang Namgyal, the first Zhabdrung Rinpoche, who was fleeing religious persecution in Tibet, unified the area and cultivated a distinct Bhutanese identity. In the early 20th century, Bhutan came into contact with the British Empire and retained strong bilateral relations with India upon its independence. In 2006, based on a global survey, Business Week rated Bhutan the happiest country in Asia and the eighth-happiest in the world. The country's landscape ranges from subtropical plains in the south to the sub-alpine Himalayan heights in the north, where some peaks exceed 7,000 metres (23,000 ft). Its total area was reported as approximately 46,500 km2 (18,000 sq mi) in 1997 and 38,394 km2 (14,824 sq mi) in 2002. Bhutan's state religion is Vajrayana Buddhism and the population, as of 2015 estimated as 770 thousand people, is predominantly Buddhist. Hinduism is the second-largest religion. In 2008, Bhutan made the transition from absolute monarchy to constitutional monarchy and held its first general election. As well as being a member of the United Nations, Bhutan is a member of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and hosted SAARC's sixteenth summit in April 2010.
DivisionDescriptionShow
BumthangBumthang District (Dzongkha: བུམ་ཐང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Bum-thang rzong-khag) is one of the 20 dzongkhag (districts) comprising Bhutan. It is the most historic dzongkhag if the number of ancient temples and sacred sites is counted. Bumthang consists of the four mountain valleys of Ura, Chumey, Tang and Choekhor (\Bumthang\), although occasionally the entire district is referred to as Bumthang valley.Show on map
ChukhaChukha District (Dzongkhag: ཆུ་ཁ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Chu-kha rdzong-khag; also spelled \Chhukha\) is one of the 20 dzongkhag (districts) comprising Bhutan. The major town is Phuentsholing which is the gateway city along the sole road which connects India to western Bhutan (cf. Lateral Road). Chukha is the commercial and the financial capital of Bhutan. With Bhutan's oldest hydropower plant, Chukha hydel (completed in 1986-88), and Tala Hydroelectricity Project, the country's largest power plant, Chukha is the dzongkhag which contributes the most to the GDP of the country. Also located in Chukha district are some of the country's oldest industrial companies like the Bhutan Carbide Chemical Limited (BCCL) and the Bhutan Boards Products Limited (BBPL).Show on map
DaganaDaga is a town in Goshi Gewog, Dagana District in southwestern Bhutan. It is the administrative capital (dzongkhag thromde) of the district. In 2005, Daga had a population of 1,146.Show on map
ChirangTsirang District (Dzongkha: རྩི་རང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Rtsi-rang rdzong-khag; previously \Chirang\), is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) of Bhutan. The administrative center of the district is Damphu Tsirang is noted for its gentle slopes and mild climates. The dzongkhag is also noted for its rich biodiversity; however, it is one of the few dzongkhags without a protected area. One of Bhutan's longest rivers, the Punatsang Chhu or Sankosh river flows through the district. It is the main districts where the Lhotshampa reside.Show on map
GeylegphugSarpang District (Dzongkha: གསར་སྤང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Gsar-spang rdzong-khag; also known as \Geylegphug\) is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan.Show on map
HaaHaa District (Dzongkha: ཧཱ་; Wylie: Haa; alternative spellings include \Ha\) is one of the 20 dzongkhag or districts comprising Bhutan. Per the 2005 census, the population of Haa dzongkhag was 11,648, making it the second least populated dzongkhag in Bhutan after Gasa. The dominant language of the district is Dzongkha, the national language.Show on map
LhuntseLhuntse District (Dzongkha: ལྷུན་རྩེ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Lhun-rtse rdzong-khag; previously \Lhuntshi\), is one of the 20 dzongkhag (districts) comprising Bhutan. It consists of 2506 households (Royal Government, Ninth Plan, pg. 2). Located in the northeast, Lhuntse is one of the least developed dzhongkhags of Bhutan. There are few roads, the first gas station was opened as recently as September 2005, electricity is not well distributed and the difficult terrain makes distribution of social welfare difficult. Despite its favourable climate, farming is also hindered by the difficult infrastructure.Show on map
MongarMongar is a town and the seat of Mongar District in eastern Bhutan. As of 2005 it had a population of 3502. Mongar is on the road from Thimphu to Trashigang. It is one of the oldest educational hubs of the country. It has a regional hospital and a good standard hotel, among other facilities. The important Yagang Lhakhang monastery is on the outskirts of the town.Show on map
ParoParo District (Dzongkha: སྤ་རོ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Spa-ro rdzong-khag) is a district (dzongkhag), valley, river and town (population 20,000) in Bhutan. It is one of the most historic valleys in Bhutan. Both trade goods and invading Tibetans came over the pass at the head of the valley, giving Paro the closest cultural connection with Tibet of any Bhutanese district. The dominant language in Paro is Dzongkha, the national language. Paro contains the only international airport in Bhutan, Paro Airport.Show on map
PemagatshelPemagatshel District (Dzongkha: པད་མ་དགའ་ཚལ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Pad-ma Dgaa-tshal rdzong-khag; previously \Pemagatsel\) is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) constituting Bhutan.Show on map
PunakhaPunakha District (Dzongkha: སྤུ་ན་ཁ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Spu-na-kha rdzong-khag) is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan. It is bordered by Thimphu, Gasa, and Wangdue Phodrang Districts. The dominant language in the district is Dzongkha, the national language.Show on map
SamchiSamtse District (Dzongkha: བསམ་རྩེ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Bsam-rtse rdzong-khag; older spelling \Samchi\) is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan.Show on map
Samdrup JongkharSamdrup Jongkhar District (Dzongkha: བསམ་གྲུབ་ལྗོངས་མཁར་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Bsam-grub Ljongs-mkhar rdzong-khag) is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan. The dominant languages of the district are Tshangla (Sharchopkha) in the north and west, and Nepali in the east.Show on map
ShemgangZhemgang District (Dzongkha: གཞམས་སྒང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie transliteration: Gzhams-sgang rdzong-khag; previously \Shemgang\), is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan. It is bordered by Sarpang, Trongsa, Bumthang, Mongar and Samdrup Jongkhar Districts, and borders Assam in India to the south. Administrative center of the district is Zhemgang.Show on map
TashigangTrashigang District (Dzongkha: བཀྲ་ཤིས་སྒང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Bkra-shis-sgang rdzong-khag; also spelled \Tashigang\) is Bhutan's easternmost dzongkhag (district).Show on map
ThimphuThimphu District (Dzongkhag: ཐིམ་ཕུ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Thim-phu rdzong-khag) is a dzongkhag (district) of Bhutan. Thimphu is also the capital of Bhutan and the largest city in the whole kingdom.Show on map
TongsaTrongsa District (Dzongkha: ཀྲོང་གསར་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie transliteration: Krong-gsar rdzong-khag) is one of the districts of Bhutan. It is the most central district of Bhutan and the geographic centre of Bhutan is located within it at Trongsa Dzong.Show on map
Wangdi PhodrangWangdue Phodrang District (Dzongkha: དབང་འདུས་ཕོ་བྲང་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Dbang-'dus Pho-brang rdzong-khag; previously spelled \Wangdi Phodrang\) is a dzongkhag (district) of central Bhutan. This is also the name of the dzong (built in 1638) which dominates the district, and the name of the small market town outside the gates of the dzong. The name is said to have been given by the Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal who was searching for the best location for a dzong to prevent incursions from the south. The word \wangdue\ means unification of Country, and \Phodrang\ means Palace in Dzongkha.Show on map
GasaNot to be confused with: Gasa Dzong or Gasa District Gasa is a town near Gasa Dzong in Gasa District in northwestern Bhutan. At the 2005 census, its population was 3,116.Show on map
Trashi YangsteTrashiyangtse District (Dzongkha: བཀྲ་ཤིས་གྱང་ཙེ་རྫོང་ཁག་; Wylie: Bkra-shis Gyang-tse rdzong-khag) is one of the twenty dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan. It was created in 1992 when the Trashiyangtse district was split off from Trashigang District. Trashiyangtse covers an area of 1,437.9 square kilometres (555.2 sq mi). The district seat is Trashiyangtse.Show on map