Maps, Guides And More - Benin

Maps, Guides & More

Places and geographical objects in Benin. Zoom in the map to level 9 to see the objects on the map.

Map of Benin

Basic information about Benin
Benin (/bᵻˈniːn/ bǝ-NEEN or /bᵻˈnɪn/ bǝ-NIN; French: Bénin), officially the Republic of Benin (French: République du Bénin) and formerly Dahomey, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Togo to the west, Nigeria to the east, and Burkina Faso and Niger to the north. A majority of the population live on its small southern coastline on the Bight of Benin, part of the Gulf of Guinea in the northernmost tropical portion of the Atlantic Ocean. The capital of Benin is Porto-Novo, but the seat of government is in Cotonou, the country's largest city and economic capital. Benin covers an area of 114,763 square kilometers and its population in 2015 was estimated to be approximately 10.88 million. Benin is a tropical, sub-Saharan nation, highly dependent on agriculture, with substantial employment and income arising from subsistence farming. The official language of Benin is French. However, indigenous languages such as Fon and Yoruba are commonly spoken. The largest religious group in Benin is Roman Catholicism, followed closely by Islam, Vodun and Protestantism. Benin is a member of the United Nations, the African Union, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, the South Atlantic Peace and Cooperation Zone, La Francophonie, the Community of Sahel-Saharan States, the African Petroleum Producers Association and the Niger Basin Authority. From the 17th to the 19th century, the main political entities in the area were the Kingdom of Dahomey along with the city-state of Porto-Novo and a large area with many different tribes to the north. This region was referred to as the Slave Coast from as early as the 17th century due to the large number of slaves shipped to the New World during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. After slavery was abolished, France took over the country and renamed it French Dahomey. In 1960, Dahomey gained full independence from France, and had a tumultuous period with many different democratic governments, many military coups and military governments. A Marxist–Leninist state called the People's Republic of Benin existed between 1975 and 1990. In 1991, it was replaced by the current multi-party Republic of Benin.Benin (/bᵻˈniːn/ bǝ-NEEN or /bᵻˈnɪn/ bǝ-NIN; French: Bénin), officially the Republic of Benin (French: République du Bénin) and formerly Dahomey, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Togo to the west, Nigeria to the east, and Burkina Faso and Niger to the north. A majority of the population live on its small southern coastline on the Bight of Benin, part of the Gulf of Guinea in the northernmost tropical portion of the Atlantic Ocean. The capital of Benin is Porto-Novo, but the seat of government is in Cotonou, the country's largest city and economic capital. Benin covers an area of 114,763 square kilometers and its population in 2015 was estimated to be approximately 10.88 million. Benin is a tropical, sub-Saharan nation, highly dependent on agriculture, with substantial employment and income arising from subsistence farming. The official language of Benin is French. However, indigenous languages such as Fon and Yoruba are commonly spoken. The largest religious group in Benin is Roman Catholicism, followed closely by Islam, Vodun and Protestantism. Benin is a member of the United Nations, the African Union, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, the South Atlantic Peace and Cooperation Zone, La Francophonie, the Community of Sahel-Saharan States, the African Petroleum Producers Association and the Niger Basin Authority. From the 17th to the 19th century, the main political entities in the area were the Kingdom of Dahomey along with the city-state of Porto-Novo and a large area with many different tribes to the north. This region was referred to as the Slave Coast from as early as the 17th century due to the large number of slaves shipped to the New World during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. After slavery was abolished, France took over the country and renamed it French Dahomey. In 1960, Dahomey gained full independence from France, and had a tumultuous period with many different democratic governments, many military coups and military governments. A Marxist–Leninist state called the People's Republic of Benin existed between 1975 and 1990. In 1991, it was replaced by the current multi-party Republic of Benin.
DivisionDescriptionShow
ZouZou is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The department obtains its name from the Zou River which traverses the land before emptying into the atlantic in the south of the country. The Zou department is one of only two in the country where the main resident ethnic group makes up a super-majority of the population at over 90%. In this case, it is the Fon people who constitute 91% of the departmental population. The Aja people make up a distant 4%, while the Yoruba who are native to the eastern fringes of the department make up 3% of the populace. All other ethnic groups of the country resident in the department result to a combined 2%.Show on map
OuemeOuémé is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The département of Ouémé lost its northern territory in 1999 when it split off to become Plateau Department.Show on map
MonoMono is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The capital of Mono is Lokossa. The Gen language is only spoken in this department in Benin. Other languages spoken in this area are Ewe and some of the Phla–Pherá languages The département of Mono lost its northern territory in 1999 when it split off to become Kouffo Department.Show on map
BorgouBorgou is one of the twelve departments of Benin. Borgou borders the country of Nigeria and the departments of Alibori, Atakora, Collines and Donga. The capital of Borgou is Parakou. Borgu is ethnically 38% Bariba, 29% Fulani, 9% Dendi, 8% Yoruba, 7% Fon, who are mostly transplanted migrants from the South. Other national communities make up the rest of the population. The département of Borgou lost its northern territory in 1999 when it split off to become Alibori Department.Show on map
AtlantiqueAtlantique is one of the twelve departments in Benin. This department is located in south central Benin along the Atlantic coast, between the Mono and Couffo in the west, Zou in the north, and Oueme in the east. Ethnically, the Fon at 61% constitute the majority of the population. They are followed by the Yoruba at 10%, Aja at 7%. Other groups make up the remaining 22%. Important towns in the department include Allada, Ouidah, Abomey-Calavi and Godomey. The département of Atlantique lost some territory in 1999 when it split off to become a Littoral Department.Show on map
AtakoraAtakora is the northwestern department of Benin, bordering Togo to the west and Burkina Faso to the north. Also, it borders the departments of Alibori, Borgou, and Donga. It is the most mountainous region of Benin, and the birthplace of the president, Mathieu Kérékou. It is a much drier area of the country than the south, with 3 major seasons, a rainy season that runs from May or June to September or October, a Harmattan season of cool, dry winds that runs from October or November to February, and a hot, Famine season that runs from February to April.Show on map
AliboriAlibori is the largest and northernmost département of Benin, with an area of 26,242 km² and a population of 868,046 (at the May 2013 Census). The départment borders the countries of Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria. The départments of Atakora and Borgou also border Alibori. The département of Alibori was created in 1999 when it was split off from Borgou Department. Since 2008, the capital has been Kandi.Show on map
CollinesCollines is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The departments that border Collines are Plateau, Borgou, Zou, and Donga. The main ethnic groups in the department according to the National population census are Yoruba of the Nagot group at 46.8% and the Yoruba of the Idasha at 14.9% for a total of 61.7% to constitute the majority, the Yoruba group is followed by the Mahi at 25.7% or just over a quarter of the regional population, while the Fon represent 13% of the population.Show on map
KouffoKouffo is one of the twelve departments of Benin. Kouffo borders the country of Togo and it also borders the departments of Mono, Zou, and Atlantique. Since 2008, the capital is Aplahoué. The markets at Azove, Klouekanme and Hlassanme form the basis of the local informal economy. The majority of the population is Aja language (Gbe) speaking. Other local languages include Tchi, notably in the Tchi Depression in the eastern limit of the department. The département of Kouffo was created in 1999 when it was split off from Mono Department.Show on map
DongaDonga is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The capital of Donga is Djougou. The département of Donga was created in 1999 when it was split off from Atakora Department.Show on map
LittoralLittoral is one of the twelve departments of Benin. Littoral is the smallest department of all of the twelve in the country, as well as the most cosmopolitan. The area is 79 km2 (31 sq mi). The Fon people group represent 48% of the departmental population, including the Guns at 15.2%. The Yoruba people are the second largest group at about 18% of the populace, Bariba 8%, Aja 6%, Ottamari 4%, Dendi 5%, Fulani/Peulh 3%, . Other groups from the rest of the country such as the Kotokolis, Yoa-Lokpa as well as foreign residents from neighboring countries and others such as Lebanese, Chinese and Europeans constitute the rest of the populationShow on map
PlateauPlateau is one of the twelve departments of Benin. The population of the department according to the according to the National population census is predominantly Yoruba of the following subgroups: Nagot group at 45.7% and the Holli, otherwise known as the Ohori at 20.9% for a total of 66.6% to constitute the majority. The Yoruba group is followed by the Fon group of the following subgroups: Guns at 12.4% of the population, Fon at 8.2% of the population, and Torri 6.5%. The département of Plateau was created in 1999 when it was split off from Ouémé Department.Show on map