Maps, Guides And More - Bermuda

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Bermuda. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Bermuda

Basic information about Bermuda
Bermuda /bɜːrˈmjuːdə/, also referred to in legal documents as, fully, \the Bermudas or Somers Isles\, is a British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic Ocean, located off the east coast of North America. Its nearest landmass is Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, United States, about 1,070 km (665 mi) to the west-northwest. It is about 1,236 km (768 mi) south of Cape Sable Island, Canada, and 1,578 km (981 mi) north of Puerto Rico. Its capital city is Hamilton. The first known European explorer to reach Bermuda was Spanish sea captain Juan de Bermúdez in 1503, after whom the islands are named. He claimed the apparently uninhabited islands for the Spanish Empire. Paying two visits to the archipelago, Bermúdez never landed on the islands, but did create a recognisable map of the archipelago. Shipwrecked Portuguese mariners are now thought to have been responsible for the 1543 inscription in Portuguese Rock (previously called Spanish Rock). Subsequent Spanish or other European parties are believed to have released pigs there, which had become feral and abundant on the island by the time European settlement began. In 1609, the English Virginia Company, which had established Jamestown in Virginia (a term originally applied to all of the North American continent) two years earlier, permanently settled Bermuda in the aftermath of a hurricane, when the crew and passengers of the Sea Venture steered the ship onto the surrounding reef to prevent its sinking, then landed ashore. The island was administered as an extension of Virginia by the Company until 1614. Its spin-off, the Somers Isles Company, took over in 1615 and managed the colony until 1684. At that time, the company's charter was revoked, and the English Crown took over administration. The islands became a British colony following the 1707 unification of the parliaments of Scotland and England, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain. After 1949, when Newfoundland became part of Canada, Bermuda was automatically ranked as the oldest remaining British Overseas Territory. Since the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997, it is the most populous Territory. Its first capital, St. George's, was established in 1612 and is the oldest continuously inhabited English town in the New World. Bermuda's economy is based on offshore insurance and reinsurance, and tourism, the two largest economic sectors. Bermuda had one of the world's highest GDP per capita for most of the 20th century and several years beyond. Recently, its economic status has been affected by the global recession. It has a subtropical climate. Bermuda is the northernmost point of the Bermuda Triangle, a region of sea in which, according to legend, a number of aircraft and surface vessels have disappeared under supposedly unexplained or mysterious circumstances. The island is in the hurricane belt and prone to severe weather. However, it is somewhat protected from the full force of a hurricane by the coral reef that surrounds the island.Bermuda /bɜːrˈmjuːdə/, also referred to in legal documents as, fully, \the Bermudas or Somers Isles\, is a British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic Ocean, located off the east coast of North America. Its nearest landmass is Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, United States, about 1,070 km (665 mi) to the west-northwest. It is about 1,236 km (768 mi) south of Cape Sable Island, Canada, and 1,578 km (981 mi) north of Puerto Rico. Its capital city is Hamilton. The first known European explorer to reach Bermuda was Spanish sea captain Juan de Bermúdez in 1503, after whom the islands are named. He claimed the apparently uninhabited islands for the Spanish Empire. Paying two visits to the archipelago, Bermúdez never landed on the islands, but did create a recognisable map of the archipelago. Shipwrecked Portuguese mariners are now thought to have been responsible for the 1543 inscription in Portuguese Rock (previously called Spanish Rock). Subsequent Spanish or other European parties are believed to have released pigs there, which had become feral and abundant on the island by the time European settlement began. In 1609, the English Virginia Company, which had established Jamestown in Virginia (a term originally applied to all of the North American continent) two years earlier, permanently settled Bermuda in the aftermath of a hurricane, when the crew and passengers of the Sea Venture steered the ship onto the surrounding reef to prevent its sinking, then landed ashore. The island was administered as an extension of Virginia by the Company until 1614. Its spin-off, the Somers Isles Company, took over in 1615 and managed the colony until 1684. At that time, the company's charter was revoked, and the English Crown took over administration. The islands became a British colony following the 1707 unification of the parliaments of Scotland and England, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain. After 1949, when Newfoundland became part of Canada, Bermuda was automatically ranked as the oldest remaining British Overseas Territory. Since the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997, it is the most populous Territory. Its first capital, St. George's, was established in 1612 and is the oldest continuously inhabited English town in the New World. Bermuda's economy is based on offshore insurance and reinsurance, and tourism, the two largest economic sectors. Bermuda had one of the world's highest GDP per capita for most of the 20th century and several years beyond. Recently, its economic status has been affected by the global recession. It has a subtropical climate. Bermuda is the northernmost point of the Bermuda Triangle, a region of sea in which, according to legend, a number of aircraft and surface vessels have disappeared under supposedly unexplained or mysterious circumstances. The island is in the hurricane belt and prone to severe weather. However, it is somewhat protected from the full force of a hurricane by the coral reef that surrounds the island.
DivisionDescriptionShow
WarwickWarwick Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named for Robert Rich, 2nd Earl of Warwick (1587-1658). It is located in the central south of the island chain, occupying part of the main island to the southeast of the Great Sound, the large expanse of water which dominates the geography of western Bermuda, and also a number of islands which lie within that sound. It is joined to Southampton Parish in the southwest, and to Paget Parish in the northeast. As with most of Bermuda's parishes, it covers just over 2.3 square miles (about 6.0 km² or 1500 acres).Show on map
SouthamptonSouthampton Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named for Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton (1573-1624). It is located in the southwest of the island chain, occupying all of the western part of the main island, except for the westernmost tip (which is part of Sandys Parish). It includes the chain's southernmost point, and its north coast comprises much of the coast of the Little Sound (an arm of the Great Sound, the large expanse of water which dominates the geography of western Bermuda). in the east it is joined to Warwick Parish. As with most of Bermuda's parishes, it covers just over 2.3 square miles (about 6.0 km² or 1500 acres).Show on map
Smith's ParishSmith's Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named for English aristocrat Sir Thomas Smith/Smythe (1558-1625).Show on map
SandysSandys Parish (/ˈsændz/ SANDZ) is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named for English aristocrat Sir Edwin Sandys (1561–1629), and hence there is no apostrophe in the name. It is located in the south west of the island chain, occupying the three islands of Ireland Island, Boaz Island, and the larger Somerset Island, as well as a small part of the main island of Bermuda. These islands make up the western coast of the Great Sound, the large expanse of water which dominates the geography of western Bermuda, where it is joined to Southampton parish. Like most other parishes in Bermuda, it covers 2.3 square miles (about 6.0 km² or 1500 acres).Show on map
Saint George's ParishSt. George's Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named after the founder of the Bermuda colony, Admiral Sir George Somers. It is located in the north-easternmost part of the island chain, containing a small part of the main island around Tucker's Town and the Tucker's Town Peninsula, as well as the island of St. George, and many smaller islands, notably Coney, Paget, Nonsuch, Castle, and Smith's Islands. Natural features in St. George's include Castle Harbour, St. George's Harbour, St. David's Head, Tobacco Bay, and Ferry Reach.Show on map
Saint GeorgeSt. George's (formally, the Town of St. George, or St. George's Town), located on the island and within the parish of the same names, settled in 1612, was the first permanent English settlement on the islands of Bermuda. It is often described as the third successful English settlement in the Americas, after St. John's, Newfoundland, and Jamestown, Virginia. In fact, although English fishermen had begun setting up seasonal camps in Newfoundland in the 16th Century, they were expressly forbidden from establishing permanent settlements, and the town of St. John's was not established until circa 1620. Jamestown, also, did not exist until 1607. Prior to that, its settlers were obliged to live within James Fort. St. George's, claimed to be the oldest continuously-inhabited English town in the NeShow on map
PembrokePembroke Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named after English aristocrat William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1580-1630). It occupies most of the short peninsula which juts from the central north coast of Bermuda's main island, and surrounds the city of Hamilton on three sides (the fourth being taken up by the shore of Hamilton Harbour). As such, its shape bears some passing resemblance to the county of Pembrokeshire in Wales. The peninsula juts into the eastern side of the Great Sound, the large expanse of water which dominates the geography of western Bermuda. In the east, Pembroke meets Devonshire Parish. As with most of Bermuda's parishes, it covers just over 2.3 square miles (about 6.0 km² or 1500 acres).Show on map
PagetPaget Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It is named for William Paget, 4th Baron Paget de Beaudesert (1572–1629). The parish is located in the central south of the island chain, immediately south of Hamilton Harbor on the main island. It is joined to Warwick Parish in the southwest, and Devonshire Parish in the northeast. As with most of Bermuda's parishes, it covers just over 2.3 square miles (about 6.0 km² or 1500 acres).Show on map
HamiltonHamilton Parish (originally Bedford Parish) is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. It was renamed for Scottish aristocrat James Hamilton, 2nd Marquess of Hamilton (1589-1625) when he purchased the shares originally held in the Virginia Company by Lucy, Countess of Bedford. Natural features in Hamilton include Flatt's Inlet, Trunk Island, Shelly Bay, Bailey's Bay, Mangrove Lake, Trott's Pond, Crystal Cave, Castle Harbor, and The Causeway, which links Hamilton with St. George's Parish.Show on map
Hamilton city(This article is about the City of Hamilton. For Hamilton parish, see Hamilton Parish, Bermuda.) Hamilton is the capital of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. It is the territory's financial centre and a major port and tourist destination. Its population of 1,010 (2010) is one of the smallest of any capital city.Show on map
DevonshireDevonshire Parish is one of the nine parishes of Bermuda. Originally named \Cavendish Tribe\ and later \Devonshire Tribe. It is named for William Cavendish, 1st Earl of Devonshire (1552–1626). He had never visited Bermuda himself, despite a parish being named after him. Devonshire Redoubt, on Castle Island, one of the Castle Harbour fortifications of St. George's Parish, was also named after him.Show on map